UBC Publications

UBC Publications

UBC Publications

Annual Report of the President 1946-1947 1947

Item Metadata

Download

Media
presrep-1.0115191.pdf
Metadata
JSON: presrep-1.0115191.json
JSON-LD: presrep-1.0115191-ld.json
RDF/XML (Pretty): presrep-1.0115191-rdf.xml
RDF/JSON: presrep-1.0115191-rdf.json
Turtle: presrep-1.0115191-turtle.txt
N-Triples: presrep-1.0115191-rdf-ntriples.txt
Original Record: presrep-1.0115191-source.json
Full Text
presrep-1.0115191-fulltext.txt
Citation
presrep-1.0115191.ris

Full Text

Array ■4aSm^s^
-'■•-^--i
-AM'   'ffjfl
Annual Report
of the President
1946-1947
The University of British Columbia
VANCOUVER, CANADA To The Board of Governors and Senate of
The University of British Columbia.
Gentlemen:
In submitting this report of the University's
activities during the academic year 1946-471 wish
at the same time to pay a personal tribute to the
devotion, cooperation and hard work of the staff
and students, to the wise counsel of the Board and
Senate, and to the understanding and support of
the Legislature, Press, and community of British
Columbia at large. It is these factors which have
created the University's enviable reputation in Canadian educational life and on which over the years
that reputation will depend.
I have not attempted in the present report to
detail the year's activities but rather to indicate, for
the benefit of those within the University and those
who support us, the main objectives, academic and
others, of the year under review and the extent to
which we have progressed towards those objectives.
fU   *i-"S  *,li f;if..i f\ \fi$    \'l  i'AJ,* t f-
'; U   v wUE-• *■ w-,  } \ >-•%— ihf.■''•-'■ "jrs ■-%:_. The academic year 1946-47 was a very busy one. More
students were enrolled than ever before in the history of the
University. Our short-term programme of emergency expansion
began to level off and our plans for the University's long-term
development began to take shape. A considerable number of
new faculty appointments were made, new temporary buildings
were erected, new equipment purchased, and new courses of
study begun. In sum, the work and responsibilities of the University expanded in a dozen directions.
Education in British Columbia has traditionally been sensitive to the needs of the province's development. The post-war
period found the University with two major problems on its hands.
The first was to help honour British Columbia's share of the
national obligation to returning veterans who wanted to take
advantage of the educational provisions of the rehabilitation program. The second was to supply the demands of the rapidly
expanding provincial economy for new types of trained and
skilled young men and women. Both of these jobs had to be
tackled together. Staff, buildings, and equipment for an emergency
period, which will presumably come to an end about 1951-52
had to be provided quickly, while at the same time it was necessary
to assemble a permanent staff, and to plan a building program to
meet the longer term needs of the province and country.
A large part of our time has therefore had to be devoted to
our building programs, emergency and permanent.
Building Programs
In April, 1945, the Legislature voted five million dollars to
"pay the cost of the construction and equipment of such buildings,
works and other undertakings upon lands of the University of
British Columbia as the Lieutenant Governor in Council may
deem expedient for the use of the University."
The Board of Governors, the administration and the faculty
immediately began to plan for future requirements in terms of a
university of from 5000 to 6000 students, the figure which registration is expected to reach after it has fallen from its present peak
(S) of over 9000 students and begun to grow normally again. From
the first, planning was complicated by the certainty that enrollment
would remain far above pre-war figures. Added to this was the
fact that the province's requirements for new types of training
had become so diverse that there was no possibility of meeting
all our building needs even on the generous appropriation which
had been made available.
The University Building Committee recommended that the
sum of $1,500,000.00 be set aside to develop buildings and resources for medical education and that the remaining funds be
spent on the following:
Physics building Agricultural Engineering and
Mechanics building
North Wing to the Library
Boiler,   Power   House   addition
Applied   Science   building
Biological Sciences and
Land  Clearing Pharmacy  building
Through the initiative of the Student Body and Alumni a
new War Memorial Gymnasium, to be financed by private and
public subscriptions, has been added to the permanent building
program.
The foregoing list does not by any means exhaust the urgent
needs of the University for further accommodation. It merely
attempts to establish the most immediate of those needs in terms
of the monies available, and to outline what we hope will be only
the first phase of the permanent building program. To this list
must be added for the earliest possible consideration:
Women's and Men's Residences A University Museum
A new Arts Building An Art Centre
A Home Economics Building
The year under review has seen the Agricultural Pavilion
completed, the Physics building1 near completion, substantial progress made on the Library Wing and the Power House Addition,
and the beginning of work on the Applied Science building. In
addition a 45-acre land clearing program has been undertaken
and is proceeding satisfactorily. We have reason to be pleased
with progress on phase one of the program but we also recognize
that phase two cannot be too long delayed. Housing
The provision of housing for veteran students and teaching
staff has been an important part of our emergency building program. In Acadia Camp and Wesbrook Place there are, at present,
living quarters for 103 student and faculty families, 304 single
men, 85 single women, and three trailer service houses with
accommodation for 70 trailers, housing 51 families and 26 single
students.
In the Fort Camp there are dormitory accommodations for 372
single students, and suites for two families. At Lulu Island and
Little Mountain camps suites for 173 married students were
completed within the year. An additional 50 suites were planned
for completion in the following academic year. In all, therefore,
the University provided housing during the year for 787 single
men and women and 329 student and faculty families, including
at last count, 318 children. In addition, an effort has been made
in each of the centres mentioned to provide, at least, minimum
community and recreational facilities.
In this connection it is a pleasure to record the University's
appreciation of the cooperation and initiative which the residents themselves have displayed in helping the University provide
for the common needs. We are well aware that not all the
camps have as yet all the facilities which are desirable in an educational community. The first requirement was shelter in order
that a maximum number of veterans might pursue their education.
We have, of course, not been able to provide housing for all who
need it, let alone the additional amenities which we hope will
come in time.
On behalf of the University Housing Committee I should
like in particular to thank the University Branch of the Canadian
Legion for the assistance they have rendered at Lulu Island and
Little Mountain. In this, as in other ways, they have performed
a very useful work on behalf of their fellow veterans.
Student Enrollment
The total number of students enrolled for the regular winter
session of 1946-47 was 9035.   This figure includes some 290 taking
(5) short courses, but does not include the 1781 persons enrolled in
the 1947 Summer School. Of the winter enrollment 7180 (79.5%)
were men, 1855 (20.5%) were women, 4796 (53.4%) were veterans
and 4239 (46.6%) were non-veteran students.
It is worth noting that the percentage of women students to
men is relatively low and that it is likely to remain so until we are
in a position to provide residence accommodation for a considerable number of the women who have to live away from home.
The large veteran enrollment is, in part, a result of the
University's decision in 1945 not to refuse admission to any veteran
duly qualified for University work, so long as the Board and the
Administration could contrive to provide sufficient staff and
facilities to ensure the maintenance of reasonable standards, and
thereby safeguard the academic tradition of which the faculty
and alumni are justly jealous.
In addition to its obligations to Canadian veterans, however,
the University had also to honour its obligations to the ever-
increasing number of non-veteran students (46.6% of the total),
most of whom are recent high school graduates who were under
military age in 1945. It is they who represent the steadily widening
demand for university training in this Province; and what this
demand has meant over the past twenty years, and in particular
over the past three years, can be seen at a glance from the following figures:
Year
Non-Veteran
Veteran
Total
1926-27
1582
Nil
1582
1936-37
2049
Nil
2049
1944-45
2912
146
3058
3223
2399
5622
(Special
Winter Session
1098)
1376
(Special Spring Session
278)
4239
4796
9035
Admittedly the pressure of sheer numbers has made it most
difficult to maintain academic standards. Large classes have
minimized personal relations between instructor and student, and
have brought about an undue reliance on formal lectures.   Such
(6) conditions over a long period of time must inevitably lower those
educational standards which the university has constantly desired
to raise. To date, although we are not out of the woods, we do
not think much violence has been done to our academic tradition.
That this is so, however, is due only to the exceptional devotion
of the teaching staff and the exceptional maturity and self-reliance
of the students. Conditions like the present cannot continue long
without exhausting the teaching staff, curtailing research, and
casting an unfair responsibility upon the students themselves. I
say this merely to underline the fact that government, the community and the universities must now take thought about the proportion of the population to whom higher education is to be
made available. This province and the country at large has produced and can produce enough first class scholars to maintain
any standard of education which the community and its representatives in government regard as necessary for the country's development, and for which they are prepared to pay.
No one today argues that ability to pay should alone determine the size of a university's enrollment. On the other hand I
have not met many who argue that all students who manage to
matriculate should proceed, as of right, to university. Between
these two extremes our enrollment in the future must be regulated
by the community's needs for trained minds and professional skills
as expressed by government grants, private endowment and student
fees. There is no mystery about educational finances. The cost
per student per year for first, second, or third class education can
with fair accuracy be arrived at.
It will be apparent from the current rate of increase in non-
veteran enrollment that when the bulk of the veterans graduate
the student body is likely to number between 4000 and 5000. From
that point it will begin to grow again in relation to the growth
and demand of the population of the province. However, 4000
to 5000 students represent a very considerable increase in and
diversification of, the province's economic and cultural life. This
increase and diversification is already reflected in the enrollment
figures (outlined in Appendix A) in Commerce and Law as well
as in Agriculture, Forestry, and Engineering; in Architecture,
Pharmacy, and Home Economics; in Physical Education, Nursing
and in the general Arts courses.
(7) Staff
The teaching staff for the academic year 1946-47 is shown in
the following table:
Deans of Faculties
4
Special Lecturers
4
Assistant  to  the  Dean,
Honorary Lecturers
8
Faculty of Arts
and
Part-Time  Lecturers
60
Science
Part-Time Instructors
2
Professors
Associate Professors
Assistant Professors
Lecturers
83
72
55
52
Assistants
Assistants in the Department  of   University
Extension
324
8
Instructors
47
TOTAL
720
This total figure represents an increase of 162 over the
previous academic year. The reasons for this growth are partly
increased enrollment and partly the new courses established within
the year.
In spite of the increased teaching staff, classes remain so
large as to call for exceptional efforts on behalf of both staff and
student. For example, the Department of English, the largest in
the University with 45 teaching members in the session under
review, had 1800 students in 47 sections in the first year, 1500
students in second year, nearly 1000 students in Applied Science
and approximately 1000 students taking elective courses in the
upper years. It is not difficult to grasp the extent of the present
teaching load in the Department when one considers the essay
reading which is so important in the English courses.
Even the exceptional devotion of the present staff if demanded
over too long a period will result in diminishing returns and the
impairment of essential research. As a result, present and future
staffing policy has been receiving considerable attention in terms
of provincial requirements for trained men, provincial grants and
other sources of income, and student load. In higher education
especially the ratio of teaching to thinking or to time spent on
research must be retained at such a level, once the emergency
period is at an end, that this University will be permitted to
make the contribution to original thought and the accumulation of
knowledge which the province has the right to expect of it.
(8) New Courses of Study
The University has attempted to keep pace with the demands
