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The President's Report 1957-58 1958

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Array THE
PRESIDENT'S
REPORT
V>\\ • " ■ it fit
THE UNIVERSITY OF BRITISH COLUMBIA To the Board of Governors and Senate of
The University of British Columbia
Ladies and Gentlemen:
In recent years in my Reports, I have concentrated on the difficulties we
face in education. Those difficulties are by no means overcome, but there
are times when we should celebrate what we have achieved, no matter
what has been left undone. This year, as you know, we celebrated the
Golden jubilee of the granting of a charter to the University in 1908, and
in this Report I intend to put aside our current problems and say something
of our achievements. Compared with some universities, we are very young
indeed, but if what has been done in our first fifty years is any portent for
the future, we may look forward with confidence and with pride.
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' K S
President. THE HISTORY OF THE UNIVERSITY
To help celebrate the fiftieth anniversary of the passing of the University Act, we published
this year TUUM EST: A History of the University of British Columbia, by Harry T. Logan,
and in the brief history that follows I have borrowed freely from Professor Logan. I hope that
what I have borrowed gives you some idea of the full story he tells so well. We could not have
found a man more suited to write our history. One of the "founding fathers" of 1912, he has
since served UBC as a member of the teaching staff and Head of the Department of Classics,
as a member of the Senate, and as a member of the Board of Governors.
In some ways our history is a record of perpetual frustration; we have never had enough
staff, buildings, money, facilities of any kind. Our building programmes were halted by two
world wars and by economic depression. We had to appeal to the public to persuade the government to move us from Fairview to Point Grey. Recently we have had to appeal for funds
to pay for the buildings we need so urgently. But there is another way of looking at our
history. The public has always responded. We have always needed more staff and more
buildings because we have always had the one surplus that is desirable—a greater demand
for education than our facilities could cope with. Since we are proud of what we offer and
since we think it good for the community to have as many of our graduates as possible, we
must sometimes rejoice that we have always had almost an embarrassment of students.
In our Jubilee year, let us remember that happy side of our history. And whatever our difficulties have been (and no doubt will be), let us look at what we offer, look at our present
campus, remember our past, and enjoy some satisfaction at what has been achieved in fifty
years.
The history of the University during these fifty years runs parallel, in many respects, to
that of the Province. As a state institution it depends mainly upon the public treasury for
financial support. It has prospered with the prosperity of the Province. It has also felt the pinch
of hard times; even to the point of threatened extinction. But throughout its half century of
life, whether in adversity or prosperity, it has always had the devoted support of leading
citizens, many of whom have served on its governing bodies. True to its Motto, TUUM EST,
"It is Yours", the University has served the interests of all the people of the Province. Within
its walls the sons and daughters of our citizens have been given the opportunity to satisfy their
needs for higher education and training.
Slowly, year by year, decade by decade, the University has added to its facilities in response to the demands of its students and to the needs of the community it serves, until today
its curriculum embraces most subjects of study offered in the larger universities of this continent. In its first Session, in 1915, the University, with a total registration of 435, was equipped
to give courses in all years of the Faculty of Arts, for the degree of B.A., and courses in three
years of Applied Science toward the degree of B.A.Sc. In 1958, with just under 10,000
students, full undergraduate degree work is offered for a total of 15 degrees distributed
among nine Faculties. In addition the Faculty of Graduate Studies directs Master's work for
seven degrees, given in six of the nine Faculties, and Ph.D. work in twenty-four separate fields of study. The teaching staff in 1915-16, in all grades of appointment, numbered twenty-four;
in 1957-58 the number exceeds 900, including demonstrators, assistants, lecturers and honorary lecturers, fieldwork supervisors in Social Work, and clinical professors and instructors in
the Faculty of Medicine. In numbers of students the University of British Columbia stands
second among the English language universities of Canada. It has graduated 26,000 men and
women.
A provincial University was first called into being by the British Columbia University Act
of 1890, amended in 1891. Under this Act a Senate of twenty-one members was constituted
and a McGill medical graduate, Dr. Israel W. Powell of Victoria, was appointed Chancellor.
Regional jealousy between the Island and the Mainland killed this Act after several ineffectual
attempts had been made to put it into operation. The Universities of Toronto and McGill
then took the lead in promoting higher education in the Province. The Columbian Methodist
College in affiliation with Toronto was formed in New Westminster in 1892 to give work in
Arts and Theology. The College was soon entrusted by Toronto with all four years' work,
though the records show that very few students ever availed themselves of these facilities.
Soon after work began in Columbian College, McGill University appeared on the educational
scene, in affiliation with high schools, first in Vancouver, in 1899, and then in Victoria. A
further stage of development was reached in February, 1906, when two Bills, drawn up in
Montreal by McGill's solicitors, were introduced in the Legislature in Victoria and passed,
setting up McGill University College of British Columbia as a private institution under an
independent governing body, known as the Royal Institution for the Advancement of Learning, and giving courses "leading to degrees of McGill University". McGill College carried on
its work for nine years, giving up to three years in Arts and two years in Applied Science in
Vancouver and two years in. Arts in Victoria. In the last Session of 1914-15, there were 290
students in Vancouver, and 70 in Victoria.
In the meantime the movement for a Provincial University had come to life again,
quickened by inter-University rivalry and the widely-held conviction that the legislature had
given McGill a position of advantage in recruitment of students from British Columbia in the
senior years and in the professional facilities. All University graduates now united with professional organizations and the governing bodies of the Presbyterian, Methodist and Baptist
churches in appeals to the Government to revive the earlier legislation for a provincial
institution The government of Sir Richard McBride yielded and, under the leadership of the
Minister of Education, Dr. Henry Esson Young, a graduate of Queen's University in Arts and
of McGill University in Medicine, two Bills were piloted through the Legislature: the University Endowment Act in 1907, and The University Act in 1908. These two pieces of legislation
were the foundation on which was built the University of British Columbia.
The government moved slowly in implementing these Bills. It was seven years after the
University Act was passed before the University was ready to begin work. In 1910 a Commission of distingushed Canadian educationists chose the Point Grey site, thus relieving the
Government of making a decision on the highly controversial issue which had wrecked the
first University Act. Convocation met in 1912, under the Chairmanship of the first Chancellor Point Grey, 1914
the Hon. Francis Carter-Cotton. The University architects sketched plans for the new buildings
in 1912. The Government appointed Dr. Frank Fairchild Wesbrook as President in 1913. The
Board of Governors called for tenders for the buildings in June, 1914; on the outbreak of war
in August, the tenders received were returned unopened. So it was that the University was
compelled to begin its work in the McGill College quarters at Fairview, destined to remain
its home until 1925.
The work of McGill in British Columbia paced U.B.C. to a flying start. In a letter to
Dr. Young, written at the end of the first day of lectures, September 30, 1915, President
Wesbrook wrote: "I think it is quite true that we have been more fortunate than any other
Canadian University. I do not recall any which started with as many students or with as
large a staff." McGill College in fact supplied most of the staff and more than half the
students for the first session. Subsequently, U.B.C. Chancellor the Honourable F. Carter-
Cotton, who had also been Chancellor of McGill College during its nine years, wrote to Sir
William Peterson, Principal of McGill:
The benefit our Province has derived from your connection with it, it would be impossible to
estimate. Many young people have received a University education for whom otherwise it
would have remained an unaccomplished dream. An interest in higher education has been fostered, not only in the young, but in our people generally, and our sense of unity with other
parts of the Dominion and with the Empire as a whole, and of the possession of common ideals
of citizenship and culture has been deepened.
For the purpose of this brief survey, the history of the University's active life since 1915
may be divided into four periods: (l) 1915-1925, At Fairview; (2) 1925-1939, Into and
Through the Depression; (3) 1939-1945, World War II; (4) 1945-1958, Expansion and the
New Era. Before I came here in 1944, the University had two Presidents: Frank
Fairchild Wesbrook, who died in office in October, 1918, and Leonard S. Klinck who succeeded
Wesbrook  in  July,   1919-   Up  till   1958   Convocation has elected five Chancellors:  the Hon. F. Carter-Cotton who retired in 1918; Dr. R. E. McKechnie, who died in office in 1944;
the Hon. E. W. Hamber; the Hon. Chief Justice Sherwood Lett "who succeeded Dr. Hamber
in 1951, and Dr. A. E. Grauer, elected in 1957.
