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The President's Report 1949-50 1951

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Array The President's Report 1949-50
THE UNIVERSITY OF BRITISH COtUMBIA THE
President's
Report
1949-50
THE   UNIVERSITY
OF  BRITISH  COLUMBIA
VANCOUVER,   CANADA,   1951 To The Board of Governors and Senate of
The University of British Columbia :
Ladies and Gentlemen:
In the report which follows covering the academic
year 1949-50, there is much evidence of the sustained development which has taken place in the University in the
post-war years. There is also evidence of the financial
stringency which has become so much more pronounced
in the current academic year. Declining veteran enrollment,
and mounting costs resulting from current inflation, have
imposed severe restraints on all aspects of University life
and development.
It is particularly important, entering as we are on a
period when our attention is concentrated on matters of
national defence and security, that we should remember
that our defence, positively as well as negatively, rests in a
democratic society on an enlightened citizenry, specialized
skills, and on new knowledge. The time has come when
we must look to the Federal Government to share substantially in supporting the work of the Universities toward these ends.
Research and sound teaching are of the first importance, now as ever. Undue economy here can only jeopardize our present security and our future development. In
submitting this report, I should like again to -pay tribute
to the encouragement and support which the University
continues to receive in increasing measure from the community we are attempting to serve.  The President's  Report
For September, 1949 to August, 1950
This annual report for the year from September 1st,
1949 to August 31st, 1950 records another twelve months of
expansion and development; development of new faculties
and courses of studies and expansion in the form of new
buildings, facilities and equipment.
Students and Staff
The number of students registered in the regular
winter undergraduate and graduate courses totalled 7,572
as compared with 8,810 for the previous year. Veteran
enrollment dropped from 3,230 in 1948-49 to 2,084 in
1949-50. This was approximately the drop expected. A
teaching staff of 806 was required to provide classroom and
laboratory instruction for these students. The teaching load
continued to be heavy, but every attempt possible was made
to keep instructional standards at a high level, for without
good teaching a university lacks an essential quality.
Retirements
The end of the year saw the retirement, after many
years of service, of Dr. J. N. Finlayson, Dean of the
Faculty of Applied Science and Head of the Department of
Civil Engineering; Professor Ellis Morrow, Head of the
Department of Commerce, and Madame Y. Darlington,
of the Department of French. The University is very
grateful for their service and generations of students can
testify to the value of their instruction and guidance. Dr. Finlayson was succeeded as Dean by Dr. Hector MacLeod,
Head of the Department of Electrical Engineering, and as
Head of the Department of Civil Engineering by Professor
J. T. Muir. Professor Morrow was succeeded by Professor
E. D. MacPhee. The University also during the past year
lost the services by retirement of Mr. Frank Garnish, for
many years foreman in the Department of Horticulture.
I would like to record an additional word of thanks at this
time to Mr. Garnish for his long and fine record of service.
The creation of the Faculty of Medicine was announced
in my annual report for 1948-49. In the present year Dean
Weaver continued the process of assembling the new
Faculty and with the help of a strong committee selected
60 students for first year Medicine from more than 270
well-qualified applicants. The first classes in this new Faculty
met in September, 1950. Other important events in our
academic development were the launching of initial postgraduate courses in the Institute of Oceanography, and the
granting of our first two Ph.D. degrees to members of the
School of Graduate Studies. In the same period a Rockefeller Foundation grant of $90,000 enabled us to expand
our program of Slavonic Studies to include new courses,
faculty and library material.
Research
In spite of heavy teaching demands, many professors
in all faculties and in most departments carried on active
research in their own special fields. Research is an essential
activity in any healthy university and it may be of
inestimable significance in the life of the community or
of the nation. The following are random samples of research
activities being actively undertaken in various departments
2 during this period: In Agriculture — studies in vacuum
harvesting, barley and alfalfa improvement, leaching losses
from B.C. soils, the control of Bangs disease, livestock
parasites, weed control, hydroponics, development of the
Hampbar chicken; in Bacteriology and Preventive Medicine — studies in cancer control, the production of cholera
vaccine; in Biology and Botany — studies in the agar and
algine content of local seaweeds, tree diseases; in Chemistry
— studies in radioactive isotopes, synthetic and natural
rubber, the radioactive content of ocean water; in Forestry
— studies in conservation; in the various departments of
the humanities and the social sciences — research in rural
housing and urban mapping techniques, the culture of
the native Indians, trade unionism and labour relations,
group therapy, theories of personality, Soviet planning and
economic theory, studies in form and colour as they relate
to architecture; in Physics — studies in atomic activities,
low temperature phenomena, Beta ray spectroscopy, cosmic
ray behaviour, cancer. These I have said, are but random
samplings, but they indicate, to some extent, the scope of
research being undertaken on the campus. A most significant development in social science research was the
organization, at the request of the provincial government,
of a series of studies of problems affecting the Doukhobors
of the province. The program, conducted by some seven
or eight members of the faculty will cover economic, social,
cultural and religious practices in Doukhobor life.