of a growing economic and cultural community by instituting new
faculties, new departments and new courses of study.
A new faculty of Law was instituted in 1945. It has proved to
be extremely popular. During the past year 240 students were
enrolled. The wholehearted support of Bench and Bar — and
the assistance of practising members of the profession as Honorary
Lecturers has meant much in establishing this new professional
school on a firm foundation.
A new Department of Agricultural Engineering has also
been established to round out the courses offered by the Faculty
of Agriculture. A new Department of Pharmacy has been added
to meet a pressing need, and enrollment during the first year of
a four-year course numbered 69. The Department of Architecture,
now in its second year, is also filling a long-felt need. It has a
current enrollment of 45. The interest which has been shown
in the Department of Slavonic Studies illustrates the immense
importance which a knowledge of the Soviet Union and the peripheral countries has aroused, irrespective of whether Canada's
relationship with these countries improves or degenerates in the
sphere of international politics and economics. In addition to
Russian and some Polish language and literature, "area" studies
offered in this field are being worked out in conjunction with
such other Departments as Economics, International Studies and
Geography.
International Studies, a new Department in the previous year,
has strengthened our offering in the Social Sciences, and is proving of great interest to senior students.
The need for a Department of Music had long been recognized. Established on a minimum basis during the academic year
1946-47, it has attracted wide support and will fill, as circumstances
permit, an increasingly important position among the University's
Humane Studies.
The opportunity to begin new courses depends on a large
number of factors, the two most important of which are the
pressure of demand and the provision of funds.
I9\ In some of the cases mentioned above, the University by means
of generous benefactions, was enabled to develop new fields of
study earlier than would otherwise have been possible. We are
of course extremely grateful for such opportunities. Acknowledgement of such benefactions is made in another section of this report.
There has been for some years now an increasing demand
and a stated need for a Medical Faculty. Discussions with the
Government and the interested groups in the community have
been and are being held. Because medical education is the most
expensive currently offered in Canada and because the social need
for trained doctors is of first rank importance, enquiries into cost
and necessary facilities have been most exhaustive and have taken
a long time. The University is anxious to proceed with the establishment of a medical faculty as soon as sufficient funds are in
sight and adequate facilities available. To begin sooner would
jeopardize not only the new medical school but also the general
academic standards which past and present faculty members and
Alumni have struggled to maintain.
Library
These twelve months were a most difficult but exciting time
for everyone connected with the Library. Student enrollment continued to rise, many new staff members, departments, and courses
appeared in the University lists, and more books than ever before
were purchased by this institution.
Although the pressure of demand for library facilities and
services became acute in this period, these new problems had to
be met with no change or improvement in spacial accommodation. We do not claim to have provided first-class service to staff
and students in 1946-47. This, understandably, was impossible.
I do not hesitate, however, to commend Dr. William Kaye Lamb
and his Library staff for a most remarkable effort to provide satisfactory service under extremely difficult circumstances. It is a
task that has called for the utmost in patience and resourcefulness.
We have not permitted adverse working conditions to detract
from our participation in national and international library activities. During the period under review the University was host
to  three   important  Library Conferences  involving  the  Pacific
(10) sociation, and the new Canadian Library Association. Some 250
Northwest Library Association, the British Columbia Library As-
librarians from all parts of Canada attended the last.
In addition to conference affairs several members of the
Library staff have participated actively in Library administration.
Dr. Lamb, Librarian, served as President of the Pacific Northwest
Library Association for the year ending September, 1946. He
is now serving as President of the Canadian Library Association,
and was appointed Chairman of the Public Library Commission
in April. Miss Anne M. Smith is a member of the Council of
the American Library Association, and in June was elected to
the Board of the Association of College and Research Libraries.
Miss Eleanor Mercer served in 194647 as Second Vice President
of the Pacific Northwest Library Association.
Good progress has been made in recent months with the construction of the large addition to the Library building. If all
goes well the roof should be completed by the middle of November,
and the wing will be substantially completed by the end of the
spring term. These changes, and the task of moving the entire
book-stock to a new location, will occupy most of the summer, but
the whole Library, old and new, should be in order and ready for
use by next September.
We have acquired 11,518 books in the review year as compared with 9,301 in the previous year. These figures do not take
into account the various special collections which are accessioned
in separate series. At the present time our Library consists of
180,000 volumes, 60,000 of which have been acquired in the last
seven years.
We are particularly grateful for the many gifts of all kinds
that have been received. These range from collections of German
literature, provided by the Custodian of Enemy Property, to a
microfilm reader donated by the Vancouver Sun. Many other
extremely generous and valuable gifts were received. Mr. H. R.
MacMillan contributed a collection of old maps in addition
to furthering work on the Forestry Collection which he has
initiated and subsidized. It is impossible to list all items here but
our grateful thanks must go to the friends of the University who
have assisted, in so many ways, to build and improve a fine and
comprehensive library collection.
(in There has been a considerable increase in Library staff from
16 full-time employees in September, 1945, to an expected 45 by
October of this year.   Eighteen of these hold professional positions.
100,281 books were circulated from the main Loan Desk in
1946-47, as compared with 7.2,753 in the preceding year. In addition the Extension Department circulated 10,398 volumes, 4,016 of
which were plays. Total "circulation in all departments was
191,736.
The Art Loan Collection is making good progress in the
second year of its inauguration. Lack of time and inadequate display and storage space have not seriously impeded its development. Once more our thanks is due to the many friends who
have contributed prints and cash donations to further this collection. Pictures available during the year included 110 original
paintings, fifteen Carnegie prints, and ten prints owned by the Art
Loan itself.
The number of recordings circulated in 1946-47 reached the
astonishing total of 22,617. This was more than double the circulation of the year before. The Extension Department loaned
3,107 records mostly to listening groups, including schools, camps,
church organizations and Parent-Teacher Associations, as well as
private listening groups of various kinds.
A total of 601 records were added this year, and the collection
now consists of 2131 records. With the Department of Music
beginning to make use of the collection, and the undergraduate
demand for record loans increasing as the service becomes popularized, there is reason to believe that this department may develop
rapidly in the next few years.
Research in The University of British Columbia
A great variety of research is continually in progress at the
University and I hope it may be possible to describe it in some
detail in a future report. It ranges in character from the modest
investigations made by some of the better undergraduate students
to important projects in research of a fundamental nature conducted by the professorial staff. Not all the work done has an
immediate practical application, but the public will probably be
interested to know of  the scale of the  contribution which  the
112) various University departments are making to industry and agriculture — to mention but two fields — year by year. Perhaps a
bare listing of a dozen or more of the projects in progress or
completed during the academic year 1946-47 will give as good an
idea as any of the nature of the work undertaken.
One department investigated the type E form of botulism
food poisoning, an outbreak of which occurred at Nanaimo recently. Another sought to develop improved methods of fruit refrigeration. A third continued long-term investigation of hyperten-
tion (high blood pressure). Two departments were busy with
problems relating to synthetic rubber, while still another was
experimenting with the chemical treatment of wood. Processes
under development may make it possible to convert such soft
woods as hemlock and alder into synthetic hard wood, suitable
for flooring. A member of the staff of the Department of
Geology and Geography completed a study of the urban geography
of the City of New Westminster.
Turning to quite a different field we find a professor working
on a contribution to a forthcoming volume to be entitled Canada
in World Affairs 1944-46. A member of the Department of Zoology has in hand a five-year study of timber wolves in the Rocky
Mountain national parks. In the field of agriculture artificial
methods of drying hay, certain defects in butter, and several aspects
of poultry nutrition and disease are all under investigation. The
University is also assisting in a soil survey which it is hoped will
ultimately cover the whole province. At the moment work is being
carried on in the Peace River block. The Department of Electrical
Engineering has been devising ways and means of locating faults
in power cables and has achieved gratifying results. Recently
the Department was able to locate a fault for a power company
with an error of less than 2 feet, with the result that a small hole
in the pavement instead of a torn-up street sufficed for the repair
work. Finally, the University is making a contribution to research
in the much-talked-about field of nuclear physics, for which considerable additional equipment is being installed in the new
Physics Building.
For some years a small appropriation has been included in
the University's budget for grants in aid of research.   The amount
(13) that it was found possible to make available in 1946-47 was no
more than $17,500.00, but the list of projects given will indicate
the surprising scope and value of the work the departments have
contrived to do.
Much of the advanced work done has been undertaken in
cooperation with the National Research Council, the British
Columbia Research Council, various Dominion and Provincial
administrative departments, and a number of large industrial
firms. Without their support it would have been impossible to
conduct many of the investigations undertaken on anything
approaching an adequate scale.
Summer School
Summer Session enrollment figures have followed the general
pattern of increase evidenced in the Fall Sessions. Once more
Veteran students account, in part, for this remarkable growth, but
it is interesting to note that the number of non-veteran students
attending the summer classes has augmented proportionately due
perhaps to the increasingly varied types of courses offered, and the
particular attractions incorporated in the short Extension Department courses.
Summer Session enrollment figures this year correspond to
regular session figures of the pre-war years, and although the
record high of last year (2380) has not been equalled by this year's
total (1815), we feel that the courses have been extremely well-
received.
The summer months are well-suited to comfortable study on
the campus, and the concentrated nature of certain of the courses
has been offset in large part by the easy availability of library and
study facilities. Lawns and gardens are at their best, and special
events and lectures arranged by the Summer Session Student's
Association add a further degree of stimulation to the overall
summer program.
All faculties and departments offered courses designed to meet
the requirements of veteran students.    For that purpose stress
(14) was put on introductory courses in most fields of study. A selection of advanced courses was available to that smaller group of
students interested in completing the last few units leading to
degrees. Students were able to select from 67 courses, exclusive
of the Extension Department and Directed Reading Courses.
Many classes were so large that a division was necessary in order
to accommodate all members.
Particularly popular were the short courses offered by the
University's Department of Extension. An attempt was made to
provide interesting and practical instruction in a wide variety of
arts and crafts, as well as to stimulate an active interest in current
affairs. This latter objective was attained with outstanding success
in a Workshop Course on International Relations which surveyed
major current developments in the field of international coopera*
tion, placing an emphasis on Canadian-United States relations and
their role in world organization.
The Summer School of the Theatre had a successful session
terminating the course with a near-professional production of "Skin
of Our Teeth", in which amateur actors and actresses of all ages
and professions displayed the results of six weeks of intensive
