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Eighteenth Report of the Library Committee to the Senate Oct 31, 1947

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Array THE  UNIVERSITY OF  BRITISH  COLUMBIA
EIGHTEENTH       REPORT
of the
LIBRARY       COMMITTEE
to
THE       SENATE
Covering the Period
September 1946 - August 1947
October, 1947 The University of British Columbia
Vancouver, Canada.
President N. A. M. MacKenzie, M..M., LL.M., LL.D., K.C.,
Chairman of the Senate,
The University of British Columbia,
Dear Sir:
As Chairman of the Library Committee I have
the honour to submit, for the consideration of Senate,
the Eighteenth Report of the Librarian of the University,
covering the period from September 1, 1946, to August 31,
1947.
All of which is respectfully submitted.
Ian MacTaggart Cowan
Chairman.
October Id, 1947. REPORT OF THE LIBRARIAN
Dr. Ian M. Cowan,
Chairman, Library Committee,
The University of British Columbia,
Dear Sir:
I have the honour to submit, for the information of
the Library Committee, the Eighteenth Report of the Librarian
of the University, covering the period from September 1, 1946,
to August 31, 1947.
These twelve months were a most difficult but a most
exciting time for everyone connected with the Library. Student
enrolment passed the 9,000 mark, scores of new professors and
instructors arrived on the campus, new departments and new
courses blossomed forth in every direction, and more books than
ever before were purchased by the University. Every one of these
developments increased the demands made on the Library, yet we
had to attempt to meet these needs with precisely the same floor
space and physical facilities that had been available twenty
years before. Ironically, the only attempt made to utilize
space elsewhere—namely, the transfer of the "reserve" division
of the Circulation Department to the upper floor of the
Armouries--was highly unsatisfactory, and this winter the Library
is once more shouldering its burdens with all its staff back
within its own narrow walls.
It would be quite untrue to say that the Library 2.
succeeded in giving first-class service to the teaching staff and
students in 1946-47, but it certainly made a first-class effort
to do the best it could under extremely difficult circumstances.
The impossibility of securing additional trained help on the one
hand, and the scarcity of books on the other, made the struggle
in some degree hopeless from the start, but the staff nevertheless
accomplished wonders. Happily, the Library was able to secure
a number of additional trained librarians during the summer of
1947, and it enters the fray this autumn somewhat better equipped
to meet the needs of 9,000 students than it did a year ago-.  The
supply of new books, too, is improving, but standard out-of-
print titles continue to be extremely scarce, and there is little
prospect that this state of affairs will change.  In the course
of the summer it was possible for the Librarian to search
personally for certain badly needed books in Toronto, Washington,
New York, and San Francisco.  Every bookseller had the same story
to tell, and days of hunting located only a handful of titles.
Even so, the books were so urgently required that the search
seemed worth while.
During the period under review the University was host
to no less than three important Library conferences.  In September,
1946, the Pacific Northwest Library Association held its annual
convention in Vancouver.  One of the general sessions was devoted
to "Library Buildings and Library Architecture", and arrangements
were made to hold this meeting on the campus.  Later in the
afternoon the 200 delegates who attended were entertained by the
University at tea.  In June, 1947, the British Columbia Library
Associativa. 1-pt^ -'*-.=• *"\vp\  convention in the Brock Memorial 3.
Building, and this was followed immediately by the three-day
convention of the new Canadian Library Association, which was
organized in June, 1946, at meetings held in Hamilton, at
McMaster University,  Some 250 librarians attended the Canadian
Library Association sessions. The majority of them came from
Eastern Canada, and many were visiting British Columbia for the
first time. Acadia Camp was made available as a residence for
delegates, and the whole of the Brock Memorial Building was used
for meetings and exhibits.  The University's hospitality was much
appreciated, and contributed substantially to the success of the
conference.
Several members of the Library staff have been active
in the affairs of the British Columbia Library Association.  Your
Librarian served as President of the Pacific Northwest Library
Association for the year ending September 30, 1946, and he is
now serving as President of the Canadian Library Association for
the year ending September 30/194$.  In addition, he was appointed
Chairman of the Public Library Commission in April, and this
autumn will complete a four-year term as a member of the Canadian
Social Science Research Council. Miss Anne M. Smith, Head of the
Reference Department, is serving the third year of her term of
office as a member of the Council of the American Library Association, and in June she was elected to the Board of the Association
of College and Research Libraries, Miss Eleanor Mercer, of the
Circulation Department, served in 1946-47 as 2nd Vice-President
of the Pacific Northwest Library AasocJaoa on. 4.
New Building
Good progress has been made- in recent months with the
construction of the large addition to the Library building.
Excavating for the foundations commenced in October, 1946, but
actual building operations did not get under way until February.
If all goes well the roof should be completed, and the building
thereby made reasonably weatherproof, by the middle of November.
Several threatened bottlenecks have failed to develop, and there
would seem to be a good prospect that the wing will be substantially
completed by the end of the spring term. It will then be possible
to proceed with the alterations that have to be made inside the
existing building.  These changes, and the task of.moving the
entire bookstock to a new location, will occupy most of the
summer, but the whole Library--old and new—should be in order and
ready for use by next September.
The dust and noise arising from the building operations
make life difficult for the staff, but this evidence of the progress being made on the wing is none the less welcome to those
working in hopelessly crowded stackrooms and service desks.
Indeed, it can be said without fear of contradiction that if
adequate accommodation were not in prospect, most of the staff
would give up the struggle and seek less strenuous employment
elsewhere.
The BookColiectIon
The number of books accessioned in the regular series
was 11,51$, as compared with 9,301 in the previous year. Until
the last ♦"wo ^±   three ypara s^p^iorr '^nalDy totalled between 5<
5,000 and 5,500 volumes annually. The Library's rate of growth
has thus doubled since the end of the war.
These figures take no account of various special collections, including the Howay-Reid Collection of Canadiana, which are
accessioned in separate series.  Insofar as other demands permit,
the full time of one cataloguer is devoted to these collections,
but at the present rate of progress it will be several years before
the work of cataloguing them is completed. Adequate shelving and
work space, which will become available when the addition to the
Library building is completed, will assist greatly in the task.
In September, 1940, when the present Librarian came to
the University, the Library consisted of approximately 120,000
volumes. It now consists of about 180,000 volumes--an increase of
60,000 volumes in only seven years. About 45,000 of these have
been received by gift, bequest or purchase in the last three and a
half years.
It is a pleasure to report that, except for the special
collections, and certain books in the Law Library that cannot be
dealt with except during the summer, the Cataloguing Department
has succeeded in keeping up with the immensely increased volume of
material that has come into the building.  This is no mean achievement for a cataloguing staff as small as ours.
The H. R. MacMillan Collection in Forestry
It will be recalled that Miss Ina Rankin, of the Library
of the University of Michigan, spent July and August of 1946 in
Vancouver, helping to plan the scope and purchasing policy of this
collection.  Since that time the project has gone steadily forward, 6.
and most of the items on Miss Rankin's original lists have been
acquired.
