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The Report of the University Librarian to the Senate of the University of British Columbia Feb 28, 1982

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 report of the university librarian
to the senate
UNIVERSITY OF BRITISH COLUMBIA LIBRARY
1980-81 The Report
of the University Librarian
to the Senate
of the
University of British Columbia
Sixty-sixth Year
1980/81
Vancouver
February 1982 TABLE OF CONTENTS
I.
Introduction
II.
Library Space
III.
Collections
IV.
Technical Processing and Systems
V.
Public Services
VI.
Prospects
Appendix   A Size of Collections - Physical Volumes
B Growth of Collections
C Library Expenditures
D Recorded Use of Library Resources
E Interlibrary Loans
F Reference Statistics
G Computer Assisted Reference Searches
H Library Organization
3 Library-Supported Reading Rooms
K Senate Library Committee
3
5
9
12
16 I.  Introduction
This report will be quite different from those previously presented. In the first place,
the prevailing atmosphere of financial restraint suggests that it should be produced as
inexpensively as possible. Aesthetic compromises have been made so that wide
distribution may continue. More important, however, it follows seventeen annual
reports prepared by Basil Stuart-Stubbs, University Librarian until June 30, 1981, when
he left that position to become Director of U.B.C.'s School of Librarianship. The
reports that Basil produced were a reflection of his enviable ability to say what he had
to say with flair. The format and style of this year's report may differ from those to
which our readers have become accustomed, but it contains some urgent and serious
messages for all friends of the Library.  It has been a significant year for the Library.
Basil Stuart-Stubbs' departure marked the end of an era of growth and development for
the Library. During his years as University Librarian he directed the development of
libraries at U.B.C. with unique skill and dedication. He joined the U.B.C. Library in
1956, working in the Cataloguing, Serials, and Special Collections divisions until 1962,
when he was appointed coordinator of collections. His appointment as University
Librarian followed in 1964.
Between 1964 and 1981 the collection of physical volumes in the U.B.C. Library system
grew from 614,000 to more than 2.2 million. Major new facilities added during that
period included the Woodward Biomedical Library, the Sedgewick Undergraduate
Library, a new Law Library, and a Library Processing Centre. Less visible, but not less
important, were the changes introduced in the way in which the Library and its
resources were managed. The U.B.C. Library, from the mid-1960's, led the way in the
application of computer technology to library processes such as circulation,
acquisitions, and serials control. During those seventeen years, the use of libraries at
U.B.C, as reflected in circulation statistics, increased three-fold: from 743,000 to
2,290,000 loans per year.
Statistics cannot adequately measure the enormous influence that Basil has had on the
shape and quality of U.B.C.'s library services.   His years as University Librarian will be noted for the development of branch library services and for the remarkable growth in
research collections. His priorities are revealed just as clearly, however, in the
emphasis given to services for undergraduates, in the impressive Wilson Recordings
Collection, in the Charles Crane Memorial Library for the Blind, and in the creation of
a Data Library. We are in Basil's debt for the broader vision of librarianship which he
shared with us, and we are confident that his success will continue in his new career.
A Presidential Advisory Committee for the Recommendation and Selection of
Candidates for the position of University Librarian was established by the Board of
Governors on May 1, 1981. Doug Mclnnes was appointed Acting University Librarian as
of July 1, 1981. His duties as Assistant Librarian for Public Services have been
temporarily assumed by Bill Watson, who continues to be responsible for Physical
Planning and Development as well. II.  Library Space
The Annual Report for 1979/80 reviewed the steps that led to the establishment of a
President's Committee on Library Space Requirements. In April, 1980 that Committee
submitted its report. The Library's space situation was grave, and immediate steps
were required to develop suitable new space for what was deemed to be a vital and
essential department of the University.
The report advised the President to ask the Facilities Planner and the Librarian to
prepare a plan for library development to the end of the century. Draft plans were
made, and discussed over the ensuing eight months with other U.B.C. bodies, including
the Land Use Committee, the Academic Building Needs Committee, the Senate and the
Board of Governors. The work culminated in the Library Development Proposal
submitted in the spring of 1981 to the Universities Council. Since that time the Library
has met on several occasions with representatives of the Council, clarifying,
elaborating and discussing issues arising from the proposal.
Meanwhile, until the Universities Council and the Provincial Government take action on
the proposal, the Library remains in an unsatisfactory and worsening state. The system
lacks open-shelf space, to a degree that is merely inconvenient in some branches but is
awkward, expensive, and hard on materials in others. Overcrowded shelves are a
common feature of U.B.C. libraries. Some do not have sufficient seating for users.
Space for staff functions is generally very limited and overcrowded. The Main Library
remains seriously deficient in terms of building code requirements. On the whole, the
system is very difficult to explain to users, inefficient, hard to manage, and expensive
to operate.
Two library branches were improved during the year. The Curriculum Laboratory in the
Scarfe Building was reorganized and renovated to make the best use of its severely
limited quarters. It is about one-third of the size it should be to provide properly for
the Faculty of Education. The latest changes are probably the last that are worth the
cost in extending the life of these inadequate premises. The Asian Centre became the home of the Asian Studies Library at the end of April,
and by the time of the official opening cermony in June the Centre and its library were
conspicuous as among the most attractive showpieces of campus architecture. Because
of the very long period of development, the shelf space available for collections growth
was very slight, but the Library staff, accustomed to cramped quarters, split collections
and totally full shelves, found the Asian Centre to be a thoroughly satisfying change of
locale.
As of this writing, no significant library space project is being planned. The
combination of having a major library proposal before the Universities Council and
needing to reorganize parts of the library system for more economical operation have
put us into a waiting position. It seems probable that more books and backfiles will
have to go into limited-access storage to get us over the next few years. III.  Collections
The dominant theme for library collections last year, and probably for years to come,
was the impact of inflation on the purchasing power of collections funding. Increases in
the cost of serials and books in recent years have consistently outstripped the
University's ability to increase the collections budget. At the same time, the
proportion of the budget spent on serials has risen steadily, from 32% in 1969/70 to 60%
in 1980/81.
