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Report of the President of the University of British Columbia for the academic year ending August 31st.,… 1929

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Array * i
REPORT OF THE PRESIDENT
OF THE UNIVERSITY OF BRITISH COLUMBU
FOR THE ACADELIIC YEAR ENDING
AUGUST 31at.t 1929. 1.
CONTENTS
Page,
Staff .......   3.
Promotions  3.
New Appointments  a. ..*.... 3.
Leave of Absence  i...  4.
Resignation       4.
Deaths ,  4.
Registration  5.
Nationality of the Students   6.
Points from which the Students come   7.
(a) Vancouver  7.
(b) Points  in British Columbia outside Vancouver. 7.
(c) Points  in Canada outside British Columbia   ... 8.
(d) Other Countries     8.
Occupations of the Parents  of  the Students Enrolled... 9.
Comparative  Statement  of Attendance 1915-16  to
1928-29  12.
Degrees Conferred 1916 to 1929   13.
Honorary Degrees Conferred  13.
Location of the Graduates  14.
Employment Bureau  15.
Scholarships, Fellowships and Bursaries Awarded to
Graduates  16.
Publications  17.
Report on the office of the Dean of the Faculty
of Arts and Science   28.
Report of the Dean of the Faculty of Applied Science.. 30.
Report of the Dean of the Faculty of Agriculture   34.
Report of the Dean of Women  39.
Report of the library Committee  42.
Report of the Extension Committee  43.
Report of the Acting-Head of the University
Health Service -  43.
(a) Report of the Medical Examiner of Students... 43.
(b) Report of the Public Health Nurse, University
Health Service  44.
Report of the Officer Commanding the University Contingent of the C.O.T.C  47. -2-
aEHEPORT OF THE PRESIDENT.
To the Board of Governors and
the Senate of the
University of British Columbia.
Dear Madam and Sirs:-
I have the honour to submit herewith
a report of the work of the University for the academic
year ending August 31st., 1929.  The report consists in
large part of reports which have been prepared by the
Deans and other administrative officers in the University.
Of these separate reports, however, the only ones v/hich
appear in full are those which have been submitted by the
Deans and by the Registrar; the others have been summarized
in such a way as to bring out their essential features. -3-
TEACHING STAFF:
Deans - Professors and Heads of Departments 3.
Professors 31.
Associate Professors 30.
Assistant Professors 23.
Dean of Women and Assistant Professor 1.
Lecturers 4.
Instructors 8.
Assistants 37.
Lecturers in Public Health (part time) 18.
Lecturers in Teacher Training (part time) 7.
PROMOTIONS:
Daniel Buchanan, B.A., M.A. , Ph.D., Dean, Faculty of Arts and
Science;  Henry F. Angus, B.A., B.S.L., M.A., from Associate
Professor to Professor of Economics;  James Henderson, M.A.,
from Associate Professor to Professor of Philosophy;  A. E.
Hennings, M.A., Ph.D., from Associate Professor to Professor
of Physics;  G. E. Robinson, B.A., from Associate Professor
to Professor of Mathematics;  R. L. Davis, M.S.A., from
Assistant Professor to Associate Professor of Animal Husbandry;
H. R. Hare, B.S.^., from Assistant Professor to associate Professor of Animal Husbandry;  F. H. Soward, B.-i.. , B.litt. , from
Assistant Professor to Associate Professor of History;  Frank
H. Wilcox, A. B., Ph.D., from Assistant Professor to Associate
Professor of English;  G. Sinclair Smith, M.^.Sc, from
Lecturer to Assistant Professor of Mechanical Engineering;
Miss E. B. Abernethy, B.A., from Assistant to the Registrar to
Assistant Registrar.
NEW APPOINTMENTS:
David Owen Evans, M.A. , Ph.D., D. Lett., Professor of French;
Joseph Friend Day, B.A., M.^. , Associate Professor of Economics
and Commerce;   Coral Wesley Topping, A.3. , B.D. , A.M., S.T.LI. ,Ph.D.,
Associate Professor of Economics and Sociology;  P.A.Child, B.A.,
M.A., Ph.D., Assistant Professor of English;  Blythe Eagles,B.A.,
Ph.D., Assistant Professor of Dairying (Under co-operative arrangement with Empire Marketing Board);  George H. Harris, 3.S.A.,M.S.,
Assistant Professor of Horticulture;  Hunter Campbell Lewis, B.A. ,
M.A., Assistant Professor of English;  R.M.Brown, B.Sc.F., Honorary Lecturer in Forest Products;  William Newton, B.S.A., M.S.,
Ph.D., Honorary Lecturer in Plant Physiology;  Miss Mildred
Campbell, B.A., M.A., Instructor in Zoology;  John Craig Oliver,
B.A. , B.A.Sc, Instructor in Civil Engineering. -4-
LEAVE OF ABSENCE:
President L. S. Klinck, M.S.A., D.Sc, LI.D. , from May loth-1928
to February 1-1929; . Stuart J. Schofield, M.A., B.Sc., Ph.D.,
Professor of Physical and Structural Geology;  A. F. B. Clark,
M. A., Ph.D., Associate Professor of French;.  Frank Dickson, B.A.
Associate Professor of Botany;   John Allardyce, B.A., M.A. ,
Instructor in Chemistry.
RESIGNATIONS
Mrs. Freda W. Stewart, M.A., Instructor in Bacteriology
DEATHS:
During the year the University suffered a distinct loss in the
death of an esteemed member of the Board of Governors and in the
passing of two distinguished members of the Faculty.
In the death of Campbell Sweeney, Esq., the University was deprived
of an able and trusted counsellor whose wide experience and mature
judgment in financial matters had been freely placed at the service
of the University ever since his appointment to the Board of
Governors when that body was constituted in 1913.
In the passing of Henri Chodat, B.A., M.A., Officier d'Academio,
France, Associate Professor of Modern Languages, the University
lost a highly respected member of its professorial staff whose
long years of efficient service in the cause of education in the
Province had won for him deserved recognition. Mr. Chodat's wide
knowledge of his subject and his deep interest in his students
made him a source of strength to the University during the many
years he served as a member of the faculty.
Scholarships, wide interests and the rare ability to bring these
to bear directly upon the problems of the day were happily combined
in Samuel Erasmus Beckett, B.A., M.A., Associate Professor of
Economics, whose sudden death deprived the University and the Province of a man whose achievements, during the years of his connection
with the University, had won for him a high olace in the estimation
of his associates. -5-
REGISTRATION:
FACULTY OF ARTS and SCIENCE
First Year	
Second Year  .. :.
Third Year	
Fourth Year 	
FACULTY OF APPLIED SCIENCE
Second Year 	
Third Year *	
Fourth Year	
Fifth Year 	
FACULTY OF APPLIED SCIENCE (NURSING)
First Year	
Second Year 	
Third Year	
Fourth Year ... *	
Fifth Year	
FACULTY OF AGRICULTURE
First Year 	
Second Year 	
Third Year	
Fourth Year	
Partial	
GRADUATES
Arts and Science	
Applied Science 	
Agriculture 	
TEACHER TRAINIFG COURSE 	
Women Men Total
252
303
555
162
150
312
116
109
wwu
101
81
182
303
103
-
77
77
-
44
44
—
34
34
14
14
7
-
7
7
7
7
-
7
6
™
_6
5
5
1
13
14
1
4
5
-
5
5
1
18
19
12
20
42
-
1
—
4
4
44
18
1274
62
258
41
48
47
52
1730 „6-
R5GISTRATI0F cont'd.
Classification and Enrolment of Students
who are not taking the full Undergraduate Courses.
Summer Session, Arts (1928) (Degree Course) 402
Late afternoon and Saturday morning classes
(Degree Course) 59
Public Health Nursing (Diploma Course 6
Occupational Course in Agriculture
(Diploma Course 7
Short Courses in Agriculture ..»  139
Evening Class in Botany   24
NATIONALITY OF THE STUDENTS:
American    76
Austrian    2
British  1559
Chinese     2
Croatian    1
Czecho-Slovakian   1
Danish     1
Dutch      2
East Indian   6
Finnish      1
French       2
Greek        1
Hebrew  13
Icelandic  4
Italian      4
Japanese     19
Latvian      1
Norwegian    5
Polish       4
Russian      14
Swedish      12
1730 -7
POINTS FROM WHICH STUDENTS COME.
Vancouver.
Points in British
Columb
ia outside of
Vancouver.
