UBC Publications

UBC Publications

UBC Publications

The President's Report 1950-51 1952

Item Metadata

Download

Media
presrep-1.0115180.pdf
Metadata
JSON: presrep-1.0115180.json
JSON-LD: presrep-1.0115180-ld.json
RDF/XML (Pretty): presrep-1.0115180-rdf.xml
RDF/JSON: presrep-1.0115180-rdf.json
Turtle: presrep-1.0115180-turtle.txt
N-Triples: presrep-1.0115180-rdf-ntriples.txt
Original Record: presrep-1.0115180-source.json
Full Text
presrep-1.0115180-fulltext.txt
Citation
presrep-1.0115180.ris

Full Text

 The President's Report 1950-51
THE UNIVERSITY OF BRITISH COLUMBIA THE
President's
Report
1950-51
THE   UNIVERSITY
OF   BRITISH   COLUMBIA
VANCOUVER,   CANADA,  1952 To The Board of Governors and Senate of
The University of British Columbia:
Ladies and Gentlemen
In submitting this report covering the academic year
1950-51, my first duty and pleasure should be to welcome
those who have been elected or appointed to the University
governing bodies during the past year, and in particular to
record the pleasure of the whole University constituency at
the election by acclamation of Brigadier Sherwood Lett as
Chancellor, in succession to the Hon. Eric Hamber, whose
term of office expired in May, 1951.
My second duty and pleasure is to express to the retiring
Chancellor the gratitude of the University for unfailing
support and wise counsel during the difficult years of growth
and transition. To Mrs. Hamber as well I would like on
behalf of faculty and students alike to extend our warmest
thanks for countless acts of kindness. We are happy that the
'Chancellor Emeritus' and Mrs. Hamber are retaining an
official as ivell as a personal connection with the University.
In the following pages, I have attempted only to sketch
some of the major development's and tendencies of the year
under review. For those who want more detailed information, I have attempted to indicate by name some of the
annual reports that form the sources from ivhich this report
is compiled. ll'
\
■l
nSt
'•■• . 1
POLE
m*±m
■1
i
f
,,^
am
w*^
-
ES,
TOTEM
v
HOUSE    POL
PARK
'E + President's Report
For September, 1950 to August, 1951
In presenting my annual reports on the progress of the
University I have stressed each year certain distinctive
developments or characteristics which were of particular
significance at the time. For example, in the years immediately following the conclusion of the second Great War, I
gave special attention to the growth of the student body
as a result of the great veteran enrolment in 1945, 1946
and 1947, and to the dramatic building program which
resulted from the need for extra classrooms, extra laboratories, and extra offices. This year I should like to stress
especially the role taken by the university in the development of the community, the province, and the nation. It
is a role, I believe, that cannot be over-stressed, but, because
of its complexity, it is also a role that almost defies adequate
description.
In the spring of 1951 the publication of the Report of
the Royal Commission on National Development in the
Arts, Letters and Sciences drew public attention to Canadian
universities in a way unknown before. In the words of the
Report (ch. xii, p. 132):
"The universities are provincial institutions; but they
are much more than that. It would be a grave mistake
to underestimate  or  to  misconceive   the  wider  and
1 indeed universal functions of these remarkable institutions. We are not here concerned with them as units
in a formal educational system or as representing the
final stage of an academic career. We are convinced,
however, that we cannot ignore other functions so
admirably performed by Canadian universities. They
are local centres for education at large and patrons of
every movement in aid of the arts, letters and sciences.
They also serve the national cause in so many ways,
direct and indirect, that theirs must be regarded as
the finest of contributions to national strength and
unity."
The implications in this passage, and in many other
passages in the Report, are of profound importance to those
connected with higher education. As is now well known,
the government, following the recommendations of the
Commission, has already extended financial aid to universities, and has under consideration other recommendations
of particular interest to all Canadian universities (for
example, national scholarships and bursaries; a Canada
Council for the encouragement of the arts, letters, humanities, and social sciences; the development of a National
Library). Yet it must be remembered that actions and
recommendations such as I have mentioned place upon all
universities great responsibilities. If we are to retain public
support, we must offer the highest quality of teaching to the
best possible students in the most favourable atmosphere.
In this way only can we produce the best possible graduates
—graduates who will illustrate their knowledge and their
values by their impact on the nation. These objectives we
have been pursuing steadily and the record of the past year
is, I think, an interesting one. The University Staff
The normal student enrolment shows a slight increase
as the veteran enrolment declines and as a consequence, the