It may be worth recalling some of the very positive developments of the last fifteen to
twenty years that have, ironically, led to the present situation. In the mid-1960's, the
MacMillan donation of three million dollars, followed by increased levels of funding
from the Provincial government, resulted in a quantum jump in the size, scope and
adequacy of the U.B.C. Library collection. Over a period of ten years, from 1965 to
1975, it grew to be the second largest university library collection in Canada, giving
place only to the much larger and older University of Toronto Library. This growth was
not merely a function of the one-time injection of a large amount of capital; it was also
very much the result of regular increases in the annual collections budget which allowed
the Library to add a great many periodical subscriptions on a continuing basis.
The strength of an academic library collection depends to a considerable extent on the
quality and breadth of its periodical holdings. Different groups of library users may
need different parts of the periodical collection—scientists tend to be particularly
interested in the current issues while humanists may be more dependent on long runs of
backfiles—but all have a very real stake in seeing strong periodical collections
maintained. Unfortunately, the cost of continuing the periodical subscriptions which
were added over the years has grown beyond our means, and we now face the prospect
of cutting the serial subscription list each year to help offset inflationary cost
increases. Already in 1981 more that $150,000 in serial subscriptions have been
cancelled.  It seems very likely that cuts will be required in each of the next few years.
The book collection, as distinct from periodicals, has also been under attack by
inflation.  In recent years, it has been necessary to give priority to the purchase of new books. Failure to acquire a fairly wide selection of current materials would simply
leave major gaps to be filled in later at greater cost. This emphasis has been at the
expense of what we refer to as "research book funds", funds which are spent mainly on
material in the humanities and social sciences, and generally on sets which cost from a
few hundred to several thousand dollars. Such materials include long periodical
backfiles, collections of older books reissued in microform, and very large reference
sets.  These form the "laboratory" of many library users in the Faculty of Arts.
If our inability to keep up with that portion of the output of the publishing world which
is relevant and significant for U.B.C.'s programmes were a purely local phenomenon,
there might be more basis for optimism. Unfortunately, academic libraries across
Canada face the same problem. In fact, the U.B.C. library has fared better than most
in recent years. Efforts to share resources are hampered, particularly in western
Canada, by the distances separating major lending institutions. By virtue of geography
and the unequal distribution of library resources across Canada, U.B.C. has had an
unofficial, and financially unsupported, role as the resource library for British
Columbia, and to a lesser extent for western Canada.
The National Library of Canada, in a recent five-year planning document, commented
on the declining ability of Canadian academic libraries to support research which should
be taking place in universities and other institutions. The National Library itself, which
concentrates on collections and services in non-science disciplines, lacks the funding
required to support a national resource collection. In the sciences, the situation is
somewhat better; the national science library, CISTI, is able to collect current
scientific and technological publications broadly enough to provide reliable access to
materials not held locally.
The implication, particularly in the social sciences and humanities, is that the large
university libraries in Canada are the libraries of last resort within the country to a
much greater degree than is the case in the United States, for example, where the
Library of Congress is a supplementary resource of immeasurable value. One has only
to think of the size and number of large libraries near most centres of population in the
United States to realize how different is the capacity for cooperation and resource sharing in Canada, where the number of large university libraries can be counted on the
fingers of two hands, scattered over five thousand miles. Unless Canada's university
library collections can be better supported, their capacity to support research will
gradually disappear—especially in the humanities and some of the social sciences.
On the local scene, the uncertain provincial economic picture and the high rate of
inflation for library materials make it likely that the next few years will be marked by
periodic if not regular cutbacks. While we may have to accept that reductions in
purchasing power will take place, we can influence the way in which these occur. The
prospect of a year in which there may be no increase in collections funding presents
almost disastrous consequences for the library collections. As mentioned earlier, over
sixty percent of the budget is used to maintain serial subscriptions; these are an ongoing expense with a substantial built-in cost increase each year. To examine and
assess closely a population of more than 25,000 serial subscriptions is a task which is
almost impossible to accomplish in a short time. We must first find sufficient time
from our somewhat reduced library staff; we must then consult extensively with all
potentially interested faculty members; and finally we must try to resolve conflicting
opinions and convince others who are not persuaded that the University's financial crisis
must affect collections in their fields of interest. Assurance of even a minimal seven
to eight percent increase each year for collections would permit the Library to plan
reductions over a period of years, and allow time to consult widely and make better
decisions.
The planning of collections expenditures must, under the present system, be completed
long before hard information is available about the Library's operating budget. For very
valid reasons, the budget process has become protracted in recent years—later
provincial budgets, deliberations on the allocation of funds among the universities,
extended collective bargaining procedures—with the result that the lack of any
assurance of even minimal budget increases until almost halfway through the fiscal year
makes rational collections budgeting almost impossible. Early commitment to a modest
budget increase for library collections should receive some priority, along with funds
for salary increases. Unfortunately, the library collections have no collective
bargaining agency working on their behalf. As collections funding becomes more limited, there is a growing need to establish
priorities for the library collections. It seems unlikely that we will be able to maintain
both the breadth and depth of all the various subject collections. Academic decisions
are involved, and these should reflect the priorities of the University community. The
University's priorities are complex, hard to project into the future, and to the librarian
largely enigmatic. The Library thus has little choice but to reduce the level of
collections, more or less even-handedly, in all areas, with potential unfortunate
consequences for programmes which may be of singular importance to the University
and the Province.
We are sometimes asked why the three university libraries cannot work more closely to
rationalize their collections. As long as duplication of graduate programmes exists
among the three Universities, their libraries are unlikely to succeed in rationalizing
responsibility for collections. This is particularly true of U.B.C, where those involved
in specialized programmes have come to expect this library to have much the largest
collection. Since we are still operating at the level of trying to persuade people that it
will be necessary to use collections in buildings other than their own, it will be difficult
to convince them that for certain materials we must rely on other university libraries.
To conclude this section of the report on a positive note, the collections across the
library system grew during the year by 110,000 volumes. Since the reported figure
refers to catalogued volumes the rate changes somewhat from year to year, depending
on processing output, though it is in the same range of magnitude (around 100,000
volumes) as for previous years. Together with the figure for growth of the non-book
collections, 230,000 pieces in the year, it is an indicator of the steadily developing
maturity of the resources of this research library.