Learned Societies and Publications
The activities of the teaching staff go far beyond the
campus. Most of them are members of national and international learned societies. In this year at least some seventy of the teaching staff held office in more than one hundred
and sixty organizations, many of them acting in executive
positions. In addition a great number published the results
of their researches in learned and popular journals in this
and other countries. At the present moment a bibliography
of these publications is being prepared and will be published by the University under the title, Publications of
the Faculty and Staff of the University of British Columbia.
Copies of this publication will be obtainable on request
from the Information Office of the University.
The Library
The Library is the core or the heart of a University;
part storehouse of accumulated knowledge, — and part
laboratory for the humanities and the social and other
sciences. Its work is of a scope that cannot be easily
estimated. In our own library, a staff of 70 is required to
meet the demands made upon it during the year. That staff
is responsible for an aggregate collection of some 300,000
books. During the past year they put into circulation
249,318 volumes, periodicals, and pamphlets — 87,470 from
the Loan Desk, 134,274 from the Reserve Room, 12,627
from the Periodicals Room, 9,634 from the Reference
Room, and 5,313 from the Fine Arts Room. Behind these
figures lie the complex operations that are almost entirely
hidden from the public — selection,, ordering, cataloguing,
binding, rebinding, location of missing items and
replacement.
These operations, as I have said, require a considerable
staff, and Dr. L. Dunlap, the University Librarian, found
it necessary during the year to appoint six new professional
librarians — five coming from library schools in eastern Canada and one from the Public Library Commission in
Prince George.
Some 13,351 volumes were acquired last year, some by
gift and others by purchase. A representative from each
department works with our acquisitions staff in determining purchases; and in this manner an increased degree
of efficiency has been effected. Lack of finances and a
relatively small record of gifts and bequests to the library
are still the chief limitations to building the collection of
books we want and need. Some important changes in
organization and in space allotment were completed or
initiated during the year. The Periodicals Division was
transformed into a Serials Division, responsible for all
periodical or serial publications for which we have continuing orders; the Reference Division opened a new
reading room for medical students. A large area has been
allocated for map storage; one staff member has spent some
months in sorting and classifying a valuable collection of
10,000 maps; and finally, plans have been initiated for
converting the Fine Arts Room on the main floor into a
special "browsing room," to be known as the Dr. Sedgewick
Memorial Room. Valedictory gifts from the classes of 1948
and 1950 and from the Alumni Development Fund have
made this significant tribute possible.
Fine Arts and Museums
Thanks to the financial and moral support of the
University Chapter of the I.O.D.E. and to similar support
from the University Board of Governors the fine arts
program on the campus increased in scope and significance.
So rich and varied was this program and so warm was the
response of the student body and of the public that nothing
5 less than a complete and separate report could describe it
adequately. A film festival of documentary and educational
films from all parts of the world; two concerts featuring
the works of Jean Coulthard Adams and Barbara Pentland,
both of the Department of Music; eight noon-hour lectures
by members of the faculty; drama and dance performances;
the formation of a Visual Arts Club; a series of fine exhibitions in the University Gallery; classes in music, painting,
theatre, ceramics, handicrafts — these and many other
activities all testify to the interest and the enthusiasm with
which students receive the fine arts as a part of their education. It is regrettable that as yet we have not found ways
and means to establish a Department of Fine Arts within
the body of the University.
The Museum of Anthropology attracted a constantly
increasing number of visitors to its restricted quarters in
the basement of the Library. The collection grows almost
daily in worth; and the thoughtful and intelligent manner
in which the hundreds of objects are displayed make this
Museum a stimulating focal point, for the student of
anthropology and for the casual visitor alike; and the
constant changing of the exhibits frees it from the static
quality common to many museums.