The earliest years at Fairview were dominated by World War I, in which the University
took its full part. The spirit of our first President as he faced his difficult war-time task of
organizing a new institution is seen in the message which he wrote for publication in the
students' Annual (now known as the Totem) at the end of the 1915-16 Session:
We, the present Student-body, Staff, Senate, Board of Governors and members of Convocation
of this infant University may well be envied by those who have gone before and by those who
will come after. To us has come the opportunity of making our Province, our Dominion, our
Empire and our world, a better place in which to live. May those for whom we hold these gifts
in trust rise up and call us blessed. To meet in full our obligation, may ours be a Provincial
University without provincialism. May our sympathies be so broadened and our service so extended to all the people of the Province that we may indeed be the people's University, whose
motto is tuum est.
Inevitably the war dominated campus life. President Wesbrook himself commanded the
contingent of the Canadian Officers' Training Corps inherited from McGill College. A branch
of the Canadian Red Cross Society worked feverishly at its self-imposed task of preparing and
sending parcels to the students and faculty who were overseas. The student body was decimated
by enlistments for active service in local and in other units. The University provided the personnel of D Company, with strength of 300, in the 196th Western Universities Battalion, and
a reinforcing platoon of one officer and 50 other ranks. By the end of the war, enlistment
totals had risen to 697 members of the University and of McGill B.C.
Although a reasonably generous and broad-based curriculum was offered full-time
students in the Faculty of Arts and Science, budget shortages in the war years seriously curtailed development of the Faculties of Applied Science and Agriculture. Of the total of 109
who graduated in the three war-time congregations all but one were students in the Faculties
of Arts and Science. In 1917-18 it was found possible to enrol the first Freshman Class in
Agriculture. The first regularly-enrolled class to graduate- in Applied Science received their
B.A. Sc. degrees at the Fifth Congregation in 1920.
The most notable result of the University's poverty in its first decade was the lack of
suitable buildings and facilities both for work and play. The architects' grandiose plans for the
University buildings at Point Grey, approved in 1912, remained in the drawing board stage.
These plans were part of the lure which had brought the first President to the Province from
the Deanship of Medicine in the University of Minnesota, and from the day of his appointment until his death in October, 1918, Dr. Wesbrook laboured to effect the move to Point Grey.
President Klinck took up the struggle in 1919 and in the following year succeeded in persuading the Government to adopt a policy of action; the 2,000,000 acres of University Endowment
Lands were exchanged for 3,000 acres in Point Grey, and a bond issue of $3,000,000 was
planned. Two further years of inaction followed until in 1922 the students, now 1,200 in
number, embarked on their "Build the University" campaign which culminated in the presentation to the legislature of petitions bearing the names of 56,000 citizens supporting the
campaign. This strong evidence of public interest in the University, added to an almost
unanimous Provincial Press brought conviction to the Government, and they at once opened
negotiations with the President and Board of Governors for the construction of the Point Grey
Campus. Less than two years later, on September 22, 1925, lectures began in the new buildings, with a student enrolment of 1,453. Accommodation provided by the Government was
limited to a strict interpretation of the "practical" needs of the University. All the buildings
except the Library and Natural Science building were of temporary construction. There was no
gymnasium; there were two inadequate playing fields, built by the students' own labour; there
were no dormitories; and there was no social centre other than the basement cafeteria in the
Auditorium. But the prevailing sentiment of joy felt by the undergraduates who had experienced Fairview is shown in this editorial comment in the UBYSSEY extra number published
on September 23, 1925: "To those of us who began our academic careers in the catacombs at
Fairview, the sudden accession to a wealth of light and beauty is positively bewildering. We
are dazed with the appearance of architectural cleanliness and bewildered by our lineal
freedom."
The Fairview years, however, had witnessed important developments in academic life
and in other matters. In the post-war years, courses, both undergraduate and graduate, were
developed in all three Faculties. The first Nursing and Health degree work to be offered in
Canada was established in 1919. Honours courses made their appearance in 1920-21. A
Summer Session was introduced in 1920, a Teacher Training course in 1923, and a Department of Education in 1924. Victoria College, closed in 1915, was re-opened as an affiliate
of the University in 1920, offering two years work in the Faculty of Arts and Science. Until the
Session of 1920-21 students paid no tuition fees, but that year a fee of $40.00 was imposed on
all students. The work of the Extension Committee, which began in 1918, became, in 1920, a Chemistry Frame    Building Materialr
Erected 1914, By
lih   v. 1924   Agriculture,. Arts
Science, 2924 permanent feature of the University extra-mural service to the people of the Province.
The year 1925 was the 10th Anniversary of the beginning of lectures at Fairview.
Inaugural activities associated with the opening of the new buildings at Point Grey included
the publication of pamphlets describing the University courses of study, buildings and laboratories, and enumerating publications of the Faculty. At a special Congregation, held on
Friday, October 16, seven Honorary Degrees were conferred. Among the recipients were Dr.
H. E. Young, "Father of the University", Dr. J. D. MacLean, Minister of Finance and Education in the Provincial Cabinet, The Chancellor, Dr. R. E. McKechnie, and Sir Arthur Currie,
Principal of McGill, who, appropriately enough, delivered the Congregation address.
In 1928 and early 1929 the University seemed to be clear of its troubles. It was established at Point Grey; its facilities were sufficient for the student population of slightly more
than 1,500 and were being improved; and, as times were good and governments and the
public seemed at last to be more favourably disposed to the University, the prospect for steady
expansion was bright. Discussions were held with Members of the Cabinet; plans were drawn
by the University architects for two further wings to the Science Building, for the first unit
of a permanent Arts Building, and for semi - permanent accommodation for Forestry and
Home Economics. The Government grant for the academic year 1929-30 of $625,000 was, in
relation to the students served by it, probably the most generous that has ever been made to
the University.
But the effects of these favorable circumstances did not last. Even before the depression
came to undermine its economic prospects, the University's security and independence were
threatened by interference from a new Government. The details of the struggle over
University policy on research and finance, especially in Agriculture, a struggle which eventually led to a Senate motion of non-confidence in the President, have been told in Tuum Est.
The Commissioner appointed by the Government to enquire into the problems of the University, Judge Peter Lampman, concluded that all concerned had acted in good faith but that
there were too many governing bodies in the University.
The enquiry had barely cleared the air when the economic problems of the depression
led to another attack on the University. In 1932 an "independent non-partisan voluntary
committee" under the chairmanship of Mr. George Kidd, was asked "to investigate the finances
of British Columbia with a view to recommending economies to the Government."
The Kidd Committee predicted that the Government would not be able to continue its
grant to the University and implied that money might be better spent in sending students to
other universities. By the time the Government rejected the committee's recommendations, all
members of the University—previously divided on financial policy—united to support it against
this attack from outside.
But unity did not solve the economic problems, and in 1932-33 salaries were cut from 5 to
23%. The President offered to cut his own salary by a further 13%, but this offer was
declined by the Board. Even with salary cuts the vacancies in departmental staffs steadily increased; replacements were not made, and temporary staff members were not reappointed. A
considerable number of dismissals had to be made of men whom the University could ill spare. vwwvwm A fortunate few went to other universities; a few hung on, on the periphery of the University, as under-paid and over-worked Assistants; some taught in the high schools and some left
the academic profession altogether. For a few years all appointments on the University were
for one year only, and tenure could not be guaranteed. The Summer Session was severely
curtailed and most graduate courses were dropped.
After 1933, however, the operating budget of the University was gradually increased, and
its problems became not only financial but the much healthier ones that still face us; how to
expand the buildings, courses and facilities so as to satisfy the increasing demands of an
increasing student body. Just as the overcrowding became intolerable, World War II broke
out.