university teaching staff showed little change, except for
the additional teachers required for the newly established
Faculty of Medicine. A simplified analysis of the staff indicates clearly the complex organization required to bring
instruction to the students of a modern university. Let me
list the principal staff division: Deans of faculties, 8; dean
of administrative and inter-faculty affairs, 1; dean of women,
1; directors of schools, 7; professors, clinical professors,
visiting professors, 89; associate professors and clinical
associate professors, 79; assistant professors and clinical
assistant professors; 93; instructors, clinical instructors,
honorary instructors, field work instructors, 98; lecturers,
lecturers in law, honorary lecturers, visiting and special
lecturers, and part-time lecturers, 109; assistants, teaching
fellows, research fellows, demonstrators, and others, 337.
This makes a total of 822, or one staff member for approximately every eight students.
In the administration, the most important event during
the year was the retirement of the Honourable E. W.
Hamber from the position of Chancellor and the election
by acclamation of his successor, Brigadier Sherwood Lett.
I should like here to express my great appreciation of the
services rendered to the University by the retiring Chancellor, who, for more than six years worked with untiring
interest and with constant generosity on behalf of the
University; and I am happy to say that he has not really
severed his university connections, for he was appointed
as Chancellor Emeritus upon his retirement.
To the teaching staff and to the University as a whole,
the death of Dr. M. A. Cameron in September, 1951, was
3 a most grievous and tragic blow. Though a young man at
the time of his death, he had served the University and the
Province with great distinction as teacher, as the author of
the Cameron Report, and later as Director of the School of
Education. I also record with sorrow the death, in December, 1950, of Dr. Daniel Buchanan, Dean Emeritus of the
Faculty of Arts and Science, who for the thirty years of his
association had contributed greatly to the growth and
development of the University, and was much loved by
thousands of former students. In November, 1950, the
University also suffered the loss by death of Colonel F. A.
Wilkin, Professor Emeritus of Engineering, who first came
on the staff in 1921 and who retired in 1948.
The Humanities and Social Sciences
One of the paramount facts of university life at the
present time is that the community, province and the
country are all making increasing demands for new and
important types of professionally skilled persons and are
looking to the universities to provide new fields of specialization both at the undergraduate and the graduate levels.
A few years ago—actually up to the end of the war—the
University had but three faculties—Arts and Science, Agriculture, and Applied Science. It now has eight faculties, the
three I have mentioned, plus Law, Forestry, Pharmacy,
Medicine, and Graduate Studies, as well as seven distinct
schools, each with its own advisory council and each with
its own director (Social Work, Physical Education, Education, Home Economics, Architecture, Commerce, Nursing).
The presence of these many—and attractive—areas of special
studies has an undoubted tendency to draw students away
from the more general type of education that is found in
the humanities and social sciences, although I should like to state hfcre that a liberal—or general—education is perhaps
the most difficult to acquire and, in spite of the obvious
advantages of specialization, is still one of the most important types of education for successful living in a complicated
society. The complaint, moreover, that a liberal education
is not practical is in itself not valid. The study of the
humanities and social sciences demands versatility, adaptability, and intelligence; and the results of such study
should be a well balanced, poised, tolerant, understanding
person, qualified to make a contribution to the better
working of increasingly complex human and social relationships in contemporary life. Or, to quote again from the
Report of the Commission (ch. xii, p. 137):
"The purpose of such great subjects as history, philosophy and literature ... is nothing less than to teach
the student how to think, to train his mind, to
cultivate his judgment and taste and give him the
capacity to express himself with clarity and precision.
Nothing could be more practical than that."
Actually, as I look back on the year under review, I
find ample assurance that the humanities are not dead, or
dying, on our campus. They are alive and vigorous. For
example, our Department of English is the largest single
department in the University and compares at least favourably with any in Canada. Its membership is well qualified to
carry the values it represents to the student body and the
community at large. This department has recently expanded
its offerings in the drama, in creative writing and together
with other language departments, in linguistics. One reason
for the size of this department is, of course, the fact that