training. Summer Theatre is becoming more and more popular
on this campus and the quality of production is comparable with
the best of the amateur work in Canada. The interest shown by
the public in our amateur theatre work, coupled with the increasing number of Community Theatre groups organized by our Summer Theatre graduates is, I think, an encourging contribution to
an approaching Canadian National Theatre in which all provinces will participate on an amateur, and ultimately a professional,
basis.
Practical courses in Radio Script Writing, Painting for Plea
sure, Music Appreciation, and Weaving were given by lecturers
selected for their high degree of accomplishment in the professional
and academic world. The University strives to bring experts in
the arts and crafts to the campus, to meet an increasing demand
for this type of instruction. It seems apparent that a considerable
portion of the community is anxious to receive organized instruction in leisure-time activities. It is my opinion that everything
possible should be done to encourage and satisfy this demand which
arises actually from a normal and insistent urge to create.
(15) Extra-Curricular Affairs
Extra-curricular activities are an essential part of a liberal
education. It is for this reason that the University collects annually
on behalf of the student body a fee of $15.00 per student. This
sum of money, totalling many thousands of dollars in aggregate,
is handed over to the Alma Mater Society (the undergraduate student body) and is administered by them at their discretion and on
their own responsibility. The student body at this University,
through its elected Council, enjoys a high degree of autonomy in
the handling of its own affairs. It hai traditionally exercised its
authority responsibly and with moderation. The Council divides
its funds among the various student organizations roughly in accordance with its estimate of the relative importance of the extracurricular activity carried on by each organization. Most of these
activities fall into one of three classes: athletics, the arts and sciences,
and social. The programs of the component organizations of the
Alma Mater Society are then developed in terms of their ingenuity
and the budget available to them.
During the past year the University maintained athletic teams
in American football, English rugby, association football, grass and
ice hockey, basketball, tennis, golf, skiing, archery, and many other
fields of competitive activity. Approximately 60 other clubs, association, and societies of all kinds were active; these range in
character from the old, established Players' Club, Musical Society,
and Parliamentary Forum, to various temporary groups which
spring up to meet the particular needs of an individual year or
years. The Radio Society is the most recent and one of the most
active of the new major clubs. With its studio and its campus
broadcasting schedule it offers practical training to all undergraduates interested in all fields of radio.
Many of these organizations — the Parliamentary Forum, for
example — provide much the same facilities for laboratory work in
the humanities and social sciences as the technical laboratories do
in the applied sciences. They exist in order that all students interested may have the opportunity of learning how to express themselves through a particular medium, be it debating, acting or music.
It permits them the opportunity to experiment in the formulation
and presentation of ideas that are applications of their expanding
intellectual, literary and cultural horizons.
(16) The final product of the student activity, in these fields does
of course vary from year to year. Last year was a successful one.
The students themselves would, I think, be the last to claim that
any production, literary, musical, dramatic or debating, represented
their final intellectual or aesthetic judgment on the subject presented. Rather, it marks current interest and current growth and
it is a matter of gratification to report that the community at large
accepts and most generously supports student extra-curricular activities on this understanding.
The University and the Community
A university as a community of scholars and students necessarily has obligations to many related communities of different
kinds. First of all it has an obligation to provide the skills and
services required by its own geographic constituency, and second
it has an obligation to make its contribution to the sum of knowledge in those fields in which it claims some special proficiency.
Third it must maintain contact with those who are doing equivalent
work in the same fields elsewhere in order to bring to its home
constituency the benefits of the discoveries of scholars elsewhere.
This university has from its earliest years attempted to maintain close contact with the province. It has made its services available to the population whenever and wherever possible on an ever
increasing scale. It is I think worth adding that the University
has also maintained its contacts with other learned bodies and
institutions in Canada and elsewhere. During the past year it has
provided the President and Secretary (Professor Angus) of the
National Conference of Canadian Universities, a member of the
National Research Council and Defence Research Council (Dr.
Shrum), the President of the Canadian Historical Association (Professor F. Soward), the President of the Canadian Association for
Adult Education (Dr. Shrum), and the President of the Canadian
Library Association (Dr. Lamb), as well as many active members
in a score or more of international, national or provincial learned
bodies. The direct value to the students and to the province of
these educational affiliations is visibly great, quite apart from the
distinction to the University at large which such associations bring.
I should like to express my thanks to the representatives of the
press, radio and in a particular way, to the Alumni Association
for the cooperation and assistance which the University has re-
(\T\ ceived from them in the performance of its duties to the community of British Columbia and Canada at large. Without the assistance of the news distributing agencies many of the services which
the University is in a position to offer would be inadequately understood or not known at all by those in a position to benefit from
them. Without the assistance of the Alumni Association the University would find it difficult to keep in touch with its graduate
members in the community, who have a special interest in its activities and its welfare.
In addition I should like to make special mention of the University Placement Service in this connection, for it is serving as an
increasingly valuable link between the University and the community, to the joint advantage of student and employer.
During the year 1946-47, 450 students found part time jobs
during the term, 2315 found summer employment, 1470 found
Christmas vacation employment, and 267 were placed in what promised to be permanent employment.
The cooperation which has been received from individual firms,
from business associations, from trades unions, and from the National Employment Service promises well for the future of the
Placement Service.
Year by year, registration statistics have shown an increase in
the numbers of students who come to the University from all sections of the province — and, indeed from many points outside
British Columbia. In the 1946-47 session, 4932 students came from
Vancouver, 4310 from other centres in British Columbia, 730 from
other parts of Canada, and 62 from other countries. Further evidence of the part the University is playing in making higher education accessible to the whole of British Columbia is revealed in the
distribution of scholarships and bursaries to some 350 students from
80 different centres in the Province.
Directly or indirectly, more and more of the people of British
Columbia are beginning to reap the benefits that accrue from the
University. These benefits may derive from research in provincial
industries, from education in attendance, or from the program of
the Department of University Extension.
University Extension
During the past year the demand for services from the Department of University Extension increased so much that additions
(18) to the staff and a move to larger quarters, both became necessary.
The increased demand becomes significant when it is realized that
those asking for services are adults voluntarily seeking education
after they have ended their formal schooling. Specialized groups,
such as Parent-Teacher Associations, Junior Boards of Trade and
farmers' organizations, as well as individuals, have asked for evening classes, short courses and conferences to assist them with their
particular educational problems.
The University staff presented 520 lectures to audiences totalling 43,314; 267 students attended 6 summer courses; 450 registered
Extension Library members borrowed 6,382 books; 90 listening
groups received 3,107 records from the Phonograph Record Loan
Service; 134 drama groups borrowed 4,016 plays; approximately
500,000 persons living in 300 communities were shown 10,528 reels
of motion picture film; while many others availed themselves of
the Extension free loan service of pamphlets.
Other major projects included field work in agriculture, home
economics, handicrafts, cooperatives and credit unions; short courses
in agriculture and allied subjects; rural leadership camps at the
University and at Kilkerran and Baldonnel, in the Peace River. And
finally, in the Vancouver area the evening courses and lectures by
the University faculty continued to be one of the basic parts of
the Extension programme.
A logical conclusion, based on this year's increased Extension
activity, is that more and more British Columbians are finding
adult education necessary either as vocational training or as an
enriching influence in their cultural life. In this process of reinforcing practical experience with systematic education the Extension Department looks forward to years of normal growth in an
ever-widening area of service.
Finances
There are normally only four sources of revenue available to
this University: the provincial government grant, student fees, gifts,
and income from endowments. To these has been added, for
the duration of the veteran educational program, a federal government grant of $150.00 per veteran student in addition
to the fees which the government also pays for each
veteran     student    entitled     to     educational     benefits.     The
(19) total income of the University from all sources during
the fiscal year 1946-47, was $3,590,564.96. Of this $1,712,-
129.50, or 47.7%, came from student fees; $920,050.00, or 25.6%,
from the provincial government grant, $791,412.60, or 22%, from
the federal government and $166,972.86, or 4.7%, from benefactions,
and sundry accounts. Income from endowment currently held by
the University is not included in the foregoing figures as it is
held in trust for scholarships, bursaries, and prizes. Income from
endowment for general purposes has still to be acquired, and this
is essential if the University is to undertake its share of pioneer
teaching and research in those fields from which no immediate and
tangible results can be expected. A good-sized endowment has
proven to be a considerable guarantee of academic freedom and
independence. While it is not to be expected that a university as
young as our should be heavily endowed the time has come when
we can justly hope for this form of tangible evidence of the University's value to the province and the country at large. I hope to
have more to say on this subject in next year's report.
Against the $3,590,564.96 which the University received during
the year, it paid out for salaries, equipment and other teaching purposes, $1,541,156.41, or 42.9%. Administration cost $186,969.79, or
5.2%; maintenance of grounds, buildings, etc., $407,383.62, or
11.3%, and general expenses including insurance, annuities, etc.,
$275,252.75, or 7.7%. In addition, the emergency program of alterations to buildings, equipment-of new laboratories, etc., accounted
for $1,472,390.33, or 41%. This item, made necessary by the heavy
enrollment of both veteran and non-veteran students, was responsible for a net operating deficit during the year of $292,587.94. This
deficit offsets the operating surplus of the previous year amounting
to $207,542.27. The net deficit for the two years amounted to only
$85,045.67 which has been charged off to former accumulated surplus.
The cost of first class higher education, particularly in those
fields where expensive equipment is required, has been increasing
rapidly. In addition general operating costs over the past year have
risen sharply. If the University is to continue to turn out fully-
trained young men and women in the quantity currently required
to meet provincial and national requirements, additional revenues
will have to be found.
(20) Appendix A
October 16th, 1947.
REGISTRAR'S REPORT TO THE PRESIDENT
Attendance, 1946-47.
(a) By Faculties and Years
(b) By Nationalities
(c) By Home Addresses
(d) By Occupations of Parents
2. Comparative statement of attendance, Session 1933-
1934 to 1946-1947.
3. Complete statement of Degrees Conferred, 1934 to
to 1947; of Honorary Degrees Conferred, 1930 to
1947; and of Diplomas issued, 1934 to 1947.
4. Statement in reference to Location of Graduates.
5. Statement of Scholarships, etc., awarded to Graduates.
CHARLES B. WOOD,
Registrar.
(21) THE UNIVERSITY OF BRITISH COLUMBIA
Registration for 1946-47
REGULAR SESSION
Men Women Total
Second Year Forest
Faculty of Arts anii SraftNcx
Engineering
35
—
35
1795
Second Year B.S.F.
Third Year
50
183
2
50
First Year
1436
359
185
First  Year  Home
Third Year Forest
Economics
70
70
Engineering
8
—
8
Second Year
1086
363
1449
Fourth Year
129
—
129
Second Year Com
Fourth Year Forest
merce
338
22
360
Engineering
6
—
6
Second Year Home
Fourth Year B.S.F.
11
	