When Canada declared war on September 10, 1939, the University, along with the other
universities of Canada, found herself deeply immersed in the struggle. As it turned out, the
impact of the war on the University was quite different from that of World War I, which was,
in the main, an affair of fighting men. In this new, total war, not only was there need for men
trained to fight on land, on sea and in the air, but the Allied Nations were confronted by an
enemy equipped with every device of modern science. To meet the challenge of the Axis
Powers, more and more urgent demands were made upon the resources of science and technology. In a struggle for mastery and survival the universities assumed a new and vitally
important role. In his Annual Report for 1940-41, President Klinck described, in terms eloquent
and memorable for their brevity, the resolute spirit of the University in meeting the unusual
challenge:
The War has called many members of the Faculty away from the Campus. All the University can
do under the circumstances is to find substitutes wherever possible, and where this cannot be done
to place extra burdens on the remaining members of the Faculty in order that the quality of instruction may not suffer too seriously. Those who remain have volunteered, as far as in them
lies, to close up the ranks and do the best they can to maintain academic standards while giving
every possible assistance to other forms of war effort. From the day of the declaration of war,
the University has been prepared to put at the disposal of the Government all possible assistance
by way of laboratories, equipment and trained personnel, in so far as such action is consistent with
the maintenance of reasonably efficient instructional standards. To do less would be unthinkable.
At the outset neither staff nor students were quite sure what their role in the war effort
ought to be. The University's official policy evolved with the varying circumstances of the
war, and as the Federal Government's policy became clearer. The principal channels of communication between the University and Government with respect to academic as distinct from
military war work, were the National Conference of Canadian Universities and the National
Research Council. At the opening of the 1939 session, students were advised by the University—especially those in the sciences—to continue their studies, pending receipt of some
authoritative direction. The N.C.C.U. and the National Research Council soon issued a statement advising all students in scientific subjects to remain at their university work until graduation. Thus was avoided, to a large extent, one of the most costly happenings of World War I,
the premature sacrifice of highly-trained personnel  in the Armed Services.  In order  to
in facilitate co-operative research, and a common approach to auricular and other problems, a
War Services Advisory Board was set up by the universities of Canada to serve as a liaison
between themselves and the Federal Government.
Military training on the campus, regarded with indifference by the great majority of the
student body in peace time, suddenly became popular. Registration in the C.O.T.C. Contingent more than doubled—from 98 in the previous session to 219 in 1939-40. For the first time
graduates of accredited institutions were permitted to enlist in the contingent, as were also
teachers who desired training to become cadet-instructors in the schools. Approval was given
by Senate to allow students enrolled in the C.O.T.S. exemption from three regular course
units in lieu of three units to be awarded for success in C.O.T.C. qualifying examinations.
By intensifying the training schedule of lectures and parades, the Corps made it possible for its
members to sit for their examinations during their first instead of their second year of training,
as was formerly the rule. The innovation of granting academic credit for C.O.T.C. work was
abandoned in the second year of the war, by which time military training had been made
compulsory. Interest in the training provided by the Corps was increased as a result of instructions issued from National Defence Headquarters in June, 1940, requiring all units of
the Canadian Active Service Force and the newly-formed Non-Permanent Active Militia Units
to select at least half of their junior officers from among qualified C.O.T.C. cadets. Aided by
this regulation, nearly all the cadets who passed the qualifying examinations in this first year
of the war received appointments in one or other of the Armed Services.
With the great demands made on university staff and facilities during the war came
fresh recognition of their importance, and it is not accidental that it was during the war that
the first money from the Federal Government came to the universities. The money was earmarked for specific purposes, it is true—War Service Bursaries, 1940; National Selective
Service Bursaries, 1942; and various specified projects of research—but it was the beginning
of those Federal grants to universities which have been so important to us since.
In 1944, having served the University for a quarter of a century as President and for
an earlier five years as Dean of Agriculture, President Klinck retired. He had guided the
University through its infancy, through depression, and through war.
Our facilities at Point Grey had been woefully inadequate in 1939. By the end of the
war, faced with a sudden influx of veterans, they were so grossly inadequate that emergency
action had to be taken. The emergency action, or rather the whole series of emergency actions
—to find staff, institute new courses, open new faculties, perhaps most noticeably to find
buildings for teaching and accommodation—made the postwar years the most exciting in our
history. They were also the most exacting in the demands they made upon the abilities,
energies and stamina of the teaching and administrative staff. The Federal Government's open-
handed assistance in the education of discharged military personnel, the generous policy of
admissions adopted by the President and Board of Governors to reject no candidate who could
qualify for entrance, brought an influx of veteran students which taxed to the limit the already
overstrained resources of the University. The University was faced with many novel problems
in this period. Nothing but the intelligent planning and grim determination of all concerned, working as a team, could have achieved solutions. Looking back now, I remember many
moments when some people must have wondered whether or not we would survive the strains.
But I also remember with pride the unfailing courage with which the University, within the
short span of three years, accepted and provided degree work throughout a twelve-month session for three times as many undegraduates as it had been used to. The student
population rose from 2,974 in 1944-45 to 9,374 in 1947-48. Courses of lectures, lecturers and
facilties were found for them all. It should be remembered, too, that the entire cost of these
undertakings was met out of an annual operating budget, and that no provision was made
for building funds and no bond issues were made, as in business and industrial procedure, to
deal with new and necessary financing.
But every effort was made to meet the emergency. The Board of Governors gave me
"general authorization to take such emergency action, in consultation with the Chancellor and
others, as may be necessary in respect of staff, equipment and accommodation." There was no
time to wait for formal approval of the Board of Governors to secure lecture-room space
when hundreds of students were enrolling for whom no such facilities were in existence on
the campus. Plans for new buildings had been made during the last two years of the war
but the most advanced of these were still in the blue-print stage when the tidal-wave of
veterans arrived.
In the session 1944-45, the registration was 2,974 (of whom 150 were ex-service personnel) ; in 1945-46, registration more than doubled with 2,254 veterans in a total student body of
6,632. A conflict of priorities at once arose between the urgent need for classrooms and for
student housing. Surplus Army and Air Force camps supplied both needs. Fifteen complete
camps were taken over by the University in the course of the 1945-46 session alone. Twelve
of these camps were dismantled; their huts were brought to the campus on trucks and there
erected and equipped as lecture rooms and laboratories; the remaining three were adapted for
living quarters, one each in Acadia and Fort Camps, the third on Lulu Island. Still another
camp, situated on Little Mountain, in Vancouver, was converted into suites for married
students.
Registration continued to mount. In the Summer Session of 1946, there were 2,398
students as compared with 861 in the previous summer. A special short Winter Session from
January to April in 1946 had 1,098 registered students. In the regular Winter Session of
1946-47, the numbers rose to 8,741 and reached their highest point of 9,374 in the following
year. Gradually from this summit registration subsided: in 1948-49, it was 8,810; in 1949-50,
7,572; in 1950-51, 6,432. In the process of settling back to what might be considered, from
past experience, to be a normal student population, an unexpected feature made its appearance in the remarkable increase in non-veteran registrants. In 1946-47, the veterans numbered
4,796 and composed 53.4% of the entire student body. Even so, the remaining 46.6%,
numbering 4,239, showed an increase of nearly 1,000 non-veteran students over the numbers
of the previous year. In 1947-48, the total of non-veterans rose to 4,917 or 53% of the
student body in the year of maximum registration. At this point, we felt safe in estimating
that the normal enrolment of the next ten years, when the educational needs of ex-servicemen
12 had been met, would be 5,000 to 6,000 students. In the next year, 1948-49, these predictions
began to appear to have been too conservative; registration of non-veteran students numbered
5,580, or more than double the total registration (2,476) ten years earlier. The number has
never since been below 5,000. Registration of veteran students dropped sharply at the rate of
1,000 a year from their maximum number of 4,796, in 1946-47, to 336 in 1951-52 in a total
student body of 5,548. In the following year the low point of post-war registration was
reached, numbering 5,355. From this date the number of undergraduates has increased each
year, at a slow rate to begin with, more recently with almost alarming acceleration, until
today, five years later, the registration for the session of 1957-58 has reached 8,986, less than
400 short of the highest post-war registration, in 1947-48. This increase in student registration
is to be ascribed to the rise in the birth-rate and to the greatly increased immigration into the
Province, to a high level of prosperity, and to the growing demand for university education.
Moreover, the growing reputation of the University increasingly brings students from abroad.
