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UBC Publications

Report of the University Librarian to the Senate of the University of British Columbia Mar 31, 1988

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Array eport of the university librarian
to the senate
THE UNIVERSITY OF BRITISH COLUMBIA LIBRARY
1986-87 The Report
of the University Librarian
to the Senate
of the
University of British Columbia
Seventy-second Year
1986/87
Vancouver
March 1988 ANNUAL REPORT - 1986-87
From time to time the University Librarian's report to Senate should look
both back and forward, commenting on what has been accomplished and outlining
what needs to be done. This report will review progress in the light of general
objectives for the Library as they were described in 1978. All were intended to
help achieve the primary objective of meeting the information needs of UBC
faculty and students. In the second part of the report, short and medium term
goals for the coming years will be identified.
L       General Objectives Defined in 1978
1.      Collections
"To select and acquire, within the limits of the financial resources
available, the books, journals, and other library materials needed by the
University."
Continued heavy use of the collections suggests that in most areas the
materials acquired by the Library are meeting genuine needs of the University.
There has been extensive consultation with faculty members in areas where
requirements may be changing, such as in the Asian and Pacific Rim collections.
Where it has been necessary to cut back on journal subscriptions, procedures for
consulting academic departments about priorities have been carefully followed.
Those responsible for selecting books and journals for the collection are obliged
to make difficult decisions about titles that have become too expensive to
purchase routinely. Without a carefully balanced approach to selection, it is
possible in these circumstances that expensive publications of considerable value
to library users may be passed over in favour of less costly but less useful
publications. In common with other Canadian research libraries, our ability to acquire
the books, journals, and other library materials needed has been seriously
affected by inflation and the devaluation the Canadian dollar. The problem of
declining acquisitions has been experienced by almost all academic research
libraries in recent years, and most have had to respond by cancelling journal
subscriptions and reducing book purchases. However, it is fair to say that the
UBC Library is considerably less able to meet its collections objectives than it
was six years ago.
The extent to which prices for journals and books have increased over the
past six years is intimidating. A few examples may illustrate the problem faced
by the Canadian academic library which spends almost 95% of its collections
funds for materials published outside of Canada:
In the five year period from 1980-81 to 1985-86, the average price of
academic books published in the United States increased by 55.9% in
Canadian dollars.
Periodicals published in the United States cost about 145% more in
Canadian dollars last year than in 1980.
In the past two years, the average price of British books in Canadian
dollars has increased by 51.3%.
British periodicals on the average cost the Canadian library 94.4% more
last year than they did in 1980.
The average price of books published in Germany increased by almost 105%
in Canadian dollars between 1980 and 1987.
From 1980-81 to 1986-87, the UBC Library increased its collections
expenditures by 46.6% (including expenditures of additional funds provided for
collections when the health science library network was established). The
Library administration, the President's office, and the Senate Library Committee
have been actively exploring ways of addressing the problem of rising collections
costs. Between new money and reallocations within the Library budget,
increases of 14% in 1986-87 and 10% in 1987-88 were provided to the collections.
Under normal circumstances, that would have been sufficient to help to catch up
from some very dry years, but because of the rate at which prices have risen,
even increases of that magnitude have not kept pace. -3-
The effect of increased prices for collections was most evident in
expenditures for serials, and two serials cancellation projects were required
($150,000 in cancellations in 1981-82 and $163,000 in 1986-87). It seems likely
that further cancellations will be required in 1988-89. While less immediately
apparent to the library user, book acquisitions have been seriously affected as
well by the reduction in purchasing power.
Though it is difficult in a large library system to establish a direct
correspondence between collections expenditures and interlibrary borrowing, it
should be noted that the UBC Library borrowed almost 72% more items from
other libraries in 1986-87 than it did in 1981-82. The number of items borrowed
(10,519 last year) is not unreasonably high, but the upward trend has been
constant over the past six years.
Implicit in the objective to acquire library materials needed by the
University should be a recognition of the value of information sources that
cannot be "acquired" in the usual sense, but to which access can be provided
nonetheless. For example, the Library makes extensive use of electronic
databases held elsewhere. These are usually bibliographic databases, but may
also be quantitative or textual. At the present time, local acquisition of such
databases is seldom feasible, but this may change as the Library begins to
acquire databases like MEDLINE by subscribing to machine-readable versions on
CD-ROM and purchasing hardware for end-user searching. Of course, large
quantities of data in machine-readable form are already acquired and made
available through the UBC Data Library.
The provision of access to information in electronic form as a substitute
for the acquisition of printed materials is a subject of current interest to the
Library. At the present time, the pricing of many electronic products seems
capricious and, under most circumstances, argues against the elimination of
corresponding printed publications. In each instance other factors as well as
direct costs must be considered if present levels of public access are to be
maintained. There is no doubt, however, about the growing importance to the
Library of ensuring access to information in electronic form from both external
and locally acquired sources. -4-
2.       Processing Library Collections
"To catalogue and classify those materials and to prepare them for use."
Much more occurs to accomplish this general objective than is suggested
above. Books, journals, and other collections materials must be ordered,
received, paid for, claimed if not delivered when expected, recorded as being in
process, catalogued when suitable information is available, and physically
prepared for the shelves. In addition, extensive revision of shared cataloguing
information is often required to place materials appropriately within special
classification schemes adopted at UBC years ago.
Before funding for the B.C. Union Catalogue Project ended in 1982, a
substantial part of the Library's older catalogue records was converted to
machine-readable form, and these records, along with new ones for materials
purchased since 1978, form the database for the developing online public access
catalogue. The spring of 1988 will see online access to the catalogue and other
library databases made available to faculty at UBC, to the Simon Fraser and
University of Victoria libraries, and to other library users (through a limited
number of public terminals in key locations within the Library). A $250,000
grant from the Provincial Government for system-wide development made this
possible. The proposal for funding was submitted jointly by UBC and Simon
Fraser University, with the support of the University of Victoria.
Much more remains to be done. A plan for technological development over
the next several years has been prepared, reviewed widely within the Library and
more recently by the Senate Library Committee. It proposes the expenditure of
about $3.8 million over the next six years and would bring, among other things, a
fully developed online catalogue, a new circulation system, the automation of
the vernacular records for Asian collections, and automated systems for
interlibrary loan. The completion of retrospective conversion of records
(RECON) for pre-1978 collections would cost an estimated additional $2 million.
