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Report of the University Librarian to the Senate Sep 30, 1968

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 TH6 UNIV6RS1TY of BRITISH COLUMBIA
TH6 RCpORTofTHe LIBRARIAN
to THe seNATe
f IfTY-THIRD Y6AR
sepTeMBeR ~ mcmlxvii
AUQUST-MCMLXV111
VANCOUV6R
MCMLXV1II The Report
of the University Librarian
to the Senate
53rd Year
September 1967 to August 1968
Vancouver
September  1968 REPORT OF THE UNIVERSITY LIBRARIAN TO SENATE
1967/1968
INDEX
Page
I.  Introductory Remarks. 1
II.  Buildings and Services.   a. Library Buildings 3
b. New Branches 6
c. Reading Rooms 7
d. Services 8
III.  Collections.   a. Funds 11
b. Acquisitions 13
c. Processing 14
IV.  Administration.   a. Organization and Relationships 17
b. Personnel 18
c. Systems Development 20
V.  Concluding Remarks 22
Appendix A: Library Expenditures
Appendix B: Size and Growth of Collections
Appendix C: Recorded Use of Library Resources
Appendix D: Comparative Statistics
Appendix E: Organizational Chart
Appendix F: Library Organization
Appendix G: Senate Library Committee          1.  Introductory Remarks
Because annual reports traditionally are devoted to the theme of progress,
general conditions tend to be overlooked.  The preceding photographs form
a backdrop for the events and circumstances described in the following
pages.
Statistical evidence supports the impression these photographs make.
In five years the collections have doubled in size, and at present rates
of acquisition they will contain at least one million seven hundred thousand volumes, as well as hundreds of thousands of documents and microforms,
five years from now.
In 1962/63, the Library loaned 653,091 items.  Last year 1,445,778 items
were loaned, an increase out of all proportion to the increase in enrolment
from 13,598 to 18,310 students in the same period.  Unless enrolment restrictions are imposed, numbers of students will exceed 30,000, and even
if enrolment is held to present levels over two million items will be loaned
within the next few years.
The decentralization of services and collections have helped the Library
to adapt to recent increases.  The past few years have witnessed the
establishment in rapid succession of the Woodward Biomedical Library, the
Forestry/Agriculture Library, the Music Library, the Mathematics Library,
the Marjorie Smith Library (Social Work) and the Institute of Fisheries
Library.  But despite the opening of new libraries, there is little space
remaining for the expanding collections, and the need for study seating, in
libraries or outside of libraries, has not been met for this year's enrolment
of 20,000 students.  Even with the inclusion of new study facilities in 2
Brock Hall, there is only one seat for every seven students at present.
Standards for a large university consisting for the most part of commuters
call for roughly one seat for every three students in the humanities and
social sciences, one for every four students in the sciences.  That U.B.C.
requires this standard of accommodation is borne out by the results of the
1966 Student Library Survey, which revealed that 54.69% of the students had
difficulty in finding a place to study, and that 80.72% of the students
spent more than one hour each day in the Library; in fact 31.32% spend more
than three hours every day in the Library, as much time as the average
student spends in classes.
Unfortunately, what is already a bad situation can only get worse.  No
funds for further construction are in sight, and even if funds were available
today, it would be several years before new library buildings were ready for
occupancy.  The physical library system as it exists today is all that will
be available for the increases of the near future.  Previous annual reports
have drawn the attention of the University to the prospects of more acute
crowding of students and staff, and the removal to storage of parts of the
collection.  Hard work and ingenuity can not remedy the fundamental problems
arising from simple lack of space.
An honest acknowledgement that the Library faces nearly insoluble problems
may at least prepare the University community for the difficult times that
lie ahead. 3
I I.  Buildings and Services
It is customary to give over to a discussion of the collections the earliest
chapter of the annual report.  This year, however, the inadequacy of the
Library's physical accommodations far outweighs in importance the state of
the collections.  The aim of a library is simple, even though it may be
difficult and expensive to achieve:  to provide readily the materials a
patron requires and a table at which he can use them.  The University of
British Columbia Library is failing in this prime objective, and it is failing because of its physical accommodations, and for no other reason.
a.  Library BuiIdings.
Planning for the expansion of 1ibrary .faci1ities has been under way for
several years.  The framework for a system of branch libraries and reading
rooms was set up on November 4, 1965, when Senate approved a document entitled
Policies Governing the Establishment and Growth of Branch Libraries and
Reading Rooms Outside the Main Library Building.  Within this framework a
second lengthy document was developed by B. Stuart-Stubbs and W. J. Watson,
entitled A Plan for Future Services, and issued in June 1966 to the Senate
Library Committee, the Deans, the Administration, the Architect Planner and
the Academic Planner.  Its substance was presented in the previous annual
report,
A number of factors must be taken into consideration in planning a system of
libraries.  Of principle importance are the following:
A.  Geography.  The U.B.C. campus is large.  When fully developed its
academic core will occupy a rectangle of about 4800' by 3200'  A
pedestrian campus with peripheral vehicle access and parking is contemplated.  Climatic conditions make it desirable that such service 4
facilities as libraries be located as close as possible to potential
users.