Abbotsford
5
Hammond
5
Agassiz
2
Hatzic
3
Aldergrove
1
Hazelton
1
Alert Bay
1
Hedley
1
Alexis Creek
1
Heffley Creek
1
Allenby
1
Hollyburn
10
Any ox
1
Hope
1
Armstrong
3
Huntingdon
1
Arrowhead
1
Kamloops
6
Ashcroft
1
Kaslo
3
Bella Coola
1
Kelowna
7
Blakeburn
1
Keremeos
2
Bonnington Falls
2
Kimberley
3
Bowen Island
1
Kingcome Inlet
1
Bridge River
1
Kootenay Bay
1
Brighouse
1
Ladner
9
Britannia Beach
2
Ladysmith
1
Britannia Mines
1
Lavington
1
Burnaby
24
Lulu Island
1
Carlin
1
Lumby
1
Cassidy
1
Lynn Creek
1
Castlegar
1
Massett
1
Celista
1
Matsqui
3
Chapman Camp
1
Mayne Island
1
Chilliwaek
9
Merritt
1
Cloverdale
4
Milne-r
4
Coalmont
2
Mission City
1
Comox
1
Monte Creek
1
Copper Mountain
1
Mount Lehman
2
Courtenay
4
Mount Tolmie
3
Cranbrook
9
LIurrayville
2
Creston
2
Nakus p
1
Cumberland
10
Nana imo
12
Deep Cove
1
Naramata
1
Duncan
6
Nelson
8
Dundarave
1
New Denver
3
Eburne
8
New Westminster
98
Enderby
1
Nicola
1
Erie
1
North Bend
1
Esquimalt
1
North Bulkley
1
Fanquier
1
North Salt Spring
Fernie
7
Island.
1
Field
1
North Vancouver
39
Fort Fraser
1
Ocean Falls
1
Galiano
1
Okanagan Centre
1
Gibson's Landing
3
Okanagan Mission
1
Golden
1
Osoyoos
1
Grand Forks
8
Oyama
2
1045 -8-
Points in British Columbif
outside of Vancouver
Forward
1 -'36
Forward
Peachland
2
Penticton
4
(c)  Points in Canada
Port Coquitlam
1
outside of British
Port Haney
5
Columbia, -
Port Moody
2
Powell River
2
Alberta            13
Prince George
5
Saskatchewan        6
Prince Rupert
14
Manitoba            3
Princeton
1
Ontario             6
Revelstoko
8
Yukon Territory      4
Riondel
2
Royston Station
2
Ruskin
1
Rossland
6
(d)  Other Countries,-
Salmon Arm
5
Sandal •
1
United States       11
Sandwick
1
India              5
Sardis
5
England             4
Shawnigan Lake
1
Holland             1
Shelley
1
China               6
Sidney
2
Ireland             1
Squamish
1
Steveston
6
Stewart
2
Sugar Lake
1
Sullivan
1
Summerland
3
Surrey Centre
1
Taghum
1
Thurlow
1
Trail
12
Tranquille
1
Union Bay
1
Upper Capilano
1
Upper Lynn
2
Usk
1
Van Anda
1
Vanderhoof
1
Vavonby
1
Vernon
16
Victoria
94
Waldo
1
Wellington
1
Westholme
1
West Summe rland
6
West Vancouver
5
Woodfibre
1
1670
32
28
1730 -9-
OCCUPATIONS OF THE
PARENTS
OF THE STUDENTS ENROLLED
(not including the
students
in the Teacher Training
Course
Accountant
40
Forward
321
Agent
10
Compositor
1
Agriculturist
2
Comptroller
1
Animal Pathologist
1
Confectioner
1
Architect
5
Contractor
44
Artist
2
Customs official
9
Auditor
6
Dairyman
5
Auto Livery
1
Deceased
83
Automobile Dealer
8
Decorator
4
Baker
9
Dentist
11
Baggage man
1
Doctor
56
Bank clerk
1
Draftsman
2
Barber
2
Druggi s t
16
Blacksmith
2
Dry cleaner
2
Boat Captain
1
Edgerman
1
Boat Owner
1
Editor
1
Boiler maker
1
Electrical Engineer
11
Bond dealer
1
Electrician
10
Bookkeeper
8
Engineer
31
Bricklayer
4
Entomologist
1
Brick maker
1
Estimator
1
Broker
37
Farmer
77
Builder
8
Factory owner
1
Building Agent
1
Fishdeuler
2
Building Manager
3
Fisherman
1
Bulb grower
1
Florist
2
Business man
17
Foreman
6
Butcher
3
Forester
1
Buyer
4
Fruit dealer
1
Canneryman
3
Fruit grower
3
Caretaker
2
Fuel dealer
1
Carpenter
33
Funeral director
1
Chauffeur
2
Furniture dealer
1
Chemical Engineer
1
Gardener
2
Chemist
1
Garage owner
2
Chipper
1
Garage proprietor
1
Chiropractor
1
Gov't, liquor vendor
3
Civil Engineer
17
Grocer
10
Civil Servant
17
Government service
1
Claims Investigator     1
Haberdasher
1
Clergy
39
Harbour Commissioner
1
Clerk
14
Hairdresser
1
Coal dealer
2
Hop grower
2
Cook
1
Hotel proprietor
2
Clothier
3
Horticulturist
1
Commercial Artist
2
Importer & Exporter
5 ■10-
OCCUPATIONS OF PARENTS
Continued)
Forward
741
Forward
115o
Inspector
14
Prison guard
1
Interpreter
1
Proprietor
2
Insurance
18
Projectionist
1
Janitor
4
Publisher
2
Jeweller
5
Publisher's agent
1
Journalist
1
Purchasing agent
1
Judge
2
Rabbi
1
Labourer
6
Rancher
20
Laundry operator
1
R.R. employee
48
Laundry owner
1
Real estate
14
Lawyer
34
Restaurant owner
1
Lineman
1
Retired
90
Linotyper
1
River pilot
1
Locksmith
1
Sailor
1
Logger
1
Salesman
14
Lumberman
29
Sales manager
3
Machinist
12
Salvor
1
Manager
57
Sanitary engineer
1
Manufacturer
6
Saw filer
1
Manufacturer's Agent
20
Senator
1
Marble setter
1
Scaler
4
Marine engineer
2
Secretary
10
Mason
1
Sheet Metal worker
4
Master mariner
7
Shift boss
1
Mechanic
9
Shingle weaver
1
Mechanical engineer
3
Shipper
1
Member of Parliament
3
Shipping merchant
2
Merchant
92
Signalman
1
Mill employee
2
Sign writer
1
Mill owner
2
Smelterman
1
Mill wright
3
Stationer
2
Mining engineer
16
Statistician
1
Mining operator
2
Steam engineer
3
Miner
10
Steam fitter
1
Ltissionary
4
Steel worker
1
Moulder
1
Stevedore
1
Musician
4
Stone mason
1
Navy
1
Structural engineer
1
Newspaperman
2
Superintendent
13
Night watchman
1
Supervisor
3
Optician
3
Surveyor
3
Orchardist
1
Tailor
9
Orthodontist
1
Tallyman
l
Pa eke r
1
Teacher
38
Paymaster
2
Telegrapher
2
Photographer
2
Timber cruiser
1
Piano tuner
3
Timekeeper
1
Plasterer
1
Traffic manager
1
Plumber
1
Transfer
4
Police
2
Truant officer
1
Pos tman
2
Truck driver
1
Postmaster
6
University faculty
17
Printer
9 -11-
OCCUPATIONS OF PARENTS (Continued)
Forward
1485
University president
1
Unspecified
**.^ta$<**r
Vancouver City employee
9
Veterinary surgeon
• 1
Warehouseman
1
Watchmaker
5*"
Welding Engineer
i
Wharfinger
i
Y.M.C.A. Secretary
2
1668. Comparative statement of attendance at the University
1915-16  to  1928-29.
REGISTRATION BY FACULTIES
Session  Arts and  Applied Double Nursing Agric- Teacher Total in Summer  Short  Grand
Science   Science Course        ulture Training Winter  Session Courses Total
Course  Session
1915-16
318
61
379
-
-
379
1916-17
321
48
-
369
65
434
1917-18
371
38
7
416
258
674
1918-19
467
54
17
538
379
917
1919-20
681
164
45
890
640
1530
1920-21
696
209
6
51
962
127
550
1639
1921-22
724
200
1
16
73
1014
134
83
1231
1922-23
890
191
-
28
85
1194
208
157
1559
1923-24
969
183
32
69
55
1308
292
152
1752
1924-25
1119
184
36
59
53
1451
294
121
1866
1925-26
1124
196
33
53
57
1463
394
127
1984
1926-27
1219
209
-
35
52
67
1582
438
158
2178
1927-28
1349
242
38
50
62
1741
487
171
2399
1928-29
1316
259
41
52
62
1730
402
175
2132 DEGREES  CONFERRED
1916
to
1929
Year
M.A.
B.A.
M
M
.Sc. or
.A.Sc.
B.Sc.
B.A.Sc
or
B.A.
Nurs
Sc.
ing
hit O . A .
B.S.A.
Total
Grand Total
1916
40
40
40
1917
34
1
35
75
1918
34
34
109
1919
2
47
1
-
50
159
1920
9
50
1
9
69
228
1921
3
84
18
-
8
113
341
1922
9
77
1
27
10
124
465
1923
14
106
6
34
3
1
12
176
641
1924
9
99
1
39
5
2
11
166
807
1925
11
133
7
27
4
1
17
200
1007
1926
16
145
4
26
3
0
9
203
1210
1927
10
156
1
37
5
2
6
217
1427
1928
17
188
1
22
5
1
7
241
1668
1929
15
160
1
31
6
1
9
223
1891
LL
.D
•
HONOURARY
DEGREES
CONFERRED
I
H
W
I
1925 -14-
LOCATION OF THE GRADUATES
Number in Vancouver ,
Number in other parts of British Columbia,
Number in other Provinces ,
Number in United States of America .......