Pressure of other work that it was impossible to put
aside has slowed down the purchasing programme in recent months, but
it should be possible once again to give the collection the careful
attention it deserves before the end of 1947.
Mr. MacMillan's purpose is to enable the Library to
build up a comprehensive collection both in Forestry proper, and in
the various related fields that are important to the forest industries in British Columbia.  Total expenditure is expected to be
about $10,000.
>
Gifts
A number of notable gifts were received during the year,
among them a complete file of the Vancouver Daily Province from
1898,  Part of this file required binding and this was done at the
expense of the paper.  Current issues of the Province are sent to
the Library free of charge on the understanding that these will be
bound and the file kept up to date.
The Vancouver Sun, through the kindness of Mr. Charles
Bailey, its business manager, had given the Library a model C
Recordak microfilm reader which was badly needed.  The machine presented was generally regarded as the best of the kind available
and had cost $479.00.
The Custodian of Enemy Property sent to the Library a
large collection of miscellaneous literature in German, most of which
came originally from the German Embassy in Ottawa, As two wars and
a depression had made it extremely diffjcn.lt to acquire an adequate 7.
collection in that language, this gift was a particularly welcome
one, and most of the several hundred items included will be very
acceptable additions to the book collection.
From Mr. W. F. Maxwell, a member of the class of Arts '16,
the Library received a collection of official publications from
the library of his father, the late G. R. Maxwell, M.P.  These
included runs of the House of Commons Debates, Senate Debates and
British Columbia Sessional Papers for most of the years from I896
to 1902.
Mr, W. E. Ireland, Provincial Librarian and Archivist,
realizing that the greatly increased number of students must
result in greatly increased wear and tear on the Library's key sets
of official publications, very kindly sent a nearly complete set of
the British Columbia Sessional Papers from 1875 to 1936.  The
Provincial Library in Victoria had also very generously permitted
the Library to choose 55 volumes from its duplicate collection of
yearbooks, almanacs, etc.  Of those selected, 34 were new titles;
the rest were additional copies of books that are in constant use.
The Department of Geology ancl Geography obtained recently
a large collection of military maps distributed by the Government
of Great Britain.  Through the kindness of Dr, M. Y. Williams, Head
of the Department of Geology and Geography, these maps have been
added to the Library's collection,  A first shipment of 200 maps
has been received, mostly captured German material, and several
thousand more are expected to arrive in due course.
From Mr. Henry Doyle the Library received a collection of
books and magazines, the outr4-01""-1-'""" ^+--^m in which was a run of the
extreme."!^ -o-o fi^a- , ^-nmpc; 0f ^he  Nativ/^^'o P-v.graphic. This run 8.
is complete except for a few individual numbers in the first three
volumes.  All of the first dozen volumes are now very difficult and
costly to secure and Mr. Doyle's gift has given us a periodical run
that is duplicated in relatively few libraries on the Continent.
Mr. Harry Wearne of Quick, B. C, presented to the Library
six of the eight parts of Bowdler Sharpe's magnificent Monograph
of the Birds of Paradise, the plates of which remind one of Audubon,
and G. P. Baker's folio monograph on Calico Painting and Printing in
the East Indies in the 17th and 18th Centuries, published in London
in 1921. The text is accompanied by a large portfolio containing
32 coloured plates.
Dr. Lachlan Gilchrist, of the Department of Physics, University of Toronto, presented a cop}/- of the Third Edition of
Newton's Principia, published in London in 1726, and a copy of the
Elements of Euclid printed in 1714.  These were presented through
our Department of Physics as a token of his interest in the development of a Physics library and Physics research on our campus.
Mr. H. R. MacMillan continued his generous gifts to the
Library, among them a valuable collection of old maps relating
mostly to this region, several of them illustrating interesting
points in the cartographical history of the Pacific Northwest.
As a result of a suggestion made by Mr. MacMillan, the Library
obtained six copies of the evidence presented to the Sloan Commission on Forestry, and twelve sets of the arguments.
Dr. Annie H. Abel Henderson of Aberdeen, Washington,
who gave the Library 200 volumes last year from her own historical
library, sent a second selection of 227 bound volumes and a large 9.
collection of pamphlets, offprints, etc.  Included among them is
a number of contemporary pamphlets on the abolition of British
slavery, printed in the l$20's and l830's.
Through the kindness of Mr. Percy Bengough, the Library
received a file of the Trades and Labor Congress Journal covering
the period 1937 to 1946, and a gift subscription that would keep the
set up to date.
From Miss E. J. Bostock of Monte Creek came a large collection of Dominion Government publications, originally gathered
together by her father, the late Senator Bostock.
Mr. J. R. Browning, a student veteran, presented a fine -
set of 54 mounted photographs of various scenes and historic buildings in Great Britain.  With them came a number of publications of
the Pamphlet Series put out by the British Information Services
during the recent war.
A set of Mortier's edition of La Chanson de Roland was received from the Canadian Embassy in Paris.  This work, consisting of
an introductory monograph and ten volumes of text, was printed in
Paris in 1939-40 and earlier distribution was prevented by the war.
Mr. A. S. Wootton, a member of the Institute of Civil
Engineers, presented nearly complete sets of the Proceedings of the
Institute for the years 1909-1935, and the Journal for 1935-46.
A most interesting gift came from Mrs. Don Haet, the former
Jean Hunt, of Nanaimo, who is known in the world of ballet under the
professional name of KIra Bounina, in the form of 16 folders of
music scores, consisting mostly of arrangements for small orchestra.
Gift subacid a>Pi oris of five useful periodicals were received
from the British Council.  TLQ.^e were: the Sphere, the Army Quarterly 10.
and the Journal of the Royal United Services Institution, Syren
and Shipping, and the Marine Engineer.
The Vancouver Women's Musical Society presented to the
Library its collection of scores and sheet music in the hope that
they would be of use to Mr. Harry Adaskin, the University's first
Professor of Music.  Hundreds of titles are included, and the gift
is a most welcome one.
Mr. Isaac Burpee of Portland, Oregon, presented a set of
Lockley's Columbia River__Va 11 ey and a set of Clark's History of
the Willamette Valley, together with photostat copies of a number
of rare pamphlets.  Mr. Winfield Matheson of North Star, Alberta
sent $ books for the William and Mary Forbes Contribution.  From
the library of the late Mr. Justice Murphy came his copy of The
Trial between James Anne    and Richard, Earl of Anglesey, presented-
by Mrs. Murphy.  Mr. J. W. Eastham, Provincial Pathologist, gave a
very large collection of pamphlets, bulletins, periodicals, etc.,
numbering about 4,000 items in all.
Other useful and generous gifts were received from the
following:
Major F. V. Longstaff of Victoria, Dr. W. H. Taylor
(Arts '28) of Washington, D.C., Mr. and Mrs. W. H. Hudson, Dr.
Lome Pierce of Toronto, Mr, Frank Buckland of Kelowna, Mrs. J. G.