B, Demography. According to current planning, academic "zones" will be
developed, which will locate the Health and Life Sciences in the southeast corner of the campus, the Pure and Applied Sciences in the southwest and centre, and the Humanities and Social Sciences in the north.
The Woodward Library is already in existence to serve the first of these
"zones"; the Main Library, supported by a few branch libraries and reading rooms, is now serving in an unsatisfactory way the rest of the
campus.  Within each of these zones, new estimates of student population
are now available, and whereas for planning purposes two years ago a
total enrolment of 22,000 was used, today the figure is a staggering
34,371 by 1973/74.
C. Needs of Faculties and Departments,  Each discipline has its own particular library requirements where collections and services are concerned.
No single library could meet such a diversity of requirements; yet
libraries can be developed which serve the common needs of several
faculties and departments in broad subject areas, as in the case of
the Woodward Library.  There was a time when libraries devoted to special interests could be developed, but the lines between disciplines
have been blurred, and the interests of students and faculty members
range over a host of topics in many parts of a library collection.  To
fragment collections and services can work against more interests than
it serves.  In designing a library system, it is not enough to assume
that a certain type of library can be constructed, without analyzing
the use made of collections by the potential users, an ability afforded to this University through the automated circulation system.
D. Growth of Collections.  While it may be possible to set an upper limit
to the growth of the student body, no end is in sight where the growth
of library collections is concerned.  However, not all books are equally
used, although all might be essential at one time or another in the
life of the university.  The day must come when the less frequently
used material is moved into storage, or, depending on the state of
technology, miniaturized or converted to digital form.  It follows that
useful limits to collection size should be set in developing new libraries .
E. Economy of Operation.  Every service point adds to the cost of operation,
a fact which argues in favour of multi-disciplinary libraries as opposed
to faculty or departmental libraries, and in favour of a type of architecture which allows services to be concentrated as much as possible in
one area of a building.
F. Technological Change.   Much is said and written about the promises of
future systems of information storage and retrieval, involving miniaturization, machine encoding, on-line access to data banks, and so on.
The long-term implications of these unrealized systems can only be
guessed at, but even the most futuristic-minded prophets do not predict
the end of libraries.  What the Library must do is to adapt to change,
and exploit new techniques as they become practical, and this has been
its approach.  In architecture, what is called for is design flexible
enough to accommodate new combinations of people, equipment and material.
Already the Library has made notable progress in introducing new technology into its operations; this is described in a later section of this
report. 6
G.  Experience.  Planning outside the context of the experience of other
universities and libraries would be foolhardy.  There have been hundreds
of new library buildings erected in North America in the last few years,
and many experiments performed.  There is an abundant literature to be
exploited and related to the needs and characteristics of our own situation.
During the fall of 1968 a revised edition of A Plan for Future Services will
be issued, based on the latest predictions of enrolment and on a re-examination of the factors listed above.  The aim, as has been said, will be to
design a library system which will permit every user conveniently to locate
and use the material he needs.
b.  New Branches.
The fall of 1967 witnessed the opening of new branches for Forestry/Agriculture and Music, both in new specialized academic buildings.  While these
facilities marked an advance in services to faculty members and students
directly concerned, they had little effect on general library conditions.
A development that will have a greater effect is the planned addition to
the Woodward Biomedical Library. A Client's Committee under the chairmanship
of Dr. W. C. Gibson moved swiftly through the stages of the user's program
(October 1967), to the architectural program (February 1968), to the schematic drawings, to the final drawings, and finally to the bidding process.
The addition will be completed by the spring of 1970, making available double
the existing space for collections and triple the space for users.
At the time of writing, no other library facilities are in the detailed
planning stage. 7
Two other developments may alleviate crowding in the Library.  One is the
opening of the Student Union Building, whose lounges and cafeterias may
remove from the Main Library some of the social role it has played.  The
other is the conversion of the ball room and cafeteria areas of Brock Hall
into a study area containing about 450 seats, a development mentioned
earlier and already taken into consideration in stating that in 1968/69
only one seat is available for every seven students.
Again, it must be emphasized that this situation is critical.  On the
average, fewer than half of the 20,000 students are in classes at any one
time.  The rest must be accommodated elsewhere, and the majority will look
for a place to study and read.
c.  Reading Rooms.
The thirty reading rooms scattered around the campus for the most part
still lack a formal affiliation with the Library, and the conditions described in previous annual reports still apply.  For a third consecutive
year, the budget submission of the Library for 1969/70 contained a proposal
for the organization and central financing of reading rooms. A clear need
for properly maintained reading rooms exists:  their very existence, eked
out of departmental supply and expense and research funds, is proof of that.
However, the financing of the reading rooms must be acknowledged by the
University as an item separate from and above the normal Library budget.
The Library should not be forced into a position of supporting reading rooms
at the expense of neglecting the development of services and collections in
its larger branches. d.  Services.