the study of English language and literature is compulsory
throughout the first two years of University. It is compulsory for two reasons: first to familiarize students with their literary heritage and to develop their critical appreciation
of that body of literature; and second to help them to
develop some skill in the use of the language as a means
of communication. Unfortunately, it does not seem sufficiently understood in any of our universities that the second
of these objectives must be pursued by all University
departments, and that adequate standards must be established by all departments if this objective is to be pursued
effectively. No matter what standards of expression a department of English demands from its students, these standards
will not be carried over automatically into other subjects
unless those responsible for the other subjects make similar
or equivalent demands. There is, I think, still a good deal
of work to be done in this field before many of us will feel
proud of the ability of our graduates to express themselves
adequately.
As further evidence of increasing support for the
humanities and social sciences, I should like to report the
grant of $75,000 awarded to this University by the Carnegie
Foundation for the development of our anthropological
studies, and also a further annual grant (given anonymously) to establish a Chair of Fine Arts. There is no reason
in my opinion to talk of the 'plight of the humanities' as
something that those of us interested in those fields of study
cannot remedy if we put our minds and energy to it.
During the year under review a number of important
and useful developments in this field took place, including
an important conference on the Humanities, which brought
together around the conference table representatives of the
British Columbia press, radio, and educational systems, as
well as officers of the Humanities Association of Canada;
the annual conference of the Language Teachers of the
Pacific Northwest, which held a two-day meeting in the Youth Training Camp, with the University acting as host;
and, in the spring of the year, the successful organization of
the Vancouver Branch of the Humanities Association.
The University Fine Arts Committee, collaborating
closely with the Literary and Scientific Executive of the
A.M.S., also presented an impressive program of events.
These included a Theatre Festival Week, with a special
Gallery exhibition of designs for stage sets, a brilliant
address to a packed Auditorium by Mr. Lister Sinclair, and
a presentation of the Male Animal by the Players' Club;
three successful concerts, including the Canadian premiere
of Bartok's Sonata for two pianos and eleven percussion
instruments (Conductor, Professor Harry Adaskin, soloists,
Colin Slim and John Brockington), presented by the Music
Committee; popular noon-day readings of their own poems
by Dr. Roy Daniells, Dr. Earl Birney, and Mr. Mario Prizek;
and modern dance programs. In addition, the Art Gallery
in the Library arranged twenty-eight exhibitions of paintings, engravings, photography, architectural drawings, and
pottery, which were attended by about 30,000 visitors, an
impressive total. For the continued support from the University Chapter of the I.O.D.E. which helped make these
and similar programs possible, I wish to express my special
thanks.
Perhaps, too, among the evidences of the vitality of the
humanities, I should place the phenomenal development of
the Anthropological Museum, and the beginnings of a
Totem Park, for the artistic richness to be found in both
of these is such as to impress those whose interests are humanistic, as well as those whose interests are primarily scientific.
The honorary curator of the Anthropological Museum,
Mrs. Harry B. Hawthorn, has been chiefly responsible for
the marked progress that the Museum has made. With insight, understanding, and taste she has improved the
displays of the Museum's materials so that they are now
attracting a steady stream of visitors, as well as a large
number of students of anthropology. I should like also to
mention the fact that many fine Indian masks and costumes
have been added to the collections through the generous
gifts of Dr. H. R. MacMillan and other friends of the
University.
The official opening of the Totem Park took place on
May 16, 1951. Located in a natural setting of forest trees
on the edge of Marine Drive, this fine collection of totem
poles, house poles and dugout freight canoes, most of them
the work of Kwakiutl carvers, makes a rich addition to the
university campus. Quite fittingly, it was Chancellor
Hamber who declared the park open, for it was through
the generosity of the Chancellor and Mrs. Hamber that the
Park, long dreamed of, had become a reality. Equally fitting
were the addresses given at the opening by Mr. Mungo
Martin, the restorer of the poles and a great Indian carver
in his own right, and by Professor Hunter Lewis, who, as
chairman of the committee in charge of the development of
the Park, had done much of the required planning and
execution.
Finally, I should like to mention the special events
arranged by various departments of the humanities, typical
of which were the plays presented by the French and Classics