A. Hutcheson, Dre William Proctor, Mrs. Gordon D. Herbert of
Kelowna, Miss Julia Stockett, Mr. D. W. Oswald, Dr. Lloyd L. Bolton
of Santa Clara University, Judge J. A. Jackson, Mr. J. Duff of
Sidney, B. C, Mr. A. Hotson, Mrs. Nelson Spencer, Mrs. Jonathan
Rogers  arirl ^v    wm-—^ ^aP  Mi*<-o nqiipq Johnson, Mr. D. H. 11.
Lo Page, Mr. A. T„ Ruffle, Mr. John Holders, the Swedish Consulate,
the Canadian Palestine Committee, the Vancouver Poetry Society,
the Vancouver Public Library, the Canadian Pharmaceutical Association, the Canadian Medical Association, and the Library of the
College of Puget Sound.
Finally, the Library continues to receive most generous
gifts from the staff of the University,  Donors who must be mentioned include Dr, L. S. Klinck, President MacKenzie, Dr. Seyer,
Professor Soward, Dr. Borden, Dr. Dallas, Dr. Warren, Dr. Hooley,
Dr, Belinfante and Dr. Clemens,
Staff^o^it_i£n_s
On September 1, 1945, the Library staff consisted of
16 full-time employees.  A year later it consisted of 32 full-time
people, plus a trained librarian \vho was working half-time.  On
September 1, 1947 the total had jumped to 42 persons, one of whom
was working half-time, and two of whom were working 30 hours per
week instead of the usual 38 hours,  Three additional appointments
are pending, and the staff will thus number 45 by October 1.  Of
these, 1$ will hold professional positions.
This expansion has taken place much too rapidly for comfort, especially in the Reference Department, where there have been
complicating factors.  At the end of April, Mrs. Dorothy Chatwin,
who had been with the Library for ten years and had rendered quite
outstanding service as Assistant in Reference, resigned in order
that she might joir> ^pr '^s'lflt^ who had been transferred to
Ottawa.  In August, Mrs. Kerr, ""^ ^b ^ootoo^i onal in Reference 12.
who had been specially trained in documents work, found it necessary to resign at a few days' notice because her husband had
accepted a position In Calgary. About the same time Miss Betty
Henderson was transferred back to her former position in the Cataloguing Department. Meanwhile, Miss Winifred Irwin, the Department's second sub-professional, had resigned in order to accept a
scholarship that would enable her to commence work towards a Ph.D.
in History,  As a result, only Miss Anne Smith, Head of the Department, and one clerical, remained of the staff as it had functioned
during the Winter Session 1946-47. Miss Smith's task was not only
to replenish her staff but also to increase it, for experience last
year showed that the time had come when Reference service would
have to be available whenever the Library was open--that is to say,
for 79 hours per week—instead of the 48 hours per week during
which it had been available in 1946-47, Fortunately the Library
was able to secure two experienced trained librarians and three
recent Library School graduates for the Reference Department, and
by the time the new Session commenced the Department's staff had
been built up to six trained librarians, three sub-professionals,
and one clerical, or ten persons in all. Acquainting so many new
people with the details of the Department's work, and especially
with the many unorthodox things that the fearfully crowded condition
of the Library building has made it necessary for the staff to
resort to, has been an immense task, but one which has been carried
out with notable success, thanks to the cooperation and enthusiasm
of the new recruits. 13.
The other departments have experienced similar problems
but to a much lesser degree. A fourth trained librarian and a
sub-professional have been added in the Cataloguing Department,
and a trained assistant has also been added to the staff of the
Periodicals Department.  A full-time Secretary to the Librarian
joined the staff on June 1. For this position we were so
fortunate as to secure Miss Ethel Fugler, who was for a number of
years a member of the staff of the Registrar, and whose intimate
knowledge of the campus made it possible for her to be of great
assistance immediately.
Circulation
The number of books circulated from the main Loan Desk
was 100,281 in 1946-47, as compared with 72,753 in 1945-46, an
increase of about 39%.  Considering the extremely inconvenient and
cramped quarters in which book loans must be handled, this was
something of an achievement.  The circulation of "reserve" books,
by contrast, actually fell from 80,509 in 1945-46, to 78,787 last
year, owing to the very unsatisfactory accommodation provided for
students who tried to make use of them. Early in October it
became evident that the old "reserve" service desk, behind the
main Loan Desk, could not possibly handle the demand for books.
At that time it was thought that the Armouries would be used
chiefly as a study hall, and upon that assumption the "reserve"
books were moved to new quarters there.  For a week or two all
went reasonably well.  Thereafter the number of concerts," student
rallies, and social events held in the Armouries increased to such
an extent that the place was in a constant state of turmoil. 14*
In a single week towards the end of the year, students anxious
to use "reserve" books had to compete with a symphony concert, a
band concert, and a roller-skating marathon.
Fortunately it has been possible to improve conditions
somewhat for the Circulation Department this year.  The Library
of Congress depository catalogue, the cards in which have now
been superseded by bound volumes, was removed from the Library's
main hallway at the end of August, and "reserve" books will be accommodated there on adequate shelving behind a new service desk.
This will, of course, make the reading rooms more crowded than
ever, but students will be.permitted to use "reserve" books outside the building if all seats in the Library are occupied.
Having all its books and staff members under one roof again will
be a great boon to the Circulation Department and, incidentally,
will result in some economies.
The Extension Department circulated 10,39$ volumes
during the year, or slightly more than in 1945-46. Of this
number 4,016 were plays. The number of theatre groups registered
was 134--the same as the previous year. The 6,382 books loaned
went to members of evening classes, "Citizen's Forum" groups,
study and book-reviewing groups, and several hundred individual
borrowers.
Total circulation in all departments was 191,736 in
1946-47, which compares with 166,515 in 1945-46.  It is interesting to note that circulation from the main Loan Desk was higher
in 1946-47 than the combined circulation of the Loan Desk,
"reserve" desk, Extension Department, etc., in 1944-45. 15.
It may be well to point out that the value of
circulation statistics in any University library is relative
rather than absolute. On our own campus, for instance, the
figures do not give any proper conception of the extent to which
the Library is used. Tens of thousands of books and pamphlets are
handed out at the Reference Desk without being recorded in any
statistical fashion, and no record can be kept of the extremely
heavy use made of the books on the open shelves.  Similarly,
staff members and students privileged to enter the stackroom
consult thousands of volumes without going to the formality of
reporting the fact to the Loan Desk.
Circulation Statistics
Total Circulation
in 1942-
•43
102,$57
1943-
■44
89,749
1944*-
•45
92,470
1945-
■46
166,515
1946-
■47
191,736
1945-46
1946-47
General
Reserve
Total
General Reserve
Total
September
2136
976
3112
3707
2334
6041
October
799$
9341
17339
13145
11492
24637
November
9043
11673
20716
143$1
12046
26427
December
3579
5213
$792
5350
6885
12235
January
9164
7702
16866
13717
7269
209$6
February
9667
8841
18508
15630
$363
23993
March
94$2
103$4
19$66
14$07
10857
25664
April
6029
9564
15593
7337
9688
17025
May
4260
2946
7206
15$6
82
166$
June
2670
3351
6021
1594
21
1615
July
5999
735$
13357
565$
6497
12155
August
2726
3160
5$$6
3369
12H
6622
72753
$0509
153262
100281
7$7$7
179068
Extension
10053
1039$
Nursing
3200
166515
2270
191736 16.