Hours of Opening
The Library now maintains one of the largest schedules in North America,
major branches being open from eight in the morning until midnight daily,
except for Saturday, when they close at five, and Sunday, when they open
at noon.  In the fall of 1968 the Brock Hall study areas will be open for
an even longer period of time, from 7:30 a.m. to 2:00 a.m. Monday to
Friday, from 7:30 a.m. to midnight on Saturday and from 9:00 a.m. to midnight on Sunday.  These extended hours may be sufficient to satisfy the
needs of the minority of students who prefer working in the early hours
of the morning.
One development which will have an affect on hours of operation is the
proposal before Senate that the summer sessions be extended for teaching
purposes.  It is presently the custom of the Library to cut its hours of
opening back to about forty a week in the period between Spring and Summer
Terms.  During this period most of the public service employees take their
vacation, and other staff members are reallocated to clear up backlogs
and to work on special short term projects such as inventory.  If the
summer session is extended, it will be necessary to extend hours, and this
will require additional staff.
Borrowers and Borrowing
Recorded circulation of library materials swelled to 1,445,778 items in
1967/68, almost double the figure of 1963/64, and an increase of more than
21% over 1966/67.  For the second year, circulation from Branch Libraries
exceeded circulation from the Main Library, a desired result of the
decentralization of collections and services.  Reflecting an increasing 9
need for materials on the part of undergraduates, circulation in the Sedgewick Library has doubled in three years, and indications are that a further
significant increase will be registered in 1968/69.  In September 1968,
circulation in the Sedgewick Library was 150% higher than in September 1967,
a circumstance for which early registration alone can not account.
It has been the usual experience that the decentralization of collections
and their situation in improved surroundings adjacent to interested borrowers has resulted in heavier use of collections, which can be taken as an
indication of improved educational opportunity and experience for students.
The housing of the Sedgewick Library and science collections in new buildings
would have a dramatic effect on circulation, and would markedly improve the
quality of education.
During the summer, library staff began a review of loan regulations, and
arrived at a number of suggested policy changes, which are now being
scrutinized by the Senate Library Committee.  One of the most pressing
problems facing the Library is the increasing amount of service it is
rendering to students of other institutions, and to the community at large.
The person unfamiliar with the Library actually requires more staff assistance than one of the University's own students, and as often as not the
material required is also in demand by our own students.  Since the Library
is the largest collection of scholarly books and documents west of Toronto,
it has an obligation to meet local and national requirements which can not
be satisfied elsewhere, yet at the same time some system of limitation must
be devised to protect the interests of the University community. 10
Copying Service
In only half a dozen years, improved copying machines have become a major
factor in extending library resources in an environment of mass education.
In 1966/67 machines installed in U.B.C. Libraries produced more than
532,000 copies.  In 1967/68 the figure had risen to 871,110, and it would
come as no surprise if the total reached a million in 1968/69.  During the
summer additional coin-operated machines operating for a nickel a copy
were installed in old and new locations.  In addition to saving students
hundreds of hours of time, the copying process has the effect of keeping
material in the Library for use by other students.
Reference Services
Decentralization of services accompanied the decentralization of collections
in the case of the new branches for Forestry/Agriculture and Music, affording more specialized assistance to students and faculty in those areas.
Apart from this, the most significant development in the area of reference
services was the creation during the summer of a new division of Information
and Orientation, located in the Main Concourse of the Main Library.  The
primary function of this division is to improve the usefulness of the Library
to the students by rendering individual assistance in the use of the catalogue, providing general information, directing inquiries to the appropriate
department, and by instructing students in the basic techniques of library
use and bibliographic research.  In this latter activity, extensive use will
be made of audio-visual techniques and published guides.
A step towards reducing the complexity of services within the Main Library
was taken this summer when the Humanities Division was moved into the
Ridington Room, bringing services in the humanities and social sciences
together in the same area. 11
Regrettably the real potential of reference service has yet to be tapped,
and will not be tapped until more branch libraries are constructed, and
until staff strength is increased to the point that a qualified reference
librarian is available at each service point during all the hours of
opening.
Increases in reference staff have not kept pace with the increase in the
number of hours of service, with the result that the level of assistance
available on evenings and Sundays is low.  Increased assistance at these
times would leave the public service divisions short-staffed during the
peak periods of the day.  The dimensions of information today are such
that it is becoming increasingly difficult for the individual to gain
access to the material he requires without the intervention of an information specialist.  To reach a point of optimum utility, it is essential
that the Library have the human resources to assist library users to
exploit the full resources of the collection.
III.  Col lections
a.  Funds.
In 1967/68 the expenditures for books and magazines dropped suddenly and
drastically from $1,515,364 in 1966/67 to $1,011,181.  This signalled the
end of the funds available from the gift of Mr. H. R. MacMillan, and of a
period of rapid development of collections, which'had seen the Library
increase by a third in only three years, a rate of growth unprecedented 12
in the history of large academic libraries.  Regrettably the University
has not since been able to maintain anything approaching the level of
spending on collections necessary to the development of a university with
growing ambitions in research and graduate study, and with increasing
numbers of undergraduates.  In dealing with the reduction of 1967/68 and
the further reduction of 1968/69 the Senate Library Committee had many
difficult decisions to make regarding priorities.  Their accommodation to
the cutback, in its simplest terms, was to maintain as much as possible
the level of spending for current publications, both books and periodicals,
and to reduce drastically allocations for the purchase of retrospective
publications.  Most seriously affected, therefore, were those faculties
and departments which have a need for older books, both in and out of
print, and for journal backfiles and works of reference. At the end of
August more than a dozen such departments had exhausted their funds, with
seven months remaining in the fiscal year.