11
Economics
60
60
Graduates
38
	
38
Second Year Physi
—
—
—
cal Education
39
8
47
2000
3
2003
Second Year Phar
macy
60
8
68
Nursing
Third Year
554
298
852
First Year
	
26
26
Third Year  Com
Second Year
	
17
17
merce
216
17
233
Third Year
	
11
11
Third Year Home
Fourth Year
	
11
11
Economics
	
52
52
Fifth Year
	
15
15
Fourth Year
310
190
500
Certificate Course
	
61
61
Fourth Year Com
merce
153
15
168
	
141
141
Fourth Year Home
Economics
221
36
49
36
270
Faculty of Agriculture
19
Graduates
First Year
88
107
Teacher Training
24
22
46
Second Year
157
18
175
Social Work
26
67
93
Third Year
93
19
112
Fourth Year
55
6
61
4463
1636
6099
Graduates
32
4
36
Included in above:
Occupational Course 59
2
61
Reading Course
—
■ ■■"
__.
Students
179
55
234
484
68
552
Extra—Sessional
. Faculty of Law
Students
51
9
60
Faculty of Applied Science
First Year 855
First Year Architecture 33
First   Year   Forest
Engineering 83
First Year B.S.F. 128
Second Year 433        1
Second Year Architecture 8      —
First Year
Second Year
Third Year
162
4
166
67
2
69
4
1
5
855
33
233
TOTAtS
240
7180   1855   9035
83
Summer Session 1946
128
1907
461   2368
434
Botany   Evening
8
Class 1946-47          23
20      43
(22) NATIONALITIES OF STUDENTS
(Racial Origins)
1946-1947
NOTE:
This list
does not include Directed
Reading Course.
American
200
Dutch
59
Norwegian
91
Armenian
1
English
2334
Polish
55
Australian
10
French
44
Roumanian
7
Austrian
15
Finnish
18
Russian
76
Belgian
7
German
45
Scottish
1334
British
705
Greek
32
South African
2
Canadian
2612
Hungarian
16
Swedish
89
Chinese
71
Icelandic
21
Swiss
8
Czecho-Slovak
Indian   (East)
4
Syrian
2
Bohemian
Irish
583
Ukrainian
72
Moravian
Italian
41
Welsh
109
Ruthenian
Jewish
32
Other Countries
16
Slovakian
24
Jugo-Slavic
10
Unspecified
24
Danish
29
Newfoundlander
3
Total
8,801
GEOGRAPHICAL DISTRIBUTION OF  STUDENTS
Regular Session, 1946-1947
Vancouver .4932
FROM  POINTS IN BRITISH  COLUMBIA OUTSIDE
OF VANCOUVER
Abbotsford
22
Bralorne
4
Coalmont
o
Agassiz
10
Brighouse
8
Cobble Hill
8
Alberni
24
Britannia Beach
8
Coghlan
4
Aldergrove
12
Burnaby
58
Comox
16
Alert  Bay
Burns Lake
2
Coombs
1
Alexandria
Campbell River
3
Courtenay
18
Argenta
Canyon
1
Cowichan Lake
4
Armstrong
11
Cassidy
2
Cranbrook
16
Aiyansh
Castlegar
13
Crescent Beach
3
Ashcroft
Caulfield
2
Creston
20
Barkerville
Cawston
1
Cultus   Lake
4
Baldonnel
Cecil Lake
-1
Cumberland
6
Balfour
Cedar
1
Dawson Creek
7
Bella Bella
Cee Pee Cee
2
Deep Cove
2
Bella Coola
Celista
1
Delta
1
Blewett
Chapman Camp
6
Denman Island
2
Bloedel
Chemainus
6
Dewdney
4
Blue River
Chilli wack
77
Dollarton
2
Boston Bar
2
Clayburn
2
Dorreen
1
Boswell
1
Clear Water
1
Duncan
42
Bradner
3
Cloverdale
38
Eburne
55
(23) Egmont
Enderby
Errington
Evelyn
Falkland
2
2
2
1
1
Fanny Bay
Fernie
1
21
Field
4
Forest Grove
1
Fort Fraser
3
Fort Steele
2
Fort George
1
Fort St. John 3
Galiano Island 10
Ganges 16
Gibson's Landing   6
Glen Valley 1
Golden 5
Gossip Island 1
Grand Forks 12
Grantham's L'd'g. 1
Great Central 3
Greenwood 3
Grindrod 2
Groundbirch 1
Haney 14
Hammond 5
tiarrop 1
Hatzic 2
Headquarters 4
Hedley 9
Hilliers 2
Hollyburn 27
Hope 11
Horsefly 3
Hopkins Landing   1
Invermere 5
loco 4
Jervis Inlet 1
Kaleden 1
Kamloops 67
Kaslo 5
Kelowna 54
Keremeos 3
Kimberley 39
Koksilah 2
Kootenay Lake 2
Kyuquot 1
Lac LaHache 1
Ladner 38
Ladysmith 30
Lake Buntzen 1
Langford 3
Langley Prairie 17
Lantzville 1
Lillooet 2
Lynmour 3
Lynn Valley
9
Revelstoke
23
Lytton
1
Riondel
1
Mai Hard ville
2
Richmond
1
Marysville
1
Robson
7
Matsqui
5
Roberts Creek
1
Mayne Island
3
Rosedale
1
Merritt
4
Rossland
16
Merville
2
Rounds
1
Metchosin
1
Royal Oak
2
Michel
4
Royston
4
Milner
11
Rutland
1
Mission City
18
Saanichton
11
Mt. Lehman
8
Salmo
1
Murrayville
2
Salmon Arm
24
Nakusp
8
Sardis
15
Nanaimo
84
Salt Spring Is.
3
Nanoose Bay
6
Sayward
1
Naramata
5
Sechelt
5
Natal
14
Shalalth
1
Nelson
72
Shawnigan Lake
5
New Denver
5
Shelley
5
New Westm'r
466
Sherman
3
Nicola
1
Shoreacres
2
North Bend
3
Sidney
22
North Vanc'r.
174
Silverton
2
Northlands
1
Slocan
2
Notch Hill
2
Smithers
6
Ocean Falls
13
Sointula
2
Okanagan Centre   2
Sooke
2
Okanagan L'ding   1
Okanagan Mission 1
Oliver                       12
Squamish
Steveston
Stewart
2
19
1
Osoyoos
4
Summerland
W. Summerland
6
9
Parksville
Peachland
11
5
Sorrento
3
Pender Is.
1
Terrace
3
Penticton
54
Trail
70
Pioneer
2
Union Bav
2
Pt. Albion
6
Valemount
1
Pt. Alice
5
Vanderhoof
2
Pt. Coquitlam
9
Vernon
47
Pt. Hammond
9
Victoria
493
Pt. Kells
3
Wardner
1
Pt. Mellon
2
Wellington
5
Pt.    Moody
5
Wells
1
Pt. Washington
4
Westbank
3
Powell River
33
West Vanc'r.
118
Prince George
16
Westview
9
Prince Rupert
31
Whiterock
23
Princeton
9
Whonock
6
Pitt Meadows
2
Williams Lake
6
Qualicum
9
Woodfibre
3
Queen's Bay
2
Wycliffe
1
Quesnel
11
Yarrow
8
Quick Station
1
Youbou
1
Radium Hot Spi
•• 2
Unspecified
98
(24^ FROM POINTS IN CANADA  OUTSIDE  OF
BRITISH COLUMBIA
Alberta 332
Saskatchewan 195
Manitoba 82
Ontario 69
Quebec 22
Nova Scotia 8
New Brunswick 7
Pr.  Edward  Is. 5
Alaska 1
Newfoundland 1
Northwest Terr. 2
Yukon 6
FROM OTHER COUNTRIES
Asia
British Isles
4
7
Europe
South Africa
6
1
South   America
United States
TOTAL
2
40
9,034
OCCUPATION OF PARENTS
1946 - 1947
NOTE:   This list does not include Directed Reading Course.
Deceased
Retired  ...
Unspecified
Agricultural
Farmers and stock raisers
Foremen—farm
Labourers—farm
Fishing
Fishermen
Hunting and Trapping
Hunters,   trappers,   guides
Logging
Owners and managers
Foremen
Foresters, timber cruisers
Lumbermen:
Loggers, axemen, cable tenders,
riggers, skid  tenders, etc.
Mining and Quarrying
Owners,   managers,   contractors,
drillers
Foremen, overseers
Labourers
Oil well drillers
Quarriers and rock  drillers
Manufacturing and Mechanical
Owners and managers:
Clothing contractor
611
4
8
737
977
803
Director
Garageman
Manufacturer
President
Publisher
Secretary, etc.
265
25
Foremen
49
Inspectors, testers—chemical
1
2
Inspectors, gaugers—metal
1
Inspectors, scalers—wood
26
Bakers
18
59
Blacksmiths, forgemen
15
5
Boiler makers, platers, riveters
5
12
Boot and shoe repairers
9
Butchers and meat cutters
17
Cabinet and furniture makers
8
64
Coopers
4
Electricians
63
Engravers and Lithographers
7
26
9
46
3
Filers,  grinders, sharpeners
6
Fitters and assemblers
1
Furnacemen, smeltermen, heaters
i 15
Jewellers and watchmakers
19
4
Machinists—metal
88
Mechanics and repairmen
58
Millers—flour and grain
3
Milliners
1
Millwrights
20
(25) Moulders, coremakers,  casters 8
Papers makers 9
Patternmakers 5
Photographers 3
Power station operators 2
Printers,   pressmen,   stereotypers 40
Sawyers—wood 37
Sheet metal workers, tinsmiths 24
Stationary enginemen 63
Tailors 17
Tool makers, die makers, setters 4
Upholsterers 2
Welders and flame cutters 9
Wood machinists, turners, planers 1
Occupations in food:
Canner, candy maker, dairyman 14
Occupations in fur products 3
Occupations in leather products 3
Occupations in liquors and
beverages 3.
Other  occupations  in  metal
products 9
Other occupations in non-metallic
products 5
Other occupations in wood and
paper products 17
Construction
Owners and managers 139
Foremen 15
Brick and stone masons 11
Carpenters 202
Electricians and wiremen 10
Painters, decorators, glaziers 48
Plasterers and lathers 10
Plumbers and pipe fitters 22
Structural iron workers 1
Other construction occupations 19
Transportation   &   Communication
Owners, officials, managers 56
Foremen 34
Inspectors 11
Agents—ticket, station 31
Baggagemen, expressmen 5
Brakemen—railway 2
Bus drivers 3
Captains, mates, pilots 48
Chauffeurs, taxi drivers 4
Conductors—railway 33
Deliverymen 1
Dispatchers 4
Engineering Officers—ship 29
Linemen and servicemen 13
Lockkeepers, canalmen, boatmen 1
Locomotive  engineers 49
Longshoremen and stevedores 16
Radio station operators 5
Seamen, sailors, deckhands 4
Sectionmen and trackmen 3
Street car operators 17
Teamsters, draymen 4
Telegraph operators 16
Telephone operators 1
Truck  drivers 21
Yardmen—railway 2
Other transportation
occupations 102
Trade and Commerce
Owners,  managers,  dealers—retail:
Agents, clothier, druggist, grocer, merchant, optician, etc 327
Owners, managers, dealers-
wholesale:
Advertisers,   brokers,   buyers,
exporters, shippers, etc. 107
Floorwalkers and foremen 4
Advertising agents 7
Brokers and agents 42
Collectors—bills 1
Commercial travellers 10
Credit men 2
Purchasing agents and buyers 16
Sales agents, canvassers 197
Sales persons in stores 25
Other trade occupations 3
Finance
Owners, managers, officials-
finance  and  insurance 112
Insurance agents 99
Real estate agents, dealers 77
Stock and bond brokers 36
Professional Services
Architects 18
Artists and art teachers 2
Authors and editors,
journalists 29
Chemists and metallurgists 59
Clergymen 87
Dentists 45
Draughtsmen and designers 8
Engineers,  civil 142
Engineers, electrical 41
Engineers, mechanical 31
Engineers, mining 33
Judges and magistrates 12
Lawyers and notaries 134
Librarians 3
Musicians and music teachers 14
Physicians and surgeons 145
(26) Professors and college principals
Religious workers
Social welfare workers
Teachers—school
Other professional service occupations
Public and Military Services
Firemen—fire dept.
Government inspectors
Officers—armed forces
Other ranks—armed forces
Policemen and detectives
Postmasters
Postmen and mail carriers
Recreational
Owners  and  managers — amusements
Actors,  showmen,  sportsmen
Motion picture projectionists
Personal
Hotel keepers and managers
Laundry owners and managers
Restaurant and tavern keepers
Barbers
Cleaners and dyers
33
4
10
136
40
19
53
47
23
41
34
36
Cooks 16
Elevator tenders 5
Guards and caretakers 43
Housekeepers,  stewards 14
Janitors 18
Nurses, practical, first aid men   10
Undertakers 5
Waiters 7
Other  personal  service  occupations 4
Clerical
Accountants and auditors 399
Bookkeepers and cashiers 35
Office clerks 122
Shipping clerks 27
Stenographers 4
10
Labourer
2
Labourers  (not agriculture, fish
10
ing, logging, or mining)             37
Other Occupations
29
Invalid                                             8
2
Homemakers                                       4
22
	