Missing Books
As no special Spring Session was held in 1947 it was
possible to take an inventory of the Library. This revealed that
in the two years that had passed since the books had last been
checked, no less than 1236 volumes had disappeared from the
shelves. High as this total is, it is not in itself out of line
with past experience, considering that the student population had
more than doubled. The new and serious factor in the situation
is the fact that very few of the books taken are being returned.
In former years at least half, and sometimes as many as two-thirds,
of the missing volumes were recovered within a year. By contrast,
only 101 of the 1236 books missing in May, 1947, had returned to
the shelves by September 1, and so few had turned up recently that
it is clear that we shall not recover many more.
A few books are bound to disappear as essay deadlines
and the sessional examinations approach, but hitherto most of
these have been returned surreptitiously after the pressing need
for them was over. Unauthorized and unrecorded "loans" of this
sort, coupled with characteristic student carelessness, once
accounted for most of our losses. At present, however, it is clear
that downright thieving rather than carelessness is to blame, and
that a proportion of the students are quite unscrupulous when it
suits their purpose to make off with Library property.  Nothing
short of this can explain the disappearance and continued absence
of such items as a volume of the Encyclopaedia Britannica.
valuable yearbooks shelved on an open stack near the Reference
Desk, and even more valuable bound volumes of periodicals.  One
can only hope that the proportion of unscrupulous students has not 17.
increased, and that our present tribulations are due to the much
higher registration. Today even a small percentage of the student
population amounts numerically to a large group.
Under the crowded conditions that exist at present it is
difficult to do much to combat book thieves, but two changes being
made for the 1947-4$ Session may be of some assistance. The
"reserve" stacks will be better protected, and anyone entering the
stackroom will have to pass a service desk, and produce the required
stackroom permit.
Rental Collection
This collection, which usually consists of forty or
fifty volumes, continues to serve a useful purpose and to give
satisfaction to the staff members and students who make use of it.
Current best-sellers, mysteries, etc., make up its stock-in-trade, -
together with a few popular non-fiction titles that would not
otherwise be available in the Library.
When interest in a book declines it is either discarded
or catalogued and added to the Main Library, depending upon its
character and condition. Rental rates are three cents per day with
a minimum charge of five cents.  So far the collection has had no
difficulty in paying its way.
Reference Department
Some of the difficulties with which the Reference
Department wrestled last winter have already been described. . Immense
demands were made upon the staff, and the facilities available for
their work were both inconvenient and quite inadequate. The 18.
Reference Desk itself was rebuilt and doubled in size, which helped
matters considerably, but the lack of shelving, sorting, and filing
space continues to be most acute.
Routine desk duties were so exacting and time-consuming
that certain outside activities of the Department had to be curtailed temporarily, notably the talks that Miss Smith formerly
gave in the Autumn to students interested in the bibliography of
special subject fields. These talks are important, and plans are
being made to resume them in September, 194$, by which time the
special lecture room designed for the purpose in the addition to
the Library building should be ready for use.
The series of displays planned by the Department and
exhibited in showcases and on screens in the main hallway again
attracted much attention. They covered a wide variety of subjects,
and a number of the teaching departments accepted an invitation to
furnish an exhibit illustrating their particular field of interest.
The special displays relating to British Columbia authors and the
Haida Indians, which were arranged for the delegates attending the
Canadian Library Association convention in June, were quite outstanding and attracted much attention. The map-charts issued by
the American News Map of the Week service, and the British Map
Review service, were posted regularly in the Spring Term and were
examined by hordes of students.
Pressure of routine work has prevented much attention
from being given to the map collection, but important additions
were nevertheless made to it during the year. The special maps
for classroom use proved to be so popular with the teaching staff 19.
that more of them were purchased. A number of excellent French
maps were also secured, but they have not yet been backed, classified, and otherwise prepared for use. Through the kind interest
of Dr. H. V. Warren and the Department of Geology and Geography, a
fine collection of British military maps and captured enemy maps
were secured, totalling about 3500 items. Most of these are still
on the "confidential" list and their use must be restricted, but
they nevertheless add greatly to the scope and value of the
Library's map resources.
The work of the Reference Department (and the Circulation
Department as well, for that matter) is frequently increased quite
needlessly by lack of appreciation of their problems on the part
of the teaching staff.  It is surprising, for example, how often
a professor will announce in class that certain books "have been
placed on the 'reserve' shelves" when, in actual fact, he has sent
no notification of any kind to the Library.  Then again, only too
frequently a professor will announce an essay topic to a class of,
say, 300 students, without warning the Library that the assignment
is contemplated. The result is that the first 25 students to reach
the Library denude the shelves of all the important references in
the field, and because the Library staff knows nothing about the
matter, the books are charged out in the usual way as seven-day
loans-.  The vast majority of the students are thus left without
any books until such time as the Library can call them in; and
inevitably the Library gets the blame.
Adequate advance notice and some consultation beforehand
would add immeasurably to the effectiveness of the Library's service 100
222
130
267
65
113
172
310
199
404
20.
to the students; but to date the Library staff has been unable to
convince a good many of the professors of this (to us) very
obvious truth.
Interlibrary Loans
Both the number of books borrowed on interlibrary loan
by the Library and the number loaned to other institutions continues to grow year by year, as the following statistics show:-
Borrowed   Loaned     Total
1943-44 (April-March) 122
1944-45 (April-March) 137
1945  (April-August) 4$
1945-46 (Sept.-August) 13$
1946-47 (Sept.-August) 205
These figures include only books actually received, and
give little indication of the great amount of correspondence
carried on in connection both with these loans, and the search for
titles that prove to be unobtainable.  The service is one which
the Reference Department is happy to make available to the
campus, but the great pressure of routine work at the moment
compels them to limit it to the most pressing needs of the staff.
Art Loan Collection
This interesting experiment made good progress in its
second year, and the service seems to fill a real need on the
campus. The progress has been achieved in spite of severe handicaps, including lack of time and lack of any proper place in
which to store and display the prints and paintings. Happily, the
storage problem was in great part solved during the year by the
construction of a set of large storage shelves mounted on castors; 21.
its many narrow compartments give protection from chance blows,
as well as from light and dust.
Seventy-eight borrowers were registered during the year.
In response to repeated requests, members of the teaching staff
were for the first time included in the number. The pictures
available included 110 original paintings, fifteen prints from the
Carnegie Study set, and ten prints owned by the Art Loan Collection
itself.  It is interesting to note that four water-colours and
three oil paintings were sold during the year, and to this extent
the Collection justified itself from the point of view of the
artists who made pictures available, as well as the borrowers who
enjoyed them in their homes.