By way of contrast, the University of Toronto spent $1,416,171 in books
and magazines in 1967/68, while the University of Alberta spent $1,506,803.
Overall Library expenditure per student at Toronto increased from $200.69
in 1967/68 to $210.28 in 1968/69, and at Alberta from $245.17 to $247.55.
British Columbia's universities have not registered the same gains.  The
newer universities, at a time when they are still building basic collections,
have had to curtail per capita spending.  Simon Fraser University's level
of expenditure dropped from $307.99 to $251.00, and the University of Victoria's from $322.50 to $307.63.  At the University of British Columbia 13
the decline was from an already-low $169.24 to $162.09. At this rate,
U.B.C. became twenty-sixth on a list of thirty-six Canadian university
libraries in terms of per capita support.  Lower than U.B.C. are: Acadia,
Memorial, St. Francis Xavier, Manitoba, Saskatchewan, Selkirk, Sir George
Williams, Waterloo and Waterloo Lutheran,
b.  Acquisi tions.
In last year's annual report it was stated that a library collection, in
order to satisfy its users, must meet the criteria of currency, depth and
access.  That is to say, new material must be available soon after publication, a broad range of older material will be needed as a base, and
individual items should be available at the time they are wanted by an
individual user.
The first of these criteria is the one that is being met most successfully,
and progress is being made toward meeting the third through the purchase
of multiple copies.  However, the previously mentioned budget reductions
are impairing the library's ability to develop the depth of collections
necessary for graduate study and research in all fields.  That serious
shortcomings exist in this aspect of the Library was clearly demonstrated
in Robert B. Downs' Resources of Canadian Academic and Research Libraries,
Ottawa, Association of Universities and Colleges of Canada, 1967.  In
evaluating the collections of all Canadian academic libraries, Dr. Downs
employed two formulas.  The first, a somewhat simple standard recommended
by the Canadian Association of College and University Libraries, calls for
75 volumes per full time student; applying this to U.B.C, Dr. Downs discovered that in 1966 the Library was 518,305 volumes short of its requirement.  Using the same formula in the current year, this deficiency would 14
be reduced to about 450,000 volumes. More spectacular was the result
obtained by Dr. Downs in using a more sophisticated formula developed by
Verner W. Clapp and Robert T, Jordan of the Council on Library Resources.
This formula weighs seven factors;  a basic undergraduate library, the
number of faculty members, total number of students, undergraduates in
honours or independent study programmes, number of fields of undergraduate
concentration, number of fields of graduate concentration at the master's
level and number of fields of graduate concentration at the doctoral level.
Applied to the U.B.C. collection in 1966, it indicated a deficiency of
1,210,885 volumes, the highest figure of any Canadian library. Alberta
followed with a deficiency of 802,125 volumes, while at the end of the
scale Toronto was calculated to have a surplus above requirement of 286,741
volumes.
Other surveys of the collection have revealed its strength in respect to
essential works.  What is still lacking is the bulk of secondary materials
which will give it the depth necessary to the pursuit of research and
graduate study.
c.  Processing.
The statistics of work performed by the Processing Divisions show a tapering
off of acquisitions, paralleling the decline in funds, and an impressive
increase in the number of volumes catalogued, indicating that encouraging
inroads are being made into the backlogs accumulated during the years of
heavier expenditures. 15
1964/65 1965/66 1966/67 1967/68
Acquisitions  Division
Orders  Placed
Volumes  Received
Serials  Division
Current  Subscriptions
Government  Publications
Documents  Received
Catalogue Division
Volumes  Processed
(exclusive of backlog)
Volumes  Processed
(inclusive of backlog)
31,939 49,744 54,323 27,520
42,532 93,607 97,503 74,212
5,970 7,430 j^gjj 11,750''
40,752
70,907
70,907
52,549
65,926
57,927
79,984 103,640 171,478
94,984 128,640 198,056
Despite appearances,   the   increase   in  the  number of active  subscriptions
was 575.     The apparent   increase,   from 8,900   to  11,750,   reflects  three
factors:     the   real   increase;   a   revised  definition of "serial",   and   the
consequent   inclusion of many publications   formerly considered
"continuations";   and  a more accurate  tally of actual   subscriptions.
The  cataloguing  backlog,   which   is   listed   in  the catalogue under  the  author's
name only and which   is  stored   in  an  area closed   to the public,   numbered
57,643   volumes  at  the  end of August,   over 2,000  volumes   less  than  at   the
same  time  last year,   and   it  can  be  predicted  that  the  total  will   drop  below
50,000  during  the coming year. 16
Reorganization within the Cataloguing Division resulted in higher production,
yet at the same time a number of special projects were undertaken and completed.  The most notable of these was the division of the main catalogue.