departments, and the brilliant performance of Ben Jonson's
play, The Alchemist, produced by Miss Dorothy Somerset
of the Department of English. Equally successful were the
fine contributions made by the Musical Society in presenting Dido and Aeneas by Purcell, at Christmas, and their
regular spring production. with an additional 20,246 through the Extension Library,
or over 700 a day for every day of the calendar year—gives
only partial evidence of the complexity of the Library's
operation, for to circulation must be added acquisition,
binding, general reference inquiries, and the staffing of the
general reading rooms and the rooms housing special collections, such as the Howay-Reid and the Fine Arts.
Two new reading rooms were opened during the year
—the Bio-Medical Reading Room in September, 1950, and
the Sedgewick Memorial Reading Room in July 1951. The
latter is a memorial to the late Dr. Garnet G. Sedgewick,
head of the English Department from 1918 to 1948, and is
primarily a browsing room for students. The idea was
conceived by Dr. Dunlap, and its execution was made
possible by the kind co-operation of the Board of Governors,
the Alumni Development Fund, the classes of 1948 and
1950, the McConnel Trust Fund, as well as a special committee (Drs. Cowan, Hawthorn and Birney) that selected
the books for the room.
The Sciences
In turning from the humanities and the library to
the sciences I am faced with the problem of reporting on
the large number of subjects that can be put under the term
science. For the purpose of this review I should like to make
special mention of medicine and public health because of
certain developments in these fields of study.
Building developments brought great improvements
to the sciences during the year. The finely equipped
Biological Sciences Building was officially opened in the
fall of 1951; the Agricultural Engineering Building was
completed; a new turkey research building and a new
Poultry Products Building were started; the magnificent
10 The University Library
The Library should be the heart of the university body.
Without it a university cannot really function. It is of vital
importance to the staff as well as to the students, whether
they be in the sciences or the humanities. It is also of
importance to thousands of people off campus who use the
Reference Division for general inquiries and the Extension
Library for the loan of books. The problems of the Library
affect many more individuals than do the problems of any
one faculty or any number of departments. If it were feasible
I should like to recommend as required reading for all
members of the university community the report submitted
to Senate by the Library Committee. It is a revealing
document.
The principal administrative change in the Library
during the year was the resignation of the Librarian, Dr.
Leslie Dunlap, who left for an appointment in the United
States in January, 1951, and the subsequent appointment
of Mr. Neal Harlow, who succeeded him in the following
August. Mr. Harlow comes to British Columbia from the
University of California (Los Angeles), where he had established a reputation not only as a skilled librarian, but also
as a scholar, particularly interested in the history and the
mapping of the California region. In the difficult interim
period prior to his appointment the Library was under
the able direction of Miss Anne M. Smith, the Head of the
Reference Division.
With its excellent physical accommodation and with
its fundamentally sound resources in the general and special
collections, the Library has continued to provide excellent
services to the university community and to the public.
The number of books loaned during the year—238,884, Wesbrook Building (to house Bacteriology, the School of
Nursing, the University Health Services and the University
Student Hospital) was brought to near completion; and
the War Memorial Gymnasium came into use during the
spring term, although it was not officially dedicated until
October, 1951. These buildings, representing a great investment in planning, labour and money, have not only
changed the physical appearance of the campus, but have
brought relief to many departments, which have been
able to move from temporary quarters in huts to excellently
designed class-rooms, laboratories, and offices. They represent, in their totality, the most significant building improvements in any single year since the establishment of the
University.
The sciences generally continue to attract large numbers of our best students. This is not to be wondered at;
we live in a world that is increasingly science-conscious, for
science has become the key to our material progress and our
national defence. For the good student the sciences offer
much in scholarships and other aids in training, and for
the young graduate scientist the opportunities of employment and advanced study are many. The University
continues to work in the closest co-operation with the
National Research Council and the Defence Research
Board, and through these bodies, as well as through other
government agencies and industries, many channels for
research and study are constantly opening up. Through the