Many gifts were received during the year, including
a collection of fifty-nine extraordinary pre-European stone
carvings of great value and unquestionable importance.
They were the gift of Dr. H. R. MacMillan.
A system of exchanges with other museums, including
the Rochester Museum of Arts and Science, the Washington
State Museum, and the Alaska Museum, made possible the
displaying of rare, exotic items, hitherto not seen in
Vancouver. It is also of interest to know that University exhibits have been in demand for displays by the Vancouver Community Arts Council, the Folks Arts Festival,
and the University Art Gallery.
The Museum was open each weekday during the
academic sessions and employed eleven students on a part
time basis, two of whom were invited to renovate and
re-design the museum at Prince Rupert in the summer of
1950.
Extension Department
The members of the Extension Department, under
the direction of Dr. Gordon Shrum, are dedicated (and I
use the word advisedly) to the task of bringing the University to the communities of the Province, no matter how
remote or how isolated those communities may be. Through
extension courses, through night classes and special lectures,
through the activities of travelling instructors, through
special institutes, the Department brings educational opportunities to many people, young and old, who might not
otherwise receive intellectual stimulus of the type that the
Department provides. The courses and institutes are many
and varied, ranging from handicrafts to Slavonic languages.
The following are a few of the highlights from the
Department's annual report.
Home Economics — By night classes, special lectures,
and demonstration booths at fall fairs staff members gave
instruction in this subject in many parts of the province.
They arranged demonstrations of textiles and cloths; they
assisted in the organization of fashion parades, sewing clubs,
hobby shows.
Handicrafts — In Vancouver and throughout the
province the Department has offered courses in leathercraft,
weaving and ceramics. The internationally known weaver, Mrs. Mary M. Atwater, gave a special advanced course in
weaving at the University in July.
Agriculture — With the co-operation of the Faculty of
Agriculture, the Department has offered instruction in the
various branches of Agriculture in Vancouver, the Fraser
Valley, central and northern B.C., and on Vancouver Island.
Field days were conducted at seven of the Dominion Illustrative Stations in northern B.C. A total of more than 600
attended these days.
Parent Education — This was carried on intensively
through the distribution of discussion material, by arranging lectures to P.T.A. and similar organizations and by
organizing workshops to train group discussion leaders.
More than 2,100 people attended parent education
meetings.
Inter-Cultural Relations — Co - operating with the
United Nations Association, the Department organized and
sponsored a workshop in inter-cultural relations, with
special1 emphasis placed on the principal Canadian minority
groups.
The Fine Arts — In music, Professor Harry Adaskin
and Frances Marr gave five brilliant summer concerts to
commemorate the two hundredth anniversary of the death
of Johann Sebastian Bach; as well as a special Bach series
in the winter session. Dr. Ida Halpern also gave a most
successful course entitled "The Music of Different
Nations". In painting, the Department not only offered
coursei on the campus, but, with Mr. Clifford Robinson as
the travelling instructor, it offered short courses in drawing,
painting, and theatre design in at least nineteen communities through the province. The eager public response gave
clear evidence of the success of this last venture.  The
8 Department also developed its Summer School program in
the theatre, in music, and in painting.
The Extension Library — Increased its circulation to
14,165 items that went to all parts of the province. Books
on contemporary affairs, travel and biography were the
most popular.
The Visual Education Service — This service sent films
out to 199 schools, 128 churches, 66 University departments
and clubs, and 811 other organizations. It also acted as
co-ordinator of 34 Film Councils in the province, arranging
through an exchange system for 5,455 showings to an aggregate audience of some 368,000.
Co-operative Educational Program — Ten years ago
the Department started a co-operative educational program
for B.C. fishermen under an appropriation from the Federal
Department of Fisheries. Special features of this year's
program were meetings conducted by Dr. M. M. Coady of
Antigonish, as well as twelve short courses in credit union
operation. Classes in navigation were provided in several
areas.
Dominion-Provincial Youth Training School—Administered by the Department, this school supervised the
instruction of 81 young people from the rural areas of the
province in an intensive eight-week course from January
8th to March 4th, 1950.
Summer Session
The thirty-first summer session of the University was
held from July 3rd to August 18th, 1950. As in the past
many of the students who attended came from the teaching
profession, but many also came because of their special
interest in the Extension Department Fine Arts Program
9 of music, painting, handicrafts and theatre.