Formerly in a single cumbersome alphabetic sequence, it has been divided
into two alphabetic sequences, one for authors and titles, and the other for
subjects.  In the latter file, all subject headings have been added in
plastic-jacketed guide cards, a feature which has greatly simplified use of
the catalogue.
In the course of the year, the routines of the Serials Division and the
Acquisition Division were automated.  These developments will be discussed
in a later section of the report. 17
IV. Administration
a.  Organization and Relationships.
At its meeting of May 22, 1968, the Senate adopted new terms of reference
for the Senate Library Committee. (See Appendix G)  In the new terms there
is an increased emphasis on communication between the Library, the Senate
Library Committee, the Senate, and the University community.  In response
to this, the Library has begun to issue on a monthly basis a newsletter to
Faculty, U.B.C. Library News, and the Senate Library Committee has adopted
a heavy schedule of meetings for 1968/69, and proposes to bring to Senate
reports on their deliberations, particularly as they affect policy.  The
Library has consolidated a strong administrative structure which is
productive of consistency, efficiency and economy.  Thus no radical changes
in the internal structure of the Library have taken place in the past year
(See Appendix E), other than the addition of the previously mentioned new
branches.  However, the increasing size of the staff and complexity of
the organization have been the cause of difficulties in communication.  To
rectify this situation, a U.B.C. Library Bulletin is now published frequently and circulated to library staff members.  The Bui let in carries administrative information and notices, and supplements the staff-produced monthly,
Biblos.  In addition, a policy and procedure manual is being compiled, in
order to ensure consistent practices in all parts of the library system.
Throughout the year, the Librarians of U.B.C, University of Victoria and
Simon Fraser University met periodically to continue the work of developing
complimentary collections and compatible automated library systems, and of
exploring all possible areas of co-operation.  Information networks based
on electronics, although they are still a thing of the future, will require 18
firm foundations which must be laid now.  Realizing that it will not be
possible for any one Library to keep abreast of all fields of knowledge in
their collections, librarians are stressing the importance of mutually
supportive collections at the level of research and graduate studies, and
searching for more effective means of sharing resources.
b.  Personnel.
The success of a service organization rests in large part on the quality
of the staff, and this can only be developed through the application of
sound policies in recruitment, training and promotion.  There is evidence
that the Library is making steady progress in this direction.
There are now 366-^ positions in the Library's establishment, 912" of which
are positions for professional librarians, the remainder being positions
for employees in a diversity of classifications, such as library assistants,
programmers, and technicians.  U.B.C. Library is thus the second largest
Library in Canada in terms of staff, following the University of Toronto
(7152 positions) and being followed by the University of Alberta (348
pos i tions).
For the first time in many years, the salary floors for librarians were not
raised, placing the Library in a disadvantageous position in recruiting.
The U.B.C. floor is $6500, compared with $6800 at the University of Victoria,
$7000 at the University of Alberta, $7200 at the University of Calgary, and
$7000 at the University of Toronto.  Out of thirty-three institutions responding to an annual survey conducted by the Canadian Association of College
and University Libraries, one library has a starting floor of less than
$6500, U.B.C. shares the $6500 floor with four other institutions, and the 19
twenty-seven remaining institutions offer more than $6500.  Fifteen offer
$7000 or over.  Since it is anticipated that a further increase in floors
will occur next spring at other institutions, U.B.C. will have a large bill
to pay in across-the-floor increases if it is going to escape from its
perilous position.  Other local institutions now offer more money and better
working conditions, and this must be recognized in establishing salary
policy.
The Library Assistants, by contrast, found their position improved.  The
introduction of a four-level classification for library assistants, combined with competitive salary scales and a policy of promoting staff members
as they become qualified, into more senior positions coming vacant, has paid
encouraging dividends.  In 1965/66, the turnover rate was 68.27%; in 1966/67,
it dropped to 54.12%; and in 1967/68 it declined further to 43.88%. Admittedly this rate of turnover is still high, but the trend is in the right direction, and considerable savings have been made already in the time spent in
staff training.  The increased experience of staff has also resulted in better
service to library borrowers.
The situation can be improved by the introduction of more changes in personnel
policy.  Prominent among recommended changes are:  salary differentials for
shift work; a new classification of Library Assistant V which would permit
the transfer to library assistants of work presently performed by librarians,
and enhance the prospect of careers for non-professional library staff;
increases in the length of the scales, which are too short; improvement of
floors in some parts of the scale; provision for exceptional salary raises,
in recognition of outstanding performance; and more reasonable treatment of
reclassification requests. 20
c.  Systems Development.