Number in British Isles  ,
Number in Australia  ,
Number in India  ■> ,
Number in Africa 	
Number in France	
Number in South America	
Number in China 	
Number in Japan	
Number in Other Countries	
Number deceased	
Total number of Graduates	
793
323
54
103
15
1
2
1
2
2
3
1
1
17
1318
Of the 103 graduates listed as being
in the United States, 24 are holders of
Scholarships, Fellowships or Bursaries. A
considerable number of other graduates residing on the other side of the line are
taking advanced work in American Universities,
but the exact number of these is not definitely
ascertainable.
New graduates (May 1928)
206
1524 -15-
EMPLOYMBNT BUREAU
During the year the Board of Governors, on the
recommendation of the Faculties, approved of the organization of an Employment Bureau.   The object of the
bureau is to serve as a clearing house between the prospective employer of student labour and the student who
desires to avail himself of the services which such an
organization can render.   The bureau, which is under the
direction of a representative committee, is prepared to
assist graduate students as well as undergraduates. SCHOLARSHIPS,   FELLOWSHIPS  and BURSARIES AWARDED TO GRADUATES.
During the year many scholarships,  fellowships and  bursaries have been won by graduates  of tho
The  following list does not include awards which have been made in tho University
University,
of British
Columbia
Name: 	
Allardyce,  W.   John
Allen,  J.   S.
Ball, Ralph
Ball,  R.W.
Birney,  Earle
Brooks,   L.
Carpenter,Gilbert B.
Carter, Neal
Chalmers,William
Davidson,  George F.
Duckering,  Charles E.
Elley,  F.   W.
Grant,  Margaret
Kania,  Joseph. E.A.
Lucas,  Colin C.
McLean,  J.Beattie
McPhail,  Murchie K.
Marin,  Joseph H.
Mellish, A.Preston
Morrison,  Edmund
Selwood,  P.  W.
Streight,  H.R.Lyle
Thompson, Homor A.
IT
Waddington, Guy
Warren, Harry V.
White, Alice M.G.
Wright, Robert Hamilton
Tolmie, John Ross
Award:
Research
Council Studentship
Council Bursary
Council Studentship
Fellowship
Fellowship
Fellowship
Industrial Research
National Travelling
Research Council Fellowship
Graduate Scholarship
Teaching Fellowship (2years)
Student Assistantship
Western Fellowship
Emmons Fellowship
Research Fellowship
Teaching Fellowship
Research Council Bursary
Research Assistantship (2years
Assistantship
Assistantship
Research Fellowship
Research Council Bursary
Research Fellowship
Travelling Fellowship
Fellowship ( 3 years)
Fellowship
Commonwealth Fund Fellowship (
Graduate Fellowship
Research Council Bursary
Rhodes Scholarship (3years)
Total Value	
Value
$ 1200.
750.
1200.
850.
600.
500.
1800.
1500.
1500.
400.
1600.
225.
500.
400.
1000.
500.
750.
)    1200.
750.
1000.
800.
750.
750.
1200.
4500.
800.
2yrs)6000.
600.
750.
5844.
. . ?40219.
Subject:
Chemistry
Chemistry
Chemistry
Chemistry
English
English
Chemistry
Chemistry
Chemistry
Classics
Civil Eng.
Forestry
English
Geology
Biochemistry
English
Biochemistry
Civil Eng.
Mathematics
English
Chemistry
Chemistry
Chemistry
Classics
Chemistry
Geology
English
Chemistry
History
Whore Tenable:
McGill University
McGill University
McGill University
University of Illinois
University of California
University of Washing tor.
Mass.Inst.of Technology
McGill University
McGill University
Harvard University
Iowa State College
University of Michigan
University of Toronto
Mass.Inst.of Technology
University of Toronto
University of Washington
McGill University
University of Illinois
Brown University
University of California
University of Illinois
McGill University
Stanford University
New York to Athens
American School at Athen
Calif.Inst.of Technology
Calif.Inst.of Technology
Smith College
McGill University
Oxford (£400 per annum).
Research
Research
Research
Teaching
Teaching
Fellowship
Fellowship
The total value of the scholarships, fellowships, and bursaries won by our graduates
n ether Universities and in Institutes since the first awards were made in 1917, is - $316,519.00 -17-
PUBLICATIONS
FACULTY OF ARTS and SCIENCE
Department of Bacteriology:
"Lowered Resistance" - and Some Fallacies Regarding it.
H.W.Hill.
Bulletin, Vancouver Medical Association, Vol.
IV, 9, June, 1928.
"Further Studies on Transfer of Infection by Handshakes"
Helen M. Mathews.
Canadian Public Health Association.
"Control of Bacillary White Diarrhoea Infection of
Poultry in British Columbia."
J. Biely.
Scientific Agriculture, Vol. IX, No. 7, March,
1929.
#    "Effects of Bacillary White Diarrhoea Infection on
Egg Production."
V.S. Asmunds.on and J. Biely.
Poultry Science, Vol. VII, No. 6, September
1, 1928.
#     Also Reported in Department of Poultry Husbandry
Department of Botany.
" A Biohydrographical Investigation of the sea adjacent
to the Fraser River mouth" by Dr. A. H.
Hutchinson.
Trans. Royal Society of Canada, 3rd Series,
Vol. XXII, Sec. V. 1928.-
" An Investigation of the Specific Effects of Monochromatic Light on the Growth of Yeast."
A. H. Hutchinson and Dorothy Newton.
Royal Society of Canada, May, 1929.
"An Investigation of the Specific Effects of Monochromatic
Light on the Growth of Paramoecium."
A.H.Hutchinson and Marion Ashton.
Royal Society of Canada, May,1929. -18-
Department of Botany (continued)
"Seasonal Fluctuations in the Chemical and Physical Properties of the Waters of the Strait  of Georgia
in Relation to Phytoplankton."
A. H. Hutchinson and C. C. Lucas, and M. McPhail.
Royal Society of Canada, May, 1929.
"The Effect of the Fraser River on the Waters and Plankton
of the Strait of Georgia."
A. H. Hutchinson and C.C.luCas.
Pan Pacific Scientific Congress, May, 1929.
"An abnormality of potatoes, probably Blind Tuber"
Lindsay M. Black.
V?
^       "A Comparative study of Sclerotinia trifoliorum" Eriksson;
(rO and Sclerotinia sclerotiorum (Libert) Massee;
Cecil E. Yarwood.
Department of Chemistry.
"The Hydrocarbons in Peruvian Petroleum Having Boiling
Points below 150. "
W. F. Seyer and A. F. Rees.
^rans. Royal Society of Canada, nil. 359, (1928).
"The Effect of Absorbed Gas on the Contact Resistance of
Carbon."
M.J.Marshall and R. K.  Wright.
Trans. Am. Electro Chem. Soc.(o4), 149, (1928).
"An Improved Laboratory Rectifying Column"
M.J. Marshall.
Ind. and Eng, Chem. 20, 1379, (1928)
Effect of High Frequency Discharges on the Dissociation
of Gases."
M.J.Marshall and E. H. Nunn.
Trans. Am. Elec. Chem. Soc. 55, May (1929).
"Cathodic Halogen"
R.H.Clark and R.H. Ball.
Trans. Amer. Electro-Chem. Sec. (54), 119,  1929)
"The Electrolysis of Cyanogen Halides"
R. H. Clark and H.R.L. Straight.
Trans. Roy. Soc. Can. XXII, 323 (1928). -19-
Department of Education
"Progress, Degeneracy and Education"
G.M.Weir.
Proceedings of the Saskatchewan Education
Association (1928).
"Some Educational Purposes and Processes."
G. M. Weir.
Proceedings of the Saskatchewan Education
Association (1928)
"Modern Education - The Junior High School."
G. M. Weir.
Proceedings of the Saskatchewan Education
Association (1928).
"Sidelights on Curriculum Building."
G. M. Weir.
Proceedings of the Saskatchewan Education
Association (1928).
"Modern Developments in Education."
G.M.Weir.
Proceedings of the Saskatchewan Trustees
Convention - 1929.
Department of English.
"The Canon of Peele's Works."
"The Father of George Peele".
T. Larsen.
Modern Philology.
"The Early Years of George Peele."
T. Larsen.
Trans. Roy. Soc. Canada.
"The Earliest English Essayists."
W.L.LlcDonald.
Englische Studien. -20-
Department of English (continued
"The Unity of tho Humanities".
G. G. Sedgewick.
Dalhousie Review..
"Themas Hardy".
G. G. Sedgewick.
Proceedings Pacific North-West Library Association.
Department cf Geology and Geography.
"The Relationships of Ore Deposits to Minor Igneous
Intursions in British Colunbia.'7
S. J. Schofield.
Canadian Institute of Mining and Metallurgy.
"Physiography of the Southern Plains of Alberta"
M,Y.Williams.
Royal Society of Canada.