41
Total   8,800
18
(27) THE UNIVERSITY OF BRITISH COLUMBIA
REGISTRATION
Session
1933-34
1934-35
1935-36
1936-57
1937-38
1938-39
1939-40
1940-41
1941-42
1942-43
1943-44
1944-45
Arts &
Science
. 1147
_ 1238
. 1337
_ 1499
- 1590
- 1634
. 1664
_ 1724
. 1763
. 1744
. 1709
... 2098
Applied
Science
287
320
336
366
416
419
434
466
488
522
515
546
1945-46   _. 4814 1083
1946-47   _ 5666 2003
Nursing
48
57
68
47
50
59
65
60
63
98
67
112
128
141
Agricui
ture
63
71
80
95
100
117
139
166
155
140
113
147
si
406
552
Law
Social
Work
51
Teacher
Training
Course
Total
Winter
Session
Session
Summer
Short
Courses
61
1606
370
124
2100
66
1652
377
165
2294
62
1883
464
278
2625
42
2049
566
306
2921
67
2223
650
279
3152
57
2286
659
290
3235
69
2371
715
253
3339
71
2487
587
206
3280
68
2537
457
184
3178
34
2538
329
98
2965
26
2430
441
131
3002
20
2974
861
113
3948)
—F.x-Service nersonnel
278)    4226
9151)
47
6632
2368
151
in—F.x-Servire oersonnel
2014)   11165
10826
46
8741
1791
294 THE UNIVERSITY OF BRITISH COLUMBIA
DEGREES CONFERRED
B.A.Sc.
Grand
Year
M.A.
B.A.
B.Com.
BED.
M.A.SC.
B.H.E.
B.A.Sc.
B.S.F.
Nursing
B.S.W.
M.S.A.
B.SA.
Total
Total
1934
11
204
31
3
37
	
5
_
4
12
307
3583
October
6
36
5
___
1
i   1,
5
     -
	
—
1
3
57
3640
1935
14
196
23
	
8
—
57
	
13
—
2
19
332
3972
October
12
45
5
	
,n
5
	
	
——-
—
1
68
4040
1936
15
175
21
	
6
,„,,,
50
_i_
7
__
5
16
295
4335
October
10
38
1
	
2
i
3
_*-
	
	
3
2
59
4394
1937
21
190
28
,   ,„
4
—
48
 .
2
-	
7
14
314
4708
October
9
54
8
...,
__
—
6
—■*
1    .
	
1
1
80
4788
1938
20
204
31
,    |
6
"    -i-
56
—
7
	
3
19
346
5134
October
10
53
3
2
(	
4
—
	
	
	
5
77
5211
1939
19
217
22
1M|
7
1|M
71
—J
8
	
4
22
370
5581
October
5
63
6
>
_
*_
9
—.
	
	
1
2
86
5667
1940
30
212
37
i „    -
4
•—
71
.—
13
	
3
18
388
6055
October
6
62
1
,;,„ ;
	
i,
71
«	
	
	
1
3
74
6129
1941
21
189
26
	
7
'-— -
81
1
8
-i—
2
19
354
6483
October
8
73
9
I
— -
	
	
	
—
3
94
6577
1942
14
170
52
9
__-
82
3
6
—
2
26
364
6941
October
12
51
1
3
_
JS
2
	
	
—
2
5
76
7017
1943
13
167
31
2
3
i   I, ■■■
92
2
12
—»
3
25
350
7367
October
8
51
1
3
_
I, lf
I
	
	
_
1
4
69
7436
1944
6
163
37
1
7
->—.
87
3
9
■-—.
1
24
338
7774
October
1
45
4
7
,	
■" —
I
1
1
™
—
3
63
7837
1945
10
189
43
4
97
3
8
	
2
19
375
8212
October
5
41
4
8
4
__
3
	
—
	
1
5
71
8283
1946
12
220
54
9
2
15
112
12
19
37
1
32
525
8808
October
12
96
56
19
10
	
5
1
2
1
3
4
209
9017
1947
25
385
151
15
14
28
131
9
16
56
11
52
893
9910 THE UNIVERSITY OF BRITISH COLUMBIA
DIPLOMAS ISSUED
Year
1934
October
1935
October
1936
Teacher
Training
61
3
65
1
60
October
1937
October
1938
October
1939
October
1940
October
1941
October
1942
October
1943
October
1944
October
1945
October
1946
October
1947
39
1
65
54
1
66
2
68
59
28
24
21
45
41
(June)
Public Health
Nursing
10
15
15
16
5
18
2
14
1
12
10
1
27
29
1
32
2
39  (fune)
5
48
Social
Work
3
3
7
12
19
1
15
2
24
3
23
1
22
4
17
2
12
8
24
1
18
Occupational
Course In
Agriculture
3
18
38
Totals
71
6
86
8
75
12
59
25
87
17
74
26
86
25
80
22
77
18
57
12
61
26
57
20
102
5
127
THE UNIVERSITY OF BRITISH COLUMBIA
HONORARY DEGREES CONFERRED
Year
LL.D.
1939
3
Prev. years
8
(Honoris Causa)
1940
1
—
1930
1
1941
_
Total
60
1931
1942
4
D.Sc
1932
2
1943
1944
1
1933
8
1944
(Oct.)
4
1945
2
1934
1
1945
1
1 946
2
1935
2
1945
(Oct.)
9
19-16    (Oct.)
1
1936
6
1946
1
	