The University can be justifiably proud of the progress which has been made
in the application of the principles of automation to library routines.  In
its fourth year of operation, the computer-based book lending system is
still the largest of its kind in the world, and has afforded benefits to
library staff and users not to be obtained by manual systems.  While it has
increased the efficiency of routines and record-keeping, the information on
the borrowing habits of students and faculty which it compiles is equally
important to the future success of the Library.  For instance, a use study
of the books housed in the Main Library's Reserve Book Collection revealed
that of 9,000 volumes, 5,000 were not used frequently enough to justify
being placed on reserve, and that in fact the students would have been
able to make better use of the books had they been loaned on the usual
basis.  Further such studies will be performed, involving the relationship
between the size of classes, the length of reading assignments, and the
use of books, with a view to developing practical guidelines for faculty
to use in preparing their reserve lists.
A number of other studies are in progress.  One such study will analyze
the use made of library materials by students in the Arts I programme,
compared with students in the regular Arts programme.  Another study will
determine by an analysis of recorded use whether changes in loan and overdue policies are   indicated, and will evaluate our present practices as
they relate to the user.
During the year, two other systems went into operation;  one for the
management of serials records, one for the acquisitions process. 21
The serials system has been under development for some time, and will
eventually record holdings of all serially issued publications, and make
the record widely available. An early by-product was Serials Holdings 1967,
which will be published annually.  The system has progressed to the point
that it now maintains records on a daily basis, and provides copies of the
record to major service points in the Library.  Another by-product will be
a bindery schedule based on the predicted completion dates of volumes of
i ndividual ti tles.
Late in the report year, an automated acquisitions system was initiated,
with a view to improving accuracy and efficiency in bibliographic records
and accounts.
Other operational systems, such as those for producing the accessions list,
the phonograph record catalogue, the Mathematics Library catalogue, and
maintaining the brief-listing scheme for uncatalogued materials, continue
to be refined. In  order   to assist the TRIUMF Project in handling it's
collection of report literature, a special indexing system is being devised,
and this system will be sufficiently flexible to permit its application to
other collections of literature, such as government documents, pamphlets
and microforms.
Few Libraries in North America can boast of such a comprehensive programme
of automation.  What is particularly impressive is the fact that so much
has been accomplished with a staff of two systems analysts, two programmers,
and eleven machine operators. Although the emphasis has been in improving
the internal records and processes for operations and management, the
groundwork for the utilization of more sophisticated systems of automation 22
and information retrieval has been well laid. Ample and regular support
has been provided by the Data Processing Centre, but as new systems offering on-line access to mass storage become available, the Library must be
able to avail itself of them or the effect of today's achievements will
be blunted.
V.  Concluding Remarks
The tone of the preceding report is far removed from that of the report of
three years ago, when the Library marked its first half century of service.
At that time, the Library seemed to be on the threshold of a period of
expansion which would raise its collections and services to the levels
necessary to support a thriving major University.  But now the promise of
that year has waned.  Collection development has been retarded by a decline
in funds.  Most serious of all, the University's needs have outstripped
the Library's ability to serve them through existing structures.  At the
time of writing, there is little cause for encouragement and none for
complacency. APPENDIX A
LIBRARY  EXPENDITURES
Fiscal   Years,     April-March
1965/66 1966/67 1967/68 1968/69-
Salaries  and  Wages $    873,300 $1,327,320 $1,674,536 $1,970,477
Books  and   Periodicals 1,613,087 1,515,364 1,011,181 955,090
Binding 50,684 105,654 88,052 106,616
Supplies,   Equipment,   Etc. 179,731 264,162 325,093 27M596
$2,716,802 $3,212,500        $3,098,862 $3,303,779
Estimated   Expenditures APPENDIX B
SIZE AND GROWTH OF COLLECTIONS
March 31 Additions Withdrawals   March 31
1967 1967/68 1967/68      1968
Volumes - Catalogued           844,992 114,428 41 943,990
Volumes - Controlled Storage     38,608 26,578 7,552        57,634
Documents                    425,690 57,927 - 483,617
Films                              2 22 -             2k
Microfilm (reels)               9,578 2,119 -         11,697
Microcard (cards)              27,761 6,908 -         34,669
Microprint (sheets)            236,130 16,452 - 252,582
Microfiche (cards)             16,248 7,016 -         23,264
Maps                        51,278 9,604 938 59,9^+4
Manuscripts                   437 ft.* 20 ft.* - 457 ft.*
Phonograph Records              9,782 2,654 391        12,045
)
Thi ckness of files. General Circulation
APPENDIX C
RECORDED USE OF LIBRARY RESOURCES
September I967 - August 1968
1964/65
1965/66
1966/67
1967/68
Main Library
General Stack Collection
Reserve Circulation
Asian Studies Division
Fine Arts Division
Government PublicationsDivision
Humanities Division
Science Division
Social Sciences Division
Special Collections Division
Branch Libraries
Sub Total
Sedgewick Undergraduate Library
Curriculum Laboratory
Woodward Library
Biomedical Branch, V.G.H,
Law Li brary
Social Work Library
Mathematics Library
Forestry/Agriculture Library
Musi c Library
_ Sub Total
Recordings
Record Collection
Music Library Record Collection
.  , ., Sub Total
Extension Library
Volumes for Extension Department
Courses
Drama Col lection
Sub Total
I nterl 1 brary Loans
To Simon Fraser University
To B.C. Med. Library Service
To other Libraries
From B.C. Med. Library Service
From Other Libraries
Photocopies
Sub Total
To  Simon  Fraser University Lib.