"Geology of Southern Alberta and Southwestern Saskatchewan."
M.Y.Williams and W. S. Dyer.
Memoir Geological Survey of Canada."
"Calgary Map Sheet and Section Supplement
M. Y. Williams and W. S. Dyer.
Geological Survey of Canada.
"Marine Palaeontology of Southern Alberta and Southwestern
Saskatchewan.
M.Y.Williams.
Bulletin of Geological Survey of Canada.
"The Silurian System of Canada."
M.Y.WilI_ams.
Geological Survey of Canada, 1929.
"Report on the Topley Area, B.C."
T.C.Pher.iister.
Geolog:cai Survey of Canada.
"British Rule of Native Races, an Evolution.''
R.W,Brock.
Institute of Jnterr.ational Relations University of
Washington.
"Makers of Queen's.  George M. Grant."
R.W,Brock.
Que en's ? e vi ev;. -21-
Department of History.
"The Significance of Canada's Jubilee."
D.C.Harvey.
The B.C.Teacher, Vol. VII, No. 4, pp. 20-26.
"Some Aspects of the Frontier in Canadian History."
W. N. Sage.
Canadian Historical Association, Annual Report,
1928.  pp. 62-72.
"The Three British Empires."
W. N. Sage.
University of Washington Press, 1929.
Book Review - Howay -  "British Columbia, The Making of
a Province."
W. N. Sage.
Canadian Historical Review, 1929. March, pp.75-77
Book Review - Bolton, "History of the America."
W. N. Sage.
Canadian Historical Review, 1929.
pp. 70-71.
"International Research."
F. H. Soward.
University of Washington Press, July, 1929
pp. 373 - 387.
"Canada's New International Responsibilities."
F. H. Soward.
University of Washington Press, July, 1929
pp. 135-141.
Also published in November issue: of the
Contemporary Review, London.-
No. 755,  pp. 594-599.
Book Review - Fay "The Origins of the World War"
F. H. Soward.
Canadian Historical Review, March, 1929.
Vol. X, pp. 67-69.
Department of Mathematics.
"The Ellipsoidal Pendulum"
D. Buchanan.
Transactions of the Royal Soc. of Canada.
Vol. XXII, Section III (1928) pp. 193-209 -22-
Department of Mathematics (continued
"The Pendulum Orbit of the Normal Hydrogen
Molecule."
D. Buchanan.
Royal Society of Canada.
"Second Genus Orbits near the Arc Orbits of the
Helium Atom."
D. Buchanan.
Royal Society of Canada ( In Press)
"Periodic Orbits for Atoms of the Helium Type."
D. Buchanan.
the Direct Product of a Division and a Total
Matrie Algebra."
F. S. Nowlan.
Bulletin of the American Mathematical
Society. (In Press).
Department of Modern Languages.
"Selections from La Bruyere'
H. Ashton.
Cambridge University Press
French Novel"
H. Ashton.
Benn's Sixpenny Series
Department of Zoology.
"International Cooperation in the Investigation of
Pelagic Fish Eggs and Larvae." •
C. McLean Fraser.
Proceedings of the Third Pacific Science Congress.
Tokyo, Vol.. 1.
"National Methods for the Protection of useful
Aquatic Animals and Plants of the Pacific."
C. McLean Fraser.
Proceedings of the Third Pacific Science Congress.
Tokyo, Vol. 1. -23-
Department of Zoology,  continued
"Marine Wood Borers of the Pacific Coast of North
America"
C. McLean Fraser.
Proceedings of the Third Pacific Science Congress.
Tokyo, Vol. 2.
"Notes on the Ecology of the Little Neck Clam,
Paphia staminea Conrad."
C. McLean Fraser and Gertrude M. Smith.
Transactions Royal Society of Canada, 3rd.Series.
Vol. XXII, Section V.
"Notes on the Ecology of the Butter Clam, Saxidomus
giganteus Deshayes."
C. McLean Fraser and Gertrude M. Smith.
Transactions Royal Society of Canada, 3rd Series.
Vol. XIII,  Section V.
"Food Material as a Factor in Growth Rate of some
Pacific Clams".
Gertrude M. Smith.
Transactions Royal Society of Canada, 3rd. Series,
Vol. XXII,  Section V.
"A Preliminary Quantitative Study of the Zooplankton
in the Strait of Georgia."
Mildred H. Campbell.
Transactions Royal Society of Canada, 3rd. Series,
Vol. XXIII.
"External Parasites of Certain Birds of British Columbia."
G. J. Spencer.
Canadian Entomologist.
"Dead Pollenia Rudis (Fabr.) as hosts of Dermestids."
G.J.Spencer.
Canadian Entomologist
"A Breeding Place of Euphorbia inda Linn., the Bumble
Flower Beetle."
G.J.Spencer.
59th Annual Report of the Entomological Society of
Ontario.
"Insects,of the Season 1928, around Vancouver, especially
Point Grey." G. J. Spencer.
59th Annual Report of the Entomological Society of
Ontario. -24-
Department of Zoology (continued)
"The Cabbage Root Maggot Attacking Carnations (Later
Identified as Hylemyia brunescens Zitt.").
G.J.Spencer.
Proceedings of Entomological Society of British
Columbia, No. 25.
FACULTY OF APPLIED SCIENCE
Department of Mechanical & Electrical Engineering.
"High Frequency Bridge Measurements"
Dr. H. Vickers.
American Institute of Electrical Engineers.
"Aeronautics".
Mr. F.W.Vernon.
American Inst, of Electrical Engineers
Department of Nursing and Health.
"Taking the Cure in Tuberculosis"
Dr. H. W. Hill.
Provincial Board pf Health of B.C.
# "The New Method of Vaccination"
Dr. H.W.Hill.
McBeath Campbell Ltd.(Bulletin, Vancouver Medical Assoc.)
f "Undulant Fever in British Columbia"
Dr. H.W.Hill
Bulletin, Vancouver Medical Assoc.
# "Definitions of Some Terms used in Public Health"
Dr. H."r.Hill.
Public Health Journal.
# Also reprinted as pamphlets for distribution by the
Provincial Board of Health of B.C.
"Report on Hospitals and Nurses" Training Schools in
Manitoba."
Miss M. Gray.
Dep't. of Health and Public Welfare, Manitoba Prov.Gov't -25-
FACULTY OF AGRICULTURE.
Department of Animal Husbandry.
"Dairy Farming in British Columbia."
Faculty of Agriculture Bulletin No. 12.
Published by the Department of Agriculture, Victoria,3.C
Department of Dairying.
"A Study of Some Types of Bacteria which Produce a
"Caramel" Flavour in Milk."
C.D.Kelly.
Transactions Royal Society of Canada, 1928, Third
Series, Vol. XXII, Section V. Ottawa.
"The Proportion of the Citrates of Milk Incorporated
in the Curd during Cheese Making."
N. S. Golding.
Transactions Royal Society of Canada, 1928, Third
Series, Vol. XXII, Section V. Ottawa.
"The Use of a Steam Sterilizer for Dairy Utensils
on the Farm."
N. S. Golding and K. C. Thornloe.
Scientific Agriculture, 1929, Vol. IX, No. 6. Ottawa.
"Further Data on the Streptococcus Lactis Strain that
Produces "Caramel" Odour and Flavour in Dairy Products."
Wilfrid Sadler.
Transactions Royal Society of Canada, 1928, Third Series,
Vol. XXII, Section V, Ottawa.
"Dairy Bacteriology in Scandinavia."
Wilfrid Sadler.
Scientific Agriculture, 1928, Vol. VIII, No. 9, Ottawa.
"The Casein-Splitting Properties of Starters."
Chr. Barthel and Wilfrid Sadler.
Transactions Royal Society of Canada, 1928, Third Series,
Vol. XXII, Section V, Ottawa.
Same paper published in Swedish.
Meddelande No. 343 (Experimentalfaltet, Sweden).
Same paper read at the World's Dairy Congress (Great
Britain) - 1928 - and published in English,French and German. -26-
Departmemt  of Dairying (continued)
"Cheshire Cheese".
Part l."A Preliminary Study of  the  Bacterial Content."
Wilfrid Sadler.
Part  II."The Classification of Certain Organisms  Isolated."
S.   Orla-Jensen,  A.D.Orla-Jensen and Wilfrid Sadler.
Scientific Agriculture,  1929,  Vol.  IX, No.   6.
Same Paper published  in French in "Le Lait"  Tome  IX,No.83,1929.
Tome  IX,No.84,1929.
Lyon.
"The Vitamin Value of Milk and Milk Products."
N.   S.  Golding.
Annual Report of the Western Canada Livestock
Union,  1928.
"Milk Supplies - Control Methods".
Wilfrid Sadler.
Annual Report of the Western Canada Livestock
Union,  1928.
"Bacteria and Flavours."
Wilfrid Sadler.
Western Canada Dairy Convention Proceedings,  1929.
"Flavour Defects in High Grade Milk."
Wilfrid Sadler.
Scientific Agriculture,  Vol.  X,  No.   2,   1929.
"Discoloration of Halibut"
F.C.Harrison and Wilfrid  Sadler.