The years since the veterans left us have been a time of steady expansion. They are close
in memory, however, and I do not intend to repeat the details of our development. They are
easily available in my Reports and in Tuum Est. The campus changed radically between 1947
and 1951 with the erection of twenty new permanent buildings. Since 1955, when the Provincial Government announced a grant of $10,000,000 for buildings, and since we have begun
to receive Federal Government grants on a large scale, it has begun an even more extensive
change. As the funds from the Development Campaign become available, we shall be able
to implement the new Development Plan. It is trite to say that buildings do not make a
university, but we must remember that they are very necessary. As a list of buildings makes
tedious reading, I have included in this Report many photographs showing the development
of the campus. To appreciate the growth of the University, however, each building must be
peopled by the imagination with the many students who have spent four or five years in it.
Fortunately, my very brief history can have no tidy conclusion. Neat summaries of the
history of an institution can be made only when it is static—or dead. The University of British
Columbia is very much alive and I hope it will continue to develop as it has done in the past.
Mechanical
Engineering,  1925 THE SUMMER SESSION
When we talk about the University, we tend to think only of the Winter Session and to
forget that our Summer Session now attracts more courses than many a regular session elsewhere, more students indeed than our own Winter Session enrolled until 1945. This year, for
example, 3,947 students attended Summer Session.
The first Summer Session, in 1920, was planned so that the men and women who had
returned from the First World War might more quickly complete their postponed or interrupted education. Since then, however. Summer Session has been held annually and has
become a regular and integral part of both university life and the educational plans of many
of our students, particularly of our teachers.
Summer Session has developed until it now offers three distinct but interrelated kinds of
education. First, it provides a comprehensive academic programme of courses in the Faculty
,y
v
■i&*s . -•-"**•■«    .     "
Auditorium, 1925
14 Union College, 1929
Anglican College, 1921
of Arts and Science. This year courses were given by 26 departments including Anthropology,
Chemistry, Classics, English (12 classes with 979 students), French, German, History,
Mathematics, Philosophy, Russian, Sociology and Spanish. Secondly, it offers almost as many
courses in the professional faculties of Education and Commerce. The Arts courses and the
professional courses complement one another. Three quarters of our Summer Session students
are teachers. They are required to take both Arts and professional courses to complete, the
teacher education required by all teachers in British Columbia. Summer Session is now an
important and necessary part of the Province's organization for training teachers.
The third main service of Summer Session is the Summer School of the Arts. Begun in
1938 by the Department of University Extension as part of its adult education programme,
it has developed into a full-fledged summer school in theatre, music, creative writing, the
visual arts, and many arts and crafts. This year saw the founding of the Vancouver International Festival and the twenty-first anniversary of the first summer courses in the arts. We
believe that our Summer School did much to prepare the way for the Festival, and we hope
that the two will work together, enriching one another, in the future as they did this year.
is Brock Hall, 1940   Armoury, 1943
wp??!
THE DEVELOPMENT FUND
Presidents of universities are famous, perhaps notorious, for the pride they take in their
fund-raising activities, particularly in the funds they raise, but I must risk charges of ingenuousness and report the overwhelming success of our appeal to the industry and public of
British Columbia. If one accept's the cynic's doctrine that the worth of an institution is
measured by what people will give to it, we can justly claim that the value of the University
has been firmly endorsed by the Province and by Canada. We have come a very long way
indeed from the time when it was argued whatever money a University would cost, it would
be better spent sending students elsewhere and from the time when it was seriously advocated
that the University be closed.
The campaign opened in September, 1957, after the Premier, the Honourable W. A. C.
Bennett, had announced that the Provincial Government would match all funds contributed by
industry and by the public up to $5,000,000. When its active phase ended in April, 1958,
nearly $8,500,000 had been subscribed by more than 29,000 contributors, and the Government had increased the amount that it would match first to $7,500,000 and then to
$10,000,000. We fully expect that during the next year or eighteen months, we shall be able
to more than meet this offer of the Government.
The campaign was led by a committee under the honorary chairmanship of Dr. A. E.
Grauer, Mr. Paul E. Cooper was general chairman, and Aubrey F. Roberts was appointed the
Director of the Fund. Many leading citizens of the Province accepted positions of responsibility in this campaign. Among them were Howard N. Walters, D.C.M., Gordon Farrell, H. R.
MacMillan, C.B.E., Alan H. Williamson, O.B.E., Douglas M. Stewart, Harold S. Foley,
K.S.G., Harold Moorhead, C. W. Jaggs, Ronald S. Ritchie, Hon. Sherwood Lett, C.B.E.,
D.S.O, Frank H. Brown, C.B.E., Walter C. Koerner, Ralph D. Perry, Reginald G. Miller,
16 J. L. Trumbull, C.B.E., Hon. R. W. Mayhew, P.C., G. Fitzpatrick Dunn, Arthur C. Law, Robert
R. Keay, Mrs. James A. Campbell, Mrs. B. M. Hoffmeister, L. C. E. Lawrence, John M.
Buchanan, Mark Collins, W. Thomas Brown, Darrell T. Braidwood, Stuart Keate, Dr. W. C.
Gibson, W. Orson Banfield, Arthur W. Moscarella, Alan E. Jessup, A. F. McAlpine, Peter J.
Sharp and Ronald W. Pearson.
Many others served as group chairmen, team captains and canvassers. To all who gave
so freely of their time and knowledge, I extend the sincere thanks of the University. They
knew how important the campaign was to us and to the Province, and they made its success
possible.
Campaign headquarters were established in the B.C. Electric Building, and weekly meetings of the campaign committee were held under the chairmanship of Mr. Cooper.
It would be invidious to single out any particular personal gifts. Some were magnificent, but all were received gratefully. The B.C. Personal Gifts Division, in fact, led the
campaign with nearly $2,750,000 from more than 4,000 donors. B.C. Corporations Division
was a close second with nearly $2,500,000 from some 1,500 donors. One hundred and thirty
national corporations contributed more than $1,700,000, and twenty-four national personal gifts
totalled $80,000.
The performance of students and alumni was outstanding. The students set the tone for
the campaign by assessing themselves $5 per capita annually for three years, for a total of
$150,000. This, added to the $300,000 they had pledged for the new wing to the Brock, made
their contribution nearly half a million.
In addition, the students organized a one-night blitz of Vancouver in which they collected
$45,095 from 8,000 citizens. Nearly 1,700 students participated, calling on as many Vancouver homes as possible. The reception they received was most encouraging, and many
expressions of friendship to U.B.C. were reported.
The Alumni Association undertook to canvass every graduate of U.B.C, and organized
committees in all communities of British Columbia and many of the larger cities in Canada
and the United States. The result was a most heartening increase in alumni activity. Alumni
provided the leadership for local campaigns in many communities of British Columbia, and
the success of these proved that U.B.C. has many friends in all parts of the Province.
The faculty and staff also responded enthusiastically to the appeal. Alumni and faculty
giving reached a total of $450,000 from 6,500 donors.
Special gifts from the B.C. Cancer Society, B.C. Medical Research Council, City of Vancouver ($100,000), International Hbuse, sponsored by the Rotary Club, and many other clubs
and organizations totalled more than $600,000.
May I record here our deepest thanks to the citizens of British Columbia who demonstrated such a lively and practical interest in the University, to our alumni all over the world
who gave enthusiastic support and leadership, and to all others who contributed to the success
of the campaign.
17 ■-} 21. Dentistry Block
■I   22. Medical Sciences Block _"E
23. Pharmacy Addition- -V
r; 24. Multi-Purpose Classroom Block.'
25. Biological Science Addition      '
26. Convocation Building
'.... 27. Future Residences
E. 28. Science Service Laboratory  "—
;: 29. Fisheries Technological Station
30. Forestry & Agriculture;--   :- -
~; 31. Engineering Addition
33. Residences — - ;~. -
34. International House     "" "
35. Commerce Building     -j'E"
36. Administration Building '":■•-
37. Cafeteria
38. Education Building^E" E -'
39. Fine Arts & Architecture. --
40. Faculty Club .    " "
41. Library Addition-'-E^'"1-""
42. Chemistry Addition    ..-—".
43. St. Mark's College    *
,".'":? 32- Forest Products Laboratory*-*^--;r    44. Gymnasium Addition----- A DEVELOPMENT PLAN
By 1957 it was certain that the University must prepare for a further major expansion.