sciences, too, the University is making increasingly important contributions to the economic well-being of the country;
but of these I should like to speak more concretely in the
section on the university and the public.
During the year the Van de Graaf generator, which I
mentioned in last year's report as being of special import- ance in research in nuclear physics, was brought into
operation. For the first time too, in the history of the
University, the annual meetings of the American Physical
Society were held on the campus, bringing together many
of the most noted physicists on the continent.
To the scientific museums some notable contributions
were made. The Botanical Museum and Herbarium
received a valuable collection of two thousand British plants
from Mr. McTaggart-Cowan, and more than three thousand
sheets of African plants from Mr. L. E. Taylor; while the
Geological and Geographical Museum received a fine
skeleton of the hooded dinosaur Lambeosaurus from the
National Museum of Canada.
Medicine and Public Health
In the annual report of McGill University for 1950-51
I noticed with interest that the registration in the Faculty
of Medicine totalled 484 in 1901 as compared with 459 in
1951. When we remember the steady increase in population
in Canada during the past half century, especially in a
province such as our own, we must realize how increasingly
difficult it has become for a young student from this province
to get a medical education. I am especially pleased, therefore, to be able to report that the first medical class in the
history of the University registered in September, 1950.
After careful screening, a total of sixty students was
accepted by the newly created Faculty, and the Dean, Dr.
Myron Weaver, has reported that, almost without exception,
they have maintained a high standard of medical scholarship. During the year, the Faculty advanced its plans for
the teaching of the higher years in medicine. Teaching beds
and office space were assigned in the Vancouver General
Hospital, and some progress was made towards utilizing
12 St. Paul's and Shaughnessy Hospitals for teaching purposes.
In the areas of Bacteriology and Immunology, the
expansion of courses and the increase of equipment are the
tangible results of a Federal Public Health Grant of $25,000,
made to the University for the special purpose of improving
the supply of senior bacteriologists in Canada.
I am also pleased to note that for the first time in the
history of the University a full time medical director, Dr.
A. Kenneth Young, has been appointed as Head of the
Student Health Service. This service has now entered its
new quarters in the Wesbrook Building; and plans have also
been made for the establishment of a twenty-six bed hospital
where students will be given proper medical care when
the need arises.
The Faculty of Graduate Studies, since its inception
two years ago, has been extending its offerings slowly but
steadily as library resources and additional funds become
available. Courses leading to the Doctor's degree are now
being offered in Physics, Chemistry, Mathematics, Botany
and Biology, Zoology and Forestry.
This, of course, is a costly type of expansion, made
possible only by increased grants and scholarships; but it
brings with it increased opportunities for research by staff
members, as well as by students, and it allows the University
to gain increased recognition as one of the important
research centres in the country. I have been especially impressed by the numbers of our graduate students who are
receiving excellent scholarships and teaching fellowships
in many of the finest universities in the United States, the
United Kingdom, and in other parts of Canada.
Research that has culminated in publication need be
no more than mentioned here, for the second annual volume
of Publications of the Faculty and Staff of the University of
13 British Columbia has already appeared; copies are available
on request from the Information Office of the University.
I should like, however, to mention the constantly increasing
support being given to research on the campus. The Committee on Research recommended for financial support
thirty-nine separate projects, for which varying sums were
authorized. The University also received large grants from
various Federal and Provincial departments, as well as
from such foundations as the Rockefeller and the Carnegie,
and from businesses, industries, and other friends of the
University. These grants and bequests were acknowledged
in detail at the Spring and Fall Congregations.
The Students
As was fully expected the number of students registered
during the regular academic year continued to decline from
the post-war totals of 1948 and 1949. The figure for 1950-51
was 6432 as compared with 7572 in 1949-50 and 8810 in
1948-49. Of the total 4930 were men, 1502 were women.
The veterans were to be found only in the upper years and
totalled 1005, or somewhat less than one-sixth of the total
student body. A true picture of registration, however, must
include the evening classes given through the Extension
Department, and the Summer School. The former attracted
1878 students, while in the Summer Session the attendance