To Other Libraries
From Other Libraries
257,530
127,561
1,593
28,457
2,200
1,925
9,457
4,636
434,359
175,923
106,860
54,527
17,988
355,298
Sub Total
1,213
1,062
2,275
1,173
813
1,986
303,863
166,443
2,886
30,508
28,927
1,347
2,641
6,569
5,654
5481838
203,229
103,505
70,042
19,762
48,823
8,174
453,535
44,166
44,166
536
615
2,355
413
1,545
5,464
15,015
1,696
1,181
17,892
308,765
62,360
3,632
27,271
31,524
985
3,808
2,750
5,842
446,937
316,253
133,562
72,046
20,805
51,772
10,908
10,366
615,712
53,494
53,494
1,802
1,021
2,823
1,015
888
2,053
479
1,836
6,271
44,591
3,060
1,855
49,506
386,765
76,830
5,243
28,103
48,571
3,334
9,028
557,462
351,004
146,884
88,117
23,418
67,164
18,178
16,980
15,306
9,810
738,861
60,000
12,399
72,399
2,887
 857
3,744
789
698
2,593
364
2,308
6,752
61,880
4,273
2,407
68,506
Grand Total
792,918       1,069,895       1,174,743       1,445,778 APPENDIX D
COMPARATIVE STATISTICS - U.S. AND CANADIAN UNIVERSITY LIBRARIES
Acqui s i tions
& Bir
lding              Salaries
Supp1ies,   etc.
Total
Texas
2,471,835
,65.7]
1,185,029
(3M5
)                           104,998
(2.8)
3,761,861
111inoi s
1,825,472
(35.4,
2,883,728
(56.0
)                         442,705
(8.6)
5,151,905
Harvard
1,742,614
,23- 1]
4,501,690
(59.7
)                      1,299,487
(17.2)
7,543,791
Cali fornia
-  Berk
sley
1,412,172
[28.4]
3,302,245
(66.5
)                        247,984
(5.1)
4,962,401
Oregon
1,386,039
(46.7]
1,350,298
(45.5
)                        230,885
(7.8)
2,967,222
Cali forni a
-   L.A.
1,308,354
,30.4)
2,680,478
(62.4
)                         306,352
(7.2)
4,295,184
Cornel 1
1,284,776
,3M5)
2,460,814
(60.4
)                        324,189
(8.1)
4,069,779
Stanford
1,282,166
J2.2)
2,413,215
(60.6
)                        285,481
(7.2)
3,980,862
Wi scons i n
1,247,918
(40.3]
1,675,761
(54.2
)                          170,390
(5.5)
3,094,069
Mi chi gan
1,229,586
,27.7)
2,979,022
(67.2
)                         221,380
(5.1)
4,429,988
Wash i ngton
1,189,424
,35.4)
1,968,793
(58.6
)                         202,563
(6.0)
3,360,780
Minnesota
1,152,248
(39.0)
1,681,493
(57.0
)                          114,123
(4.0)
2,947,864
Alberta
1967 -
1968 -
68
69
1,642,124
1,481,000
,51.6)
(42. 1)
1,342,006
1,755,030
(42.2
(50.0;
)                          198,440
)                         279,170
(6.2)
(7.9)
3,182,570
3,515,200
Toronto
1967 -
1968 -
68
69
1,576,311
1,578,000
32.8)
,27.6)
2,810,729
3,626,261
(58.6
(63.4
411,504
)                         514,114
(8.6)
(9.0)
4,798,544
5,718,375
Simon   Fraser   1967
1968
- 68
- 69
765,502
630,000
'47.5)
,40.6)
630,657
748,748
(39.2
(48.2,
)                         213,382
)                          174,175
(13.3)
(11.2)
1,609,541
1,552,923
V i ctori a
1967 -
1968 -
68
69
620,556
660,000
47.7)
44.2)
564,293
742,000
(43.4y
(49.8,
115,467
90,000
.8.9)
,6.0)
1,300,316
1,492,000
UBC
1967 -
1968 -
68
69
1,099,233
1,061,706   (
'35.5)
32. 1)
1,674,536
1,970,477
(54.0)
(59.7;
325,093
27M596
10.5)
8.2)
3,098,862
3,303,779
Note:  All U.S. figures are for 1965/66.
Canadian figures for 1968/69 are  budgeted amounts. APPENDIX  E
UNIVERSITY  OF BRITISH  COLUMBIA  LIBRARY ORGANIZATIONAL  CHART
Head  Librarian
I
Associate  Librarian
Deputy
Budget
Fi nances
Supplies   & Equipment
Personnel
Assi stant] Librarian
Technical Services
Acquisitions Division
Cataloguing  Division
Ser i a 1s  Di vi si on
Prebindery
Bindery
Gifts & Exchange
Assistant Librarian
Pub 1i c Serv i ces
Systems. Ana 1yst
Systems Development
Branch Libraries
Curriculum Laboratory
Fisheries Institute Library
Forestry/Agriculture Library
Law Library
Mathematics Library
Music Library
Record Library
Sedgewick Library
Social Work Library
 Woodward Library
Subject Collections
I
Asian Studies
Fine Arts
Government Publications
& Micro-Materials
Map Collecti on
Special Collections
Circulation Division
I
Ci rculat ion
Reserve Books
Library De1ivery
Photocopy Services
Assistant Librarian
Collect ions
Bib 1iography
Di vi sion
Colbeck Room
Reference Divisions
I
Humanities Division
& I .L.L.