Quite apart from any social or political changes that might lead a higher proportion of our
young people into higher education, the increased immigration and the higher birth-rate
indicated that the University would double its enrolment in a very few years. Already the
population on campus is about the same as that of the City of Kamloops. The 12,000 students
we expect in 1961 will be equivalent to the population of Nanaimo.
It was obvious that very careful planning of the development of the campus was necessary
if we were to meet the demands we expected and if we were not to make mistakes that would
be difficult to amend. We are extraordinarily fortunate in that the foresight of early governments and educators provided us with room to expand, but even in our fortunate position, the
land is not unlimited and there are practical limits to how far people can be expected to walk
from one building to another between lectures. Moreover, Point Grey does involve some particular difficulties of access. Situated on the point of a peninsula at some distance from the
centre of the city, it will always be uneconomic as a terminus of a normal transit system. A
high proportion of students will normally travel to and from the University by car, and we
may expect the proportion that does to increase. And the number of cars will increase
relatively as well as absolutely.
Physics, 1945
20 With these and other difficulties in mind, the Board of Governors appointed a planning
committee and asked it in consultation with the University architects, Messrs. Thompson,
Berwick and Pratt, to prepare a development plan for the campus. This would give us general
guidance in the planning of our campus.
The committee and architects prepared the development plan in three stages. First they
studied probable enrolment for the next fifteen years, together with estimates of the needs of
all academic and non-academic departments on campus. Secondly, on the basis of these estimates, they prepared a development plan, comprising a model of the campus, maps and
drawings. Thirdly, they made a detailed study of the problems of services, such as heat, light,
power, sewerage and landscaping.
Specifically, the first stage was concerned with three questions:
1—How much building space and land will U.B.C. as a whole and each individual
department need by 1971-72? (This year was selected as the long range "target date", because
it is possible to forsee major developments within the next fifteen years. Many of our freshmen for 1971 are already in school).
2—How much building space will U.B.C. as a whole and each individual department need
by 1966-67- (This year was chosen to fit in with the University's current ten year building
programme).
3—What is the best location on campus for each department, considering the interrelationships between departments and the necessity for students and faculty to move from one
lecture room to another?
Wesbrook Building, 1949
Biological Science
& Pharmacy, 1948
21 ngineering Building, 1947
22 Home Economics, 1949
The size, type and location of future buildings on campus will be determined largely by
the number and distribution of students among the various departments and by the future
policies of the University on such matters as student-faculty ratios, teaching methods, and the
development of new studies or the expansion of existing ones. After enrolment had been
predicted from birth statistics and present educational trends, future policies were discussed
with heads of departments, deans and various University committees. Estimates of future
building needs were also made by applying the space standards developed by the University
of California for its Berkeley campus.
These estimates of future enrolment and other developments made it clear that by
1971-72, the complete campus area of 1,000 acres would be fully used. After careful consideration of enrolment, existing buildings and the problems of parking, certain broad principles were established. The academic or inner campus should be contained within an area
bounded by Marine Drive, Wesbrook Crescent and Agronomy Road. The professional schools
should be on the outer fringe. Surrounding or adjacent to the fringe should be a number of
parking areas served by a peripheral road system. The area to the south of the main teaching
campus should be developed for student residences, government or private research laboratories, playing fields, agriculture, botanical gardens and forestry.
For the second stage of the development plan, the preparation of a physical development
plan, the committee and architects decided that, with the exception of some of the agricultural
buildings, all the buildings of "permanent" construction should remain indefinitely, and
virtually all of them should continue to serve their present purpose. All "temporary" and
several "semi-permanent" buildings should be removed and replaced by permanent buildings
by 1971-72. The teaching campus will require 215 acres, as follows:
Theological Area  25 acres
Medical Area  40 acres
Other Teaching Groups  95 acres
Related Non-Academic Buildings 40 acres
Faculty Parking   15 acres
23 Several existing campus roads will be given over entirely to pedestrian traffic, and new
roads and parking areas will be developed. In this way we shall create a "walking campus"
with the majority of academic buildings within an area half a mile in diameter. By separating
pedestrian and vehicular traffic as much as possible, we can speed up the movement of both,
and we shall be able to create an architecturally unified campus that would not be possible if
there were busy traffic routes and parking lots separating the buildings.
The third stage of the plan, the planning of individual buildings and services, will
require continuing study and consideration as the University expands, and it is in process
now. Specialist consultants in overall planning, landscaping, services, medical buildings, etc.,
are at present preparing reports on their studies of the details of the development plan. New
circumstances, doubtless, will force us to make changes in the plan as we now have it, but I
think that we can say that we shall be able to work within a plan conceived in the light of
intensive study of the problems involved and one which will give us even more reason to be
proud of the campus. We have been blessed with a magnificent site. We are determined to
try to make the campus worthy of it.
Memorial Gymnasium,
1949
24 OBITUARIES
I record with sorrow the deaths of the following members of staff during the year, and
on behalf of their colleagues I acknowledge the Universities debt for devoted services.
Mr. William B. Coulthard Professor, Electrical Engineering.
July 31, 1958.
Dr. B. M. Cwilong Associate Professor, Physics, 1950-53.
March, 1958.
Dr. A. E. Hennings Emeritus Professor of Physics.
January 13, 1958.
Dr. Lavell H. Leeson Clinical Associate Professor, Surgery.
June 29, 1957.
Dr. William H. Perry Part-time Assistant Professor, Medicine.
December 25, 1957.
Dr. George F. Strong Clinical Professor, Medicine.
February 26, 1957.
Dr. Otis J. Todd Professor Emeritus of Classics.
January 16, 1957.
OFFICIAL OCCASIONS
The University celebrated its Jubilee in the traditional manner by conferring honorary
degrees at the Fall and Spring Congregations and at four Special Congregations.
At the Fall Congregation, in October, 1957, honorary degrees were conferred upon:
John Villiers Fisher LL.D.
Harold Scanlon Foley LL.D.
Leon Joseph Koerner LL.D.
William Archibald Mackintosh LL.D.
William George Murrin LL.D.
James Stewart LL.D.
At the Spring Congregation in May, 1958,honorary degrees were conferred upon:
Joieph Badenoch Clearihue LL.D.
Walter Henry Gage LL.D.
Albert Edward Grauer LL.D.
Francis Renault Joubin D.Sc.
Evelyn Story Lett LL.D. Arthur Edward Lord LL.D.
Ralph Carr Pybus LL.D.
John Ewart Wallace Sterling LL.D.
Charles Joseph Thompson LL.D.
At a special Congregation in May, 1958, the degree of Doctor of Laws was conferred
upon His Royal Highness the Prince of the Netherlands (Prince Bernhard).
At a Special Congregation in July, 1958, before an audience of more than 5,000 guests,
the degree of Doctor of Laws was conferred upon Her Royal Highness the Princess Margaret.
In accepting the degree, Her Highness said:
Mr. Chancellor: I was deeply touched by the very kind way in which you have welcomed me. I was also greatly moved, Mr. President, by the generous citation which you
delivered, and in which you so thoughtfully referred to my being president of the
University College of North Staffordshire.
Despite its youth, my university maintains and guards its privileges with the same
determined spirit which marks older institutions. This vigilance is all the more evident
when a university makes use of its most cherished privilege, the right to grant degrees.
And so I am keenly aware that the highest honor a university can bestow upon any
person is admission to the degree which you have just now conferred upon me. For this
distinction and for the right to include myself among your convocation, I thank you
most sincerely.
The distinction of now being so closely associated with the University of British
Columbia is very welcome to me because it means membership in a community which
has contributed greatly to the development, not only of this province, but also of the
whole of Canada.
In the past two weeks, I have been made very conscious of your influence upon
those who live and work in this prosperous and beautiful land. All parts of the community—the professions, industry, and business—depend on your graduates for the
learning and responsibility which they acquire here.
I have come to take part in some of the celebrations marking the hundredth anniversary of this province. It is indeed an occasion to give thanks for those who have
helped to build this province, to those who have struggled to realize its tremendous
material potentialities, and to those who have sustained its high cultural and spiritual
achievements. But it is also an occasion to consider the future, to lay plans for further
progress, to seek yet higher goals.