Assistance received from a number of friends has been
greatly appreciated. Mr. and Mrs. Lawren Harris presented six of
the new silk-screen prints issued recently, and a number of cash
donations made it possible to purchase a dozen first-quality
prints of well-known paintings in New York.  Several artists
visited the collection on picture-loan day, including Mrs. Amess,
Mrs. Willis, and Mrs. Shadbolt.  In addition, Mrs. Amess permitted
us to stage a fine display of her water-colours. Other displays
arranged in connection with the Collection included oils and
water-colours by Illingworth Kerr, and representative work from
the Vancouver School of Art. We also displayed and sold for the
Federation of Canadian Artists a number of the new silk-screen
prints from the National Gallery of Canada. A special word of
thanks is due Mrs. C. E. Dolman, a member of the Art Loan Committee,
who came regularly to the Library once a*month to help the staff
on picture-loan day. 22.
The Library Catalogues
The two major events of the year for the Cataloguing
Department were the addition to the staff of a fourth trained cataloguer, and the discontinuance of the filing of cards in the Library
of Congress depository catalogue.
For a few months during the winter the^ Department was so
fortunate as to secure the services of Mrs. Anne Woodward on a
part-time basis. Her help was invaluable at a time when the pressure
of work was particularly great. Mr. T. R. McCloy joined the staff
on May 15, and he has been placed in charge of the cataloguing of
special collections. His interest in and knowledge of Canadiana
will be of great benefit to the Howay-Reid Collection.
Effective January 1, 1947, the Library of Congress 'Bedded
to discontinue the distribution of cards to depository card catalogues (except those in bibliographic centres, where continuation
of the service will be essential), and to substitute instead a
cumulation of the cards in book form that would be sold at a subscription rate of $100.00 a year to any library requesting it.
This change will save the Library at least $750.00 annually, as
staff time to a value considerably above this figure has been required lately to keep the thousands of cards received filed up to
date.  As noted elsewhere in this report, the depository catalogue
proper, which has been superseded by a catalogue in book form, was
dismantled and removed from the main hallway late this summer. The
steel filing cabinets are at present in storage, and will be used
in the new building to accommodate our own Library's main catalogue,
and the various card files that are essential in the Cataloguing 23.
Department. Only the supplementary portion of the Library of
Congress depository, which bridges the gap between the printed
volumes issued in 1942-43 and the new printed catalogue commenced
in 1947 need now be retained, and this supplement will itself be
issued in book form within a year or two.
As noted above, a total of 11,51$ volumes were accessioned and with few exceptions catalogued during the year, not
including the work done on the Howay-Reid and other special collections. The number of new titles reported to the Bibliographic
Center in Seattle was 529$, and the number of discards reported
was 334, The volume of work handled by the relatively small staff
reflects the excellent team-work that has been characteristic of
the Department.
Periodicals
Few people on the campus probably realize how rapidly
the Library's subscription list has expanded of late, and how much
work this has occasioned in the Periodicals Department. Time was
when buying magazines was simply a matter of dollars and cents.
Now it is frequently a matter of persuasion and anxious negotiation,
To quote a single example: the proprietors of one journal which
the new Department of Architecture was most anxious to have
available stated that they were quite indifferent as to whether
the Library ever secured their magazine; their primary purpose was
to get it into the hands of contractors and others who were in a
position to do business with their advertisers. Months--sometimes
many months--may pass after a subscription has been placed before
the first copy is received, and efforts to secure recent back 24.
numbers, to make a new file date from the beginning of a year or
the first of a volume, are often quite fruitless. Many publications
are still lagging badly behind publication schedule, and it is
sometimes quite impossible to tell when an individual issue will
arrive.  Inevitably, many members of the teaching staff fail to
realize how difficult conditions are at present, and are apt to hold
the Library responsible for delays that arise far beyond its walls.
The annual report for 1945-46 listed 69 new periodicals
that had been subscribed to by the Main Library, and an additional
21 journals that had been secured for the Faculty of Law, making a
total of 90 titles In all.  This year, the demand for additional
journals has been so great and so Insistent that no less than 187
new periodicals have been added to the list.  This is an interesting
development, for it furnishes a striking indication of the extent
to which the campus is becoming research minded.  In addition, of
course, it reflects the still widening range of the University's
curriculum, and in many instances the insistence of new staff members that they should have the periodicals that are essential if
they are to keep abreast of developments in their various disciplines
It should be added that there is no possible doubt that provision
of an adequate periodical collection is one of the most effective
means of checking staff turnover, and of retaining the services of
able minds, once they have been brought to our campus.
For convenience, the new periodicals and important back
files acquired during the year are listed below in eight groups. 25.
(1) Important New Sets Acquired; General Collection
{"§  indicates that current subscription to
the title was first placed in 1946-47)
#
I
i
#
AMERICAN LITERATURE, v.l, 1929, to
AMERICAN MIDLAND NATURALIST, v.19,
complete)
AMERICAN SCHOLAR, v.l,
APPALACHIA, v.l, 1876,
CEREAL CHEMISTRY, v.l,
CLASSICAL BIBLIOGRAPHY
date (not quite complete)
193$, to date (not quite
ENZYMOLOGIA, v.l,
ANIMAL
1932 to date (complete)
to date (complete)
1924, to date (not quite
I929 to date (not quite
to date (complete)
1936,
ECOLOGY, v.l, 1932, to date
complete)
complete)
complete)
v.l, 1932
to
JOURNAL OF
JOURNAL OF CELLULAR AND COMPARATIVE PHYSIOLOGY
date (not quite complete)
JOURNAL OF MATHEMATICS AND PHYSICS, v.l6, 1937, to date (not
quite complete)
LLOYDIA, v.l, 193$, to
complete set of
that it superseded,
MATHEMATISCHE ZEITSCHRIFT
(not quite
# MAZAMA,       ' '
date (complete); also practically
Lloyd Library and Museum publications
going back to 1$9$,
, v.l to v.49, 191$ to World War II
complete)
, v.l 1$96, to date (not quite complete)
MISSISSIPPI VALLEY HISTORICAL REVIEW, v.l, 1914, to date
(complete)
LE NATURALISTE CAKADIEN, v.l  1868, to date (complete)
PHYSICA, v.l, 1933, to date (complete)
PSYCHIATRIC QUARTERLY, v.l, 1937, to date (not quite complete)
PSYCHIATRY, v.l, 193$, to date (complete)
PSYCHOANALYTIC QUARTERLY, v.l, 1932, to date (not quite complete)
UNIVERSITY OF TEXAS STUDIES IN ENGLISH, v.l, 1911, to date
(not quite complete)
(2) Shorter Runs of the Following Titles have been Acquired
(# indicates that current subscription to the
title was first placed in 1946-47)
AMERICAN JOURNAL OF PSYCHIATRY
# AMERICAN POTATO JOURNAL
# AMERICAN SCHOOL BOARD JOURNAL
# BOOKS ABROAD
BUSINESS WEEK
# CANADIAN JOURNAL OF MEDICAL TECHNOLOGY
# CANADIAN JOURNAL OF OCCUPATIONAL PSYCHOLOGY
# COMMON GROUND
# DANCE INDEX
JOURNAL OF ABNORMAL PSYCHOLOGY
# JOURNAL OF POLITICS
# LEAFLETS OF WESTERN BOTANY
MENNONITE QUARTERLY
MODERN LANGUAGE JOURNAL
# NEW ENGLAND QUARTERLY 26.
NEW YORK BOTANICAL GARDEN.  BULLETIN and MEMOIRS.