was 989. These two activities—the evening classes and the
Summer School Session—represent in no small degree the
University's contribution to adult education, and I should
like to see them increasingly stressed; for adult education
can be of singular significance in an expanding community
such as ours.
During the year three congregations were held. The
first, 27 September 1950, was a special congregation to mark
14 the establishment of the Faculty of Medicine. It was
attended by many outstanding medical men, of whom two,
Dr. Ray Farquharson and Dean J. B. Collip, were given
honorary degrees. The regular fall congregation was held
on 25 October 1950, with honorary degrees being granted
to Dr. G. S. Avery and Dr. J. R. Dymond. As has been
the custom in the last few years, the spring congregation
was held on two days, 17 and 18 May, 1951, with honorary
degrees being granted to Dr. Ralph Bunche, W. Bruce
Hutchison and Dr. Isabel Maclnnis. In all 1721 students
were graduated during the year.
The housing of students from out of town continues
to be a major problem. An historic advance in housing was
made, however, when the first three units of the women's
residences were opened at the beginning of the winter term,
although the official opening ceremony did not take place
until the spring congregation. The three halls, with accommodation for approximately 150 girls, have been named in
honour of the late Dean Mary Bollert, the first Dean of
Women; Dr. Isabel Maclnnis, the recently retired head of
the German Department and a member of faculty since
the beginnings of the University; and Mrs. Anne Wesbrook,
the widow of the University's first president. The building
of these finely designed and beautifully situated residences
is, of course, only a part of our long term plan for improved
living conditions on the campus; and I hope that before too
long we shall be able to add other units for our out-of-town
students. I should like, here, to repeat my thanks to those
who have contributed so generously towards the furnishing
costs of the new residences. A total of $7894 was donated,
$5000 of which came through the U.B.C. Development
Fund.
In the various residential camps that we have operated
15 since the end of the war—Acadia, Fort, Wesbrook, Little
Mountain, and Lulu Island—we continued to house and
to feed hundreds of students, as well as a number of the
teaching staffs. In all camps, the totals were 898 married
persons including their families, and 973 single persons.
The Lulu Island camp was closed, however, in July 1951,
and the University is also planning to withdraw gradually
from the Little Mountain area.
Though, as I have already mentioned, the number of
veterans has sharply declined, the Counselling Bureau,
which was established to give guidance to student veterans
at the end of the war, continues to be as active as ever. Under
the new title of the Department of Personnel and Student
Services, it now provides testing and counselling for veteran
and non-veteran alike; acts as an employment office for
undergraduates and graduates; and works out personnel
problems with non-instructional members of the University
staff. To realize the genuine contribution being made by
this Department to the students one needs but to glance at
some of its statistics. For example, it provided testing and
counselling during the year for about 1000 students; it
secured employment for 611 graduates, summer employment for 1439 undergraduates, Christmas employment for
1131, and regular "self-help" employment on the campus
for 121.
The three divisions of the armed forces—the Navy, the
Army, and the Air Force—continued their programs of
providing winter and summer training for students who
wish to become commissioned officers, either with the
permanent forces or with reserve units. During the year
the University Naval Training Division had on its establishment 69 cadets, RCN (R) and 9 cadets, RCN; the
University   of   British   Columbia   Contingent,   Canadian
16 Officers' Training Corps, had an establishment of 6 officers
and 196 officer cadets, the largest enrolment since the end
of World War II; and the Reserve University of British
Columbia Flight had a total strength of 109. The significance of the work being done by these three units cannot
be over-stressed. They are providing excellent military
training to a carefully selected number of students who
will, in time, help to build up the cadre of well disciplined,
well informed, well trained military personnel so essential
in times of world emergency.
I should like to comment on the many other student
activities on the campus—in self-government, in athletics,
in club activities, in international student education, and
in publications, to name only a few—but the variety of the
picture forbids it. The interested person can find, however,
a full annual report in the Totem, published by the Alma
Mater Society.
The University and the Public
Although a university is primarily a gathering together
of scholars and students in one central location, it is also
an institution that profoundly affects the living habits, the
thinking processes, and the economic standards of thousands