Information & Orientation
Science Division
Social Sciences
Biomedical Branch Library APPENDIX F
LIBRARY ORGANIZATION
ADMINISTRATION
Stuart-Stubbs, Basi 1
Bel 1, Inglis F.
Hami1 ton, Robert M.
Mclnnes, Douglas N.
Watson, Wi11iam J.
ACQUISITIONS
Omelusik, Nicholas
ASIAN STUDIES  >
Ng, Miss Tung King
BIBLIOGRAPHY
Colbeck, Norman
Palsson, Gerald
El 1 i ston, Graham
Mercer, Miss Eleanor
CATALOGUE DIVISION
Elrod, J. McRee
Little, Margaret
Misewich, Mrs. Elizabeth
Sharpe, James
Shields, Miss Dorothy
CIRCULATION DIVISION
Butterfield, Miss Rita
CURRICULUM LABORATORY
Hurt, Howard
FINE ARTS DIVISION
Dwyer, Miss Melva
FISHERIES INSTITUTE LIBRARY
Verwey, Huibert
FORESTRY/AGRICULTURE LIBRARY
Un i vers i ty Li brar i an
Associate Librarian
Assistant Librarian ■
Assistant Librarian ■
Assistant Librarian ■
He-id Librarian
Collect ions
Pub lie Serv i ces
Technical Services
Head Librarian
Bibliographical Consultant
Bibliographer - Science
Bibliographer - European languages
Bibliographer - English language
Head Librarian
Cata logue Spec ia 1 i st
Catalogue Specialist
Catalogue Specialist
Catalogue Specialist
Head Librarian
Head Librarian
Head Librarian
Head Librarian
Brongers, Mrs. Lore
Head Librarian Appendix F Cont'd.
GIFTS &  EXCHANGE
Harrington, Walter Head Librarian
GOVERNMENT PUBLICATIONS
Dodson, Mrs. Suzanne Head Librarian
HUMANITIES DIVISION
Selby, Mrs. Joan Head Librarian'
INFORMATION & ORIENTATION
Chew, Luther Head Librarian
LAW LIBRARY
Shorthouse, Thomas Head Librarian
MAP DIVISION
Wilson, Miss Maureen Head Librarian
MATHEMATICS LIBRARY
Kent, Mrs. Kathy Head Librarian
MUSIC LIBRARY
Burndorfer, Hans Head Librarian
RECORD COLLECTION
Kaye, Douglas Record Librarian
SCIENCE DIVISION
Brongers, Rein Head Librarian
SEDGEWICK LIBRARY
Erickson, Ture Head Librarian
SERIALS DIVISION
Johnson, Stephen Head Librarian
BINDING SECTION
Fryer, Percy Foreman
SOCIAL SCIENCES DIVISION
Carrier, Miss Lois Head Librarian Appendix F Cont'd.
SOCIAL WORK LIBRARY
Freeman, George
SPECIAL COLLECTIONS
Yandle, Mrs. Anne
SYSTEMS DEVELOPMENT
McDonald, Robin
Dobbin, Miss Gerry
WOODWARD LIBRARY
Leith, Miss Anna
BIOMEDICAL BRANCH LIBRARY
Cummings, John
COLBECK ROOM
Colbeck, Norman
Head Librarian
Head Librarian
Systems Analyst
Systems & Information Science Librarian
Head Librarian
Head Librarian
Curator APPENDIX G
Senate Library Committee
1.967/68
Dean I. McT. Cowan (Chairman)
Dr. C. S. Belshaw
Dr. M. Bloom
Dr. W. C Gibson
Mr. W. L. Holland
Dr. D. V, Smiley
Dr. S. Rothstein
Dr, M. W. Steinberg
Dr. S. H. Zbarsky
Dr. B. A. Dunel1
Dr. G. Tougas
Dr. N. J. Divinsky
Mr. G. Mate
Chancellor J. Buchanan (ex officio)
President K. Hare (ex officio)
Mr, J. E. A. Parnall (ex officio)
Mr. B. Stuart-Stubbs (ex officio)
Terms of Reference:
(a) To advise and assist the Librarian in;
(i)   formulating a policy for the development of resources for
instruction and research;
(ii)   advising on the allocation of book funds to the fields of
instruction and research;
(iii)   developing a general programme of library service for all the
interests of the University; and
(iv)   keeping himself informed about the library needs of instructional
and research staffs, and keeping the academic community informed
about the 1ibrary;
(b) To report regularly to Senate on matters of policy under discussion
by the Commi ttee.

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