Sources of funding for these developments have not yet been identified. -5-
The conversion of catalogue records for older materials will become
increasingly important as online access to the catalogues becomes the norm.
That part of the collection is of critical importance to scholars in the
humanities, and it contains materials that are unique to the province and
therefore of great interest to other institutions. During the past year, staff in
some public service divisions have undertaken preliminary conversion of older
records for specific parts of the collection, but these must be revised before
they can be integrated into the online catalogue.
Work has continued on other library automated systems. Current serials
are now received directly by the teaching hospital libraries and recorded on the
serials system, making the latest issues available sooner to those who need them.
Other possibilities for decentralizing processing work are being reviewed to
determine where costs may be reduced or service improved. To increase the
availability of records for cataloguing purposes, the UBC Library has become a
member of OCLC (the Online Computer Library Center), which had in June 1987
a membership of 7,900 participating libraries and almost 16 million Marc II
records in its online database.
3.      Access Services
"To make the collections available to the UBC community and, insofar as it
can be done without detriment to the interests of UBC, to make them
available to other institutions and individuals."
The Library has continued in its policies to emphasize the broadest possible
access to materials, adapting loan periods to meet demand. It is essential to
continue to review loan policies as demands on the collections grow and further
reductions are made in multiple copies of monographs and duplicate subscriptions
to key journals. Without some revision of policies, the failure rate for users
seeking specific items from the collection is likely to increase. In this
connection, an extensive review of journal titles held in the Woodward Library
has been carried out with a view to limiting those in very high demand to use
within the Library. -6-
The Library ranks with the very largest academic research libraries in the
number of loans it makes to users. In the most recent compilation of
supplementary statistics from the Association of Research Libraries (1984-85),
the Library's total loans exceeded those reported by any other member library.
Only a few libraries at private universities with particularly strong graduate
programs make more loans each year per FTE student (91 in 1986-87 at UBC).
The ratio of loans to the number of public service staff members in the Library
is also very high at UBC in comparison to other public universities. These should
be taken as general indicators only, since varying loan policies among the
libraries may influence the volume of loans recorded. They do, however, suggest
that the UBC community uses the Library intensively and that the number of
staff available to provide basic services to the public is not excessive for the
work resulting from that demand.
Over the past ten years the community beyond the University has made
increasing use of the Library's collections and services. This has occurred less
through a deliberate change of policy than through circumstances which have
focused attention on the Library as a research resource for the province.
Contributing factors include:
- Growth in enrolments at other post-secondary institutions, which has not
been matched by corresponding increases in their library resources.
- Emphasis within the business and industrial communities on high
technology developments, closer ties with the University's research
community, and special interest in subjects such as Pacific Rim trade.
- Increased interest from many high school students in making use of
library resources that are not available in secondary school libraries.
- UBC's strong interest in strengthening its ties to the community and to
other post-secondary institutions in the province. The Library plays an
important role in bringing the community to the University.
The most recent survey carried out by the Library (March 1986) found that
more than 22% of the people present in the campus libraries were not affiliated
with the University. A recent one-day survey of telephone enquiries at the
central information desk determined that 60% of the calls were from persons not
formally connected with UBC. -7-
Complimentary borrower cards are available to faculty, professional staff,
and graduate students of other B.C. universities, and to faculty members of B.C.
colleges and institutes. In addition, any adult resident of B.C. may purchase a
UBC library card, and institutional cards may be purchased by organizations. By
far the greatest amount of use occurs, however, through direct consultation of
materials and reference staff in the Main Library and the branches, for which no
fee is charged.
4.       Reference Services
"To interpret the collections to users, assisting them in making effective
use of the Library's resources and in gaining access to materials
elsewhere."
The ARL supplementary statistics on the number of reference questions
received also placed the UBC Library in the top ten reporting libraries for both
1983-84 and 1984-85. More recent comparative figures are not available. Last
year, reference staff helped to meet the above objective by responding to
382,803 enquiries and completing 7,330 online searches of external databases.
Instruction in the use of the Library continued to be an important aspect of our
efforts to promote effective use of the Library's resources, as 636 tours and
instructional sessions were given to 9,548 UBC students. Further improvements
in directional signs and printed materials have also been made to help to make
regular library users more self-sufficient. In recognition of the changing needs
of some groups of library users, a series of instructional sessions was successfully
organized to assist those who wish to learn to do their own online searches of
external databases.
In recent months, reference staff have been helping with the design of
user-interfaces for the Library's developing online catalogue. A variety of
means will be used to assist users to learn to use the Library's online databases
more effectively. The task of making the online catalogue an easy-to-use and
efficient tool for the library user will require special effort over an extended
period of time. -8-
Assisting library users in obtaining access to materials held by other
libraries has been a part of the Library's reference services, provided primarily
by the interlibrary loan staff, since the Library's beginning. The importance of
this service has grown as library users discover, through online searches of
external databases, a wealth of material that might in the past have been
overlooked. The use of electronic mail and, in many cases, the ordering of
documents as part of the online search process have made the interlibrary loan
process more effective. Further improvements in document delivery will be
needed as the Library comes to depend more in future on external sources for
documents.
We can expect to see somewhat greater use of telefacsimile for the
delivery of documents in the near future, though cost and the urgency of the
request will determine the extent to which it is used. The next major
development for interlibrary loan at UBC will be an automated system for
managing and expediting interlibrary loan requests.
5.      Preservation of the Collection
"To preserve the collection for the future."
It seems unlikely that the implications of this simple objective were fully
understood in 1978. Preservation has become a critically important issue for
libraries as more has been learned about the life expectancy of our collections.
No single academic research library can hope to accomplish all that is necessary
to ensure that its collections will be preserved for future generations; it is
essential that the use of resources allocated for preservation be carefully
planned to ensure maximum benefit through cooperation with other agencies.