The enrollment for the regular Summer School courses
followed the prevailing decline noticeable in the winter
session. A total of 1118 students took credit courses this
year as compared with a total of 1642 in 1948, and 1426
in 1949. The decrease was most noticeable among the
sciences.
Although it has become an accepted premise that the
Summer Session should serve the special needs of teachers,
a survey of the student attendance showed clearly that many
outside of the teaching profession were coming to the
Session. For example, a number of young people just out
of high school and with no previous university experience
were registered this year. In the ten courses open to them
they constituted eighteen percent of the enrollment. In the
future some shift of emphasis may have to be made to meet
these changing needs.
As I have indicated above the Summer Session is a
blending of regular academic courses with courses offered
by the Extension Department. Many students taking
regular academic work also took courses (credit and non-
credit) in theatre, opera, art, or handicrafts. Perhaps the
most interesting new development in this area of activity
was the addition of opera training to the curriculum. Mr.
Nicholas Goldschmidt, Director of the Opera School of the
Royal Conservatory of Music in Toronto, gave three courses
in opera appreciation, opera chorus training, and German
Lieder interpretation.
The Summer School of the Theatre offered its regular
courses in acting, speech, directing, stagecraft, and children's dramatics, and towards the end of the session two
fine productions were presented to the public — Charlotte
10 Chorpenning's Jack and the Beanstalk and William Shakespeare's Othello.
As in the past many of the staff for the regular academic
courses came from other universities. Of the total of sixty-
two, seventeen were visitors — eleven from other parts of
Canada, five from the United States, and one from Great
Britain.
Twenty bursaries for summer students made available
for the first time in 1949 were provided again this year, and
the I.O.D.E. and the B.C. Teachers' Federation provided
additional scholarships and loan funds;
Personnel Services
What was known formerly as the Veterans' Counselling
Service continues to give invaluable guidance and help
under the broader title of Personnel Services. This year
2,104 ex-service men and women registered at the University
on D.V.A. allowances. This was approximately 1,000 less
than in 1948-49 and we were consequently able to give more
attention to other aspects of student counselling. These
included the following:
(a) Testing and counselling high school students
entering the University for the first time
(b) Group testing Physical Education students at the
request of the Physical Education Department
(c) Extending a 'self-help' program, thereby placing
121 needy students in part-time employment in
various University departments
(d) Making a survey and classification of all secretarial,
stenographic, and clerical personnel; giving clerical and stenographic aptitude tests to employment
applicants (e) Surveying employment possibilities across Canada;
visiting various agencies, industries, and officials
of the National Employment Service; and eventually placing a high percentage of graduates in
suitable employment, as well as obtaining summer
employment for many undergraduates.
Congregations
The autumn congregation, held on October 26th, 1949
was immediately followed by a very useful Legal Symposium held on the campus under the guidance of the
Faculty of Law. Among the honorary degrees granted six
were conferred upon leading representatives of the legal
profession who attended the symposium. The degree of
Doctor of Laws honoris causa was conferred on: Homer
Armstrong Thompson, Frederick Clinton Cronkite, Erwin
Nathaniel Griswold, Vincent Christopher MacDonald,
David Hughes Parry, and Cecil Augustus Wright. The
degree of Doctor of Science honoris causa was bestowed on
Albert Edward Richards. Dr. Griswold delivered the
congregation address.
The spring congregation was held on two days, May
11th and 12th, 1950 with 1772 students graduating. On the
first day the Right Honourable Clarence Decatur Howe
gave the congregation address and received the degree of
Doctor of Science honoris causa, in company with William
Randolphe Diamond, John Norison Finlayson, (Dean
Emeritus of the Faculty of Applied Science), H. R. MacMillan, and Frederick Emmons Terman. After the ceremony
Mr. Howe opened the new Engineering Building and
Premier Byron Johnson presented the keys to the building
to Chancellor Eric W. Hamber. On the following day the
12 remainder of the large graduating class saw Dr. Arthur
Lionel Crease and Miss Marion Lindeburgh receive the
degree of Doctor of Science honoris causa; and Miss Laura
Holland and Mark Edgar Nichols receive the degree of
Doctor of Laws honoris causa. Dr. MacMillan gave the
congregation address.
Student Activities
Student activities for this year have already been fully
recorded in the A.M.S. publication, The Totem, as well
as in the columns of the Ubyssey. I shall, therefore, only
touch on some of the most exceptional events in the student
life on the campus.