Biological Board of Canada,  Bulletin,  No.   12.
Department of Horticulture.
"An Economic Study of  the  Tree Fruit Industry of the
Okanagan Valley."
F.M.Clement and  J.   C.  Wilcox.
Bulletin No.  13, Faculty of Agriculture.
"An Economic Study of  the  Tree Fruit Industry of
the Okanagan Valley."
Popular circular - prepared by L.   S.  Mallory.
Published  by the Department  of Agriculture,   Victoria,  B.C. -27-
Department of Poultry Husbandry.
"The First Year Egg Production Barred Plymouth Rocks
V.S.Asmundson.
Scientific Agriculture, 1928, Vol. IX, No. 2.
"Fish Oils as Sources of Vitamin D for Poultry."
V.S. Asmundson, W. J. Allardyce and J. Biely.
Scientific Agriculture, 1929, Vol. IX, No. 9.
# "Effect of Bacillary White Diarrhoea Infection on
Egg Production."
V. S. Asmundson and J. Biely.
Poultry Science, Vol. VII, No. 6.
# Also reported in Bacteriology. -28-
REPORT ON TKE OFFICE OF THE DEAN
OF THE FACULTY OF ARTS and  SCIENCE.
Attendance.
Reports on First and Second Year Students with
deficient attendance were submitted at the end of each month
and at the end of each term.  Letters of warning were sent
to each student so reported. About twenty students were not
allowed to write some or any of their final examinations in
April. Certain of them, however, were permitted to write the
Supplemental as provided in the Calendar regulations.
Medical Certificates
On the receipt of a medical certificate at this office,
notices stating the period of illness were sent to each Department in which the student was taking work.  Students who were
prevented through illness from writing the final examinations
were, with four exceptions, allowed to defer their examinations
until September. No fee was required for such examinations and
the marks obtained in September were counted as if the examinations were written in April. For example, a First or Second
Year student was required to make a minimum of 40/j in September
and an average of 50$ on all the examinations in April and
September.  The numbers of candidates granted deferred examinations in some or all of their subjects were as follows:
First Year 19
Second " 8
Third " 4
Fourth " 1
Four candidates were granted aegrotat standing - one
in the Third Year and three in the Fourth Year.   The Third Year
candidate would easily have made a First Class. Two of those
in the Fourth Year were recommended for First Class Honours.
Examinations
Llid-term
Reports on the work of the First and Second Years,
based either upon examinations or on term work, were submitted
early in November. Letters of warning were sent to the parents -29-
REPORT ON THE OFFICE OF THE DEAN
OF THE FACULTY OF ARTS AND SCIENCE (continued
or guardians of all students who failed in three or more of
their five subjects and such students - 100 in the First Year
and 20 in the Second - were called into the Dean's office for
personal interviews.
Christmas
After the  Christmas  examinations  letters  of warning
were  sent to all First and  Second Year students who failed but
managed to make sufficient marks to escape the Christmas
exclusion.      Lest the Dean's office might be  considered as
existing solely for  the  benefit of  the  "under-fifty-per centers"
personal letters of congratulations were  sent  to all First and
Second Year students who made First Class and  their names were
published  in the  city papers.
April.
Four committees on examinations had charge of the
results in April.  The Dean was chairman of the Fourth Year
Committee. I wish to record my appreciation of the work of
these committees and in that connection of the work of the
Registrar and his staff and also of the Dean's secretary.
Letters of congratulations were sent to the students
of all years who made First Class standing and also to all
prize winners.
I cannot conclude the report of my office without
recording my appreciation of the uniform cooperation and support
of the various.members of the Faculty.  I wish also to refer to
the great loss sustained by the Faculty in the death,of Professor
Chodat in November, 1928, and of Professor Beckett in February,
1929.  The Faculty has recorded on its minutes its appreciation
of the contributions of these men to the educational work of
this Province.
Respectfully submitted
D. Buchanan 1927-28
1928-29
8
4
1
0
7
3
10
13
3
1
2
8
3
7
4
8
6
»
-30-
REPORT OF THE DEAF OF THE FACULTY OF APPLIED SCIENCE
L.        Distribution of Students.
The industrial expansion of the Province during
the last few years is causing a marked increase in the number
of students selecting geological, mining, electrical and
mechanical engineering, resulting in a corresponding loss in
chemical, civil and forest engineering, as shown by the figures
for the Fourth Year given below.
Chemical Engineering
Chemistry
Civil Engineering
Electrical Engineering
Forest Engineering
Geological Engineering
Mechanical Engineering
Mining and Metallurgical Engineering
Nursing and Health (Degree course)
Many more graduates could have been placed this
year had they been available, probably three times as many. For
instance there were twenty more requests for Chemical Engineers
than could be supplied, and there is a standing order for five
of these each year for the coming four years.
2.        General Policy of the Faculty of Applied Science.
The general policy is outlined in the University
Calendar as a Foreword to the Applied Science section. Briefly,
it is to afford a sound University education in the strict
sense of the term:- to train students in exact quantitative
and fertile thinking, to train their imaginations, to give
tern a sound knowledge of natural laws and of the means of
applying this knov/ledge to the utilization of natural forces
and natural products for the benefit of man and for the advancement of civilization.
Experience shows that this type of training is the
best yet devised for a large and increasing proportion of the
administrative and technical positions in business and industry
as well as in the engineering professions themselves. Fifty
per cent of the graduates may be expected to eventually enter
business or industry.
The aim is not to turn out % finished product -
this only the school of experience can do properly - but
young men with a special capacity and training for attaining
success and distinction in engineering, industry or business. -31-
REPORT OF THE DEAN OF THE
FACULTY"OF APPLIED SCIENCE (continued)
Consequently the course is broad and general rather than narrow
and specialized.  This holds true not only for the first three
years, which are common to all Applied Science students, but
also in the last two years, which are divided into separate
courses.
3. New Courses.
In Electrical Engineering the following new
courses have been added:-
Electrical and Magnetic Instruments and Measurements.
Design of Direct Current Machinery.
Direct and Alternating Current Technology.
Problem Courses.
Transit Phenomena and Oscillations.
In Mechanical Engineering the following new
course is being offered:
Aeronautics.
4. More Important Changes in Courses.
In Forestry a week of field work, after the spring
examinations has been added to Forestry 2 (Mensuration).
The most important changes have been made in the
Department of Mechanical and Electrical Engineering.  Hitherto
the Fourth Year was common to both Mechanical and Electrical
courses, and specialization was confined to the Fifth Year. This
did not leave enough time to cover what is now fundamental. By
separating the uuarses in the Fourth Year and dropping a few
classes in other departments, principally in Civil Engineering,
the new classes mentioned in the preceding paragraph have been
fitted in.  In this way it is possible to cover more satisfactorily what the present day graduate in Mechanical and Electrical
Engineering is expected to be familiar with.
The problem of improving the English of Applied
Science students is one that has not been satisfactorily solved.
Regular courses in English, tried in many universities, do not
secure the desired results.  For several years the Dean has
been going over the student's ess-ay with the writer and this
seemed to be more promising, for the author's pride in his production receives a severe shock when he sees the beauty of his
pages ruined by corrections of English, resulting in a desire
to Improve.  The difficulty was that the Dean had not the time
for so much individual attention.  Consequently an Assistant was -32-
REPORT OF THE DEAN OF THE
FACULTY OF APPLIED SCIENCE (continued)
appointed to devote his whole time to tutoring in English,
based on the students' essays.  In addition he attends the
students' meetings to criticize their speaking.  One session's
experience is insufficient for a definite judgment but the
results seem promising.   The students themselves think it
well worth while.
A Committee of Deans of Applied Science of the
Canadian Universities Conference has been considering the
question and at its spring meeting, our experiment was outlined
and met with its approval. McGill, quite independently, is
trying a somewhat similar experiment but along slightly different
lines, and from these experiments the Committee is hopeful that
a tolerable solution of the problem may be evolved.
5. Publications See list of Publications).
6. Researches under way
Department of Mechanical and Electrical Engineering:
H. Vickers - "The limiting value of the slip in
the synchronous induction motor for
pulling into step."
"Commutation in polyphase commuter
motors."
"Failure of dielectrics and the
mechanism of failure."
"Noise in induction motors."
"Influence of unbalanced windings
on the short circuit current and
overload capacity of induction
motors."
L.  B.   Stacey-  "Failure of static  condensers  under
surge voltages."
Dr. H.F.G.Letson- "On internal combustion engines."
7. Increased Accommodation:
(a) Larger class rooms are   required  for the   Second
and   Third Years.
(b) Is extension of about 25 feet is needed on the
Hydraulic and  Testing Laboratory. -33-
REPORT OF THE DEAN OF THE
FACULTY OF APPLIED SCIENCE continued)
In Electrical Engineering a Communication Laboratory
and a High Tension Laboratory.
c) A room to be used as a Department Library and Reading
Room is required by the Department of Mechanical
and Electrical Engineering.
8.        Other Urgent Needs.
The Department of Civil Engineering needs equipment
for graduate and research work, as does also the Department
of Mechanical and Electrical Engineering.