For the past 50 years, your university has been a partner in the development of this
province. It is altogether fitting that you should join in these centennial celebrations, for
your institution has shown itself a true adventurer, worthy of standing beside those
bold travellers and hardy colonists who first discovered and then transformed this
country.
But as British Columbia looks to the future, so must her university. Everyone here
has a vision of what this province will become,  and expects  from its university the
26 Law, 1950
wisdom and enterprise which will make this dream a reality. I am confident that the
foresight shown by your founders, which has been so amply justified, will be matched
by your future achievement.
Mr. Chancellor, to be given an honorary degree from a university so energetic and
upright in its youth and which now enters its middle years fortified by these same qualities, is a responsibility I gladly accept, and an honour I shall always cherish.
In September,  1958, two Special Congregations were held in conjunction with An
Academic Symposium to commemorate the Centenary of the Province, The Golden Jubilee
of the University, and the Opening of the Buchanan Building. At the first Congregation,
honorary degrees were conferred upon:
W. C. Costin LL.D.
Harold W. Dodds LL.D.
Sir Hector Hetherington LL.D.
D. W. Logan LL.D.
The Right Reverend Monsignor Irenee Lussier LL.D.
T. H. Mathews LL.D.
R. G. Sproul LL.D.
At the second Congregation, honorary degrees were conferred upon:
The Honorable Frank M. Ross LL.D.
The Right Honourable John G. Diefenbaker LL.D.
The Honourable W. A. C. Bennett LL.D.
The Honourable Lester B. Pearson LL.D.
The Honourable Brooke Claxton LL.D.
M. J. Coldwell LL.D.
The general theme of the Academic Symposium was The Scholar, The University, and
the World Community. Professor Roy Daniells, Head of our Department of English, gave the
first address, and on succeeding days addresses were given by the Right Reverend Monsignor
Irenee Lussier, Dr. W. C. Costin, Sir Hector Hetherington, and Dr. Rhys Carpenter. These
addresses will be published by the University in the near future.
The Buchanan Building was formally opened by the Honourable W. A. C. Bennett.
27 Mm Bolleii Halt, 191o    ^r^
18 Memorial Gymnasium
Pool, 19H
29 St. Andrew's Hall, 1958
30  Buchanan Building.
32 Thtr Future
33 SUMMARY OF REVENUE    AND EXPENDITURE
(Excluding Capital Additions to  Endowment,  Student Loan     and   Capital Developement Funds) April 1, 1957 to March 31, 1958
REVENUE
General Funds
%
Teaching
and
General
Purposes
%
Government of Canada Grants
Province of British Columbia Grants
United States Government
Student Fees
$ 1,363,868.54
3,936,329.63
2,441253.26
17.0
49.1
30.5
$ 19,332.62
21,250.96
4.6
5.0
Gifts and Grants (Commerce, Industry, Associations
Foundations and Individuals)
Miscellaneous
268,680.61
$8,010,132.04
3.4
100.0
372,438.96
11,945.01
$ 424,967.55
87.6
2.3
100.0
EXPENDITURE
Academic Faculties and Departments and
Associated Academic Services
Administration
Service Departments and Maintenance
$ 5,736,362.72
451,396.65
1,365,280.07
716
5.6
17.1
$ 392,726.30
92.4
General Expenses
Fellowship, Scholarship, Prizes and Bursaries
Research
Miscellaneous
160,357.82
62,618.00
25,870.24
75,717.46
2.0
.8
.3
.9
5,440.35
151.20
1.3
1.0
Buildings, Equipment and Campus Development
Non-Endowment Funds carried forward to meet
expenditures in 1958-59
Endowment Fund Income carried forward to 1958-59
$ 7,877,602.96
$ 132,529.08
$8,010,132.04
98.3
1.7
100.0
$398,317.85
26,649.70
$ 424,967.55
93.7
6.3
100.0
Trust Funds
Total
%
Non-Endowment
Fellowships,
Scholarships
Prizes and
Bursaries
%
Research
%
Endowment
%
$7,200.00
100.00
3.1
.0
$ 738,376.86
36,216.68
70,650.77
66.7
3.3
6.4
-     -
-
$2,128,778.02
3,993,897.27
70,650.77
2,441,253.26
21.7
40.7
.7
24.9
225,201.85
2,133.99
$ 234,635.84
96.0
.9
100.0
260,363.98
1,347.00
$ 1,106,955.29
23.5
.1
100.0
35,655.65
$ 35,655.65
100.0
100.0
858,004.79
319,762.26
$9,812,346.37
8.7
3.3
100.0
-    -
-
_    _
-
$2,241.52
6.3
$6,131,330.54
451,396.65
1,365,280.07
62.5
4.6
13.9
230,949.25
98.4
1,077,466.32
97.3
19,554.23
54.8
165,798.17
313,272.68
1,103,336.56
75,717.46
1.7
3.2
11.2
.8
$ 230,949.25
3,686.59
$234,635.84
98.4
1.6
100.0
$ 1,077,466.32
29,488.97
$ 1,106,955.29
97.3
2.7
100.0
$21,795.75
13,859.90
$ 35,655.65
61.1
38.9
100.0
$9,606,132.13
$ 132,529.08
59,825.26
13,859.90
$9,812,346.37
97.9
1.4
6
.1
100.0
34
35 University of British Columbia
DEGREES CONFERRED 1934-1958
YEAR
Ph. 0.
M. A.
B. A.
M. Com.
B. Com.
B. Ed.
M. Ed.
M. Sc.
M. A. Sc.
B. H. E.
B. A. Sc.
B. Arch.
1934 SPRING
,yj4 FALL
-•
11
6
204
36
-
31
5
-
-
-
3
1
-
37
5
-
,9„ SPRING
lyjs FALL
:
14
12
196
45
-
23
5
-
-
-
8
-
57
5
-
,9,, SPRING
1936 FAU
_
15
10
175
38
-
21
1
-
-
-
6
2
-
50
3
-
19,7 SPRING
lyj/ FALL
.:
21
9
190
54
-
28
8
-
-
-
4
-
48
6
-
,0,a SPRING
1938 fALL
-
20
10
204
53
-
31
3
-
-
-
6
2
-
56
4
-
1Q,9 SPRING
lyjy FALL
„
19
5
217
63
—
22
6
-
-
-
7
-
71
9
-
,940 SPRING
ly4U FALL
-
30
6
212
62
„
37
1
_
-
-
4
-
71
1
:
10,, SPRING
,y41 FALL
—
21
8
189
73
_
26
9
:
„
-
7
1
-
81
-
10,, SPRING
ly4/ FALL
—
14
12
170
51
-
52
1
3
-
-
9
-
82
2
-
1Q/(, SPRING
ly4JFALL
:
13
8
167
51
-
31
1
2
3
-
-
3
-
92
1
—
,944 SPRING
ly44 FALL
-
6
1
163
45
"
37
4
1
7
-
-
7
-
87
1
:
,945 SPRING
ly43 FALL
—
10
5
189
41
-
43
4
4
8
-
-
4
-
97
3
-.
194* SPRING
1946 FALL
-
12
12
220
96
-
54
56
9
19
-
-
2
10
15
112
5
-
,947 SPRING
,y4/ FALL
:
25
11
385
151
-
151
78
15
32
-
-
14
7
28
6
131
4
-
10-fl SPRING
1948 FALL
-
33
20
599
192
-
208
64
21
4\
-
-
6
6
39
6
170
6
-
,949 SPRING
ly4y FALL
_
36
25
698
197
-
190
51
14
46
-
-
12
10
48
6
326
11
-
,950 SPRING
lyou FALL
2
2
38
29
584
199
-
129
20
14
29
-
-
7
5
43
7
480
17
3
2
10c, SPRING
1501 FALL
2
52
24
451
169
-
62
13
10
18
-
-
13
13
45
5
324
23
16
1
101.9 SPRING
ly3/ FALL
3
2
29
14
380
146
-
60
10
5
30
-
2
8
5
26
7
205
12
17
2
io>,'5 SPRING
tyoj fAU
3
8
22
12
329
124
1
72
6
10
41
-
15
8
3
3
29
4
129
17
12
1
,954 SPRING
ly°4 FALL
3
1
22
8
294
113
:
74
9
12
36
-
10
7
4
1
27
4
109
21
7
1
,95c SPRING
,yss  FALL
5
10
14
10
294
104
M. B. A.
1
85
7
29
62
-
10
9
3
6
27
4
117
15
14
19s, SPRING
1956 FALL
12
7
22
17
299
116
1
96
9
36
84
-
11
10
10
5
35
4
132
19
8
,9„ SPRING
,y3/ FALL
4
7
15
9
318
119
1
102 -< 5
10 L
j:
103 V
5 48
1
: 10
151
> 7
E 25
3 92
> 14
E 29
10
8
4
20
159
3
14
2
3
12
1958 SPRING
8
26
225
-
3
18
12
32
B
177
Sc.