The university collections are now valued at more than two hundred million dollars for
insurance purposes, though their true value is inestimable. IV.  Technical Processing and Systems
The Library began the year 1980/81 with a substantial backlog of materials to be
catalogued and the expectation that the backlog would continue to grow unless
compromises could be made through changes in cataloguing standards. A Task Force on
Cataloguing Alternatives was asked to determine whether all materials did, in fact,
require full cataloguing, and whether an alternative level of cataloguing could be found
which, while of a lower bibliographic standard, would be suitable and less costly for
many items.
Anticipated continued growth in the cataloguing backlog was temporarily avoided,
however, as it became necessary to divert more collections funding to meet increasing
serial costs, with the result that fewer monographs were purchased. The reduced intake
of monographs permitted some catch up in the cataloguing backlog, which was reduced
to 61,500 volumes from more than 77,000.
The Task Force on Cataloguing Alternatives, after a thorough examination of potential
economies, was unable to recommend a long-term solution. Development of an
acceptable lower standard of cataloguing for certain categories of material, together
with the need to find appropriate selection criteria for a two-standard approach, proved
to be extremely elusive. A number of useful changes to procedures did emerge,
however, and have been implemented. Collectively, the net result is not sufficient to
be considered a solution to the backlog problem, and the prospect of further growth in
the backlog will be with us again when the purchase of monographs returns to previous
levels.
Overall, services and operations for the technical processing divisions have remained
stable and reasonably adequate. The potential for service problems, mainly in the form
of backlogs, remains as a function of changes in collections spending.
Systems development for the Library continued to focus on improvements to existing
applications and on implementing new support systems only where clear operational
benefit  could  be  derived.     In   view  of   the  financial  pressures  anticipated  by  the 10
University, this emphasis can be expected to continue for systems applications
affecting all areas of the Library: public services, collections, and technical processing.
New computer-supported library services and improvements to existing services will for
the present occur only as a by-product of developments required to improve operations
and effect economies.  Priority must also be given to maintaining existing services.
The Library has a small but highly specialized group of systems professionals and is able
to determine priorities for work in relation to Library requirements. The potential for
using automated methods to obtain better library operations has generated a significant
increase in demands to extend the use of existing systems within the Library, to
enhance systems, to generate more and better COM listings, and to introduce on-line
systems. There has also been a distinct change in general acceptance of computer-
based systems. There is virtually no need to "sell" the use of computers any longer; the
problem is to find means to meet the demands and expectations of library staff and
patrons.
In a number of its operations the Library is experiencing an increasing and critical
dependence on the computer and library software essential to maintain services. In the
same way that inadequate library collections and services can affect academic
programmes of the University, inadequate computing resources can cripple a library
operation or another academic/administrative function. So far this has not been a
problem, but increased commitment to automated systems by the Library and other
areas of the University combined with growth in academic use of computing facilities
raises some concerns. To date the University's computing facilities have been able to
meet most of the increased demand, but there are indications that the resources are
somewhat strained and that little if any extra capacity exists. The time may be
approaching when escalating demand can no longer be met through prudent financial
management, through cost/performance gains provided by better technology and a
highly competitive marketplace. Two concerns should be noted: there may be a need
for substantial increases in funding for computing resources in the immediate future,
and library services may be seriously impaired if the central computing facilities are
not adequate, or separate and dedicated facilities cannot be obtained. 11
December 31, 1980 marked the retirement of Walter Harrington as Head of the
Acquisitions Division. Walter joined the Library in 1965 upon retirement from the
Canadian Army. A graduate of the University of Toronto Library School, he worked
initially in the Prebindery area, transferring to Gifts and Exchanges in 1967. In 1969 he
was appointed Head of the Reading Rooms Division, and in 1974 he became Head of the
Acquisitions Division. Walter's retirement did not sever his connection with the
Library. He has continued in a consulting role to develop and implement prebindery and
binding policies. 12
V.  Public Services
For the public service divisions of the Library the year saw a continuation of normal
activity rather than the beginning of any major new trends. Staff dealt with the central
library activities of dispensing information, instructing and assisting in the use of
resources, circulating material for on and off-premises use, making facilities available.
There was little substantial change, but continued pressure to provide the highest level
of service that resources would allow.
To draw attention to a few of the measures that serve as indicators of public service
activity, the circulation of materials to users was recorded at 2,220,631 transactions,
down slightly (a little less than three percent) from those of 1979/80. Interlibrary
lending declined somewhat from last year's: loans out from UBC numbered 21,245, a
drop of 11.6 percent, while incoming borrowings were 7,168, down by 12.3 percent.
Questions asked at the reference desks were comparable to those of 1979/80 at 337,632,
a decline of just under one percent. Changes of these magnitudes are insignificant,
unless they persist over a long period. They demonstrate that things were very much
the same as last year.
Users' Survey
Considerable effort was invested in planning, conducting and analyzing a survey of user
attitudes to and opinions about the library system, its facilities, its policies and
procedures, its staff, collections, services. More than 6,000 students, faculty and staff,
twenty percent of the UBC population, completed the form distributed throughout the
library system in the second week of March, 1980. Their responses confirmed many
known and believed ideas about the Library, and drew attention to several areas of
special concern.
It was not a surprise to learn that users were often frustrated and dissatisfied to find
the books and journals they wanted were not on the shelves, nor that there was
insufficient study space available in some branches, notably the Sedgewick and
MacMillan  libraries  and  the  Curriculum   Laboratory.     Users,   particularly  students, 13
confirmed what library staff knew to be the case from observation, that copying
facilities were a source of general dissatisfaction.
On the positive side, four out of five of the responders rated the Library as a whole
"good" or "excellent", though fewer than half of those surveyed liked the decentralized
system. One fifth were actively inconvenienced by the spread of branches, and those
whose collections are most widely dispersed - Nursing, Planning, Education, Home
Economics - were least well served by it. With regard to collections, two thirds of
those who responded rated them as good or excellent. The hours of opening were
generally satisfactory. Assistance from staff received more favorable comment than
any other aspect of the Library. Fewer than one person in 25 reported finding staff
unhelpful.