Respectfully submitted,
R. W. Brock. —34 —
REPORT OF THE DEAI OF THE FACULTY OF AGRICULTURE
The work of the Faculty has been continued without
marked modification throughout the year.  The emphasis on
the various divisions of work may be changing but all lines
have been continued.  The teaching work while primary in its
demands for attention has not tended to absorb more than a
fair proportion of the time of the staff.  If I judge the
situation correctly, there is undoubtedly a decided tendency
to recognize more openly what has been a fact for some time,
that is the importance of the experimental and research work
in Agriculture.  Possibly even at this time the investigational
work is the major interest of the Faculty.  The teaching is
coming to be based more and more on it.
The evidence of the strengthening of the emphasis on
research is best noted in the structural changes that were
authorized late in this academic year.  These changes apply
more particularly to the modifications that are being made in
Room 114, Agriculture Building, whereby this room will be used
in the future primarily for research in Dairying.  This is being
done in cooperation with the Empire Marketing Board.  Some
modifications are being made in Room 104 also, to permit of
certain research work in Horticulture.  These projects are
referred to later.
The Office of the Record of Performance Association
has been moved to the Winch Building, Vancouver. Professor Lloyd
is still Secretary but has been relieved of a large proportion
of the detailed work in connection with the Association.  It is
expected eventually that Professor Lloyd will act in an advisory capacity only.
The Farm Survey work has been continued but no change
in policy or method has been made.  About forty-two new farms
were added to the number.  These are in the area known as
Central British Columbia and the work has been done in cooperation
with Mr. A. E. Richards, Supervisor of Illustration Stations for
British Columbia.
Agricultural Economics. Agricultural Economics as a
subject has not yet attained the dignity of a department. Mr.
Hare, as a member of the Department of Animal Husbandry,has
recently organized and offers a course in Farm Management. -This
course is proving to be quite popular.  It is a study of farms
as they are and is based on the records of more than five hundred
farms for from five to seven years.
The courses in Agricultural Economics and Marketing
were attended by twenty-eight and nine students respectively. -35-
REPORT OF THE DEAN OF THE
FACULTY OF AGRICULTURE (Continued
Animal Husbandry.
T-_     1-
CHANGES IN POLICY IN DEPARTMENTS
There have been no radical changes in the policy of
the Department of Animal Husbandry for the past year with the
exception of the plans for the introduction of a unit of
imported Ayrshire cattle to the Dairy Barn as made possible
through the kind donations of certain public-spirited men of
this Province.
Also during the past year a Clydesdale stallion has been
imported from Scotland jointly by the Delta Farmers' Institute
and the University.  This horse is to be used at the University
Farm during the early part of the season and then travelled
in the Ladner district for some two months.  This joint ownership is proving quite workable and satisfactory to all parties
concerned.
Agronomy.
It would seem desirable, within a not too distant future,
to change, to some extent, the investigation policy of the
Department of Agronomy by concentrating in some measure on
comparative ecological studies of crop production in the Province
and by extending the clover and grass work to embrace wild as
well as cultivated forms.  How such work may best be brought
about will be an object of study and consideration during the
summer.
Dairying.
No change in the policy of the Department of Dairying is to
be reported.  Thanks, however, to the grant which has been forthcoming from the Empire Marketing Board, the policy as defined in
the report for 1927-1928 can be more intelligently and effectively
pursued.
Poultry Husbandry.
The R.O.P. Association has experienced considerable growth
in business, advancing from $6,000.00 to $100,000.00 turnover
under the direction of the Head of the Department of Poultry
Husbandry.
A down-tov/n office for the R.O.P. Association has been
established in Room 316, Winch Building, adjacent to the Poultry
Division of the Dominion Livestock Branch and considerable assistance is now being given by the Dominion Department of Agriculture
in routine work.
The Secretary, Professor Lloyd, has succeeded in systematizing the work of this association to such a degree that he now
acts in an advisory capacity only.  It is hoped that eventually
Professor Lloyd will be relieved of all responsibility in
connection with the assoeiation. -36-
REPORT OF THE DEAN OF THE
FACULTY OF AGRICULTURE (Continued) .
NEW COURSES
No new courses have been offered during the year by the
regular departments. Under the heading of "Agricultural Economics"
two new courses of graduate grade, Agricultural Economics 50
and Agricultural Economics 51, were authorized by Senate.  Two
students were registered for these courses.
PUBLICATIONS ( See list of Publications)
RESEARCHES UNDER WAY.
Animal Husbandry.
Some progress has been made in the following research
problems in Animal Husbandry and it is hoped that continued work
will be carried on in practically all of these as they are not
yet in a state of completion.
(a) The determination of blood normals in animals which is
an endeavor to arrive at a method of diagnosis of various disease
conditions.  These blood normals are studied under varying conditions as to species, types, breeds, sex, age, pregnancy, lactation
as well as ovarian, uterine and vaginal conditions.  It is anticipated that this work will assist quite materially in Haematuria
investigational work and in the prevention of skeletal trouble and
calculi in the ureters of sheep, a condition which appears to be
an economic consideration in the University herds and flocks. This
is being conducted in cooperation with the Chemistry Department of
the University of British Columbia,
(b) Studies in the cause and control of Haematuria or
Red Water in cattle. This  'sease condition is very prevalent
in the Lower Coastal regions of British Columbia.
(c) Investigation in the control of B. abortus in cattle
through agglutination test and isolation.  It is anticipated to
extend this agglutination testing to other types of livestock. It
is carried on in conjunction with the Department of Bacteriology
at the University of British Columbia.
(d) Preventative measures in Infectious Mastitis through
inoculation of infected and suspected animals.
(e) Investigation in the prevention of Navel 111 through
the feeding of iodine to the pregnant mares, inoculation of foals
and other preventative measures.. Navel 111 is one of the most
prevalent diseases in foals of this Province and few farme*e are
free from this disease. -37
REPORT OF THE DEAN OF THE
FACULTY OF AGRICULTURE (Continued)
(f)  Prevention of influenza among young horses,
especially those on pasture that are liable to be exposed to the
infection. This work at the present time is taking the nature of
inoculation.
}/
Agronomy.
In the vicinity of 1500 plots in experimental work
of various kinds have been laid out and harvested in the Department of Agronomy.  Besides, measurements and records have been
taken of close to 100,000 individual plants all of which naturally
involves a great deal of work and attention.
The following problems being carried on by members of
this Department might be mentioned:  "Inheritance in Cruciferous
crossings; Alfalfa crossings;  continued vegetative propagation
in clovers, grasses and alfalfa; wheat and oat testing at various
points in the Province; studies in nitrification and nitrogen
sources."
Dairying.
The  research work on which  this Department   is
was  dealt with at some   length in the  1927-1928 report.
lorti culture.
engaged
A definite policy of research has been initiated
and some progress made in Horticulture during the past year.
Two rooms in the Agriculture Building are in process
of being fitted up as a research laboratory, and equipment is
now arriving.
Research work is to be carried on also in two specially
equipped sections of the new greenhouses, while still other work
is being undertaken in the fields.
Some of the main pro1 .ems already outlined or under way
are as follows:
"PROJECT 1. Studies on tree growth with special reference
to root activities.  Besides systematic measurements, this involves
studies of cambial activity and factors affecting it, food reserves,
etc.
This problem in addition to its interest from
the standpoint of general physiology is of value as it relates to
such practices as pruning and methods of training trees (particularly in the early stages), cultural treatment, and fertilizing
problems. -38-
REPORT OF THE DEAN OF THE
FACULTY OF AGRICULTURE- TC'ontinued)
"PROJECT 2.  Studies on grasses with reference to lawn
and oichard cover crop problems.  The relative proportions and
amounts of soil nutrients required by the different grasses and
their relative ability to obtain the required nutrients from a
given soil are being studied.
"PROJECT 3.  To determine how and at what time of the year
fruit tree roots absorb mineral nutrients and at what periods and
under what conditions most of the activity takes place, with a
view to ascertaining the best time of fertilizing and methods of
handling soil in orchards.
Poultry Husbandry.
All researches in Poultry Husbandry are being continued,
and additional researches are being undertaken by Mr. Biely on
B.W.D., chicken pox, paralysis and other poultry diseases.
The effect of ultra-violet light on chicks, laying hens
and breeding stock is to be studied during the coming year, a new
lamp having been loaned by the Hanovia Company for this purpose.
INCREASED ACCOMMODATION, etc.
Class rooms in the Agriculture Building have been used
to capacity during the past year.  As much room as is possible
has been loaned the Faculty of Arts and Science but with the
additional research work this year, it will, not be possible to
make the usual loan of rooms. Also it is felt that Room "S"
which hitherto has been used by Arts and Science as an office
might this year be vacated.  If this is done, there is adequate
accommodation for Agriculture in this building for the time being.
The specific suggestions with regard to increased accommodation are made in the departmental reports.
EXTENSION SCHOOLS.
It is felt that an effort should be made during the
winter of 1929-30 to offer.once more extension schools in about
four centers in the Province. Not only are the schools of great
x     ue from the point of view of the communities where they are
held but they are an excellent means of keeping the staff in -39-
REPORT OF THE DEAN OF THE
FACULTY OF AGRICULTURE (Continued}
touch with conditions in the country.