of persons, many of whom have never even seen the university campus. This relationship between the university and
the public is gradually gaining general recognition.
Through research, through the Extension Department,
through the radio, through the speaking platform, a university reaches out into all parts of a community, and many
parts of a nation. I have already mentioned the close links
that exist between our own university and such bodies as
the National Research Council; and now I should like to
mention some of the research projects, and some of the
17 activities of the Extension Department that are closely
linked to the welfare of the general public, especially in our
own province.
In the various departments of the Faculty of Agriculture, for example, research investigations were made into
such problems as weed control, hydroponics, factors affecting
the food values of B.C. fruits and vegetables, poultry
breeding and nutrition (the establishment of a new breed,
the Hampbars, was reported to the World's Poultry Congress), alfalfa breeding (including the development of
improved strains of Rhizoma), potato harvesting, vacuum
harvesting, the breeding of mink and swine, linebreeding
of the University's Ayreshire herd. Research teams in the
Department of Zoology have been studying the effect on
fisheries of the proposed water utilization projects, the
habits of nesting waterfowl, the physiology of young salmon
during their transition from freshwater life to marine life,
the origins and control of schistosome dermatitis, more
commonly known throughout the province as swimmers'
itch. In Biology and Botany the research studies have ranged
from cancer to root rot of the Douglas fir and to 2,4-D. And
in the Department of Economics, Political Science, and
Sociology, studies have been made of Indians in the fishing
industry, industrial fluctuations in a planned economy, and
the cultural evolution of the native tribes in the province.
I Should like, too, to make special reference to the
continuing studies of the Research and Consultative Committees that have been investigating and analyzing the
backgrounds and the problems of the Doukhobor communities in British Columbia. These committees have been
warmly supported by the Provincial Government, they have
received the co-operation of representative Doukhobors,
and they have already effected some interim amelioration
18 of certain aspects of the problems. The report of the
Research Committee promised for May 1952 ought to
provide many worthwhile suggestions for more permanent
forms of amelioration of present conditions and positive
programs for the future.
Finally, through the activities of the Department of
Extension, the University continues to make direct contributions to nearly every community in the province. The
full story of these contributions is contained in the Annual
Report of the Department, but I should like to mention
just a few facts to give some idea of the scope of this work.
The Department, for example, organized 52 evening classes,
with a registration of 1878; it supervised 66 institutes,
conferences, and short courses, with a registration of 1584;
it carried on an active program of radio education through
the Farm Forum and the Citizen's Forum; through the
Extension Library it circulated over 20,000 volumes;
through the Visual Instruction Services, it sent out over
16,000 reels of motion pictures; it brought instruction in
such subjects as agriculture, handicrafts, and the arts into
communities extending from the Queen Charlottes to the
Peace River, and from Langley Prairie to Prince Rupert;
and it records that members of the University Staff gave
outside lectures on 748 occasions to a total of over 72,000
listeners. It is an impressive record.
Scholarships, Bursaries and Loans
Detailed acknowledgment of scholarships, named
bursaries, prizes and other awards is made twice a year at
the spring and fall congregations. A summary of these
awards, however, is of considerable interest, especially
because it shows the extent to which students are receiving
19 some sort of financial assistance, and the interest extended
by Federal and Provincial authorities, as well as by private
individuals, in making that assistance possible.
Under the Dominion-Provincial Student Aid program approximately 320 awards were made in all faculties,
totalling $59,000. From the Special Bursaries Fund, 150
awards were made, totalling $16,500. Named bursaries,
worth $15,000, were granted to 112 students. Entrance
scholarships provided 35 students with aid totalling $12,000,
and awards made by outside organizations in cooperation
with the University went to some 20 students and were
worth about $6,000. This means that during the year a
total of 637 awards, worth $108,500, were made. It should
be noted that, in addition, 250 students obtained loans
totalling $44,000, and that many others were assisted by
means of scholarships and prizes awarded in May and
available for study in the following winter session. It is
estimated that approximately 900 students have received
financial assistance amounting to some $160,000.
It is a pleasure to record the appreciation of the
Faculty, Board and students to Dean Walter Gage and the