# OXFORD BIBLIOGRAPHICAL SOCIETY, PUBLICATIONS
# PHOTOGRAMMETRIC ENGINEERING
PLANT WORLD
# REVIEW OF ECONOMIC STATISTICS
# SOCIAL SCIENCE RESEARCH COUNCIL, BULLETIN
# STANFORD UNIVERSITY, CONTRIBUTIONS of the Dudley Herbarium
STUDIES IN PHILOLOGY (University of North Carolina)
(3) New Subscriptions; General Collection
(%  indicates either a new publication, or
a title of which the Library hopes to have
a complete file in the near future.)
%  AGRICULTURAL CHEMICALS
ANALYST (Chemistry)
%  ARTS
%  AUGUSTAN REPRINTS SOCIETY
AUSTRALIAN JOURNAL OF SCIENCE
%  AUSTRALIAN SOCIAL SCIENCE ABSTRACTS
BAKER'S HELPER
BARRON'S
BETTER HOMES AND GARDENS ■
%  BIOLOGIA
fo  BOOK HANDBOOK
fo  BRITISH JOURNAL OF SOCIAL MEDICINE
BRITISH MEDICAL BULLETIN
fo  CANADIAN HOBBYCRAFTS MAGAZINE
CANADIAN HOMES AND GARDENS
CANADIAN SILVER FOX AND FUR
fo  COLONIAL PARLIAMENTARY BULLETIN
fo  COLUMBIA JOURNAL OF INTERNATIONAL LAW
fo  DRAMA
fo  ECONOMIC BOTANY
EDINBURGH MATHEMATICAL SOCIETY, PROCEEDINGS
f0  ETUDES GERMANIQUES
fo  EVOLUTION
fo  FARM QUARTERLY
FOLK DANCER
FOOD MANUFACTURER
FOOD PACKER
%  FOOD TECHNOLOGY
fo  'FORTY-SEVEN
%  FRENCH STUDIES
%  FRUIT VARIETIES AND HORTICULTURAL DIGEST
FUR OF CANADA
fo  FURTHER EDUCATION
%  HANDBOOK OF ECONOMIC STATISTICS
f  HARVARD LIBRARY BULLETIN
fo  HEREDITY
HIGHLIGHTS
%  HOMMES ET MONDES 27.
fo  HUMAN RELATIONS
%  INTERNATIONAL ORGANIZATION
fo  JOURNAL OF FINANCE
fo  JOURNAL OF GENERAL MICROBIOLOGY
fo  JOURNAL OF GLACIOLOGY  .
JOURNAL OF PHYSICS (USSR.)
LOOM MUSIC
%  LUTTRELL SOCIETY REPRINTS -
fo  MAINSTREAM
MATHEMATICAL SYMPOSIUM (USSR.)
fo  MATHEMATICAL TABLES AND OTHER AIDS TO COMPUTATION
MECHANICAL ENGINEERING
fo  MIDDLE EAST JOURNAL
MILK DEALER
MODERN HOSPITAL
LE MONDE ILLUSTRE
MONTHLY MUSICAL RECORD
fo  NATIVE VOICE (B. C. Indian Brotherhood)
NEW YORK THEATRE CRITICS' REVIEWS
NEW YORK TIMES (daily)
NEW YORKER
NORTHWEST SCIENCE
fo  NUTRITION SOCIETY, PROCEEDINGS
fo  PACIFIC SCIENCE
fo  PACIFIC SPECTATOR
PAMPHLETEER
fo  PENGUIN MUSIC MAGAZINE
fo  POPULATION (Paris)
RESTAURANT MANAGEMENT
REVUE MUSICALE
ROYAL COLLEGE OF SURGEONS, SCIENTIFIC JOURNAL
ROYAL STATISTICAL SOCIETY, JOURNAL
SCIENCE AND SOCIETY
SCRUTINY
SHUTTLE CRAFT GUILD, BULLETIN
SMITH COLLEGE STUDIES IN SOCIAL SCIENCE
SOCIAL WORK (London)
SOCIAL WORKER (Toronto)
SOCIETY FOR EXPERIMENTAL STRESS ANALYSIS
STORY
fo  THEATRE TO-DAY
TRIBUNE
f  UNITED NATIONS WORLD
fo  UNIVERSITIES QUARTERLY
WESTERN CANNER AND PACKER
WORLD AFFAIRS
fo  WORLD IN BOOKS
Y.W.C.A. QUARTERLY
YOUTH LEADERS DIGEST 28.
(4) Subscriptions Placed at the Request of the
Department of Architecture
ARCHITECTURAL FORUM
ARCHITECTURAL REVIEW
ARCHITECTS' JOURNAL
L'ARCHITECTURE D'aUJOURD'HUI
ART AND INDUSTRY
ARTS AND ARCHITECTURE
BYGGMASTAREN
GRAPHIS
L'HOMME ET L'ARCHITECTURE
JOURNAL OF HOUSING
PROGRESSIVE ARCHITECTURE
ROYAL ARCHITECTURAL INSTITUTE OF CANADA, JOURNAL
ROYAL INSTITUTE OF BRITISH ARCHITECTS, JOURNAL
WERK
The Library already had a complete set and current
subscription to the ARCHITECTURAL RECORD, and it
has acquired a virtually complete file of PROGRESSIVE
ARCHITECTURE - PENCIL POINTS, v.l, 1920, to date.
(5) Subscriptions Placed at the Request of the
Faculty of- Law
(Twenty-one of the forty-two were new subscriptions in 1946-47)
ALL ENGLAND LAW REPORTS
BRITISH COLUMBIA REPORTS
AUSTRALIAN LAW JOURNAL
CALIFORNIA LAW JOURNAL
CAMBRIDGE LAW JOURNAL
CANADA TAX CASES
CANADIAN BAR REVIEW
CANADIAN CRIMINAL C^SES
CANADIAN CRIMINAL PROCEDURE
COLUMBIA LAW REVIEW
CORNELL LAW QUARTERLY
CRIMINAL APPEAL CASES
CRIMINAL REPORTS (CANADA)
CURRENT LAW
DOMINION LAW REPORTS
FORTNIGHTLY LAW JOURNAL
HARVARD LAW REVIEW
INDEX TO LEGAL PERIODICALS
JOURNAL OF CRIMINAL LAW
INTERNATIONAL LAW QUARTERLY
JURIDICAL REVIEW
LAW AND CONTEMPORARY PROBLEMS
LAW JOURNAL and REPORTS
LAW QUARTERLY REVIEW
LAW REPORTS and WEEKLY NOTES
LAW TIMES
MICHIGAN LAW REVIEW
MINNESOTA LAW REVIEW
MODERN LAW REVIEW
ONTARIO REPORTS
OREGON LAW REVIEW
SOLICITOR
TIMES LAW REPORTS
UNIVERSITY OF CHICAGO LAW REVIEW
UNIVERSITY OF PENNSYLVANIA LAW
REVIEW
UNIVERSITY OF TORONTO LAW JOURNAL
VIRGINIA LAW REVIEW
WASHINGTON LAW REVIEW
WESTERN WEEKLY REPORTS
YALE LAW JOURNAL
ADVOCATE (gift)
CANADA LAW REPORTS (gift) 29.