UBC is a subscriber to the work of the Canadian Institute for Historical
Microreproductions, through which every available monograph, pamphlet,
and broadside published by or about Canada before 1900 has been
preserved through microfilming. The CIHM programme is continuing
with the microfilming of early Canadian periodicals. -9-
Last spring a Standing Committee on Preservation was established to
consider approaches and priorities for the UBC Library. Following the
committee's report, an extensive publicity campaign was initiated to
make library users aware of the ways in which damage to the collections
can be avoided.
- A library committee has also been established to develop a "disaster
plan" for the Library. It is an essential precaution that all possible
preparations should be made to expedite the proper treatment of library
collections in the event of damage through fire, water, or other
unexpected emergency.
- Recently, Mrs. Suzanne Dodson, the Head of the Government
Publications and Microforms Division, accepted the additional
responsibility of serving as Acting Preservation Librarian. Under her
direction, priorities and an action plan for the UBC Library will be
developed.
6.       Library Facilities
"To offer facilities for use of the various forms of library materials on
library premises."
After a period of nine or ten years during which the need for additional
space has been a constant concern for the Library, it now appears that an
acceptable plan has been developed and that support for new library space as a
very high University priority has been secured. Without the support of the
President's office and of President Strangway in particular, this would not have
been possible. I would also like to thank the Senate, the Senate Library
Committee, and the Chairman of that Committee, Dr. Jonathan L. Wisenthal,
for their efforts to ensure that additional space for library collections will be
available.
Dr. Wisenthal also chaired the President's Advisory Sub-committee on
Library Space Planning. That Committee had its first meeting in February, 1987
and completed its work during the summer. In those few months, the Advisory
Sub-committee met frequently and, with the assistance of consultants, reviewed
and confirmed space requirements for the Library and for the David See-Chai
Lam Management Research Centre. A review of siting and development options
led to a recommendation for construction of new space on the site of the former
bookstore. The report was transmitted last fall to the President's office for
consideration by the President's Advisory Committee on Space Allocation. -10-
If the proposal goes forward and can be funded, the Library's principal
space requirements will be met. The major remaining task will be to renovate
space that has been freed in the Main Library so that services can be efficiently
organized and current safety codes observed. In that connection, work has
almost been completed on the installation of a sprinkler system in the Main
Library. While the process has been difficult because of the low ceilings and
complex nature of the building, the result should substantially reduce the hazard
of fire for patrons and collections.
During the summer, shelving units were installed throughout the Main
stacks wherever spaces could be put to this use. Together they provide about
one thousand linear feet of shelf space, or room for some nine thousand volumes,
equivalent to three months' Main stacks intake of new books. At the same time,
fifty thousand volumes were selected from the open shelves for relegation to
what was previously temporary, working storage. These two moves complete the
full utilization of the Main Library spaces.
It is essential that new library space provide the best possible
environmental conditions for collections. Care must also be taken in its design
to ensure that the facility can be operated efficiently and that the most modern
technology can be accommodated.
Recent improvements in the facilities available to library users include the
replacement and upgrading of a number of readers and reader-printers in the
Government Publications and Microforms Division. After an extended waiting
period, the Library was also able to replace its public photocopying equipment,
adding debit card readers for greater user convenience. The replacement of this
equipment will be funded from copying revenues. Finally, with funds made
available by the University and the Faculty of Medicine, the Library is
proceeding to acquire CD-ROM workstations to be located in the Woodward
Library and in each of the teaching hospital libraries. With the assistance of the
hospital library committees, funds are being raised from private sources for
subscriptions to the MEDLINE database on CD-ROM for each location. The new
equipment will make it possible for users of the health science libraries to
perform many of their own MEDLINE searches. -11-
7.       External Relationships
"To cooperate with other bodies in sharing resources and in furthering the
goals of the Library."
The Library has continued to participate in local and national cooperative
activities and to provide leadership where appropriate. Management of the B.C.
Post-Secondary Interlibrary Loan Network (NET) is based at UBC During its ten
years' operation (1977-87), NET has provided 154,211 loans and photocopies to
post-secondary libraries in B.C. Sixty-four percent (99,262) of these have come
from the UBC Library's collections. The Library also maintains statistical
records for the Media Exchange Cooperative (MEC). In 1986/87, 2,759 films and
videotapes were circulated through the MEC network, with UBC providing 15%
of the total. The UBC Library is the only academic library participating in the
Federated Information Network, operated by the Greater Vancouver Library
Federation for public libraries in the lower mainland. Since 1974, the Library
has provided 21,142 loans and copies to public and provincial government
libraries through the FIN network.
In cooperation with other member libraries of the Canadian Association of
Research Libraries, the Library is working to prepare a detailed profile of its
collections using methodology developed in the United States for the National
Collections Inventory Project (NCIP). For each area of the collection, an
assessment is made of both existing strength and current collecting level. The
results are being collected by the National Library of Canada in a machine-
readable database. While it may be some time before the benefits of this work
will be realized, we hope that improved information about the scope and depth of
UBC's collections will assist in refining collections development policies locally
and that a more accurate picture of Canada's academic library resources will
lead to improved cooperation in developing and sharing resources.
Individual staff members serve on committees and task forces of the
National Library, CISTI, the Canadian Association of Research Libraries, the
B.C. Library Association and many specialist groups, such as the Canadian
Association for Information Science, the Association of Asian Studies, the Music -12-
Libraries Association, the Canadian Association of Law Libraries, the
Association of Canadian Archivists, the Association of Canadian Map Libraries,
and the B.C. Health Science Libraries Association. The University Librarian was
elected President of the Canadian Association of Research Libraries in June,
1987.
8.       Efficiency and Economy of Operation
"To  manage  the operation of the  Library system  in an  efficient and
economical manner."
New services have been introduced and others discontinued during the past
six years. Retrenchment in 1983 saw the closure of the Ecology Library as an
official branch and, in the same year, the Library withdrew most of its support
from departmental reading rooms. Some staff savings were realized from these
service reductions, but a major objective was to reduce the number of duplicate
subscriptions that the Library would have to maintain in the future. Also in
1983, responsibility for the Film Library, previously part of Extension Services,
was transferred to the Library, along with the staff employed to operate it.