It is encouraging to the librarians and support staff that most users are so generous in
their assessment of the Library, but there are many matters needing attention. Some
of these can be put right with a few necessary adjustments and reminders. Others are
less amenable to easy solution, especially in times of belt-tightening. The difficulty in
locating the particular book or journal wanted, for example, is a phenomenon likely to
become more rather than less commonplace. Probably the loan regulations will have to
be adjusted to permit fairer access to resources, since extended loans are resulting in
more material out for longer periods, and hence, inaccessible to others. The
cancellation of multiple subscriptions and the limitation of monograph purchases to stay
within the available funds can only compound the shortage.
Health Science Library Network
The system of libraries to serve the needs of the teaching hospitals associated with the
University is still in process of development. Steps towards the establishment of the
health science library network are being taken deliberately and probably irrevocably,
but still without long-term commitment of resources on the part of the Province.
During the year under review the construction of the Children's/Grace/Shaughnessy
Hospital complex proceeded, complete with a small library to serve the combined needs 14
of the three hospitals. Plans were made and funds were provided for furnishing and
equipping the library to a good standard. Plans were also made, revised, and re-made
for development of a new and larger library in the St. Paul's Hospital extension.
The outcome in both locations should be a small reference library, providing a basic
clinical collection of books, journals and other materials, but dependent for back-up on
the other local heath sciences libraries, notably the Woodward Biomedical Library. In
both Children's/Grace/Shaughnessy and St. Paul's the space available is less than that
wanted by the Library, so that the extent of dependence on other collections is likely to
be greater than we would prefer.
Libraries, among institutions, go much further in implementing cooperation than most,
even to the extent of having a formal international code governing interlibrary lending.
In this respect the UBC Library has been a full-fledged cooperator, lending three times
as much material to other libraries as it borrows from them. The Woodward Library
contributes heavily to interlibrary lending. A worrisome question is now being posed:
how far can Woodward go in serving as a major resource library for teaching hospitals
without working to the critical disadvantage of its primary constituency of users, the
faculty and students of the University? Plans for health sciences library expansion have
emphasized the need to augment the Woodward Library's resources in accordance with
its increased responsibilities. Special funding provided must be adequate for this
purpose if the Library is to be responsible for the operation of the proposed network.
Major concerns
In the course of the last series of division by division annual reviews, certain recurrent
themes were identified. The division heads, those people who manage the daily
operation of the system, were concerned with the basic stuff of library service -
collections, space and staff. Here again their concerns are not new ones, though they
have reasons to be somewhat more anxious than in other recent years.
At no time in the last twenty years has the state of the Library collections been so
bleak.   The combination of inflation and a weak Canadian dollar has seriously curtailed 15
purchasing power. The spate of material from the world's presses is growing, and new
journals which we cannot afford continue to come onto the market. Competition in the
libraries by users, including many from off-campus, is keen. The users' survey has
confirmed that there is not enough of the most-wanted material to go around. No doubt
the situation will get worse.
The UBC Library system gets closer and closer to full working capacity. Plans for the
new central library have had the short-run effect of intensifying the space problem, for
until there is a response from the Universities Council, no substantial expense for
improvement of the deficient Main Library is warranted. Most parts of the Main
Library, and particularly the stacks, are overfull and difficult to use. Again the
situation will surely worsen before it improves.
The staff time available to the Library system began to decline five years ago, partly
because collective bargaining reduced the number of hours worked, partly because funds
for staff would not go so far as before. With cuts in the work week, more vacation,
increased inter-departmental transfers, higher salaries and wages, more leaves of
absence, fewer student assistant hours, the staff time available to provide services and
conduct internal operations stretches more thinly each year. Although the work load is
fairly stable, there are many tasks the division heads would assign if there were staff
enough to do them. As it is, work is handled in order of priority and there is no end to
what remains to be done.
This paragraph should perhaps be in parentheses because it deals with a matter that
does not belong to the year under review. It is included here because, recognizing that
the conventions of annual reports are somewhat arbitrary, we consider it would be
artificial not to acknowledge that developments of the summer and fall of 1981 are
going to have serious effects on the Library. The financial situation, the consequent
austerity, and the preparations for retrenchment, will certainly exacerbate the tensions
in the Library about collections, space, staff, facilities, and everything else dependent
on the availability of funds. 16
VI.  Prospects
The Library entered the 1980's with the promise that this would be an interesting, but
not an easy decade. The Library's assets were considerable: extensive collections, of
greater depth than one might expect to find in a relatively young university library;
experienced, knowledgeable and specialized staff; an early and substantial commitment
to the use of computer technology for both record-keeping and information retrieval;
and, not least in importance, goodwill and support from a large community of diligent
library users. Some progress had been made in identifying potential solutions to major
space problems, and the Library's role as a "keystone" resource for the Province was in
the process of being clarified and confirmed.
In coming years, the Library must continue to build upon those assets, developing and
improving its capacity to support the University's academic programs, scholarship and
research.
Collections of 2.2 million physical volumes - more than 5.6 million items when
materials other than conventional books and journals are included - represent a resource
to be nurtured so that it can continue to meet the changing needs of the University's
students, faculty and staff and provide critically needed support for others engaged in
post-secondary teaching, study and research in B.C. The systematic development of
that capital resource is at risk of serious compromise as the cost of materials increases
more rapidly than University budgets. Duplication of collections, which many consider
essential to the effective operation of a decentralized library system, has been greatly
reduced and will be subject to further reductions in the next year or so. Our ability to
protect the Library's unique collections from being diminished is uncertain. The highest
priority must be given to discovering a means by which adequate annual increases in
library collections funds can be assured.
The high quality of the University of British Columbia's Library is exemplified as well in
its staff. Over the years, the Library has developed a corps of subject specialist
librarians, whose training and experience make them uniquely qualified to assist
researchers with information problems in areas ranging from Asian Studies to Zoology. 17
Specialization is characteristic of almost every aspect of a large university library's
operation, but it merely reflects and responds to the complex nature of information
itself and the highly specialized programmes of a graduate university. At the same
time, the Library has not forgotten its responsibilities to undergraduate students.