Complete sets or long runs of most of
these titles have been purchased.  In
some instances the subscriptions are
for two or more copies.
(6) Subscriptions Placed at the Request of the
Department of Pharmacy
{#  indicates that back files have been
acquired.)
# AMERICAN JOURNAL OF PHARMACEUTICAL EDUCATION
AMERICAN JOURNAL OF PHARMACY
# AMERICAN PHARMACEUTICAL ASSOCIATION, JOURNAL (both editions)
AMERICAN PROFESSIONAL PHARMACIST
AUSTRALIAN JOURNAL OF PHARMACY
# CANADIAN PHARMACEUTICAL JOURNAL
CHEMIST AND DRUGGIST
DRUG AND COSMETIC INDUSTRY
DRUG MERCHANDISING
MANUFACTURING CHEMIST
N.A.R.D. JOURNAL
NEW MODERN DRUGS
PACIFIC DRUG REVIEW
PHARMACEUTICAL JOURNAL
QUARTERLY JOURNAL OF PHARMACY
WESTERN DRUGGIST
(7) Subscriptions Placed for the H, R. MacMillan
Collection in Forestry (supplementing those
placed previously).
AMERICAN LUMBERMAN (and substantial back file)
BRITISH COLUMBIA LUMBERMAN
CANADA LUMBERMAN
FORET QUEBECOISE (and several back volumes)
PAPER INDUSTRY AND PAPER WORLD
SOUTH AFRICAN FORESTRY SOCIETY, JOURNAL (and back numbers)
PULP AND PAPER INDUSTRY
SOUTHERN PULP AND PAPER JOURNAL
TIMBER OF CANADA
VENEERS AND PLYWOOD
WEST COAST LUMBERMAN
WOOD (London)
WOOD   (New York;  a new publication)
WOOD-WORKER 30.
($) Gift Subscriptions from the British Council
MARINE ENGINEER
SYREN AND SHIPPING
ARMY QUARTERLY
ROYAL UNITED SERVICES INSTITUTE, JOURNAL
SPHERE
The ARMY QUARTERLY and RUSI JOURNAL continue
the files deposited in the Library two years
ago by Major-General Letson.
A number of periodicals either ceased publication
during the year, or were superseded by other publications.
These included the following 14 magazines to which the Library
subscribed:
AMERASIA
ASIA AND THE AMERICAS )
FREE WORLD )  superseded by UNITED NATIONS
INTER-AMERICAN MONTHLY) WORLD
BETTER FOOD
CANADIAN DIGEST
CANADIAN HORSE
CANADIAN HORTICULTURE (both editions superseded by
different journals)
COMPARATIVE LITERATURE STUDIES
ECONOMIC AFFAIRS
GANTS DU CIEL
LE CANADA FRANCAIS (superseded by REVUE DE L'UNIVERSITE
DE LAVAL)
MODERN MUSIC
RICE INSTITUTE PAMPHLETS
Foreign Periodicals
The French periodical scene, which a year ago was very
confused, has clarified somewhat in the interval. Subscriptions
have been placed for the revived MERCURE DE FRANCE, REVUE DE
LITTERATURE COMPAREE, and REVUE D'HISTOIRE LITTERAIRE DE FRANCE.
Subscriptions to a number of other French journals have been
noted in the lists already given, including LE MONDE ILLUSTRE and
HOMMES ET MONDES. 31
The Library was so fortunate as to secure a complete
file of the HELVETICA CHEMICA ACTA for the war years, and a con- •
tinuing subscription, at a very satisfactory price.
Mention was made last year of the efforts of the National
Research Council to secure back numbers of German periodicals for
Canadian libraries.  Some of these have now been reported upon, and
the Library should receive a considerable amount of material
within the next few weeks.  Volumes reprinted by Edwards Brothers,
in Ann Arbor, under license from the Custodian of Enemy Property
in the United States, continue to arrive, and although many odd
volumes will probably still be lacking, our files should soon be
in a much more satisfactory state than seemed possible some time
ago.
The Library recently ordered from the National Research
Council a complete set of the forthcoming FIAT Reviews of German
Science.  The preparation of this set, which will consist of
some 60 volumes, was prompted in part by the scarcity of German
periodicals for the war years, and it is hoped that reference to
virtually every development of importance that took place in
Germany in the 1939-45 period will be included.
During the year the Library also subscribed for the
Linguistic Bulletin of the Academie des Sciences de l'URSS., which
was required for the work of the new Department of Slavonic
Studies.
Binding
The Library's binding schedule, which was completely
upset in the summer of 1945, when Mr. H. W. Brooks retired from 32.
business, is still far from normal.  The work done by
Mr. M. I. Sochasky is quite satisfactory, but the volume of work
awaiting attention has been far beyond the capacity of his shop.
The needs of the Faculty of Law in particular, which have received
every possible priority, have caused arrears to pile up in the
general periodical collection, The extent to which Law was given
preferred treatment in 1946-47 is shown by the return listing the
periodical sets consisting of 15 or more volumes that were bound
during the year.  The Law sets bound totalled 515 volumes, whereas
all other sets consisted of only 249 volumes.  Preferred treatment
was also required by the Department of Slavonic Studies. The Head
of this Department, Dr. St,Clair-Sobell, was so fortunate as to
secure an important private collection in England, but unfortunately
its owner had purchased practically all his books in paper-bound
editions and had left them in that condition. As a result, almost
everything in the collection had to be bound before it could be
placed on our shelves, and while this was being done, regular
routine binding had perforce to come to a standstill.
By the end of the spring term the arrears in hand had
become so extensive that it was decided to send a large shipment
to an Eastern bookbinder.  This had not been returned at the end of
the academic year, and the result of the experiment will be reported
in the next annual report.
Negotiations are at present under way which we hope will
make it possible for Mr. Sochasky to move his workshop to the
campus, and to devote his entire time to the Library's binding
needs.  Suitable accommodation can be provided in the new addition
to the building, and it is hoped that the transfer may be made 1156
42$
414
$2
$2446.90
712.35
510.90
205.00
71
169.03
100.00
2$.73
$4172.91
33.
sometime next summer.
Binding statistics are best given in terms of the
financial year (in this instance April 1, 1946 to March 31, 1947).
The work done may be summarized as follows:
Volumes of periodicals bound
Paper-bound books bound
Rebinds and repairs
Theses
Law periodicals bound by the
Canada Law Book Company
Sloan Commission on Forestry
bound by King's Printer
Miscellaneous binding costs
Total
The Library received a credit of $3$5«00 for binding
materials purchased by the University from Mr. Brooks and supplied
to Mr. Sochasky, and the actual expenditure on binding for the
year was therefore $37$7.91,
Average binding costs for the last three years have been
as follows:-
1944-45     1945-46    1946-47
Periodicals 1,1.$5       $2.09      $2.13
Paper-bound books       1.22        1.60       1.66
Rebinds and repairs      1.29        1.46       1.23
Prices will rise by approximately 10% in the financial
year 1947-4$, but even so the Library is obviously faring exceedingly well so far as binding costs are concerned. The expectation is
that the proposed transfer of the bindery itself to the campus will
help materially to hold costs down. 34.