As noted earlier, special attention has been given to achieving more
efficient operation through continued improvements in the Library's automated
systems, particularly those which are essential to the purchasing of materials for
the collection, the preparation of materials for use, and the creation of records
of Library holdings. Those changes, along with other economies, have allowed
the reallocation in the past two years of almost $430,000 in continuing funds to
the collections budget.
Technical processing routines have received closer scrutiny and more
frequent review than any other Library operation. Because in some instances
processing costs can be reduced or controlled through automation, the Library
has given a high priority to the introduction of online systems for the tasks
involved in processing. As a result, more than 35 positions have been eliminated
from the Processing Divisions since 1973 - it was estimated last year that these
positions would have cost $649,000 annually in 1986 dollars.   From 1978, when ■13-
the card catalogue was closed and a shift was made to online computing for all
technical service systems, until 1987, 23 staff positions were eliminated, a
reduction of about 16% in processing staff.
More rapid progress could have been made in the development of the online
catalogue system for the benefit of library users if it had been possible to
reinvest all of the savings in its development, but unfortunately the University's
financial situation has required that annual operating costs be reduced, and
automation of processing routines has helped to make this reduction possible. It
has also, of course, released funds for reallocation to collections.
The greatest potential for improving efficiency in the public service
operations of the Library lies in the development of the online catalogue as an
integrated database system. At present, public service staff and users must
consult several files to determine what is in the Library's collection. Our long
term objective must be to represent the Library's total holdings in the online
catalogue and to permit the library user to interact with the catalogue by
entering reserve requests and requests for specific items as part of the search
process. Changes are being made at the present time to make the process of
searching the Library's catalogues easier for staff and users, but the objective
will not be met until records for our pre-1978 monograph holdings can be
converted and added to the online database.
II.      Additional Short and Medium Range Objectives
Appropriate long term goals for the Library will become clearer following
the Review of the Library, which sould be completed by May, 1988, and the
publication of the University's Mission Statement. There are, however, a number
of activities underway at the present time which sould be advanced or completed
in the coming year:
1.      Space
Continued efforts will be made to accommodate normal collections growth
in existing library spaces, and a plan will be developed for seeking and utilizing
new temporary storage space. -14-
2. Collections
The probability of further cancellation of journal subscriptions will require
consultation with faculty members, close examination of duplicate subscriptions,
and efforts to secure alternative sources for cancelled titles.
Procedures must be put in place to identify journal titles which have
increased most substantially in cost. Various options should be considered where
cost increases seem excessive or unjustified in terms of the value of the titles to
the University.  The involvement of faculty members in this process is essential.
Funds will be sought outside the University's operating budget to help to
offset the cost of journal subscriptions that are important to the community.
Special efforts must be made to find the means of improving collections in
areas of current priority to the University. For the Pacific Rim and Asian
collections, where funding has been obtained, the Library will work with faculty
members to determine how the collection should be developed.
3. Preservation
Activities directed towards the preservation of the collections will be
continued and a formal programme for the preservation of UBC's library
collections will be introduced.
4. Technology
The immediate priority will be to continue with the development of the
online public access catalogue. As circumstances permit, other priorities
identified in the Library's plan for the application of technology will be
addressed with the objective of improving services to users and, where possible,
helping to control operating costs.
Access to the Library's online catalogues will be extended to college and
institute libraries and, if possible, to public libraries in the Greater Vancouver
Library Federation. 15-
CD-ROM will be introduced as a means of providing user access to health
science databases. Consideration will be given to other areas where CD-ROM or
the local acquisition of database tapes may be appropriate.
5.       The Library's Profile in the Community
A newletter will be prepared for distribution to the re-activated Friends of
the Library organization.
Arrangements are being made for a Friends of the Library Council to hold
its first meeting within the next few months.
Plans for improved access to the Library's collections through the online
catalogue development will be publicized.
III.     Notable Events in the Last Reporting Year:
The report of the Faculty/Library Committee to Review Priorities for
the UBC Asian Library was received. Several recommendations have
either been implemented or are in process: a continuing Faculty/Library
Advisory Committee for the Asian Library has been established;
catalogue records for Indie materials were reproduced and filed in the
Asian Library catalogue; and a listing of Korean books donated to the
Library is being prepared. Through the Funds for Excellence
Programme, the Library received an additional $150,000 in continuing
funds to improve collections to support Pacific Rim studies and $^5,000
to recruit staff with the additional language skills required.
Last spring saw the completion and publication of A Bookman's
Catalogue, The Norman Colbeck Collection of Nineteenth-Century and
Edwardian Poetry and Belles Lettres. The contents of this impressive
two volume work, published by the University of British Columbia Press,
illustrate clearly the remarkable value of the gift that Dr. Colbeck made
in donating his personal collection to the University in 1967. Its
publication would not have been possible without the thousand-odd pages -16-
of handwritten notes by Dr. Colbeck, the determination and guidance of
Dr. William E. Fredeman, and the capable editorial work of Dr.
Tirthankar Bose.
The Patent Search Service (PATSCAN), announced in last year's Report,
has now been in operation for more than a year. It is funded at the
present time through a grant under the Canada-British Columbia
Subsidiary Agreement on Science and Technology Development. During
its first full year's operation, almost 500 informational patent searches
were carried out, primarily for faculty and graduate students of the
three B.C. universities. In addition, prototype work for online retrieval
of Canadian patent information has continued and a useful database is
now available.
The annual reception of the Wesbrook Society was held in the Main
Library on June 4, 1987. The setting, enhanced by artistic and
imaginative planning by staff from the Alumni Association, the
Development Office, and the Library, made the evening a very pleasant
and successful occasion.
In March, the Library participated actively in UBC's most successful
Open House. More than ten thousand Library visitors were given
opportunities to win a Library card for a year's use, to take away a
photocopy of headlines made on the day they were born, to have their old
books assessed by experts, to see online searching demonstrations, a film
of UBC's history, a Chinese calligrapher at work... The Library's most
conspicuous contribution was OLIF, the On-Line Information File, which
made information about Open House events available online at terminals
in the libraries and at many campus network terminals.
Efforts to increase public awareness of the Library's value as a major
resource for the province of B.C. have continued. The Report of the
President on the Library has proved to be an excellent document for this
purpose. In addition, the Library contacted many of the outside
organizations and individuals that use the Library regularly to determine ■17-
how the Library has been able to help them. Responses to this informal
survey were most informative and helped to emphasize the critical
importance of a strong research library to the community. On the
occasion of the University's Open House, the Friends of the Library
organization was reinstated after an hiatus of more than fifteen years.