Perhaps the most impressive event was the visit of
India's Prime Minister, Mr. Nehru, who addressed thousands of students in the University Field House. It was a
dramatic and significant occasion, one that left a deep
impression on students and faculty alike.
In the realm of intercollegiate debating, the University debating team not only won the prized McGoun Cup
in competition with other western Canadian universities
but went on to win the highest honours in the national
university finals in Ottawa.
In theatre and music the year was marked by the
Players' Club performance of J. B. Priestley's An Inspector
Calls and by the Musical Society's presentation of Sir
Edward German's light opera, Tom Jones.
Campus clubs were as vigorously active as ever and
rarely did a noon-hour go by without student meetings in
the Auditorium and in classrooms. The various religious
and political clubs and such special groups as the Radio
Society, the United Nations Club, and the Varsity Outdoor
13 Club — to name but a few — had well-planned and well-
executed programs. I should like to add, here, that I am an
enthusiastic supporter of these clubs, for each in its own
particular way is a fine training ground in group participation and citizenship.
In sports, all students had abundant opportunities to
acquire athletic skills and to take part in competitions,
either on the intra-mural or on the intercollegiate level.
Teams were entered in city and provincial leagues, and in
the Evergreen Conference. The English Rugby team had
an especially brilliant season, winning not only the McKechnie Cup, but also defeating the Golden Bears of the
University of California in a close series.
Aid to Women Students
The work of the Dean of Women's Office continues to
be twofold — co-operation with student organizations and
individual counselling. This year the Dean of Women, Dr.
Dorothy Mawdsley, has drawn special attention to evergrowing interest shown by many women's organizations in
giving financial aid to women students who need assistance
to continue their courses of study. I should like to extend
my thanks to the many women's organizations that have
done so either by founding scholarships and bursaries or by
arranging for loans or gifts to worthy causes. Important
contributions have been made by the Alumnae of the
University of Toronto (The Marion McElhanney Memorial), the Kappa Gamma Sorority, the Kappa Kappa Gamma
Mothers' Club, the Kappa Kappa Gamma Alumnae, and
the Alpha Phi Chapter of Delta Gamma Sorority. Women
students may also be helped through the Mary L. Bollert
Loan   Fund,   and   the   Judge   Helen   Gregory   MacGill
14 Memorial Student Aid Fund (for students in Law or Social
Work).
Many women's clubs and women students still on the
campus gave warm support during the inaugural stages
of the new women's residences, but I shall report more fully
on this in my account of the University Building Program.
Building Program
Since the end of the war in 1945 the University has
carried on a vigorous, long-term building program that has
already radically changed the appearance of the campus.
The year 1949-50 saw a steady continuation of that program.
One new building — the massive Engineering Building
— was officially opened by Rt. Hon. C. D. Howe on May
11th, 1950, at the time of the Spring Congregation. One
other building — the Biological Sciences and Pharmacy
Building at the corner of University Boulevard and the
Mall was completed in its present form (one floor and one
wing are to be added in the future) at the end of the
summer of 1950, and was officially opened by the Minister
of Education, Hon. W. Straith at the beginning of the new
term.
These two buildings, with their numerous classrooms,
laboratories, and offices, have done much to relieve the
almost unbelievably crowded conditions that existed on the
campus from 1945 to 1949; but much is still to be done
before space needs are met.
Two more large buildings have passed the "shell"
stages of construction and will be completed before many
more months have elapsed. The first of these, a building
for Bacteriology and Medical Services, is designed to give
permanent quarters to a number of groups concerned with
15 medical and health sciences, as well as to students and
graduate research workers. In addition it will be the Health
Service Centre for the University.
The second of these two great buildings is the Memorial Gymnasium, also on University Boulevard. Already, in
its still incomplete state, it has been the source of much
favourable comment, and will, without doubt, have an
importance of its own among campus buildings. And this
is as it should be, for the Gymnasium is a memorial to the
students, staff, and alumni who served in two World Wars.
Since the first fund campaign was launched by the students
in 1946 over $700,000 have been raised, through a truly
significant student effort, and from support generously
given by the Provincial Government, the Board of Governors, and many interested organizations through the
province. This building, in active use during the present
year, will lack the swimming pool and other subsidiary
facilities originally planned for, but temporarily postponed
because of rising building costs.