70
7
M. F.
B. S. F.
B. A. Sc.
B. S. W.
M. S. A.
M. S. W.
B. S. A.
B. S. P.
B. P. E.
M. D.
LL. B.
Total
Grand
Total
-
-
Nun.
5
-
4
1
-
12
3
-
-
-
-
307
57
3583
3640
-
-
13
-
2
-
19
1
-
-
-
-
332
68
3972
4040
-
-
7
-
5
3
-
16
2
-
-
-
-
295
59
4335
4394
-
-
2
1
-
7
1
-
14
1
-
-
-
-
314
80
4708
4788
:
:
7
-
3
-
19
5
-
-
-
-
346
77
5134
5211
-
:
8
-
4
1
-
22
2
-
-
-
-
370
86
5581
5667
-
-
13
-
3
1
-
18
3
-
;
-
-
388
74
6055
6129
-
1
8
-
2
3
-
19
-
-
-
-
354
94
6483
6577
-
3
6
-
2
2
-
26
5
-
-
-
..:
364
76
6941
7017
_
2
12
-
3
1
-
25
4
-
-
-
-
350
69
7367
7436
:
3
1
9
1
-
1
-
24
3
-
-
-
-
338
63
7774
7837
:
3
8
-
2
1
-
19
5
-
-
-
-
375
71
8212
8283
:
12
1
19
2
37
1
1
4
-
32
4
-  .
-
-
-
525
209
8808
9017
-
9
1
16
56
1
11
2
8
52
4
-
-
-
-
893
305
9910
10215
-
15
1
14
4
56
4
7
3
4
91
9
-
-
-
59
4
1318
364
11535
11899
-
41
14
3
69
19
5
4
6
11
134
13
47
1
31
7
-
101
26
1772
430
13671
14101
-
76
2
16
58
29
7
7
11
8
124
9
64
3
21
7
-
125
21
1802
396
15903
16299
-
67
2
B. S. N.
9
2
54
25
10
3
7
18
58
11
62
3
30
7
-
90
20
1360
359
17659
18018
i
27
2
15
3
46
8
8
6
5
19
54
13
36
4
12
7
-
100
21
1037
313
19055
19368
1
22
1
7
1
46
3
1
8
3
10
51
11
43
4
15
3
_
60
2
873
268
20241
20509
4
14
7
4
47
1
9
1
1
30
34
6
37
1
16
7
54
2
68
853
253
21362
21615
3
19
1
18
11
46
4
3
8
20
5
30
4
31
6
10
6
56
2
70
4
905
278
22520
22798
1
20
3
21
39
5
1
18
2
25
7
38
2
19
7
60
58
945
314
23743
24057
1
2
25
32
37
6
2
17
2
18
4
34
5
19
3
48
2
52
967
404
25024
25428
3
18
1. S. F.
Sopron
28
35
4
r
8
28
36
14
45
72
1107
26535
■fr   G - Graduate; S - Secondary) E - Elementary
36
37 University of British Columbia
registration by faculty
09
Session
Arts
&   Sc.
Ap.  Sc.
Nursing
Agric.
Law
Soc.
Work
T. T.
Course Pharm.
Com
Arch.
Forestry
Med.
Grad.
Studies
Total
Winter
Session
Summer
Session
Short
Courses
Corres:
Ext. Sess:
Bot. Even
Grand
Total
1933-34
1147
287
48
63
—
61
—
—
—
—
—
1606
370
124
2100
1934-35
1238
320
57
71
—
66
—
—
—
—
—
1652
377
165
2294
1935-36
1337
336
68
80
—
—
62
—
—
—
—
—
1883
464
278
2625
1936-37
1499
366
47
95
—
—
42
—
—
—
—
' —
2049
566
306
2921
1937-38
1560
416
50
100
—
—
67
—
—
—
—
—
2223
650
279
3152
1938-39
1634
419
59
117
—
—
57
—
—
—
—
—
2286
659
290
3235
1939-40
1664
434
65
139
—
—
69
—
—
—
—
—
2371
715
253
3339
1940-41
1724
466
60
166
—
—
71
—
—
—
—
—
2487
587
206
3280
1941-42
1763
488
63
155
—
—
68
—
—
—
—
2537
457
184
3178
1942-43
1744
522
98
140
—
—
34
—
—
—
—
—
2538
329
98
2965
1943-44
1709
515
67
113
—
—
26
—
—
—
—
—
2430
441
131
3002
1944-45
2098
546
112
147
—
51
20
—
—
—
—
—
2974
861
113
3948)
Special Spring Session — Ex-Service Personnel	
278)
4226
1945-46
4814
1083
128
406
87
67
47
—
—
—
—
—
6632
2368
151
9151)
Special Spring Session — Ex-Service Personnel	
2014)
11,165
1946-47
5666
2003
141
552
240
93
46
—
—
—
—
—
8741
1781
294
10,816
1947-48
5750
2115
112
546
409
105
70
—
—
—
—
—
9374
1626
209
11,189
1948-49
5172
2008
100
507
473
135
145
—
—
—
—
—
8810
1430
282
10,252
1949-50
4028
1676
103
379
446
173
215
188
—
—
—
364
7572
1075
326
8973
1950-51
3604
1028
92
286
325
142
213
166
—
142
60
374
6432
1098
430
7960
1951-52
3261
812
102
235
264
117
146
135
—
85
120
271
5548
976
418
6942
1952-53
3205
667
101
193
238
89
113
134
78
91
176
270
5355
958
387
6700
1953-54
3254
726
133
158
226
95
100
131
79
93
232
273
5500
1040
644
7184
1954-55
2754
793
165
143
197
108
113
139
82
96
231
325
5914
1161
('54)
713
7798
1955-56
3860
904
177
163
212
84
120
136
91
111
222
323
6403
1420
('55)
1038
8861
1956-57
3555
1032
216
153
231
77
905
142
572
94
129
209
384
7699
1810
('56)
1649
11,158
1957-58
4150
1157
243
165
248
76
1125
119
605
100
328
(Incl.
Sopron)
213
457
8986
3507
('57)
2406
14,899 EDUCATIONAL LEVEL OF STUDENTS ADMITTED FOR THE
FIRST TIME IN 1957
University Entrance Standing
British Columbia   .
Saskatchewan	
Manitoba ..	
Ontario   	
••>•••••**•#••
•  •»•»••
•  ••»•*
•  *  •  *  «
• •*••••••••*•
*  #  •  •
•      »      9      *
•      •      •      •      ♦
•      •      •      #      *
Yukon Territory and Northwest Territories
« • • •
• *•••*•
*••••#•*
*••**••
• ••«••
• ••••■
• •••••
• ••*•••
• *••••
• # • • •
• ••*»••
• ***•••
• •*•••
• ••••••
• » » •
Senior Matriculation (Grade XIII, B.C.)
British Columbia—full   ....
British Columbia—partial  ..
./xiDeria   .......
Saskatchewan   ..
Manitoba	
v^nxano   .......
New Brunswick .
Nova Scotia ....
Prince Edward Island	
jLNon-v«>anaciian	
One Year Victoria College ........
Two Years Victoria College 	
Undergraduate above Senior Matriculation ....