LAND FOR FARM.
Capital expenditure of $25,000.00 in land clearing and
making a farm would•tend to reduce the feed bills very materially.
I believe this possibility should be given serious consideration.
OILED ROADS IN HORTICULTURE.
It is suggested that consideration be given to the
problem of oiling all dust roads on the farm and in Horticulture
in particular. The dust problem is a cause of irritation and
worry at times as well as a factor of damage to grass and crops.
Respectfully submitted,
F. M. Clement.
REPORT OF THEDEANOF WOMEN.
Academic.
I have taught a class of f-^e™?0u^of*study,
and IB, have advised_ students regarding their ^f   ral
have answered inquiries of Pr°£e?f rsre^ra^ g    *
attitude of students **08%w°ft " £°* °rents who have asked
conferred with students a.nd with many Pajenta wn       COurses,
for advice because of special lack of ^^ of suffiCient
lack of interest generally in f lle°*dwh^ given help in
  j-~ „~-«-m vinp in p.olleee. &c. , ana. nave 6x
money to continue in college, &c
other ways. -40-
RE?)RT OF THE DEAN OF WOMEN (Continued)
Housing:
I have inspected boarding houses for out-of-town
students, have advised regarding the housing of women and of
a number of men students, have kept in touch with householders
to see tv-.it as far as possible the discipline and conditions
of a well-conducted home have prevailed in their houses.
Student Organizations:
As Honorary President of the Women's Undergraduate
Society, the Panhellenie Council, the International Club, the
Studio Club and the Women's Literary Society, I have attended
meetings and have advised in the arrangement of programs
and in other matters.  The Panhellenie Council has presented
especial difficulties this year because of the drawing up of
a new Constitution, the "internationalizing" of two sororities
and the many problems of the whole sorority situation.  On the
request of the sororities, "bidding" is now announced through
the Dean of Women's office. This new system is doing away with
some of the abuses inseparable from the older system of "rushing" and "bidding".
In connection with the Women's Literary Society I
organized a course in public speaking and one in vocations,
the lectures in the latter course being given by women who
themselves are successful in these vocations.  On the request
of the students I spoke a number of times at meetings of their
various organisations.  Also at the beginning of the year
I followed the practice common among Deans of Women of speaking
to the women of the freshman class, the attendance, of course,
being voluntary, on such subjects as: How to Live on Twenty-
four hours a day,  Right Study Habits, How to Fit into your
new environment,  Recreation,  Boy and Girl Friendships, Women's
Place in the World,  Organization Life in College, &c.  Frequently
these meetings took the form of an open discussion.
Employment
Notwithstanding the organization of an employment bureau
at the University with which I do not have any official connection, the majority of the persons who wish to secure the services
of women students., and probably all of the women students, who
wish to obtain work during the college term or during the -41-
REPORT OF THE DEAN OF WOMEN (Continued)
vacation apply for assistance at my office.  I have placed
students who have given light services for room and board,
taken care of childre-i, tutored backward or delicate children,
and performed other services by which they have earned the whole
or part of their way through college.  I have also placed a
number of girls for the summer in summer hotels and camps,
housework, in stores, in the Y.W.C.A. , and in other v/ork which
will make possible their return to college next fall.
Social:
In the capacity of chaperon I have attended practically
all of the functions organized by the students under the name
of the University and have been consulted by them in their
preparations.
Many students belong to what is called the unsocial type.
Through timidity, or supersensitiveness or a-vkwardness, or lack
of social training, or lack of sufficient money to dress well
enough to make them feel comfortable in the intimate society of
their fellow students, a large number of students are kept from
participation in student social activities and do not achieve
the all round development which they should have.  Complaints
are raised sometimes about the excessive social life in our
University, but, as a matter of fact, there are more unsocial
or socially inexperienced girls than oversocial.  I have made
a special effort to interest such girls in one or more of the
student activities, and have organized a series of teas in my
home and in the Women's Common Room at which I have asked the
students of the second year regardless of their social experience to assist .e.  These affairs have required only a half
hour from each student concerned and consequently have not encroached upon her study time.  I may add that judging from the
comments which have reaehed me both from outside the University
and from the students themselves, this work has been considered
of value.
At Thanksgiving and at Christmas I arranged that all the
out-of-town women students who could not go home, had an invitation for part of the vacation from some place in the city. In
this work I was assisted by the Student Welfare Committee of the
Faculty Women's Club under the convenership of Mrs. Lemuel Robertson.
I have kept in touch with students who have been ill,
or in financial or other distress.
I have also assisted in securing loans for students and
have placed gifts of money, clothing and text books from the -42-
REPORT OF THE DEAN OF WOMEN (Continued
University Women's Club, McGill Women's Associati m and
other sources, for deserving students who were not entirely
successful in their efforts to earn their way ihrough, and
others who were unexpectedly in need.
Vocational:
Perhaps the most important and most difficult
part of my work has been that of assisting students in their
choice of a vocation and in the selection of courses which will
lead up to the vocation chosen.  The statistics of adult workers
show that not more than one in five selects and enters upon
the life v/ork for which he is best fitted. This means that
four out of five get into life wrong, and points to the need
of young people for assistance in the making of a choice.
General:
During the year I have been consulted about their
teaching and other problems by a large number of graduates of
the University, in this city and elsewhere, have served on two
national and a number of local committees, have given a number
of addresses to various organizations, have worked in connection
with the plans to build a Women's Union have attended the conference of the "Western branch of the. Association of Deans of
Women of the United States, &e.
During the coming summer I expect to visit widely
among women in administrative positions in colleges and among
college students in England, and Switzerland, also to attend
the conference of the World Federation of Educational Institutions, and to represent the Canadian Federation of University
Women on the council of the International Federation of University Women at their triennial conference in Geneva.
Respectfully submitted,
Mary L. Bollert.
REPORT OF THE LIBRARY COMMITTEE.
In October last/'-e Library Committee submitted
its Report to the Senate and the Board of Governors. -43-
REPORT OF THE UNIVERSITY EXTENSION COISTITTEE.
The period covered by the Report submitted by
Dr. 0. J. Todd, Secretary of this Committee, is from April
1st., 1928 to March 31st., 1929.
During this time, 48 members of the professorial
staff delivered 248 lectures in 45 points in the Province. 138
of these lectures were not arranged by the Committee.  The
total attendance reported was 27,158.
Approximately one-half of these lectures were delivered in Vancouver and the immediate vicinity; but Vancouver
Island, the Fraser Valley and the Interior - East and North -
also provided representative audiences on over 100 occasions.
REPORT OF THE ACTING -HEAD OF THE UNIVERSITY
HEALTH SERVICE
I have the honour to submit the annual report of the
University Health Service consisting of the reports to me of
the Medical Examiner of students and of the Public Health Nurse:
(a)  Report of Medical Examiner'of students.
(b   Report of Public Health Nurse.
■ '■■.::   :  '   '".- "TV:- V;'V T-.-/--r-. ;■.'-■-.'.;■- ■-.-• fyv:c" ' -t"t>-"-^
Respectfully submitted,
H. W. Hill.
(a)       Re port of the Medical  Examiner of - Stud ent s:
I have  the  honour to  submit  the  annual report  upon
the   physical  examinations  of the  students-of Pthefii>st;year,   those
of'other    years who for' various reasdri&--had-':not yet been-examined,
women participating in major athletics ,  and'-'certain1 students whose
physical  condition was' •unsatisfactory last year.
Ah;-analysis^ of-the-statisticalcreport-shows that although
thos'e of the-sehlor yearshad-gained' in height: and weight', -44-
REPORT OF THE ACTING-HEAD OF THE
UNIVERSITY HEALTH SERVICE feontinued)
and although those definitely unfit had been weeded out by
the process of examination, the chest expansion had definitely
decreased.  Those taking major athletics were the exceptions.
This suggests that academic work may have been pursued at the
expense of physical training.  It is hoped that full use of
the gymnasium, the acquisition of which now seems to be a
certainty, will overcome this deficiency.
The number of students working under the handicap
of poor vision uncorrected by glasses, is a matter of some
concern.  The number with diseased tonsils and teeth is still
too large, although the number who have already had diseased
tonsils removed is strikingly large.
Among those women taking major athletics a number
were found in whom these strenuous exercises seemed to be working
to their physical disadvantage.
The students re-examined all showed improvement.
In October, owing to the number of smallpox cases
in the city, an epidemic at the University was expected, but
happily this did not develop.  This, no doubt, was partly due
to the fact that so many are protected by vaccination, 77.7 per
cent of those-examined having been successfully vaccinated at
some time during their lives, many of them at the clinic operated
by the University Health Service.
The presence of a public health nurse at the University
should help to make the Health Service more effective. Eighty-one
students were marked for re-examination by the nurse next year,
to see if the minor defects such as those of eyes, teeth, and
tonsils discovered at the physical examination, will have been
remedied.  Sixteen of those having more serious defects were
marked for re-examination by the University medical examiners,
next autumn.