The year was also noteworthy for the beginning of the
first Women's Residences. Located at the north end of the
campus, three fireproof units will house 150 young women.
Ultimately other units will be added, as well as a social
centre and dining hall. The Alumnae Committee on
Women's Housing, the Committee on University Residences of the University Women's Club, and other organizations and individuals have generously contributed, in
time and in money, towards furnishing these buildings.
The Residences are a great addition to University housing,
for accommodation for women students from out of town
has always been difficult to arrange and has not always been
satisfactory.
16 The new buildings are all much needed and much
appreciated, but we need additional buildings in order that
the many temporary huts and the semi-permanent buildings
which constitute a fire hazard can be vacated. The following
indicate some of the remaining requirements to be met:
Men's Residences; additional units of Women's Residences;
a new Arts Building; a Law Building; a Medical Sciences
Building; a modern cafeteria; an Extension and Adult
Education Building; a University Museum and Arts Centre;
a bookstore; Agriculture and Forestry Buildings.
Housing
As I have dealt fully in my last two reports with the
housing problems that the University has met since the war,
I need only sketch what has been done during this past
year. Wo have continued the operation of Fort Camp,
Acadia Camp, Little Mountain, Lulu Island, and Wesbrook,
providing much needed accommodation for single students
(men and women) and for married students and staff. In
Fort Camp and Acadia Camp the University housed and
fed 760 single students (86 women students living in Acadia
Camp) and in these and the other camps it provided
cottages, suites, trailer huts, and trailer space for 468
married couples and their children. The new Women's
Residences will mean improved living conditions for
women students, but it is obvious that some of these camps
will continue to be essential for years to come.
Bursaries, Prizes, Scholarships and Loans
In the year under review, exclusive of Department of
Veterans' Affair grants, the University made the sum of
$180,000 available for student aid. This amount categor-
17 ized under bursaries, prizes, scholarships, and loans was
alloted to approximately 600 students (one-tenth of the
student population) on the basis of need and merit. Outstanding among the many generous bequests and gifts in
this period were the $100,000 Paul E. Murphy Student
Loan Fund; the Chris Spencer Foundation Scholarships of
$225 each and two special scholarships of $400 each, renewable over a five year period; and the Plimsoll Club Scholarships, providing thirteen scholarships of from $200 to $300
annually.
A complete list of bursaries, prizes, scholarships and
loans, as well as gifts, grants and bequests is published and
distributed at the Spring and Fall Congregations.
Gifts, Grants and Bequests
From September 1st, 1949 to September 1st, 1950 the
University received a total of $698,002 in gifts, grants and
bequests, exclusive of miscellaneous gifts whose value in
many cases cannot be measured by any pecuniary scale. Some
four hundred of these gifts were received including collections of Indian basketwork, collections of zinc ores and
rocks, many books and book collections, and a great variety
of other materials, all of them useful to the departments to
which they were directed.
In the record of cash donations such items as the
Defence Research Board allocation of $19,970 for the
purchase of a Collins Helium Cryostat, Mr. Robert Fiddes'
fifth installment on a $5000 grant to the Department of
Music, the Rockefeller installment on a $90,000 grant to
the Department of Slavonic Studies, $7000 received from
the U.B.C. Alumni Development Fund, $4000 from the
H. R. MacMillan Export Company Ltd., for instruction in
18 forest mensuration, $5000 from Messrs. Walter and Leon
Koerner for library and other purposes, are outstanding and
typical of the generosity manifested by others.