other members of the University's Committee on Prizes,
Scholarships, Bursaries and Loans, for the infinite care and
interest with which they administer this important part of
the University's operation, and to Dean Gage in particular
for the zeal with which he has gone about accumulating
funds for the assistance of greater numbers of worthy students. As Dean Gage points out in his report, the encouraging increase in funds becoming available is a tribute to the
generosity of increasing numbers of private citizens, businesses and organizations who wish to make a contribution
to the University for the encouragement of our young men
and women of worth and promise.
20 Summary of Revenues and Expenditures
April 1, 1950 to March 31, 1951
Revenues
Provincial Government
Dominion Government
Supplementary Grant
Student Fees
Grants for Teaching "and Research
Miscellaneous
Total %
$1,750,000.00 43.30
154,418.00 3.82
1,352,238.00 33.45
477,372.00 11.81
307,860.00 7.62
$4,041,888.00       100.00
Expenditures
Teaching Cost
Salaries
and Wages
Supplies and
Operating
Expenses
Total
/o
(including Library) $2,029,601.00
$   441,822.00
$2,471,423.00
61.15
Research
180,031.00
211,341.00
391,372.00
9.68
Maintenance
244,225.00
468,437.00
712,662.00
17.63
Administration
201,529.00
54,689.00
256,218.00
6.34
Miscellaneous
210,213.00
210,213.00
5.20
$2,655,386.00
$1,386,502.00
$4,041,888.00
100.00
21 Registration  for  1950-51
Enrolment  (Winter  Sessions)   by  Years
Veteran   Enrolment   1945-1951
Graduates  by  Years
Occupational   Distribution  of  Students
Geographical   Source  of  Students,   1950-51
Where   Does  the   University   Dollar  Come   From ?
Where  Does  the   University  Dollar  Go ?
22 REGISTRATION   FOR  1950-51
w:j
3O30
ARTS AND SCIENCE.
COMMERCE ,
HOME ECONOMICS 	
PHYSICAL   EDUCATION	
TEACHER TRAINING COURSE.
APPLIED SCIENCE	
ARCHITECTURE	
.2951
_329
NURSING _.	
AGRICULTURE.
LAW   	
_185
_139 PHARMACY
.210 MEDICINE-
_931 FORESTRY_
.97 GRADUATE STUDIES
. 92
.286
325
.166
-60
-142
519
Includes freshman class, many of whom will proceed to degrees other than B.A.
23 ENROLMENT  (WINTER SESSIONS)  BY YEARS
10000
9000
sooo
7000
4000
5000
4000
3000
■jnnn
Pi    N
iooo
1936-37
38-39
40-41
1936-37
1937-38
1938-39
1939-40
1940-41
1941-42
1942-43
1943-44
1944-45
1945-46
1946-47
1947-48
1948-49
1949-50
1950-51
42-43
44-45
2049
2223
2286
2371
2487
2537
2538
2430
 2974
 6632
8741
9374
8810
7572
6432
46-47
48-49
50-51
24 VETERAN  ENROLMENT 1945-1951
1945-46
1946-47
1947-48
948-49
$BiW.
v}\yl (i'J ti'Jvjli
1949-50
1950-51
AM
1000
2000
200
3000
1945-46
3200
1946-47
4796
1947-48
4339
1948-49
:3230
1949-50
2084
1950-51
1000
4000
5000
25 GRADUATES  BY YEARS
2200
2000
I BOO
ion
1400
F4"O0
ioeo
BOD
600
400
200
U
1
i ■
1944 1945 1946 1947
1948
1949 1950 1951
1944.
401
1945
446
1946
1034
1947.
1198
1948.
1682
1949
2202
1950.
2198
1951
1721
26 OCCUPATIONAL  DISTRIBUTION   OF  1951   GRADUATES
AGRICULTURE.
BUSINESS	
•EDUCATION	
ENGINEERING &
ARCHITECTURE
FISHERIES	
FORESTRY .
LAW _
-4%
-12%
.22%
MINING	
SOCIAL SERVICES	
GOVERNMENT	
SCIENTIFIC &
INDUSTRIAL RESEARCH.
MISCELLANEOUS	
J 8%
_5%
-4%
-9%
-.5%
-7%
_5%
_6%
.12%
•Includes students proceeding to higher
degrees in teacher training and related
fields.
MINING
FISHERIES
GEOGRAPHICAL SOURCE OF STUDENTS,  1950-51
CANADA
VANCOUVER	
OTHER PARTS OF B.C.	
OTHER PARTS OF CANADA
FOREIGN
Africa —;'■•■-, \r ' ,, -
ASIA ;ev ■ ;.:! E' ■":
BRITISH   ISLES     	
CENTRAL  AMERICA
EUROPE .      	
NEW ZEALAND	
SOUTH   AMERICA        	
U S.A	
-3292
■is SO
_653
YUKON  TERRITORIES
UNSPECIFIED	
TOTAI	
_11
.22
.16
. 14
_ 2
10
206
.^37
27 WHERE DOES THE  UNIVERSITY DOLLAR  COME   FROM'
43 30c
■11 00c
33.45c
i   n
1 2 50c
■ 2.67c
/ 13c iO 88c
3.82c 11.81c 7.62c
1948-49
1949-50
| PROVINCIAL GRANT
| a STUDENT FEES
| i | D.V.A. SUPPLEMENTARY GRANT
[ | GRANTS FOR TEACHING, AND RESEARCH
__■_■ MISCELLANEOUS
WHERE DOES THE UNIVERSITY  DOLLAR GO?
—i i I
5.68c
. 2.05c
-   28c
1.25c
• 5.20c
61.15c
j)      TEACHING
RESEARCH
MAINTENANCE
ADMINISTRATION
9.68c 17.63c    6.34c
~3      MISCELLANEOUS
_^^M     LOSS ON FOOD, HOUSING AND
^^^™      OTHER OPERATIONS
28

Cite

Citation Scheme:

        

Citations by CSL (citeproc-js)

Usage Statistics

Share

Embed

Customize your widget with the following options, then copy and paste the code below into the HTML of your page to embed this item in your website.
                        
                            <div id="ubcOpenCollectionsWidgetDisplay">
                            <script id="ubcOpenCollectionsWidget"
                            src="{[{embed.src}]}"
                            data-item="{[{embed.item}]}"
                            data-collection="{[{embed.collection}]}"
                            data-metadata="{[{embed.showMetadata}]}"
                            data-width="{[{embed.width}]}"
                            async >
                            </script>
                            </div>
                        
                    
IIIF logo Our image viewer uses the IIIF 2.0 standard. To load this item in other compatible viewers, use this url:
https://iiif.library.ubc.ca/presentation/cdm.presrep.1-0115180/manifest

Comment

Related Items