1937
1946
(Oct.)
1
Grand  Total
66
1938
5
1947
2 October, 1947.
LOCATION OF GRADUATES, October, 1947
Number in:
Vancouver  	
4091
Other parts of B.C	
2159
Other parts of Canada
628
Great Britain 	
70
United States of America	
284
Other Countries	
50
Number deceased                             	
229
Number whose address is unknown	
1297
Total
8808
N.B. — These figures do not include original members
of Convocation.
(8n Scholarships, Prizes, and Bursaries
During the past year a total of approximately $96,000 was
made available to students in the form of scholarships, prizes, and
bursaries. This has meant that, in addition to the 53.4% of the
student body who are receiving financial assistance under the Veterans Rehabilitation program, an additional 5 or 6% of the non-
veteran students are receiving some measure of financial help in the
form of:
(a) Scholarships or fellowships which are given for outstanding
achievement during one year to students who are continuing
their studies or research for another year;
(b) Prizes, which are given at the end of the academic year for
work of special merit during that session;
(c) Bursaries, which are provided for students of special ability
who are also in need of financial assistance in order to continue their education.
Scholarships and Prizes
Almost all scholarships, fellowships and prizes at the University
are either endowed or are maintained as annual gifts by private
donors.
Last year 130 individual students were awarded scholarships
to the value of approximately $36,000, and 50 received prizes to
the value of $4,000.
Bursaries and Loans
Bursaries at the University are provided from three main sources: the Dominion-Provincial Student Aid and Provincial Loan
Fund; the University Special Bursary Fund, and the named bursaries established at the University by various individual organizations and persons.
(32) The largest source, the Dominion-Provincial Fund, last year
provided assistance to some 200 students, to the value of about
$40,000. Bursaries provided from this fund are part gift, part loan.
Each student received 60% of the grant as a gift and 40% as a loan,
which is interest free until one year after he enters gainful employment, at which time he is expected to begin repayment.
The University Bursary Fund, an annual grant set aside by the
Board of Governors, provided some 30 bursaries to the total value
of $6500, while the various "private donor" bursaries gave further
assistance totalling over $10,000 to approximately 70 others. In all,
therefore, 300 students received assistance to the value of $56,500
under the combined bursary programs.
Despite the fact that increasing numbers of promising students are receiving a certain amount of financial assistance as a
result of their own efforts and abilities, there are still too many
well-qualified young men and women in the province to whom a
university education is out of reach for financial reasons.
The University is extremely grateful to the governments and
private donors who are helping to bring a university education
within the reach of an increasing number of those who are most
qualified to benefit from it. Acknowledgement of benefactions
is made in an appendix to this report.
(33) Gifts, Grants and Bequests
The following list acknowledges gifts, grants, and bequests
received during the period September 1st, 1946 to August 31st,
1947.
Grants and Gifts for Research
and Research Equipment
Atomic Energy Commission—to the Department of Physics for construction of Van de Graaf Generator $32,500.00
B.C. Forest Products, Limited—for expenses of research work in forest
entomology 1,000.00
British Columbia Electric Railway Company, Limited—to the Department of Mechanical and Electrical Engineering for special
research equipment 600.00
British Columbia Research Council—to the Department of Physics for
research on air conditioners and the electrical analogue calculator   1,000.00
British Columbia Telephone Company, Limited—for special equipment in Mechanical and Electrical Engineering and Engineering
physics 1,500.00
Canadian   Fishing   Company,   Limited—supplementary   donation   for
continuation of research on fish oils 1,000.00
Consolidated Mining and Smelting Company of Canada—
(a) for scientific research 50,000.00
(b) 4,060 lbs. of lead to be used for the protection of investigators
in nuclear physics.   Value 406.00
Geological Society of America—to the Department of Geology and
Geography
(a) for an investigation of the relationships of plants to ore
deposits 2,000.00
(b) for special research on fossial pleospongia 400.00
National Cancer Institute—to the Department of Physics for research
on the effects of radiation from tracers on tissue 1,500.00
National Research Council—to the Department of Physics
(a) Synthetic Rubber Programme: continuation of present work       6,750.00
(b) Chalk River Atomic Energy Research Programme:
(i)  ion source development. 1,750.00
(ii)  disintegration schemes and energy levels of radioactive
isotopes 2,279.00
(c) General Research Programme:
(i)   biophysical research on amino acids 2,000.00
(ii)  Raman and infra-red spectrum 2,800.00
(iii)  Nuclear magnetic moments 1,275.00
(d) Geophysics:   distortion  of  audio   frequency electromagnetic
fields by electrical conductor 1,000.00
National Research Council—to the Department of Chemistry from
Chalk River Laboratories:
(a) for rubber investigation 2,000.00
(b) apparatus valued at 2,000.00
(34) Safeway Stores Limited, in cooperation with the Empress manufacturing Company, Vancouver, and the Fraser Valley Growers, Mission,
B.C., for study of the small fruits industry 2,000.00
Vancouver Milk Distributors Association—for milk cost survey 1,600.00
Victoria Pasteurized Milk Distributors—for milk cost survey 400.00
Gifts for University Buildings, Lands
and Forest Areas
Hillel Foundation, Vancouver Lodge No.  668, B'nai  B'rith—for a
study hut on the Campus 4,000.00
H. R. MacMillan Export Company, Limited—for the development
of the Forest Research Area at Haney, B.C. 5,000.00
Ogilvie Flour Mills Limited—for the Poultry Mortality Building
supplementing a previous gift of $5,000.00 from various feed
companies 1,000.00
Pharmaceutical Association of the Province of British Columbia—
for equipment in the proposed Pharmacy Building 5,000.00
Estate of the late Hugo Brash—bequest to the Faculty of Agriculture
and the Department of Animal Husbandry 1,000.00
Gifts for Chairs of Instruction, Lectureships,
and Special Courses
B.C. Forest Products Limited—$4,000.00 a year for five years to establish a Professorship in Forest Entomology.   First instalment 4,000.00
B.C. Packers, Limited—third instalment for Course in Fisheries 7,500.00
Canadian Foundation for the Advancement of Pharmacy—for assist-
antships in Pharmacy.   Total 600.00
Dominion Department of Fisheries—increase in grant for the Adult
Education directed by the Department of University Extension   5,000.00
Dominion Government Grant—for the Department of Social Work
(1947-48) 10,166.40
Mr. Robert Fiddes—$5,000.00 a year for 10 years for a Chair of Music.
Second instalment 5,000.00
Junior League of Vancouver—for the Department of Social Work.
Third instalment 3,000.00
Mr. H. R. MacMillan, C.B.E.—
(a) $5,000.00 a year for 5 years for work in Silviculture.    First
instalment 5,000.00
(b) $500,00 a year for 5 years to provide special lecturers in
Forestry.    Second  instalment 500.00
H. R. MacMillan Export Company Limited—$4,000.00 a year for 5
years to establish a Professorship in Forest Mensuration.
First instalment 4,000,00
Vancouver Board of Trade, Advertising and Sales Bureau—for the
course in Advertising conducted by the Department of Commerce.
Second annual instalment 1,000.00
(35) Special Trust Funds
Alaska Pink Sales Limited—through Mr. Walter J. Koerner—to establish the "Otto Koerner Memorial Trust Fund", the interest on
which is to be used for the purchase of books and materials for
music  and  fine  arts. $25,000.00
Class of Arts '22—to be held in  trust  for some special purpose. 307.28
University Chapter, I.O.D.E.—transfer of funds from the "University
Chapter, I.O.D.E. Loan Fund for Women" to a new account for
the  establishment  of a  University  Art  Centre. 2,500.00
Miscellaneous Gifts
Mrs. J. W. deB. Farris—for the Art Loan Fund. 10.00
Mr.  C.  D.  Houghland—for equipment  in  Pharmacy. 55.00
Marwell Construction Company—for special journals and technical
books in Architecture. 600.00
Mr. B. Knowlton—for equipment in Pharmacy. 55.00
Mr. C. Lightbody—for books or equipment in Pharmacy. 55.00
Mrs. Charles Milne, California—to the Department of Home Economics, in memory of her sister, Mrs. Peter McNaughton, a damask
tablecloth  and a cash  donation of
Mr. and Mrs. Leon Koerner and Mr. and Mrs. Walter Koerner—for
the Art Loan Fund 100.00
Mr. A. W. Scott—for equipment in Pharmacy 55.00
Social Work Students—for the Social Work Department 150.00
Mrs. Douglas Stewart—for the President's Fund 200.00
Veterans' Land Act, Mr. I. T. Barnet, District Supervisor—to assist
in some phase of work under the Act
Vancouver Island Canadian Association for Social Workers—for the
Social Work Students' Fund 20.00
Anonymous—for the purchase of Totem Poles for the University       $5,000.00
Anonymous—for the President's Fund 50.00
Dr. George S. Allen—books  (24 vols.)  for Botany and Biology
Aluminum  Company of Canada Limited—25 pounds of Aluminum
Casting Alloys for Mining and Metallurgy.
Bond Dealer's Association—industrial manual, supplements thereto
and binder
Botanic Garden, Basel, Switzerland—seeds and herbarium specimens
British Columbia Telephone Company Limited—length of 600 pair
telephone cables for the Communications Laboratory
Cave and Company Limited—mineralite collection: Mounted specimens
of fluorescent minerals
Copper Development Association, London, England — collection of
publications on copper metallurgy
Crossman Machinery Company Limited—early type of bipolar electric
generator
(36) Dominion Arboretum and Botanic Gardens, Ottawa—seeds and herbarium specimens
Dominion Oxygen Company Limited—complete series of welding instructions and process literature
Electro Metallurgical Company of Canada, Limited, Welland, Ontario-
samples of pure ferro-alloys and inoculants
Professor G. A. Gillies—valuable specimen of telluride gold ore from
Calgoorlie, Australia.
Miss Jane Halling—a dentalium necklace from an Indian grave, Alaska.
International Nickel Company of Canada Limited—material for class
room purposes,
Marshall-Wells Limited—collection of alloy steels.
Morton Arboretum, Lisle, Illinois—seeds and herbarium specimens.
Mr. R. C. McCrossan, Dr. A. Lawson and associates of the former
"World Museum"—pleistocene horse skull, Alaska.
Mr. Neil MacGregor, Chilliwack, B.C.—herbarium of the late Mr.
H. B. MacGregor.
Mrs. R. E. McKechnie—billiard table for student veterans.
National   Pressure   Cooker   Company   Limited—Presto   Cooker   and
pressure cooker.
Northland Automatic Appliances Limited   (B.C. Distributors) —
Bendix Automatic Home Laundry.
Pharmaceutical Association of the Province of British Columbia
equipment and supplies for Pharmacy.
Provincial Division of Child Welfare—books for Social Work.
Pumps and Power Limited—hydraulic turbine.
Robinson Electric Company Limited—steam pressure regulating leslie
valve for demonstration purposes.
Royal Botanic Gardens, Kew—seeds and herbarium specimens.
Royal Botanic Gardens, Edinburgh—seeds and herbarium specimens.
Dr. Gustav Schilder, Vancouver—mercury vapor quartz lamp with
transformer and stand.
Professor G. Spencer—fruit of Kigelia africana, Africa.
Hon. H. H. Stevens—complete set of "The Report and Evidence of the
Royal Commission on Price Spreads."
Survey Map Store, Iveagh Estate, London, England—maps for
Geography and Geology.
Union Steamship Company Limited—complete radar set for the Department of Mechanical and Electrical Engineering.
University Women's Club of Vancouver—brass plaque in memory of