Gramophone Records
The number of recordings circulated in 1946-47 reached
the astonishing total of 22,617, Of these 19,510 were borrowed
through the Main Library, This was more than double the circulation
the year before, and more than four times the number loaned in
1944-45*  The record collection now requires the services of a staff
member full time during the winter months, and additional help is
sometimes needed at the weekend.
The Extension Department loaned 3,107 records, mostly to
listening groups. Ninety of these, scattered all over the Province,
were registered last winter. They included schools, camps, church
organizations, and Parent-Teacher associations, as well as private
listening groups of various kinds. Breakage in the mail is still a
serious problem. Even when specially made reinforced cases are
used, any carelessness in packing, or accidental rough treatment, is
almost certain to result in broken records.  For this reason an
attempt is made to restrict borrowing by mail to records that are
understood to be readily available; but so many of the titles listed
in current record catalogues are in fact unobtainable that the
replacement problem is a serious one.
A total of 601 records was added this year, and the
collection now consists of 2131 records. During the same period
75 records were added to the supplementary collection of several
hundred discs owned by the Extension Department.
Circulation in 1947-4$ will probably be about the same
as in 1946-47.  Thereafter it may well decline somewhat, if registration drops as much as anticipated. On the other hand the new 35.
Department of Music is just beginning to make use of the record
collection, and its needs may develop rapidly in the next few years.
An annual registration fee of $1.00 is paid by all
borrowers, and the revenue thus secured, together with a balance
carried forward from the previous year, provided sufficient funds to
pay for all the new recordings acquired in 1946-47.
Statistics covering the six academic years in which individual students have been permitted to borrow records follow:
Individual students
Student groups
University staff
Station CBR
Special loans
Gramophone Record Loans
Academic Year
1941/2 1942/3 1943/4 llkkll    1945/6 1946/7
1605   2932   3367 3075   7740 15636
472     3$    396 205    474  1216
456   1671   14$9 $46   1124  2194
330    37$    3$3 359    399   464
27     2     31 11
Main Library total
Extension Department
TOTAL
2$90
650
5021
1120
5666
3960
4532
4947
9437
3$77
19510
3107
3540
6141
9626
9479
13314
22617
University Publications
No one had the time necessary to push this project
effectively in 1946-47, but it has not been lost sight of, and
progress should be reported in 1947-4$. 36.
Finances
Expenditure on books and magazines in the financial
year 1946-47 (i.e., from April 1, 1946, to March 31, 1947) may be
summarized as follows:-
Carried forward from 1945-46 to
meet outstanding orders .$5,0$3.45
Books and Magazines: regular appropriations
ior ~LyifO"™if ( « o o < o « < i i i • i i « • « • • < i i « < * < • • t <io. ipuiUU
Sundry extra appropriations, income from
book fines, etc  4,026.73
Expended to March 31, 1947   25, 563.$4
Carried forward to 1946-47,to meet
outstanding orders   $1,696.34
Special appropriations for basic collections
in new departments:
Faculty of Law  frlO 068. 54
Department of Architecturee  1,735.00
Department of Pharmacy  946. $8
Department of Slavonic Studies  1,216.43
$13,966.$5
Expenditures from.regular budget, as
tabulated above   25,563,$4
TOTAL EXPENDITURE: BOOKS AND MAGAZINES..$39,530.69
Expenditure on books and magazines in 1945-46 totalled
$24,$$6.33, composed as follows: from the regular Library appropriations, $20,62$.14; for the Faculty of Law, $4,25$,19* 37,
Staff
On September 1, 1947, the staff of the Library was
composed as follows:
Administration
W. Kaye Lamb, Ph.D.
Ethel Fugler, B.A.
Evelyn Hearsey
Order Department
Dorothea Aylen, B.A., B.L.S.
Mrs. Shirley Rowley, B.A.
Reference Department
Anne M. Smith, M.A., B.L.S.
Mary Rendell, B.A., B.L.S.
Doreen Fraser, B.A., B.L.S.
Isabel Abernethy, B.A., B.L.S.
Isabel McDonald, B.A., B.L.S.
Samuel Rothstein,»4*B.A., B.L.S.
Lily Kristjanson, B.A.
Dorothy Barritt, B.A.
Muriel Martinson, B.A,
Mary Wilson
Cataloguing Department
Dorothy M. Jefferd
Doreen Woodford, B.A., B.L.S.
Betty Henderson, M.A., B.L.S.
T. R. McCloy, B.A., B.L.S.
Betty Scott, B.A.
Mrs. Lillian Cumming
Hilda Cartwright
Mrs. F. Zacharias
Mrs. F, Bryce
Betty Hodgkinson
Periodicals and Binding
Roland J. Lanning, B.A., B.L.S.
Helen Walsh, B.A., B.L.S.
Mrs. P. Cundill
Sheila Donald
Joyce Wilson
Robert Neale
Librarian
Secretary to the
Librarian
Accounts Clerk
Assistant (half-time)
Sub-professional
Head
Assistant
Assistant
Assistant
Assistant
Assistant
Sub-professional
Sub-professional
Sub-professional
Clerical
Head
Assistant
Assistant
Assistant
Sub-professional
Clerical
Clerical
Clerical
Clerical
Clerical
Head
Assistant
Clerical
Clerical
Clerical
Stackroom attendant 3$.
Circulation Department
Mabel M. Lanning, B.A., B.L.S.
Eleanor B. Mercer, M.A., B.L.S,
Margaret Howieson, B.A., B.L.S,
Lois Crook
Mrs. Harold Hunter
Dorothy Rolfe
Mrs. V. B. Arnott
■Patricia Mayne
Mary Parker
Extension Library
Eleanor Gibson, B.A., B.L.S.
Mrs. Regina Macfarlane
Head
Assistant
Assistant
Sub-professional
Sub-professional
Clerical
Clerical
Clerical
Page
Assistant
Clerical
Library Committee
The Committee appointed by Senate in October, 1946, consisted
of the following members:-
Dr. J. C. Berry
Dr. A. E. Hennings
Dr. I. M. Cowan )
Prof. A. C. Cooke )
Dr. Blakey Smith  )
Representing the Faculty of
Agriculture
Representing the Faculty of
Applied Science
Representing the Faculty of Arts
Dean G. F. Curtis    Representing the Faculty of Law.
Dr. Cowan was unanimously elected Chairman at the first
meeting of the Committee held after these appointments.  It is both
a duty and a pleasure to acknowledge the freedom of action that the
Committee accorded the Librarian, the interest the members displayed
in Library matters, and the staunch support they gave its best
interests on the campus.
Respectfully submitted
W. KAYE LAMB,
Librarian.
October, 1947

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