Graduate	
Non-Matriculation	
•  §••••
•  •  •   •
•  •  •  •
*.*»*•»#
•  •*••*
•  «**•••
•  ••••*
•  • •  #  »
•  t  •  •  •
•  •  *  •  •
•  •  «  #  •
*  •   •  •
•  *  #» »
•/ •  •  •
*•••••
•  •••••
•  • •  •  •
•  *•<§••
«*«•••
•  •  »  •
•  •   •  *
»  # #  »
* «•  •  •
1718
33
15
8
20
5
3
142
•  »  •  •  *
»  •  •
»  »  »  »  «
• t  •  •  •
»  »  *  *  #
«  •  •  *  »
•  •   • •  •
•  » •  •
345
209
45
29
16
33
3
2
78
63
50
119
220
15
\
SUMMARY
University Entrance Level	
Senior Matriculation Level	
Above Senior Matriculation Level ........
Non-Matriculation
• •••*•••••••
•     ••• Jm L. ^/ ^
»     •     »     • V^ ■*■>   /
389
•     »•••••»•»••
•     #•••*•••••••••••#•
15
39 RELIGIOUS DENOMINATIONS 1957 -1958
Adventists - Seventh Day   14
Baptist    209
Buddhist  28
Christian and Missionary Alliance  30
Christian Science; Church of Christ-Scientist 45
Church of Christ, Disciples  3
Church of England in Canada; Anglican .... 2,117
Confucian     4
Congregationalist  4
Doukhobor  12
Episcopalian  11
Evangelical Church  12
Greek Catholic  20
Greek Orthodox    75
Hindu     34
Jehovah's Witness   6
Jewish  185
Lutheran  345
Mennonite    104
Methodist  29
Mormon  20
Moslem; Islam; Mohammedan  97
Pentecostal   39
Plymouth Brethren   21
Presbyterian  270
Protestant  1,075
Quaker  4
Roman Catholic  975
Salvation Army   5
Sikh   39
Ukrainian Catholic   4
Unitarian    15
United Church of Canada  2,091
Other religions    Ill
No religion; Agnostic; Atheist  184
Religion not given  819
40 North America
Canada   ....
Mexico   ....
United States
Central America
Dominion Republic	
Honduras, British	
Panama 	
Barbados     ,
Jamaica 	
Trinidad     	
Other British West Indies
South America
Argentina  ....
Bolivia   	
Chile	
Columbia   ....
Guiana, British
Peru   	
Venezuela  ....
Europe
Austria   	
Belgium   	
Czechoslovakia   	
Denmark	
Eire (Ireland)   	
Finland 	
France    	
Germany—Western Zone .
Germany—Eastern Zone .
Great Britain & N. Ireland
Greece	
Hungary    	
Italy	
Netherlands   	
Norway	
REGISTRATION 1957 - 58
COUNTRY OF CITIZENSHIP
Poland    	
7557
3
108
1
2
1
1
14
143
6
2
1
1
1
2
1
2
4
6
6
17
7
3
7
103
4
315
8
210
10
74
22
Portugal ...
Romania ...
Soviet Union
Sweden ....
Switzerland .
Yugoslavia   .
Africa
Egypt	
Gold Coast	
Kenya  	
Morocco   	
Nigeria  	
Rhodesia  	
Union of South Africa
Asia
Burma	
Ceylon   	
China   	
Hong Kong  	
India    	
Indochina   	
Iran	
Japan	
Java    	
Korea   	
Malaya   	
Pakistan   	
Palestine  (Incl.  Israel)
Philippines   	
Syria   	
Turkey   	
Oceania
Australia    ...
New Zealand
Stateless 	
9
7
5
26
2
7
15
1
4
2
1
5
3
5
1
4
71
21
49
2
1
12
1
4
6
6
8
3
2
1
14
8
38
41 REGISTRATION 1957 - 58
OCCUPATION OF PARENT
Agricultural  . 638
Clerical     . 246
Commercial   600
Communication    . 87
Construction     • 464
Electric Light, Power Production, and Stationary Enginemen . 80
Finance     • 165
Fishing, Hunting and Trapping   85
Labourers (not agricultural, fishing, logging, mining)   .... . 95
Logging  • 155
Manufacturing and Mechanical     830
Mining  and   Quarrying     . 112
Professional   • 1.526
Owners,   Managers—General     • 1,466
Service (exclusive of professional service)  . 387
Transportation  • 321
Unspecified, Retired, Disabled or Deceased  . 1,729
42 REGISTRATION 1957 - 58
GEOGRAPHICAL DISTRIBUTION OF STUDENTS
(B.C.—Based on Census Divisions)
East Kootenay and Upper Columbia River      (1) 122
West Kootenay, Columbia River and Slocan Lake      (2) 346
Okanagan, Similkameen, Kettle, and Upper Shuswap Rivers ......     (3) 444
Lower Fraser Valley and Howe Sound      (4) 5441
Vancouver  Island      (5) 888
North Thompson, Shuswap, Nicola, Chilcotin South,
Lillooet East, Bridge—Lillooet       (6) 189
Bella Coola, Knight Inlet, Powell River      (7) 83
Nechako—Fraser, Chilcotin—North, Cariboo, Skeena, Takla Lakes ..     (8) 90
Atlin Lake, Skeena Coast, Queen Charlotte Islands      (9) 87
North East B.C.—Laird, Finlay—Parsnip, Beaton River      (10) 68
Alberta  321
Saskatchewan  115
Manitoba  61
Ontario     154
Quebec  38
New Brunswick  6
Nova Scotia  12
Prince Edward Island ,  2
Newfoundland  1
Yukon  9
Northwest Territories  5
Africa     23
Asia  141
British Isles  62
British West Indies  149
Central America  9
Europe  33
Oceania  7
South America*  17
United States  63
43 BUILDINGS 1917 -1958
Dairy Barn  1917
Beef Barn    1919
Agronomy Barn  1920
Administration  1924
Agriculture  1924
Forestry & Geology - Old App. Sci. ... 1925
Arts & Science Building (Old)  1925
Auditorium  1925
Mechanical Labs   1925
Electrical Labs   1925
Mining & Metallurgy  1925
Chemistry  1925
Library   1925
Power House  1925
Horticulture Barn    1925
Horse Barn   1926
Farm Cottages (4)  1926
Fire Hall & Workshops  1926
Anglican College  1927
Women's Gymnasium  1928
Union College  1929
Vocational    1931
Stadium*     1937
Farm Cottage No. 5  1941
Armoury*     1943
Physics    1945
Brock Memorial Hall*   1940
Agricultural Pavilion  1945
Bull Barn  1946
Scenery Shop*   1946
Library - Addition    1946
Engineering   1947
Field House  1947
Insectory     1947
Dpminion Animal Pathology  1947
Bio. Sciences & Pharmacy  1948
Agricultural Engineering   1948
Greenhouses  1948
Wesbrook     1949
Home Economics  1949
♦Built with
Memorial Gymnasium*  1949
Bee House  1949
Headhouse & Turkey Research .. 1950
Poultry Science Service  1950
President's Residence    1950
Law Building    1950
B.C. Research Council  1950
Mary Bollert Hall  1950
Isabel Maclnnes Hall  1950
Anne Wesbrook Hall  1950
Horticulture   1951
Stores & Shops (B. & G.)  1951
Buildings & Grounds Office  1952
Central Animal Depot    1952
British Empire Games Pool  1954
Physical Metallurgy  1954
Home Management House  1955
Bookstore & Bus Stop  1955
Administration Addition  1955
Plant Pathology     1955
Mink Furring Shed  1955
Brock Addition (Annex)*  1956
School of Education  1956
Women's Residence No. 5  1956
Married Quarters - Wes. Villa  1956
Turkey House   1956
Fisheries Storage & Lab  1956
Deer Barn   1957
New Buildings & Grounds Office. . 1957
Medical Research Labs  1957
Heather Street Medical School Bldg. 1957
Sculpture Studio    1957
Principal's Residence (Union)  1957
Federal Forest Prod. Labs  1958
St. Andrew's Hall  1958
Technological Station  1958
International House (Gift)  1958
New Faculty Club (Gift)  1958
Buchanan Building  1958
Faculty Row Housing  1958
St. Mark's College   1958
Student Funds.
44

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