Response has been good, though the Library has not yet mounted a
general campaign for memberships outside the University.
With the assistance of a generous donation from Mr. Naomichi
Nishimura, formerly Director of the Hikone Public Library in Japan,
work has begun on the microfilming of Tairiku Nippo (The Continental
Daily News). The UBC Library owns the most complete set of this
newspaper, published in Vancouver from 1907 to 1941. Since UBC's copy
is becoming fragile, this project will ensure that the newspaper is
preserved and can be shared with others.
IV.     Notable Grants, Gifts and Donations:
It is always a pleasure to acknowledge the generosity of those who have
supported the Library either with financial contributions or gifts in kind. The
following items are a few of those received during the reporting year:
1.       Grants
- In the summer of 1987 we learned that the Social Sciences and
Humanities Research Council had made a grant to the Library of $50,000
spread over the following three years, to be used for retrospective
material in Japanese history and literature.
The B.C. Council of Archives made a grant of $12,000 to the Library to
help clear a backlog in the processing of archival materials.
The   Public   Archives   of   Canada   supported   an   archivist   internship
programme in the UBC Archives with a $4,000 grant. -18-
2. Donations
- Among our long-time Friends, Mr. Sam Lipson, Dr. Kaye Lamb, and Mr.
Derek Lukin Johnston must be acknowledged for their regular annual
gifts. Many alumni remember the Library in their annual givings; this
occurs as individual donations or as class projects. This year the Library
was pleased to receive a collective donation from the class of 1927.
Several donors contributed to the Crane Library. The Variety Club of
B.C. donated two recording consoles; Wm. Mercer (Canada) Ltd., Mr.
Wm. R. Read and Mr. James W. Phelps all donated funds to Crane for
equipment or other purposes.
First City Financial Corporation, the Boag Foundation, Dean Blythe
Eagles, Mrs. Violet Eagles, Mr. Po Ting Ip, Ms. Letitia Hay, and Ms.
Betty Hender made donations to support the collections and the UBC
Archives.
3. Gifts in Kind
- Gifts to the Special Collections Division include the papers of Hubert
Evans, Grace Maclnnis, E. Herbert Norman, and Henry Howard. Other
gifts to Special Collections include special books and materials from Ms.
G.P.V. Akrigg, Mrs. Hilary Brown, Mrs. W.E. Gale, Mr. O. Lauritzen, Ms.
Patricia Page.
The UBC Archives received donations of the Walter Young papers from
Mrs. Young, the Walter Sage papers from Mrs. Sage, the Michael Bullock
papers from Professor Bullock, the Blythe Eagles papers from Dean and
Mrs. Eagles, and the N.A.M. MacKenzie medal collection from Mrs.
Roote.
- Other donors of gifts in kind to the general collections included Dr. Joel
H. Kaplan, Dr. R. Lakowski, Dr. John E. Nafe, Dr. Philip Pinkus, Mrs.
Susan Roote, Dr. G.F. Schrack, Dr. M.W. Steinberg, Mrs. Elizabeth
Steward, Dr. Peter C Swann, Mr. Alexander Wainman, and Ms. Glennis
Zilm. -19-
Staff
As in previous years, the number of Library staff continued to decline,
changing from 104.2 professional librarians and 285.29 support staff in 1985/86
to 104 professional professional librarians and 275.29 support staff in 1986/87, a
reduction of 2.6%. Every position which became vacant was rigorously reviewed
before a request for authorization to refill was sent to the President's Office.
Wherever possible, positions were left vacant, filled through relocation of staff,
or filled at a more junior level in order to save money.
Retirements and resignations of both librarians and support staff led to
increased turnover during this year. Tung King Ng, Head of the Asian Studies
Library for many years, retired at the end of December 1986. After a lengthy
search process, she was replaced by Linda Joe.
Joan Selby, Curator of the Colbeck Collection, and also a longtime member
of the Library's staff, retired during this year and was replaced by Chuck Forbes,
formerly the Head of the Humanities/Social Sciences Division. Phyllis Reeve
resigned as Acquisitions Librarian and Karen Olcen resigned as
Curriculum/Audiovisual Catalogue Librarian.
Other professional changes resulted from leaves of absence, maternity
leaves, and exchanges. Judith Frye, Head, Marjorie Smith Library, was granted
one-year leave of absence, and was replaced by Pia Christensen,
Humanities/Social Sciences Reference Librarian. Kathy Scardellato, Serials
Librarian, went on maternity leave. Jane Price, Co-ordinator of Health Sciences
Network Services, was on exchange for six months. Her responsibilities were
carried out by John Cole, Reference Librarian, Woodward Library.
Recruiting commenced in July 1987 for four half-time librarians with
competency in Asian languages, namely Indie languages, Indonesian, Japanese,
and Korean. These positions were established through special funding in support
of Pacific Rim studies. None had been filled by the end of the reporting year
because of the difficulty in finding qualified and suitable applicants. -20-
Support staff vacancies filled (new appointments, promotions, transfers,
recalls, reassignments, temporary promotions, demotions) increased from 44% in
1985-86 to 55% in 1986-87. For heads and supervisors, already hardpressed to
maintain services because of staff cuts and restrictions on replacements, the
additional training load represented by this increase created further demands on
their resources.
Longtime support staff members who retired or resigned included Ingeborg
Schafer, Library Assistant 4, Catalogue Records; John Nanning, Library
Assistant 3, Copy Services; Teresa Petrala, Library Assistant 2, Collections; and
Wendy Murphy, Library Assistant 3, Prebindery.