Reference librarians in the Sedgewick Library have responded to undergraduate needs
through special programs of instruction in the use of the library, "term paper clinics",
and a general reference service designed to encourage new students to work their way
gradually into the research collections. All U.B.C. libraries provide service to
undergraduates, of course, and all provide the means for those unfamiliar with U.B.C.'s
library resources to learn to use these more effectively. In each of the last three years,
more than ten thousand library users have been given some formal introduction to the
use of the Library, often taking the form of classroom instruction, accompanied by a
practical exercise in library use. Such instruction requires a considerable investment of
staff time, but it pays immeasurable dividends in encouraging greater and more
sophisticated library use. The effect of future retrenchments on the services provided
by Library staff will not be difficult to predict. With fewer staff available, it will be
necessary to consolidate services into larger, more cost effective units. In the process,
many of the special services now offered through small branch libraries or separate
reference divisions will receive less priority than in the past. Some very basic questions
about the future organization of library services will be posed.
The U.B.C. Library was among the first to apply computer technology to library
procedures in the mid-1960's. While continuing to develop its own internal systems, the
Library has played an important role in the creation of the B.C. Union Catalogue, so
necessary to the sharing of library resources in the Province. Through grants provided
by the Provincial Government, records for older materials in U.B.C.'s collection are
gradually being converted to machine-readable form. Since 1977, the B.C. Post-
Secondary Interlibrary Loan Network (NET) has provided the means by which students
and faculty can have access to library collections throughout the Province. The B.C.
Union Catalogue has already made that process easier by disseminating information
about the holdings of each post-secondary library, and some public libraries, in B.C.
The next stage in this development, the B.C. Library Network, would see facilities in
place  within  the  Province  to  permit  post-secondary   and   other   libraries   to   move 18
cooperatively toward the development of more sophisticated computer-based services.
The willingness of libraries to cooperate in this endeavour has been remarkable, but to
carry it through will require financial resources, as well as commitment and foresight.
Comparative figures on the use of university libraries are seldom compiled, since
reliable and meaningful measures of library use have yet to be established. Most
libraries record the number of items borrowed annually from their collections and the
number and nature of the reference questions answered by their staff. By any
yardsticks available, the U.B.C. Library stands out as one of the most heavily used
university libraries in North America. One could speculate that methods of teaching
and an emphasis by faculty members on library research contribute substantially to the
heavy use of library materials at U.B.C. Experience and intuition suggest that faculty
members are most influential in determining the extent to which their students use the
library. On the other hand, it may be partly the wet weather that drives students and
faculty to seek refuge in the library stacks! The recent Library Survey, completed by
more that six thousand students and faculty, indicates in fact that the quality of library
collections and services does stimulate more intensive use of library resources.
Use of the library collections increased significantly with the introduction of an
automated circulation system in the 1960's. Further increases were registered each
time a branch library was established, bringing collections closer to their primary users.
Decentralization of collections and services has been a major factor in encouraging
greater use of the Library. The existence of a branch library system has also helped to
make the Library more responsive to the special interests and needs of its community.
The widespread development of reading rooms in departments was a feature of the
1960s which was encouraged by a vigorous statement of policy approved by Senate.
Today that policy is being revised and rewritten. Though the value of reading rooms is
not in question, the costs for duplicate subscriptions and for staffing are an increasing
drain on the funds, which are hard pressed now to cover even essential core collection
and services. Departments and Faculties have shared in the costs of reading rooms in
the past.  They may have to carry the whole cost in the future. 19
We now face the prospect of re-integrating some services for reasons of economy.
Given appropriate central physical facilities, as proposed by the President's Committee
on Library Space Requirements, the transition could be accomplished in a way that
offered compensating advantages, as well as economies in operating costs. These might
include opportunities to provide more adequately for on-site use of periodical
collections, for improved security, and for the introduction of new technology. Without
such space, advantages will be hard to find and even the potential for operating
economies will be limited.
The challenge of the 1980's will be to redesign and reconstruct the Library system.
Because the existing system imposes severe financial, staff and space constraints, it
will take some time to make a fundamental change. Circumstances, however, are likely
to impose change whether it is welcome or not; our task will be to anticipate and
respond positively to the circumstances that will shape the Library, and to move
towards a system that will continue to support the University's programmes as
effectively as it has done in the past. Appendix A
SIZE OF COLLECTIONS -PHYSICAL VOLUMES
Main Library
General Stacks 1
Asian Studies
Fine Arts
Humanities <5c Social
Sciences Reference
Science Reference
Special Collections
SUBTOTAL
March 31/80
Additions
Deletions
March 31/81
821,303
45,7*8
4,08*
862,967
108,398
9,607
16
117,989
79,417
6,252
28
85,641
45,428
1,9*4
103
47,269
15,179
447
96
15,530
51,665
2,065
1
53,729
1,121,390
66,063
4,328
1,183,125
Branches & Reading Rooms
Animal Resource Ecology
Library
Biomedical Branch Library
Crane Library
Curriculum Laboratory
Law Library
MacMillan Library
Marjorie Smith Library
Mathematics Library
Music Library
Reading Rooms^
Sedgewick Library
Woodward Library
SUBTOTAL
TOTAL
Storage
GRAND TOTAL
14,483
341
21
14,803
21,507
1,742
1
23,248
7,152
235
2
7,385
55,985
8,811
890
63,906
116,351
4,060
149
120,262
34,410
3,333
622 2
37,121
13,259
1,127
55
14,331
21,385
1,174
58
22,501
31,369
2,688
113
33,944
117,328
6,254
55*
123,028
163,610
10,810
2
,896
171,524
238,729
9,952
32
2*8,649
835,568
50,527
5
,393
880,702
1,956,958
116,590
9
,721
2,063,827
150,505
2,691*
2
153,194
2,107,463
119,281
9
,723
2,217,021
Notes:  1. Includes some minor Main Library collections.
2. Includes 456 volumes removed to storage.
3. Includes the Data Library and bibliographic material
in the Library Processing Centre.
t. Includes 2,233 net volumes processed directly to storage and
456 volumes removed from the MacMillan Library to storage. Appendix B
GROWTH OF COLLECTIONS
March 31, 1980
Net Growth
March 31, 1981
Volumes - Catalogued
Documents - Uncatalogued
Microfilm (reels)
Microcards (cards)
Microprint (sheets)
Microfiche (sheets)
Aperture Cards
Films
Filmloops
Filmstrips
Video Tapes
Slides
Slide/Tape Shows
Transparencies
Photographs
Pictures
Posters
Maps
Manuscripts'1"
Sound Recordings
Computer Tapes
Air Photos
2,107,463
554,311
65,229
111,976
1,058,250
1,062,338
2,589
85
15
3,056
387
27,234
11
1,650
19,094
68,410
2,779
130,106
4,344 l.f.