Summary of Revenues and Expenditures
April 1, 1949 to March 31, 1950
Revenues
Provincial Government
$1,550,000.00
%
36.02
Dominion Government
Supplementary grant
Student Fees
308,313.24
1,529,456.86
7.17
35.55
Revenue and Sundry Grants
468,489.36
10.89
Miscellaneous
446,331.95
$4,302,591.41
10.37
100.00
Expenditures
Teaching Costs (including
%
Library)
$2,376,432.33
55.23
Research
453,053.03
10.53
Administration
199,249.76
4.63
Maintenance
513,402.92
11.93
Emergency Accommodation
36,039.21
.84
Capital Expenditure
224,834.71
5.22
Miscellaneous & General
499,579.45
$4,302,591.41
11.62
100.00
19 Registration for 1949-50
Enrollment by Years
Graduates by Years
Graduates
Geographical Source of Students 1949-50
Occupation of Parents
University Income
Costs per Student
Research Grants and Funds REGISTRATION FOR 1949-50
_
FACULTY   Or   APPLIED  KI ENCE
j    FACULTY   OF   LAW
rACULTY OF AGRICULTURE
1 ULTl   Of   GRADUATE   STUDIED
rACULTY  OF   PHARMACY
3
1000
2000
3000
4000
5000
FACULTY OF ARTS 4 SCIENCE	
FACULTY OF APPLIED SCIENCE
NURSING   	
FACULTY OF AGRICULTURE
FACULTY OF  LAW	
FACULTY OF  PHARMACY	
FACULTY  OF  GRADUATE  STUDIES
4416
1676
103
379
446
188
364
7572
VETERANS
MEN 1984
WOMEN 100
NON VETERANS
MEN 3940
WOMEN 1584
22 ENROLLMENT (winter sessions) BY YEARS
10,000
9000
8000
7000
6000
5000
4000
3000
2000
1000
1933-34   35-36   37-38   39-40   41-42   43-44   45-46   47-48    49-50
NON-VETS
VETS
TOTAL
1933-34
1606
—
1606
1934-35
1652
—
1652
1935-36
1883
—
1883
1936-37
2049
—
2049
1937-38
2223
—
2223
1938-39
2286
—
2286
1939-40
2371
—
2371
1940-41
2487
2487
1941-42
2537
2537
1942-43
2538
—
2538
1943-44
2430
—
2430
1944-45
2974
—
2974
1945-46
3432
3200
6632
1946-47
3945
4796
8741
1947-48
5035
4339
9374
1948-49
5580
3230
8810
1949-50
5488
2084
7572 GRADUATES  BY YEARS
1800
1600
1400
1200
1000
800
600
400
200
1944
1945
1946
1947
1948
SPRING CLASSES
FALL CLASSES
1944 SPRING     338
FALL    63
1945 SPRING   375
FALL 71
1946 SPRING   525
FALL   509
1947 SPRING     893
FALL   305
1948 SPRING   1318
FALL   364
1949 SPRING   1772
FALL    430
1950 SPRING 1802
(Largest Single Grad Class)
24 GRADUATES
VANCOUVER    6810
OTHER PARTS OF B. C  3597
OTHER PARTS OF CANADA  1345
GREAT BRITAIN        66
UNITED STATES     593
OTHER COUNTRIES        86
12,497
DECEASED 700
ADDRESS UNKNOWN       ...   1186
1886
TOTAL 14,383
GEOGRAPHICAL SOURCE OF STUDENTS
1949-50
CANADA
VANCOUVER 3800
OTHER PARTS OF B. C  2825
OTHER PARTS OF CANADA 775
FOREIGN
AFRICA 6
ASIA '0
BRITISH  ISLES 16
CENTRAL AMERICA   23
EUROPE   12
NEW ZEALAND   2
SOUTH AMERICA 8
U. S. A  5r
UNSPECIFIED **
TOTAL   172
FOREIGN —
25 OCCUPATION OF PARENTS
i
PERSONNEL SERVICES
LOGGING
I ABOURING
MINING 8. QUARRYING
FISHING &  HUNTING
RECREATIONAL SERVICES
J.
^
^
^
100
200
300 400
500
600
700 800 900
AGRICULTURE 	
CLERICAL 	
CONSTRUCTION	
FINANCE    :.;.„...;.
FISHING 8, HUNTING     	
LOGGING    	
LABOURING	
MANUFACTURING 8. MECHANICAL
MINING 8. QUARRYING
PERSONNEL SERVICES 	
PUBLIC SERVICES	
PROFESSIONAL SERVICES „	
RECREATIONAL SERVICES  	
TRADE   	
532
351
417
413
26
132
94
770
68
191
438
935
12
753
26 WHERE DOES THE UNIVERSITY DOLLAR COME FROM?
1946-47
1947-48
1948-49
1949-50
46c 43c
STUDENT FEES
PROVINCIAL GRANT
D.V.A. SUPPLEMENTARY GRANT
MISCELLANEOUS
8c   3c
27 RESEARCH GRANTS AND FUNDS*
THOUSANDS OF DOLLARS
500
400
300
200
100
1946-47 1947-48 1948-49 1949-50
(47) (81) (144) (468)
*From public and private sources for undergraduate and graduate research projects.

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