of the late Judge Helen Gregory McGill, LL.D., to be placed in the
Library.
Westland Iron and Steel Foundries Limited—specimens of pig-iron
and ferro-alloys.
Mrs. G. E. Whitner—Indian artifacts from Lytton and Lillooet, B.C.
37) Wilkinson's Limited—length of inconel tubing for special application
in Mining and Metallurgy laboratories.
Mrs. Wallace O. Wright—mounted mule-deer head.
Mr. A. R. C. Yuill—section of hollow copper conductor of the Boulder
Dam transmission line type.
LL.D. cap, gown and hood of the late Judge Helen Gregory McGill.
Dr. Annie H. Abel Anderson, Aberdeen, Washington—427 volumes and
a large collection of pamphlets, offprints, etc.
Mrs. Percy Bengough—file of the Trades and Labor Congress Journal,
1937-46, and a gift subscription to keep the set up to date.
Miss J. E. Bostock, Monte Creek, B.C.—large collection of Dominion
Government  Publications.
British Council—gift subscriptions of the Sphere, Army Quarterly,
Journal of the Royal United Services Institution, Syren and Ship-,
ping, and Marine Engineer.
Mr. J. R. Browning—set of 54 mounted photographs of various scenes
and historic buildings in Great Britain.
Mr. Isaac Burpee, Portland, Oregon—set of Lockley's Columbia River
Valley and a set of Clark's History of the Williamette Valley, and
photostat copies of a number of rare pamphlets.
Canadian Embassy, Paris—set of Mortier's edition of La Chanson de
Roland, consisting of an introductory monograph and ten volumes
of text, printed in Paris 1939-40.
Custodian of Enemy Property—large collection of miscellaneous literature in German, most of which came originally from the German
Embassy in Ottawa.
Mr. Henry Doyle—collection of books and magazines, including rare
early volumes of the National Geographic.
Mr. J. W. Eastham, Provincial Pathologist — large collection of
pamphlets, bulletins, periodicals, numbering 4000 items in all.
Dr. Lachlan Gilchrist, Department of Physics, University of Toronto—Third edition of Newton's Principia (1726), and a copy of
the Elements of Euclid (1714).
Government of Great Britain—various military maps.
Mrs. Don Haet (Kira Bounina) — 16 folders of music scores, mainly
arrangements for small orchestras.
Mr. W. E. Ireland, Provincial Librarian and Archivist—nearly complete set of the British Columbia Sessional Papers, 1875-1936.
Mr. W. F. Maxwell (Member of Arts '16) —official publications from
the House of Commons Debates, Senate Debates and British
Columbia Sessional Papers for most of the years from 1896 to 1902.
Mr. Winfield Matheson, North Star, Alberta—eight books for the
William and Mary Forbes Contribution.
Mrs. Denis Murphy—copy of The Trial between James Annesley and
Richard, Early of Anglesey, from the library of the late Mr. Justice
Murphy.
(38) Mr. H. R. MacMillan—a gift to the total of $10,000.00 for the purpose
of establishing a comprehensive collection in Forestry and related
fields important to the forest industries in British Columbia.
Mr. H. R. MacMillan—collection of old maps   (Pacific Northwest).
Provincial Library, Victoria—55 volumes of yearbooks, almanacs, etc.
Vancouver Daily Province — complete file of the Vancouver Daily
Province from 1898. Any necessary binding done by the Vancouver
Daily Province.   Also current issues of the Province.
Mr. Henry Wearne, Quick, B.C.—six of the eight parts of Bowdler,
Sharpe's Monograph of the Birds of Paradise and G. P. Baker's
Calico Painting and Printing in the East Indies in the 17th and
18th Centuries; together with a portfolio containing 32 colored
plates.
»
Vancouver  Sun,  through   Mr.   Charles  Bailey,   business  manager—a
model C Recordak microfilm reader costing about $479.00.
Vancouver Women's Musical Society—collection of scores and sheet
music.
Mr. A. S. Wooton—nearly complete set of the Proceedings of the
Institute of Civil Engineers, 1909-1935, and the Journal, 1935-46.
Miscellaneous—other useful and generous gifts from: Dr. F. J. Belin-
fante; Dr. Lloyd Bolton of Santa Clara University; Dr. C. Borden;
Mr. Frank Buckland of Kelowna; Dr. W. A. Clemens; Dr. Dorothy
Dallas; Mr. J. Duff of Sidney, B.C.; Mrs. Mildred Fahrni; Mr. John
Helders; Dr. G. Hooley; Mrs. Gordon D. Herbert of Kelowna;
Mr. A. Hotson; Mr. and Mrs. W. H. Hudson; Mrs. J. G. A.
Hutcheson; Judge J. A. Jackson; Miss Dallas Johnson; Dr. L. S.
Klinck; Mr. D. H. LePage; Major F. V. Longstaff of Victoria;
President N. A. M. MacKenzie; Mr. D. W. Oswald; Dr. Lome
Pierce of Toronto; Dr. William Proctor; Mrs. Jonathan Rogers;
Mr. A. T. Ruffle; Dr. W. A. Seyer; Professor F. H. Soward;
Mrs. Nelson Spencer; Miss Julia Stockett; Dr. W. H. Taylor (Arts
'28) of Washington, D.C; Dr. H. V. Warren; the Canadian
Medical Association; the Canadian Pharmaceutical Association;
the Canadian Palestine Committee; the Library of the College of
Puget Sound; the Swedish Consulate; the Vancouver Poetry
Society; the Vancouver Public Library.
Gifts to the Law Library
Attorney General for Ontario—Statutes.
Mr. H. E. Bond—Canadian Bar Review and B.C. Reports.
Messrs. Bourne and Desbrisay—B.C. Reports.
Mr. H. R. Bray—English Reports Annotated 1866-1900.
Mrs. N. P. Buckingham—textbooks and reports.
Messrs. Campney, Owen and Murphy—textbooks.
Canada Law Book Company—Notable British Trials.
Mr. J. Chalmers—Hansard  (Can.).
Mr. George C. Crux—Miscellaneous and Canada Law Reports.
(39) Dean George F. Curtis—textbooks.
Mr. Thomas Elliott, B.C. Yukon Chamber of Mines—Miscellaneous.
Mr. C T. Hamilton—textbooks and statutes of Canada and British
Columbia.
Messrs. Holgate and Summerfield—miscellaneous.
Mr. Gilbert D. Kennedy—textbooks.
Mr. Garfield A. King—Canadian Bar Review and miscellaneous.
Messrs. Ladner, Carmichael and Downs—textbooks.
Mrs. A. P. Luxton—Halsbury  (1st ed.)  and textbooks.
Mr. J. A. Macdonald—Reports.
Mr. R. M. Macdonald—rare old nominate Report.
Messrs. McDougall, Morrison and Jestley—Canada Bar Review and
Supreme Court Reports.
Mrs. Jessie McGill—Corpus Juris.
Mr. M. A. McPherson, K.C.-Hansard (Can.)   1917-34.
Mr. Elmore Meredith—Revised Rejorts.
The Minister of Labour, Ottawa—Labour Gazette.
Mr. T. G. Norris, K.C—textbooks
Powell River Corporation, Powell River, B.C.   (R. H. Scanton) —
Statutes of B.C., Statutes of Canada, etc.
Mr. S. J. Remnant—textbooks.
Mr. H. Richmond—Canadian Bar Review and Miscellaneous.
Mr. Bruce Robertson—Common Law Reports.
Mr. Henry Smilie—textbooks.
Mr. David Spencer—Case books and Reports.
Dr. C. W. Topping—textbooks.
Mr. R. H. Tupper—boxes of books and papers.
Mr. George H. R. Turner—textbook.
Mr. R. K. Walkem—Reports.
His Honour Judge D. Whiteside—Reports and texts.
Mr. A. M. Whiteside, K.C—sets of All England Reports, and Miscellaneous.
Anonymous—British Columbia Reports and Canada Bar Review.
New Fellowships, Scholarships, Prizes
and Bursaries
(List also includes Awards offered under revised terms.   Unless otherwise stated,
the amount given is the total annual value.)
FELLOWSHIPS
British Columbia Packers Limited—for research and study in fisheries,
Session 1947-48. $1,200.00 Swift Canadian Company Limited—for research in food products and
nutrition. 1,000.00
Scholarships
British Columbia Teachers' Federation Scholarship—Scholarship for
teachers in the Summer Session increased from $50.00 to $100.00
annually. $100.00
British Columbia Telephone Company, Limited—graduate scholarships
for Physics and Engineering in the Session 1947-48 to the total of 2,500.00
Canadian Association for the Advancement of Pharmacy—two awards
for students in Pharmacy to the annual total of 200.00
Canadian Association for Health, Physical Education, and Recreation—annual Scholarship for Physical Education. 50.00
Dafoe Foundation—a Scholarship awarded in May, 1947, to a student
in Social Sciences. 200.00
Estate of the late Alan Boag—a Scholarship awarded annually by the
trustees of the Estate for an essay on Socialism. 250.00
International Brotherhood of Pulp, Sulphite and Paper Mill Workers' Local 312, Ocean Falls—Scholarship increased from $200.00
to $250.00 annually. 250.00
Kelly, Douglas and Company Limited—the Nabob Scholarship in Food
Technology.   Given annually. 300.00
Mr. I. J. KLEiN-gift of a trust fund of $3,500.00 to establish the N. Leo
Klein Memorial Scholarship on a permanent basis. An annual
scholarship in Commerce. 100.00
Mr. Leon J. Ladner and Family—an annual scholarship to be called
the T. E. and M. E. Ladner Memorial Scholarship—Donation of
$2,500.00 towards a trust fund and $300.00 for the first scholarship.    300.00
Players'  Club  Alumni—an  annual  scholarship  for  members  of  the
Players' Club. 50.00
Summer Session  Students' Association—original scholarship  increased
from $40.00 to $75.00 annually. $  75.00
Second scholarship also provided (Annual amount indefinite at present.)
Mr.  Austin  C.  Taylor—Boultbee-Bosustow  Memorial  Scholarship  in
Mining and Metallurgy.   An annual award. 250.00
Vancouver Primrose Club—an annual scholarship named the Hon.
R. L. Maitland Memorial Scholarship, for students in Law. Contribution of $450.00 to a trust fund and $150.00 for the first award.    150.00
Winspear, Hamilton, Anderson and Company—Scholarship for Commerce   (first awards to be made in September, 1948). 300.00
Bursaries
Allied Officers' Club Auxiliary—$2,500.00 to provide emergency assistance from time to time for veterans. Also a trust fund of $2,500.00
to establish an annual bursary for veterans of annual value $75.00.      75.00
American Women's Club—annual bursary for students in Social Work.    100.00
Mr. R. G. Cole, Hamilton, Ontario—bursaries in Mining and Metallurgy, Session 1947-48. 300.00
41 Mr. W. J. H. Dicks, Sidney, B.C.-trust fund of $5,000.00 now established to provide the Geldart Riadore Bursary.                                $ 150.00
Mr. C T. McHATTiE-the Ellen Ethel McHattie Bursary for Social Work. 300.00
Mr. and Mrs. J. S. McLean, Toronto—bursaries for the Session 1947-48. 1,000.00
Nursery School Association of Victoria—bursaries for students proceeding to Nursery School Work elsewhere.   Session 1947-48. 500.00
Rotary Club of Vancouver—bursary for Social Work, Session 1947-48. 300.00
Mr. Louis Toban—annual bursary for students in Pharmacy. 100.00
University   Women's  Club  of  Vancouver —an  annual  bursary  for
women students. 100.00
Vancouver Bar Association—annual bursaries for students in Law. 200.00
Anonymous—the sum of $1,000.00 to be awarded to a worthy student
in instalments over his undergraduate course.   Total amount 1,000.00
Prizes
B.C. Tree Fruits Limited, Kelowna—Special prizes awarded in August,
1947, to students in Commerce. $   300.00
Hewitt Bostock Memorial Lecture Prize—for the best essay on the
Bostock Lecture. 25.00
Canada Law Book Company—annual book prize for students in law.      25.00
Chemical Institute: of  Canada—annual book prizes for students in
Chemistry. 50.00
J. W. Dafoe Foundation Prizes—prizes open to students in Economics
or History in the Session 1946-47. 200.00
Entomological Society of the Province of British Columbia—annual
book prize for Zoology. 15.00
Frosst Proficiency Awards—prizes offered annually through the Pharmaceutical Association of Canada by the Charles E. Frosst Company,
Montreal, to the total of 225.00
Mr. H. R. MacMillan, C.B.E.—second instalment of $750.00 to provide
a fund of $2,250.00 for prizes in Forestry. 750.00
Northern Peat Moss Company, Limited—prizes for Agriculture in the
Session 1947-48. 100.00
Dr. Wilder Penfield—special prize for 1946-47. 100.00
Toronto General Trusts Corporation—annual book prize for Law. 25.00
Trail Board of Trade Prizes—awards for Architecture.   Total donation      75.00
Transportation and Customs Bureau, Vancouver Board of Trade—
prizes in Commerce for the Session 1946-47 to the total of 325.00
Vancouver Bar Association—prize for students in Law, Session 1946-47.    100.00
Anonymous—prize for Home Economics, Session  1946-47. 50.00
Anonymous—Special book prize for Law, Session 1946-47. 25.00