97,364
371
70
109,558
22,882
2,159
24,250
153,916
1
250
27
1,343
50
2,395
838
99
3,425
132 l.f.
16,284
54
2,217,021
577,193
67,388
111,976
1,082,500
1,216,254
2,589
86
15
3,306
414
28,577
11
1,700
21,489
69,248
2,878
133,531
4,476 l.f.
113,648
425
70
Thickness of files in linear feet. Appendix C
LIBRARY EXPENDITURES
Fiscal Years, April /March
Year
Salaries &
Wages
Collections
Binding
Supplies &
Equipment
Totals
1971/72
2,896,602
1,286,401
151,501
346,378
4,680,882
1972/73
3,178,630
1,308,537
154,593
350,455
4,992,215
1973/74
3,522,626
1,348,775
165,081
373,302
5,409,784
1974/75
4,263,647
1,502,317
127,480
428,391
6,321,835
1975/76
5,344,412
1,741,021
144,266
428,696
7,658,395
1976/77
5,755,893
1,954,121
154,043
752,810
8,616,867
1977/78
6,303,582
2,473,368
177,253
518,360
9,472,563
1978/79
6,515,980
2,722,613
184,223
976,638
10,399,454
1979/80
7,227,991
2,872,972
195,527
795,386
11,091,876
1980/81
8,074,711
3,311,221
234,778
1,272,232
12,892,942
The figures above include expenditures from special grants,
as well as those from the regular library budget. Appendix  D
RECORDED  USE  OF LIBRARY  RESOURCES
GENERAL CIRCULATION
1978/79
1979/80
1980/81
X Increase/
Decrease vs
1979/80
Main Library
General Stacks
441,023
(442,606)*
417,960
(422,346)*
425,038
1.7
Reserves
15.353
(  15,080)
32,853
( 33,432)
24,076
- 26.7
Extension
7,500
(    8,450)
7,605
(    6,512)
6,400
- 15.8
Asian Studies
16,881
(  18,183)
21,646
(  21,245)
19,539
- 9.7
Fine Arts
95,929
(  95,700)
101,052
(102,534)
105,756
4.7
Government Publications
131,333
(128,760)
123,753
(125,634)
124,477
0.6
Maps
10,799
(  10,870)
10,538
( 10,423)
10,648
1.0
Special Collections
19,027
(  19,164)
20,273
( 20,135)
17,088
- 15.7
SUBTOTAL
737,845
(738,813)
735,680
(742,261)
733,022
- 0.4
Branch Libraries & Reading Rooms
Crane
47,176
( 46,219)
37,723
(  38,140)
38,615
2.4
Curriculum Laboratory
206,837
(209,155)
186,927
(188,267)
177,453
- 5.1
Ecology
11,561
(  11,441)
10,816
(  10,510)
8,660
- 19.9
Law
137,982
(140,087)
144,939
(143,738)
123,732
- 14.6
MacMillan
47,556
( 47,334)
46,161
( 46,576)
45,302
- 1.9
Marjorie Smith
18,853
(  18,694)
18,493
(  19,049)
18,135
- 1.9
Mathematics
18,700
(  18,388)
18,591
(  18,758)
19,026
2.3
Medical Branch
35,074
(  36,559)
37,604
(  36,895)
36,633
- 2.6
Music
41,850
( 42,735)
42,636
( 42,627)
45,814
7.5
Reading Rooms
72,113
(  73,170)
76,000
(  76,977)
72,333
- 4.8
Sedgewick
335,100
(339,805)
326,852
(332,849)
305,933
- 6.4
Woodward
189,149
(187,425)
(1,171,012)
184,947
(186,138)
184,590
- 0.2
SUBTOTAL
1,161,951
1,131,689
(1,130,524)
1,076,226
- 4.9
Use of Recordings
Wilson
321,169
(331,756)
335,313
(332,257)
331,284
- 1.2
Music
52,107
( 52,393)
52,355
(  52,573)
51,686
- 1.3
SUBTOTAL
373,276
(384,149)
387,668
(384,830)
382,970
- 1.2
INTERLIBRARY LOANS'-
To Other Libraries
Original Materials 10,055 (10,940)
Photocopies . 13,581 (13,258)
TOTAL INTERLIBRARY LENDING             23,636 (24,198)
From Other Libraries
Original Materials 3,066 (3,521)
Photocopies 3,929 (4,131)
TOTAL INTERLIBRARY LENDING               6,995 (7,652)
GRAND  TOTAL (General Circulation
& Interlibrary Loans) 2,303,703 (2,325,824)
* * Interlibrary Loans are presented
10,913
13,129
24,042
3,647
4,528
8.175
(10,921)
(13,507)
(24,428)
(3,406)
(4,534)
(7,940)
10,034
11,211
21,245
3,049
4,119
7,168
2,287,254    (2,289,983) 2,220,631
in greater detail in Appendix E.
- 8.1
14.6
11.6
- 16.4
- 9.0
- 12.3
- 2.9
* NOTE:  Figures are for the year ending June 30.  In previous annual reports they were for years ending August 31.