Respectfully submitted,
Harold White.
(b)  Report of the Public Health Nurse
I have t ■ present the second annual report covering
the work of the 1928-29 session, as part-time Public Health Nurse
in the University Health Service of the University of British
Columbia. -45-
Report of the Public Health Nurse (continued
The inclusion *his year of the Medical Examination
Service, in the University Health Service, without previous preparation being made, resulted in the work as a whole, being
carried out somewhat haphazardly.  Since the recommendation for
a new method of notification of students to be medically examined which I placed before you in April-1929 has been accepted,
the so-called "invitation card", will no longer be used.
1.  First Aid Department.
Eighteen hundred and forty two interviews and consultations , were held, including members of the Faculty, Staff,
and workmen.
Three hundred and sixty eight students sought advice
about health and various physical defects.  Of this group, (a)
two hundred and two were referred.respectively to: Dentists,
Specialists, or the Family Physician.  The remaining group, (b)
came within the province of the University Health Service, and
advice was given, followed up where possible.
Follow-up of Defects Found by Medical Examiner
By far the most important of these defects, are
those found and reported covering the particulars of those students
(a)   who through physical disabilities are exempt from athletics
al  ^ether; and of those (b), whose activities have to be modified.
Supervision of Infection.
With this phase of the work, last year's procedure
was followed, that is, students becoming indisposed while on the
Campus reporting at once, and those who had been exposed to
infection reporting daily for prescribed periods. Any who suffered
from infection or indisposition of undetermined nature, were if
possible, transported home. Eighty-eight such transportations
were effected, exclusive of volunteer transportation offered by
students and members of the Faculty and Staff.
Vaccination.
Besides the questionnaire regarding vaccination
stamped on the Registration Card, (which did not quite fulfil our
expectations, owing to the failure of some of the students to
return the card, and others omitting to fill in the history) a
separate questionnaire was sent to about seven hundred First and
Second Year students.  The combined effort gave results which, ii
not measuring up to expectations, were sufficient to warrant the
continuance of a similar effort this year, and to this end the -46-
Report of the Public Health Nurse continued)
Registration Card has been revised on my recommendation.  I
would like to see compulsory vaccination introduced at the
University.  This would not be creating a precedent, since it
is already practised in some of the Eastern Universities, notably the University of Toronto, where by order of the Board
of Governors, every candidate for admission must submit a
certificate of successful vaccination, with his or her application, or agree to submit such certificate within ten days
after the opening of the session.  Those who so desire may
be vaccinated in the Toronto U. H. S.
University of B.C. students, to the number of three
hundred and ninety-nine, during the current year, were vaccinated
at the U.H.S., others were done by their Family Physician, as
this service is only given by the University to those who for
some reason desire it.  Of those students vaccinated, ninety-
eight had never previously been vaccinated.
Seventy-five students filed affidavits of Conscientious
Objection. Many of these claimed they did not personally object,
and were merely carrying out the wishes of parents; but that
this was not always a true reason was proved in many instances,
where it was discovered that the parents did not, in fact, object.
V. Health Education
The fact that this branch of education is required by
some students, is evidenced by the number who have expressed a
desire to take such lectures.
VI. Sanitary Inspection.
The Common Room sanitary conveniences show considerable
improvement, although those in the Library Building leave much
to be desired.
Respectfully submitted,
Ce'. ia A. Lucas. -47-
REPORT OF THE OFFICER COMMANDING THE UNIVERSITY
OF BRITISH COLUMBIA CONTINGENT OF THE CANADIAN
OFFICERS TRAINING CORPS.
I beg to submit the following report on the work
of the University of British Columbia Contingent of the
Canadian Officers Training Corps for the session 1928-29:
1. Enlistment of Cadets.
Number of Cadets enlisted  132
Number of Cadets struck off stren^h   17
Total strength in Cadets, end of session   115
The first members were taken on strength December 3, 1928,
The majority joined the Corps on Dec. 3 and 4, 1928. The last
enlistment took place on Feb. 25, 1929.
2. Camp at Victoria.
Under arrangements made by the Department of National
Defence, District Headquarters, Victoria, 52 Cadets and 1
officer attended a camp at Victoria, Dec. 27, 1928 to Jan. 3,
1929.  The members of the Corps were accommodated in the
permanent buildings at Work Point Barracks.  The time was
spent in intensive training which proved of great value in the
subsequent work of the Corps.
3. Appointment of Officers.
The following officers have been appointed to the Corps:
Lt.Col. H.T. Logan, M. C. Officer Commanding.
Major A. H. Finlay, M. C. and Bar.
Capt. G. M. Shrum, M.M.
Capt. L. B. Stacey.
Capt. G. B. Riddehough.
Lieut. D. B. Pollock.
Lieut. M. L. Bird.
Major G. A. Lamont C.A.M.C. (attached) Medical Officer.
4. Organization.
The Corps  is organized as  a  2-Company Battalion, with
Battalion Headquarters.     Each Company is  composed of two -48-
Report of the Officer.Commanding the
University of British Columbia Contingent
of the Canadian Officers Training Corps,(continued
Platoons. Capt. Staeey is acting Adjutant. Major Finlay
commands''A' Company, Capt. Shrum, 'B' Company.
Twenty-two Cadets were promoted to Cadet Noncommissioned rank and posted to companies, platoons and
sections.
5. Assistance of Permanent Active Militia.
The training of the Corps was made possible by
the active cooperation and generous help of District Headquarters,
which vas carried the Corps through their initial and most
difficult stage of its work.
Company Sargeant Major Instructor, W. J.Gibson, M.C
was assigned to the Corps during the entire period of training
and rendered splendid service in every part of the Corps'
activities — in the Orderly Room, the Quartermaster's Stores,
the Lecture Room, and on the Parade Ground.
6. Quarters
Quarters for Orderly Room and Stores were prepared
in the basement of the Arts Building during the Christmas vacation, 1928-29. For parades the officer commanding the 1st
B.C. Regiment, (Lt.-Col. H.F..G. Letson M.C.) kindly gave the
use of the Beatty Street Drill Hall on two evenings, and for
the Annual Inspection.
7. Issues.
The unit was issued with clothing and equipment,
rifles, bayonets, office furniture etc.  The clothing and equipment was returned to Battalion Stores by the Gadets at the end
of the training season.
8. Training.
Training was carried out as follows:  The greater
part of the training consisted of lectures, two hours a week
for all members of the Corps.  These lectures were given in a
lecture room of the University in accordance with a prepared
syllabus.  Three drill parades — one on the Campus, two in
the Drill Hall — were carried out in preparation for the
Annual Inspection. Because of the lack of time available, it
was decided, with the approval of the General Staff Officer,
Divisional Headquarters, to forego musketry training until
next session. -49-
Report of the Officer Commanding the
University of British'Columbia ContTngent
of the Canadian Officers'Training Corps (continued)
All cadets in training were passed as efficient —
less their musketry training — by Brigadier J. Sutherland Brown,
District Officer Commanding, Military District No. 11, at
the Annual Inspection on March 23rd.
Three cadets attended special lectures given by
Company Sargeant Major Instructor Gibson and Lt.-Col. G. R.
Pearkes, V.C. , D.S.O., M.C, General Staff Officer, Military
District, No. 11, and passed the practical portion and wrote the
theoretical portion of the War Office Examination for certificate
'A' .
In addition three general lectures were given to the
Corps as follows:
1. Discipline and Leadership: by the Commanding Officer.
2. The Battle of Bourlon Wood: by Major Finlay.
3. Infantry in Battle: by Lt.-Col. G.R.Pearkes.
All trailing was arranged so as not to interfere
>. ether with regular University work or with other Student activities,
especially athletics.
9. Social Activities.
The social activities of the season consisted of two
Smoking Concerts, one held at the beginning of the Spring Term,
the second on the evening of the day of the Annual Inspection.
The General Officer Commanding the District, the General Staff
Officer and a number of Officers Commanding, local Militia Units,
honoured the Corps by attending the final entertainment.
10. Cooperation of Local Militia Units.
.'..-.s organization of the Corps has received the very
warm approval of the local Units of the Non-permanent Active
Militia. A number of Senior Officers of the Units attended the
Annual Inspection and in other ways have shown a keen interest
in the Corps and their desire to asstt in any way possible. Also,
a number of enquiries have been received from Commanding Officers
regarding a supply of Subaltern Officers for their Units from
among trained members of the University Corps.  It is clear that
the Corps will fill an important place in the Military needs of
the community.
In general, Officers and Cadets have shown the utmost
keenress in the work of the TJnit. At once they entered into the -50-
Report of the Officer Commanding the
University of British Columbia Contingent
of the Canadian Officers' Training Corps' (Continued).
spirit of their training, and have developed a warm
esprit de corps in the brief period since the formation
of the Battalion.  In attendance at lectures and parades
the cadets were regular and carried out all instructions
cheerfully and eagerly. All but two have signified their
intention in writing, of continuing in the Corps next session.
Respectfully submitted
H.T.Logan,
Lieutenant-Colonel.
December 16th-1929. D- S. KLINCK,
President.

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