The number of work study students funded through the Awards Office for
Library work continued to decline drastically. While 55 positions were
advertised by the Library, only 15 were filled. Work study students assisted in
shelving materials, maintaining the bookstacks in an orderly condition,
processing materials, data entry, and filing. The loss of these student hours has
resulted in reshelving delays, disorderly shelves, and slower processing of
materials. Appendix A
SIZE OF COLLECTIONS - PHYSICAL VOLUMES
Asian Studies Library
Biomedical Branch Library (VGH)
Catalogue Records Division
Crane Library
Curriculum Laboratory
Data Library
Fine Arts Library
Government Publications Division
Hamber Library (CGSH)
Humanities & Social Science Reference
Law Library
MacMillan Library
Main Stacks
Map Library
Marjorie Smith Library
Mathematics Library
Music Library
St. Paul's Library (SPH)
Science Reference
Sedgewick Library
Special Collections Division
Woodward Library
SUBTOTAL
Storage Collections
TOTAL
March 31/86
Additions
Deletions
March 31/87
190,681
.7,695
1
198,375
30,346
1,519
309
31,556
5,481
89
3
5,567
6,723
168
4
6,887
96,628
4,886
315
101,199
465
37
3
499
109,629
4,188
7
113,810
3,334
309
11
3,632
9,516
666
-
10,182
58,962
2,418
90
61,290
138,797
6,419
273
144,943
55,267
3,537
17
58,787
940,017
30,296
340
969,973
8,324
304
11
8,617
17,601
932
57
18,476
27,827
1,256
14
29,069
47,894
2,440
7
50,327
6,938
612
1
7,549
21,642
3,121
51
24,712
192,943
5,185
2,838
195,290
63,860
2,818
-
66,678
309.139
9.236
7
318.368
2,342,014
88,131
4,359
2,425,786
213.653
_
4,359
213.653
2,555,667
88,131
2,639,439 Appendix B
GROWTH OF COLLECTIONS
March 31. 1986
Net Growth
March 31. 1987
Volumes - Catalogued
2,555,667
83,772
2,639,439
Documents - Uncatalogued
670,720
13,837
684,557
Microfilm (reels)
85,809
2,737
88,546
Microcards (cards)
111,680
-
111,680
Microprint (sheets)
1,087,670
-
1,087,670
Microfiche (sheets)
2,005,607
198,973
2,204,580
Aperture Cards
2,589
-
2,589
Films
1,595
46
1,641
Filmloops
8
-
8
Filmstrips
2,496
128
2,624
Slides
17,488
310
17,798
Slide/Tape Shows
92
16
108
Transparencies
1,281
-
1,281
Video Tapes
1,504
326
1,830
Videodiscs
1
-
N 1
Photographs
26,114
60
26,174
Pictures
74,855
105
74,960
Maps
168,431
4,426
172,857
Manuscripts*
2,065  m
120  m
2,185 m
Sound Recordings
157,491
6,021 ,
163,512
Computer Tapes
534
36
570
Microcomputer Discs
80
59
139
Air Photos
72
683
755
Thickness of files in meters. Appendix C
LIBRARY OPERATING EXPENDITURES
Fiscal Years. April/March
Year
Salaries &
Wages
1984/85
9,825,272
(66.17)
1985/86
9,589,910
(63.85)
1986/87
9,584,602
(61.20)
Collections
3,649,325 (24.58)
4,266,642 (28.41)
4,853,225    (30.99)
Binding
178,021 (1.20)
202,553 (1.35)
198,148 (1.27)
Other
1,195,044 (8.05)
959,160 (6.39)
1,025,395 (6.55)
Totals
14,847,662
15,018,265
15,661,370
Notes:    (1)     There was a change in practice regarding collections expenditures because of which figures for 1984/85 are not
comparable with those of other years.   Funds for orders which have been placed, but not yet received, can now be carried
forward to the following fiscal year.   The introduction of this practice resulted in lower expenditures in 1984/85 and
higher expenditures in 1985/86.
(2) Expenditures from grant and trust funds are not included; in 1986/87 they amounted to $233,805 for collections.
(3) Cost recoveries of $237,301 are not reflected in Appendix C. Appendix D
RECORDED USE OF LIBRARY RESOURCES
Years ending June 30
GENERAL CIRCULATION
Main Library
General Stacks
Reserves
Extension
Fine Arts
Government Publications
Maps
Special Collections
SUBTOTAL
Branch Libraries
Asian Studies
Crane*
Curriculum Laboratory
Film Library
Hamber
Law
MacMillan
Marjorie Smith
Mathematics
Medical Branch
Music
St. Paul's
Sedgewick
Woodward
SUBTOTAL
Use of Recordings
Wilson
Music
SUBTOTAL
Document Delivery
Health Sciences Network
INTERLIBRARY LOANS
To Other Libraries
From Other Libraries
TOTAL INTERLIBRARY LOANS
GRAND TOTAL (General Circulation
& Interlibrary Loans)
1984/85
1985/86
500,628
514,315
30,680
25,716
7,153
9,168
104,668
95,481
122,631
120,768
10,919
11,132
22,753
21,143
799,432
797,723
21,320
19,667
29,093
1,958
149,496
162,012
2,034
2,032
27,979
34,659
120,624
117,198
60,833
62,584
26,082
27,081
28,630
22,637
33,387
34,784
54,164
53,424
17,929
20,852
333,855
304,699
248,364
248,721
1,153,790
1,112,308
257,317
257,240
53,516
53,610
310,833
310,850
33,558
2,323,019
36,532
2,284,844
1986/87
520,708
23,188
10,251
86,449
124,574
10,957
18,827
794,954
19,245
1,875
161,164
2,013
34,600
117,888
55,957
30,617
24,515
30,470
53,075
20,641
288,827
254,374
1,095,261
267,276
53,320
320,596
34,261
15,730
17,589
19,035
9,676
9,842
10,519
25,406
27,431
29,554
2,274,626
% Increase
Decrease vs.
1985/86
-0.35%
-1.53%
+3.14%
-6.22%
+7.74%
-0.45%
The Crane Library circulation transaction unit has been changed from a piece to a package of one or more
parts equipped with a single circulation card.  There is no satisfactory way of comparing the 1985/86 and
1986/87 figures to those of previous years. Appendix E
INTERLIBRARY LOANS
Years ending June 30
1984/85
1985/86
1986/87
% Increase
/Decrease vs.