Figures in parentheses are from last year's annual report and are included here for comparison. The reason for
the changed report year is that the Library is asked by two statistics-gathering organizations to provide figures
for the earlier year, and we wish to standardize on that one. Appendix E
INTERLIBRARY LOANS
Years ending June 30
To Other Libraries
-   Original Materials
1978/79
1,739
1979/80
2,085
1980/81
1,962
Percentage
Increase/Decrease
vs 1979/80
General
-  5.9
Federation Information Network^
1,353
1,267
1,269
-  0.2
BC Medical Library Service
2,661
3,628
4,118
-   13.5
BC Post-Secondary Library Network2
4,269
3,922
2,676
- 31.8
Bamfield Marine Station
33
10,055
11
10,913
9
10,034
- 18.2
SUBTOTAL
-8.1
-   Photocopies
General
1,846
2,000
1,908
-4.6
Federation Information Network
854
840
679
- 19.2
BC Post-Secondary Library Network
10,777
10,174
8,535
- 16.1
Bamfield Marine Station
104
13,581
23,636
115
13,129
24,042
89
11,211
21,245
-22.6
SUBTOTAL
- 14.6
TOTAL INTERLIBRARY LENDING
- 11.6
From Other Libraries
- Original Materials
General
BC Medical Library Service
SUBTOTAL
- Photocopies
TOTAL INTERLIBRARY BORROWING
2,825
2,657
2,256
- 15.1
241
990
3,647
793
- 19.9
3,066
3,049
- 16.4
3,929
4,528
8,175
4,119
- 9.0
6,995
7?168
- 12.3
FIN, a network of public libraries operating since December 1974 under the aegis of the
Greater Vancouver Library Federation.  It provides access to the UBC collections for its
own members and for some B.C. Government libraries in Victoria.
NET, a network of B.C. public university and college libraries, since September 1977. Appendix F
REFERENCE STATISTICS
July, 1980
- June, 1981
Directional
Questions
Reference
Questions
Research
Questions
TOTAL
% Increase/
Decrease vs
1979/80
Main Library
Asian Studies
1,550
2,898
3,284
7,732
Fine Arts
12,085
15,162
1,671
28,918
Government Publications
942
27,814
677
29,433
Humanities
1,880
9,276
801
11,957
Information Desk
23,062
39,825
62,887
Map Collection
295
3,531
91
3,917
Science Division
491
6,606
1,773*
8,870
Social Sciences
672
14,386
866*
15,924
Special Collections
3,099
6,033
1,023
10,155
SUBTOTAL
(1979/80)
44,076
(33,532)
125,531
(141,798)
10,186
(10,263)
179,793
185,593)
-3.1%
Branch Libraries
Animal Resource Ecology
1,704
2,948
193*
4,845
Crane
1,711
2,080
443
4,234
Curriculum Laboratory
7,864
18,236
114
26,214
Law Library
3,126
3,904
1,413*
8,443
MacMillan Library
2,188
6,963
304*
9,455
Marjorie Smith
1,298
2,558
419
4,275
Mathematics Library
1,227
1,158
343
2,728
Medical Branch (V.G.H.)
14,154
11,114
861*
26,129
Music Library
2,169
8,818
734
11,721
Sedgewick Library
11,460
12,639
144
24,243
Woodward Library
6,826
25,264
3,462*
35,552
SUBTOTAL
(1979/80)
53,727
(48,038)
95,682
(98,005)
8,430
(8,471)
157,839
(154,514)
+ 2.2%
GRAND TOTALS
(1979/80)
97,803
(81,570)
221,213
(239,803)
18,616
(18,734)
337,632
(340,107)
-0.7%
47,853 questions (44,658 in 1979/80) in Reading Rooms are not included in ,
Appendix F.
* Patrons served through computer-assisted bibliographic searches are included in the reference
statistics under "research questions".  A separate table showing the number of computer
searches is provided in Appendix G. Appendix G
COMPUTER-ASSISTED REFERENCE SEARCHES
July,
1980 - June, 1981
Division
No of
Searches
Student
Special
Searches
UBC Searches
(excluding
Student
s  Specials)
Non-UBC
Searches
Reference &
ILL
Verification
Total
Data
Bases
Searched
Current
Awareness
Profile
& Reports
Ecology Library
57
18
23
—
16
86
—
Law Library
75
26
7
19
23
449
—
MacMillan
Library
101
33
16
2
50
170
__
Medical Branch
Library - VGH
558
—
264
1
293
1,140
4
Science
Division
1,041
57
102
38
844
1,171
3
Social Sciences
Division
326
148
104
25
49
392
Woodward
Library
1,240
57
l)   1
581
38
564
3,065
674<e)
TOTALS
3,398
339(S
,097
123(b>
1
,839(C)
6,473(d>
681
(1979/80)(f>
(3,225)
(364)
(
974)
(151)
(1
,736)
(5,415)
(608)
(a) "Student Special" searches are limited searches provided to UBC students at a flat fee
of $5.00.  The relatively low number done in the Woodward Library results from the
exclusion of MEDLINE searches, which are normally inexpensive, from the special rate.
(b) Full costs, including staff time, for computer-assisted searches are charged to patrons
not associated with the University.  The number of searches is therefore relatively low,
although the searches that are done for non-patrons tend to be complex and often require
the use of several data files.
(c) Not recorded separately in 1978/79, staff searches are usually for the purpose of
verifying the existence and location of documents, and ordering them on-line as inter-
library loans.  Computer-assisted searching methods have become increasingly helpful
to this process, particularly in the sciences.
(d) A single reference search may involve the use of more than one data base (i.e. MEDLINE
and Psychological Abstracts).  Depending on the particular combination of data bases
required, this may involve a substantial amount of additional staff time.
(e) Figure represents the number of monthly updates distributed to patrons.  Current awareness
(SDI) profiles are included in the "patrons served" total only when they are initially
established or subsequently revised.
(f) Unlike the 1980/81 information, the 1979/80 figures indicate totals based on a September -
August year.  This means that July and August 1980 are common months to both 1979/80 and
1980/81. Appendix H
LIBRARY ORGANIZATION
1980/81
ADMINISTRATION
Stuart-Stubbs, Basil
Bell, Inglis F.
de Bruijn, Erik
Jeffreys, Anthony
MacDonald, Robin
Mclnnes, Douglas N.
Watson, William 3.
University Librarian (to June 30, 1981)
Associate Librarian
Assistant Librarian - Administrative Services
Assistant Librarian - Collections
Assistant Librarian - Technical Processes
and Systems
Assistant Librarian - Public Services
Acting University Librarian (July 1,1981 - )
Assistant Librarian - Physical Planning and
Development
Acting Assistant Librarian - Public Services
(July 1, 1981 - )
ACQUISITIONS
Harrington, Walter
Davidson, Joyce
Head (to December 31, 1980)
Head (January 1, 1981 -  )
ANIMAL RESOURCE ECOLOGY LIBRARY
Nelson, Ann Head
ASIAN STUDIES
Ng, Tung King
Head
BIBLIOGRAPHY
Cole, John
Elliston, Graham
Forbes, Jennifer
Hallonquist, P. Lynne
Johnson, Stephen
Mcintosh, Jack
Shields, Dorothy
Bibliographer - Science
Bibliographer - Serials
Bibliographer - English Language
Bibliographer - Life Sciences
Research Bibliographer
Bibliographer - Slavonic Studies
Bibliographer - European Languages
BIOMEDICAL BRANCH LIBRARY (V.G.H.)