Anonymous—prize for Mathematics, Session 1946-47. 50.00
(42) Medals
Frank W. Horner, Limited, Montreal—gold medal for Pharmacy.
Law Society of British Columbia—gold medal for Law.
Board of Governors—Silver Medal for Arts and Science.
Student Loan Funds
Mr. H. R. MacMillan, C.B.E.—fourth instalment of a loan fund of
$2,000.00 for Forestry students. $ 500.00
Spring Session Students' Association,  1946—emergency loan fund for
veterans. 2,054.60
Summer Session Students' Association—loan fund for teacher-students. 300.00
Anonymous—loan fund for Home Economics students. 375.00
Anonymous—loan fund, at present for the use of student veterans. 1,500.00
Previously Established Awards
Maintained in the Session 1946-47
(Unless otherwise stated the amount given is the total annual value.)
Alaska Pine Company Limited—Scholarship. 600.00
Alberta Meat Company Limited—bursary 50.00
Alliance Francaise—bursary. 50.00
Alumni Association, University of B.C.—bursary. 50.00
American Women's Club—bursary. 100.00
Mr. and Mrs. Daniel M. Armstead—scholarship and prize. 300.00
Association of Professional Engineers—book prizes. 125.00
B.C. Drugs Limited—scholarship. 150.00
Mrs. Angela Bell—bursary (trust fund). 150.00
Beverley Cayley Scholarship   (provided under the will of the late
Mrs. Cayley) 100.00
B'nai B'rith District No. 4 Hillel Foundation—scholarship. 250.00
B'nai B'rith Auxiliary No. 77—scholarship. 50.00
Mr. and Mrs. J. L. Bolocan—prize. 25.00
Britannia Mining and Smelting Company, Limited—scholarship. 250.00
British Columbia Co-operative Seed Growers' Association—bursary. 100.00
British Columbia Electric Railway Company Limited—scholarships 1,000.00
British Columbia Fruit Growers Association 125.00
British Columbia Loggers' Association—bursary 225.00
British Columbia Lumber Manufacturers' Association—prizes 175.00
British Columbia Sugar Refining Company Limited—scholarships. 2,500.00
Mr. P. W. Burbidge—scholarships 250.00
(43) Canadian Forest Products Limited—scholarships and prizes. $ 500.00
Canadian Industries Limited—fellowship. 750.00
Canadian   Pulp and Paper Association, Western  Branch—fellowship.
(Not awarded.) 1,000.00
Cariboo Gold Quartz Mining Company Limited—scholarship. 200.00
Carswell Company Limited, Toronto—book prizes.                                $ 40.00
Mr. S. J. Cohen—bursary  (trust fund). 150.00
Consolidated Mining and Smelting Company of Canada Limited—
Fellowship. 1,200.00
Convocation, University of British Columbia—prize 50.00
Crofton House Alumni—scholarship. 175.00
Mr. G. T. Cunningham—prizes and scholarships   (not awarded). 150.00
Robert S. Day and Son Limited—bursary. 150.00
Delta Gamma Fraternity—bursary. 75.00
Delta Gamma Fraternity—bursary for blind student. 100.00
Mr. William Dorbils—scholarship.
(contribution of $500.00 a year for four years to provide a scholarship of $2,000.00 to be awarded in 1950) 500.00
Dunsmuir Scholarship—(provided by a trust fund). 150.00
Engineering Inst, of Canada—Prize 25.00
Engineering Institute of Canada  (Vancouver Branch) —book prize. 25.00
Faculty Women's Club—bursary and scholarship 200.00
Gamma Phi Beta Sorority, Alpha Lambda Chapter—bursary. 50.00
General Construction Company Limited—scholarships! 500.00
Gladstone Chapter No. 6 C J., Order of Ahepa—prize. 100.00
Major General D. M. Hogarth, Toronto—scholarships. 250.00
Imperial Order Daughters of the Empire—scholarship   (trust fund) 100.00
Mr. T. Ingledow—prizes. 100.00
John Inglis Company Limited, Toronto—scholarships. 250.00
I.O.O.F. Grand Lodge, B.C.—bursaries. 1,200.00
Mr. J. R. J. Llewellyn Jones—prize. 50.00
Khaki University and Y.M.C.A. Bursaries (trust fund). 500.00
Mr. William N. Kelly—prize. 15.00
Mr.' Thomas H. Kirk—scholarship. 100.00
Kiwassa Club of Vancouver—bursaries. 600.00
Brigadier Noel D. Lambert—scholarship. 200.00
Lady Laurier Club—bursary. 100.00
Lauder Mercer and Company Limited—bursary. 250.00
Lefevre Gold Medal and Scholarship (provided by a trust fund established by the late Mrs. Lefevre). 150.00
Captain LeRoy Memorial Scholarship (trust fund established by Universities Service Club). 150.00
(44) Lions Service CLUB-fellowship. $1,500.00
Mrs. Mary C. Lipsett—bursary. 300.00
McGill Graduates   (trust fund established by the McGill Graduates
Society of British Columbia). 125.00
Mrs. D. A. McKee—prize (provided by trust fund) 30.00
Native Daughters of British Columbia—scholarship. 50.00
News-Herald—prizes. 350.00
Nicholson Scholarships  (trust fund established by the late Dr. F. J.
Nicholson). 1,000.00
Mr. G. W. Norgan—scholarships and prizes 1,000.00
Northern Electric Company Limited—prize. 100.00
Pacific Mills Limited—scholarship. 250.00
Pacific Meat Company Limited—bursary. 200.00
P.E.O. Sisterhoods, Vancouver Chapters—bursary. 150.00
Mr. J. W. Pattison—bursaries. 200.00
Pharmaceutical Association of the Province of British Columbia—
Scholarship and prize. 150.00
Mr. R. J. Pop—scholarship. 150.00
Powell River Company Limited—scholarship. 700.00
Price, Waterhouse & Co.—scholarship. 250.00
Provincial Department of Health and Welfare (Health Branch) —prizes 100.00
Flying Officer Rev. George Robt. Pringle Memorial Bursary. 200.00
Provincial Council of British Columbia, Canadian Daughters' League
bursaries. 200.00
R.C.A.F. Veterans'  Fund   (established  by  the  Wartime  Convalescent
Homes, War Charity Fund, Inc.). 300.00
Rotary Club of Vancouver—bursaries. 1,000.00
R. Randolph Bruce Scholarships  (trust fund established by the late
Honourable R. Randolph Bruce). 200.00
Royal Institution (trust funds) —scholarships. 1,600.00
Miss Marion A. Shaffer—bursary. 200.00
Shanahan's Limited—scholarship. 500.00
Shaw Memorial Scholarship  (trust fund established by the friends of
the late James Curtis Shaw). 125.00
Shell Oil Company of Canada Limited—fellowship. '       1,075.00
Standard Oil Company of British Columbia Limited—fellowship. 1,100.00
Summerland Scholarship—established by the citizens of Summerland.      250.00
Col. and Mrs. W. G. Swan—bursary. 250.00
Teamsters' Joint Council No. 36—bursary. 250.00
Terminal City Club (trust fund established by Members of the Club).    100.00
David ThOm Bursaries and Scholarships (provided by trust funds from
the David Thom Estate). 400.00
45 Timber Preservers' Limited—prizes.                                                             $ 135.00
United Empire Loyalists Association—silver medal and cash prize. 25.00
University Women's Club—bursary. 100.00
Woman's Christian  Temperance  Union of British Columbia—prize.
(not awarded) 50.00
Vancouver Daily Province—scholarship. 250.00
Vancouver Panhellenic Alumnae Association—bursary. 200.00
Vancouver Sun—scholarships. 600.00
Vancouver Section National Council of Jewish Women—bursary. 100.00
Vancouver Women's Canadian Club—scholarships   (partly maintained
by trust fund). 300.00
Hon. W. C. Woodward—scholarships. 250.00
Anonymous—G. M. Dawson Scholarship. 50.00
Anonymous—International Studies Prize  (provided from a trust fund). 30.00
Special Awards
His Excellency the Governor-General of Canada—gold medal.
Kiwanis Club of Vancouver—gold medal.
Sigma Tau Upsilon Honorary Agricultural Fraternity—gold medal.
Acknowledgements
Contributors to the Dean of Women's Fund—
Kappa Kappa Gamma Sorority.
Kappa Kappa Gamma Mothers' Club.
Alumnae of University of Toronto (Marion McElhaney Memorial Bursary)
Dominion-Provincial Student  Aid Fund and Provincial Loan Fund—
Approximately $40,000.00 in bursaries and loans awarded to 200
students in attendance at the University of British Columbia.
French Government Medals, Book Prizes and Scholarships—
awarded to graduates of the University of British Columbia.
Imperial Oil Limited—scholarship of $300.00 awarded to a graduate of
the University of British Columbia.
Imperial Order Daughters of the Empire—overseas scholarships
awarded to two graduates of the University of British Columbia.
Rhodes Scholarship Trust.
Vancouver Men's Canadian Club—because of whose efforts many of the
scholarships available for students were obtained.
(46) SCHOLARSHIPS, PRIZES, FELLOWSHIPS AND BURSARIES AWARDED TO GRADUATES
1946 - 1947
During the year many scholarships, fellowships, and bursaries have been won by graduates of the University.   The
following list does not include awards which have been made by the Senate of the University of British Columbia.
—Scholarship
—Teaching Fellowship
— Teaching Fellowship
—Scholarship
-Ramsay Wright Memorial Scholarship
Adcock,   Zelle
Roberts,  R.  P	
Blissett,  William  .
Chekov,  Louis  	
Clemens, Ann M.
Creighton, Kenneth D. .Teaching Fellowship
Filmer-Bennett,  G. T Unknown  	
Forester, J. H Teaching Assistantship   -	
Goodman, Abraham H Graduate Scholarship	
Height, Joseph Teaching Fellowship	
Ivey,  Donald . Teaching Fellowship 	
Johnston, A.  C Teaching Assistantship 	
Kusacka, Shuichi  Frank B. Jewett Research Fellowship..
Metford, L. Jacques S French Government Scholarship	
Milley, H. R Teaching Fellowship 	
Mitchell, Patricia A. M._Resident Graduate Scholarship 	
(approx.)
.unknown
...$900.00
... unknown
-$800.00
...$650.00
_$750.00
—unknown
-$1800.00
-$ 400.00
—unknown
-$2000.00
-$1800.00
...$3000.00
$1,000.00
-$1500.00
...$ 500.00
Philosophy  Columbia University
English    University of California
English University of Toronto
Psychology   University of Washington
Zoology    University of Toronto
Accounting University of California
Psychology .University of Indiana
Physics  —Purdue University
Education   .Harvard University
German University of California
Physics Notre Dame University
Physics Purdue University
Physics Princeton University
McGregor, Malcolm F John Simon Guggenheim Memorial Fellowship	
McLeod, R. R._ . Teaching Assistantship	
Retallack, J.  G Teaching Fellowship	
Rush, Jack T. French Government Vacation Scholarship     (approx.)
Shepard, A. H . Teaching Fellowship
Physics
History
History
Physics
Phvsics
French University of Paris
— Purdue University
 Bryn Mawr University
-unknown      History    unknown
-$1800.00 Physics Purdue University
._$ 900.00 Physics   University of California
$ 170.00 French University of Paris
$1200.00 Psychology   University of Iowa
-$1250.00        Astrophysics University of Chicago
-$ 600.00 Psychology   University of Toronto
NOTE:—In many cases these scholarships and fellowships carry with them free tuition or exemption from fees   (or
travelling expenses)   in addition to their monetary value.
Value of scholarships, fellowships and bursaries won by our graduates in other Universities and in Institutes during
the 1946-47 Session $21,020.00
Total value of scholarships, fellowships and bursaries won by our graduates in other Universities and in Institutes
since the first awards were made in 1917 .,        .   $802,959.00
August 28, 1947.
NOTE:—This list does not include Directed Reading Courses.
Underhill, Anne 	
Zubeck, John Peter.
-Canadian Federation of University Women Fellowship.
. Teaching Fellowship

Cite

Citation Scheme:

        

Citations by CSL (citeproc-js)

Usage Statistics

Share

Embed

Customize your widget with the following options, then copy and paste the code below into the HTML of your page to embed this item in your website.
                        
                            <div id="ubcOpenCollectionsWidgetDisplay">
                            <script id="ubcOpenCollectionsWidget"
                            src="{[{embed.src}]}"
                            data-item="{[{embed.item}]}"
                            data-collection="{[{embed.collection}]}"
                            data-metadata="{[{embed.showMetadata}]}"
                            data-width="{[{embed.width}]}"
                            async >
                            </script>
                            </div>
                        
                    
IIIF logo Our image viewer uses the IIIF 2.0 standard. To load this item in other compatible viewers, use this url:
http://iiif.library.ubc.ca/presentation/cdm.presrep.1-0115191/manifest

Comment

Related Items