1985/86
To Other Libraries
Original Materials
General
Federated Information Network
B.C. Medical Library Service
B.C. Post-Secondary Library Network
Bamfield Marine Station
SUBTOTAL
Films
1,465
1,486
1,551
974
969
784
3,797
3,662
4,423
2,120
2,504
2,949
40
25
80
8,396
8,646
9,787
994
895
823
+13.2
8.0
Photocopies
General
Federated Information Network
B.C. Medical Library Service
B.C. Post-Secondary Library Network
Bamfield Marine Station
SUBTOTAL
TOTAL INTERLIBRARY LENDING
1,617
2,312
2,480
472
592
206
17
713
192
4,140
4,329
5,362
94
102
185
6.340
8.048
8.425
+ 4.7
15.730
17.589
19.035
+ 8.2
From Other Libraries
Original Materials
General
B.C. Medical Library Service
SUBTOTAL
2,853
353
2,496
394
3,206
2,806
371
2,890     3,177    +9.9
Films
817
828
670
-19.1
Photocopies
5.653
6.124
6.672
+ 8.9
TOTAL INTERLIBRARY LOAN BORROWING
9.676
9.842
10.519
+6.9 Appendix F
HEALTH SCIENCES LIBRARY NETWORK
July 1986 - June 1987
Interbranch Loans
To Other Branches
Woodward
Biomedical Branch
Hamber
St. Paul's
Other U.B.C. Libraries
TOTAL
(1985/86)
Original
Material
5,815
647
327
411
1,171
8,371
(9,243)
Photocopies
Total
21,435
27,250
2,264
2,911
711
1,038
266
677
1,214
2,385
25,890
34,261
(27,289)
(36,532)
% Decrease
vs. 1985/86
From Other Branches
Woodward
Biomedical Branch
Hamber
St. Paul's
Other U.B.C. Libraries
TOTAL
(1985/86)
612
1,613
2,225
3,023
7,119
10,142
2,908
10,274
13,182
1,236
5,571
6,807
592
1,313
1,905
8,371
25,890
34,261
(9,243)
(27,289)
(36,532)
-6.21% Appendix G
REFERENCE & INFORMATION QUESTIONS ANSWERED
July 1986 - June 1987
Directional      Reference       Research % Increase
Questions        Questions Questions TOTAL    vs. 1985/86
Main Library
Fine Arts
Government Publications
Humanities & Social Sciences
Information Desk
Map
Science Division
Special Collections
SUBTOTAL
(1985/86)
11,789
8,113
1,584
21,486
644
27,824
1,194
29,662
1,493
32,405
1,313
35,211
11,004
45,806
-
56,810
525
4,162
56
4,743
462
7,351
474
8,287
5,121
8,856
2,172
16,149
31,038
134,517
6,793
172,348
(32,420)
(128,717)
(6,704)
(167,841)
+2.69%
Branch Libraries
Asian Studies
Crane
Curriculum Laboratory
Film
Hamber
Health Sciences Network
Law
MacMillan
Marjorie Smith
Mathematics
Medical (V.G.H.)
Music
St. Paul's
Sedgewick
Woodward
SUBTOTAL
(1985/86)
GRAND TOTAL
(1985/86)
1,553
5,674
370
7,597
1,573
1,886
696
4,155
7,797
15,790
1,173
24,760
1,756
5,551
544
7,851
7,414
10,172
4,612
22,198
-
2,418
59
2,477
4,771
6,513
3,372
14,656
1,681
7,828
729
10,238
1,506
2,517
172
4,195
1,561
1,221
411
3,193
2,432
12,831
849
16,112
2,950
10,150
98
13,198
3,168
13,703
667
17,538
7,127
15,262
129
22,518
8,181
27,026
4,562
39,769
53,470
138,542
18,443
210,455
(57,067)
(133,304)
(15,927)
(206,298)
84,508
273,059
25,236
382,803
(89,487)
(262,021)
(22,631)
(374,139)
+2.02%
+2.32% 1
No. of
Division Searches
Biomedical
Branch 595
Curriculum
Laboratory 122
Hamber 1,011
Humanities &
Social Sciences      463
Law 175
MacMillan 392
St. Paul's 395
Science 1,799
Woodward 2,378
Total 7,330
1985/86 (8,291)
Appendix H
COMPUTER-ASSISTED BIBLIOGRAPHIC SEARCHES
July 1986 - June 1987
2
Student
Searches
16
113
36
38
63
72
338
(374)
3
UBC
Searches
424
61
492
82
45
63
311
99
809
2,386
(2,474)
Non-UBC
Searches
5
3
14
8
14
2
19
34
99
(81)
Reference
166
42
519
254
86
277
82
370
931
2,727
(2,724)
6
1,248
532
1,780
(2,638)
Data Bases
Searched
1,456
157
2,182
583
1,894
629
1,159
1,952
5,191
15,203
(17,728)
8
SDI
Reports
188
584
214
1
1,183
2,171
(2,042)
1. Number of searches: a total of the figures in columns 2 to 6.
2. Student specials: limited searches provided to UBC students at a flat fee.
3. UBC searches: for UBC members, excluding student specials.
4. Non-UBC searches: full costs, including staff time, are charged for searches on behalf of persons not
associated with the University.  These searches tend to be complex and often involve the use of several
data files.
5. Reference searches are usually brief inquiries for information not readily accessible in print.
6. ILL verification is a search for the purpose of determining the existence and location of documents and
ordering them on-line as interlibrary loans.
*   The total for Science includes all ILL verification for the Library system except Woodward
and the hospital libraries
**        The Woodward total includes ILL verification for Woodward and the 3 hospital libraries.
7. A single reference search may involve the use of more than one data base.  Staff time for a reference
search may vary depending on the number and combination of data bases used.
8. Selective Dissemination of Information reports: the number of monthly updates distributed to clients.
Current awareness (SDI) profiles are included in columns 1 to 5 only when they are initially established
or subsequently revised. Appendix I
ORIENTATION TOURS & INSTRUCTIONAL SESSIONS
July 1986-June 1987
UBC students, faculty, staff
Community groups
Main Library
Fine Arts
Government Publications
Humanities & Social Sciences
Information & Orientation
Map Collection
Science
Special Collections
SUBTOTAL
10
3
63
2
14
92
88
66
756
65
72
1,047
4*
3.7
11
40
46
13
3
6
156
385
60
779
505
184
115
130
2,158
13
4
24
2
7
50
56
103
368
27
15
569
Branch Libraries
Asian Studies
Crane
Curriculum Laboratory
Hamber
Law
MacMillan
Marjorie Smith
Mathematics
Medical Branch (V.G.H.)