Freeman, George Head Appendix H
(continued)
CATALOGUE RECORDS
Turner, Ann
Bailey, Freda
Head
Deputy Head & Bibliographic Control Librarian
CATALOGUE PRODUCTS
Joe, Linda
Head
CIRCULATION
Butterfield, Rita
Head
CRANE LIBRARY
Thiele, Paul
Head
CURRICULUM LABORATORY
Hurt, Howard
Head
DATA LIBRARY
Ruus, Laine
Head
FINE ARTS
Dwyer, Melva
Head
GIFTS & EXCHANGE
Elliston, Graham
Head
GOVERNMENT PUBLICATIONS & MICROFORMS
Dodson, Suzanne
Head
HUMANITIES
Forbes, Charles
Head
INFORMATION & ORIENTATION
Sandilands, joan
Head Appendix H
(continued)
INTERLIBRARY LOAN
Friesen, Margaret
Head
LAW LIBRARY
Shorthouse, Tom
Head
MACMILLAN LIBRARY
Macaree, Mary
Head
MAP DIVISION
Wilson, Maureen
Head
MARJORIE SMITH LIBRARY
de Bruijn, Elsie
Head
MUSIC LIBRARY
Burndorfer, Hans
Head
READING ROOMS
Omelusik, Nicholas
Head
SCIENCE DIVISION & MATHEMATICS LIBRARY
Brongers, Rein
Head
SEDGEWICK LIBRARY
Erickson, Ture
Head
SERIALS DIVISION
Baldwin, Nadine
Head
SOCIAL SCIENCES DIVISION
Carrier, Lois
Head Appendix H
(continued)
SPECIAL COLLECTIONS DIVISION
Yandle, Anne
Selby, Joan
Head
Curator, Colbeck Collection
SYSTEMS DEVELOPMENT
Dennis, Donald
Dobbin, Geraldine
Systems Analyst
Systems & Information Science Librarian
WILSON RECORDINGS/COLLECTION
Kaye, Douglas
Head
WOODWARD LIBRARY
Leith, Anna
Head Appendix J
LIBRARY SUPPORTED READING ROOMS
AS OF AUGUST, 1981
Adult Education
Agricultural Economics
Anthropology-Sociology
Applied Science/Mechanical Eng.
Architecture
Asian Studies
Audiology
Chemical Engineering
Chemistry
Classics
Commerce
Comparative Literature
Computer Centre
Creative Writing
Economics-History
Electrical Engineering
English
Room 20
5760 Toronto Road
Ponderosa Annex D
Room 105
Anthropology-Sociology Building
Room 2314
Civil «5c Mechanical Engineering Bldg.
Room 2050
Frederick Lasserre Building
Room 9B (Basement)
Buchanan Building
Room 2208
James Mather Building
Fairview Crescent, Room 205
Chemical Engineering Building
Room 310
Chemistry Building
Room 261
Buchanan Building
Room 2218
Henry Angus Building
Room 307
Buchanan Building
Room 227
Computer Sciences Building
Room 302
Buchanan Building
Room 4258
Buchanan Tower
Room 1097
Electrical Engineering Building
Room 428 (Enter by Room 434)
Buchanan Tower
Room 697 Appendix J
(continue)
Extended/Acute Care
French
Geography
Geology
Geophysics
Hispanic-Italian
Home Economics
Institutional Analysis 6c Planning
Library School
Linguistics
Metallurgy
Microbiology
Mineral Engineering
Oceanography
Pharmacology
Philosophy
Physics
Health Sciences Centre
Room M40, Extended Care Unit
Buchanan Tower
Room 897
Geography Building
Room 140
Geological Sciences Building
Room 208
Geophysics Building
2nd Floor, South
Buchanan Building
Room 2220
Home Economics Building
Room 210
Main Mall N. Administration Bldg.
Room 140
Main Library, North Wing
8th Floor, Room 831
Buchanan Building
Room 0210
Metallurgy Building
Room 319
Westbrook Building
Room 300
Metallurgy Building
Room 319
Biological Sciences Building
Room 1449
Medical Sciences Building
Block C, Room 221
Buchanan Building
Room 3270
Hennings Building
Room 311 Appendix J
(continued)
Physiology
Political Science
Psychiatry
Psychology
Religious Studies
Slavonic Studies
Theatre
Transportation Studies
Medical Sciences Building
Block A, Room 201
Buchanan Building
Room 1220
Room 22, Health Sciences Centre
2255 Westbrook Road
Henry Angus Building
Room 207
Buchanan Building
Room 2250
Buchanan Building
Room 2251
Frederick Wood Theatre
Room 211
Auditorium Annex
Room 100 Appendix K
SENATE LIBRARY COMMITTEE
1980/81
Mrs. M.F. Bishop
Dr. K.O.L. Burridge
Mr. C. Fulker
Mr. Steve T. Henderson
Dean P.A. Larkin (Chairman)
Ms. M.C MacPherson
Mr. R.K. Paterson
Mrs. A. Piternick
Miss R. Robinson
Dr. G.G.E. Scudder
Dr. J.G. Silver
Dr. CE. Slonecker
Dr. M. Smith
Dr. N. Sutherland
Dr. J. Wisenthal
EX-OFFICIO
Chancellor J.V. Clyne
President D. Kenny
Mr. K.G. Young
Mr. B. Stuart-Stubbs
Mr. D. Mclnnes
Terms of Reference
(a) To advise and assist the Librarian in:
(i) formulating a policy for the development of resources for
instruction and research;
(ii) advising on the allocation of book funds to the fields of
instruction and research;
(iii) developing a general program of library service for all the
interests of the University; and
(iv) keeping himself informed about the library needs of instructional
and research staffs, and keeping the academic community informed
about the Library.
(b) To report to Senate on matters of policy under discussion by the Committee.

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