Music
St. Paul's
Sedgewick
Woodward
SUBTOTAL
6
22
54
981
7
39
7
125
15
114
10
205
43
142
10
120
62
1,283
44
487
258
3,518
3
2
26
5
21
4
11
46
15
130
35
28
538
27
1,020
65
111
843
158
2,825
193
25
1
4
541
358
5
90
16
4
230
29
1,039
GRAND TOTAL
350
4,565
286
4,983
280
1,608
* Estimated number of participants Appendix J
LIBRARY ORGANIZATION
1986/87
ADMINISTRATION
Mclnnes, Douglas N.
de Bruijn, Erik
Jeffreys, Anthony
Keate, Heather
MacDonald, Robin
Watson, William J.
University Librarian
Assistant Univ. Librarian for Administrative
Services
Assistant Univ. Librarian for Collections
Assistant Univ. Librarian for Public Services
- Branch Libraries
Assistant Univ. Librarian for Technical Processes
and Systems
Assistant Univ. Librarian for Public Services
- Central Libraries
ACQUISITIONS DIVISION
Davidson, Joyce
Head
ASIAN STUDIES LIBRARY
Ng, Tung King
Joe, Linda
Head (to December 31, 1986)
Acting Head (January 1 to May 31, 1987)
Head (from June 1, 1987)
BIOMEDICAL BRANCH LIBRARY (V.G.H.)
Freeman, George
Head
CATALOGUE RECORDS DIVISION
Turner, Ann
Head
CATALOGUE PRODUCTS DIVISION
Omelusik, Nick
Head
CIRCULATION DIVISION
Banham, Mary
Head Appendix J
(continued)
COLLECTIONS DIVISION
Elliston, Graham
Forbes, Jennifer
Hallonquist, P. Lynne
Kreider, Janice
Mcintosh, Jack
Karpinski, Leszek
Bibliographer - Serials
Bibliographer - English Language
Bibliographer - Life Sciences
Bibliographer - Science
Bibliographer - Slavonic Studies
Bibliographer - European Languages
CRANE LIBRARY
Thiele, Paul
Head
CURRICULUM LABORATORY
Hurt, Howard
Head
DATA LIBRARY
Ruus, Laine
Head
FINE ARTS LIBRARY
Burndorfer, Hans
Head
GIFTS & EXCHANGE DIVISION
Elliston, Graham
Head
GOVERNMENT PUBLICATIONS 6c MICROFORMS DIVISION
Dodson, Suzanne
Head
HAMBER LIBRARY (Children's/Grace/Shaughnessy Hospitals)
Nelson, Ann Head Appendix J
(continued)
HEALTH SCIENCES LIBRARY NETWORK SERVICES
Price, Jane
Cole, John
Co-ordinator (on exchange Jan. 1 to June 30, 1987)
Acting Co-ordinator (January 1 to June 30, 1987)
HUMANITIES & SOCIAL SCIENCES DIVISION
Forbes, Charles
Head (to July 31, 1987)
INFORMATION & ORIENTATION DIVISION
Stevens, Julie Head
INTERLIBRARY LOAN DIVISION
Friesen, Margaret
Head
LAW LIBRARY
Shorthouse, Tom
Head
MACMILLAN LIBRARY
Brongers, Lore
Head
MAP LIBRARY
Wilson, Maureen
Head
MARJORIE SMITH LIBRARY
Frye, Judith
Christensen, Pia
Head (LWOP, May 1, 1987 to April 30, 1988)
Acting Head (May 1, 1987 to April 30, 1988)
MUSIC LIBRARY
Burndorfer, Hans
Head
ST. PAUL'S HOSPITAL LIBRARY
Saint, Barbara
Head Appendix J
(continued)
SCIENCE DIVISION & MATHEMATICS LIBRARY
Brongers, Rein
Head
SEDGEWICK LIBRARY
Sandilands, Joan
SERIALS DIVISION
Baldwin, Nadine
Head
Head
SPECIAL COLLECTIONS DIVISION
Yandle, Anne
Daniells, Laurenda
Selby, Joan
Forbes, Charles
Head
University Archivist
Curator, Colbeck Collection (to June 30, 1987)
Curator, Colbeck Collection (from August 1, 1987)
SYSTEMS DEVELOPMENT DIVISION
Dennis, Donald
Dobbin, Geraldine
Systems Analyst and Head
Systems & Information Science Librarian
WILSON RECORDINGS COLLECTION
Kaye, Douglas
Head
WOODWARD LIBRARY
Leith, Anna
de Bruijn, Elsie
Head
Associate Head Appendix K
SENATE LIBRARY COMMITTEE
1986/87
Dr. F.S. Abbott
Mrs. H.M. Belkin
Dean P.T. Burns
Ms. H.E. Cowan
Dr. J.A.S. Evans
Dr. C.V. Finnegan
Mr. K.D. Hancock
Dr. P.A. Larkin
Dr. B.C. McBride
Mr. M. McMillan
Dean R.C Miller, Jr.
Dr. A.G. Mitchell
Miss D.J. Moore
Prof. A.B. Piternick
Mr. J. Ringwald
Dr. L.S. Weiler
Mr. J. Williamson
Dr. J.L. Wisenthal (Chairman)
EX-OFFICIO
Chancellor W.R. Wyman (to June 24, 1987)
Chancellor L.R. Peterson (from June 25, 1987)
President D.W. Strangway
Vice President K.D. Srivastava
Mr. K.G. Young
Mr. A.C McMillan
Mr. D.N. Mclnnes
Terms of Reference
(a) To advise and assist the Librarian in:
(i) formulating a policy for the development of resources for instruction
and research;
(ii) advising on the allocation of book funds to the fields of instruction and
research;
(iii) developing a general program of library service for all the interests of
the University; and
(iv) keeping himself informed about the library needs of instructional and
research staffs, and keeping the academic community informed about
the Library.
(b) To report to Senate on matters of policy under discussion by the Committee.

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