Open Collections

UBC Publications

UBC Publications

UBC Publications

The Report of the University Librarian to the Senate of the University of British Columbia 1978-01

Item Metadata

Download

Media
libsenrep-1.0115298.pdf
Metadata
JSON: libsenrep-1.0115298.json
JSON-LD: libsenrep-1.0115298-ld.json
RDF/XML (Pretty): libsenrep-1.0115298-rdf.xml
RDF/JSON: libsenrep-1.0115298-rdf.json
Turtle: libsenrep-1.0115298-turtle.txt
N-Triples: libsenrep-1.0115298-rdf-ntriples.txt
Original Record: libsenrep-1.0115298-source.json
Full Text
libsenrep-1.0115298-fulltext.txt
Citation
libsenrep-1.0115298.ris

Full Text

 fojAedhwdde
fcwfe^ o£SB/dti^A ^olwmSta
J976-77 The Report
of the University Librarian
to the Senate
of the
University of British Columbia
Sixty-second Year
1976/77
Vancouver
January 1978 TABLE OF CONTENTS
I. Introduction 1
II. Costs of Library Operations 2
Collections 5
IV. Public Services 6
V. Technical Services and Systems 8
VI. Library Spaces 10
U.B.C. Library in a Provincial Library Network 14
Concluding Remarks 16
Appendix A Size of Collections - Physical Volumes
B Growth of Collections
C Library Expenditures
D Recorded Use of Library Resources
E Reference Statistics
F Library Organization
G Library Supported Reading Rooms
H Senate Library Committee - 1
I.   INTRODUCTION
Those long-time members of Senate and others who are faithful readers of
these reports may wonder whether a document such as this might better be
titled The Librarian's Annual Lament. Certainly, in recent years, there
has been much to bewail, as the Library has attempted to maintain standards
of performance with diminishing means at its disposal.  It is not that the
University environment is hostile, or that its administration is disinterested or unsympathetic.  To the contrary, the Library has been favourably
treated. But as part of the University It must share a total environment
which eternal optimists might call challenging, but which in reality is
simply trying.  Throughout this report reference will be made to features
of this environment which lay behind a number of persistent difficulties.
But at the outset, in order that the reader may appraise the Library's
accomplishments and shortcomings, it may be useful to state in the simplest
terms what are the primary objectives of the University of British Columbia
Library.
First, to acquire, organize, preserve and make available for use a collection
of materials relevant to teaching and research at this University.
Second, to provide a variety of supporting and information services for
the students and faculty of this University.
Third, to make these collections and services available to other institutions
and persons, insofar as this can be done without detriment to the interests
of students and faculty at this University.
Fourth, to meet the above objectives in the most cost-efficient manner
possible.
How did the Library fare in 1976/77, in light of these objectives? The
following pages tell that story, which has its high points and its low
points. II.  THE COSTS OF LIBRARY OPERATIONS
Three trends with serious implications for the Library, all of them related
to the operating budget, continued their development in 1976/77.  They were:
continued inflation; a fall in the value of the Canadian dollar against
many other major currencies; and a further decline in hours of staff time
available to the Library.  These factors impinged on virtually all Library
operations.  It is perhaps less obvious, because less immediate, that their
future effects will be more serious than their current effects, since the
long-term quality of collections and services depends on consistent and
regular development.  There is a brutal fact which every member of the
University community must confront:  the University Administration has
neither the power nor the means to offset or reverse these trends.  That
the Library has been able to continue functioning is attributable to readjustments within the University's budget, mostly in the nature of personnel
reductions, involving nearly all faculties and departments. As will be
shown, the Library too has made its sacrifices.  But the point has now been
reached where no further sacrifice is possible, without severe and adverse
effects on the quality of collections and services.
A review of spending by major categories will be found in Appendix C.
The money spent on salaries and wages, including part-time student assistants,
increased from $4,263,647 in 1974/75 to $5,344,412 in 1975/76, to $5,755,893
in 1976/77, and will increase to an estimated $6,350,000 in 1977/78.  These
amounts expressed as percentages of total Library expenditures for the four
years are 67.4%, 69.8%, 66.8% and 68%. No striking trend is discernable.
However, it has been calculated that while 68% of the Library's budget is
spent on salaries and wages, and while the amount spent on salaries over
four years has increased by an impressive two million dollars, there has
been an effective reduction of 76.5 full-time equivalent positions in the
Library establishment.  This reduction was made up by a loss of student
assistant hours equivalent to 30 positions, a loss of 19.5 full-time staff
positions struck from the establishment, and a loss of 27 full-time equivalent
positions (51,675 working hours) arising out of increased vacations, shortened
work weeks and other time benefits. 3 -
Considering that the Library establishment as of July 1, 1977 numbered
402.5 positions and that funds for student assistants were sufficient for
another 48 full-time equivalent positions, for a total strength of 450.5,
it is clear that the loss of 76.5 positions will have had telling effects.
There has been in just the past three years a decline of 14.5% in staff.
Users of the library are beginning to note the effects in shorter hours,
diminished service, untidy stacks, cataloguing delays, errors in records.
Yet statistics reveal that the demand for Library services is increasing.
As for collections, the amounts spent in 1974/75, 1975/76, 1976/77 and
projected for 1977/78, with percentages of the total Library budget shown
in parentheses, are:  $1,629,797(25.7%);  $1,885,287(24.6%);  $2,108,164
(24.5%); and $2,240,000  (24%).  As a proportion of the Library's expenditures, collections have declined slightly; but the budget has increased
by over $600,000, a significant amount in these times, and an indication
that the University administration regards collection development as essential to the processes of teaching and research.
But again it is necessary to draw attention to an ominous trend.  Despite
the increases to the Library's collections budget, the number of volumes
added to the collections has declined.  There were 96,258 volumes added
in 1974/75.  There were 92,843 volumes added in 1976/77.  It is expected
that expenditures of nearly two and a quarter million dollars will result
in the addition of about 90,000 volumes in 1977/78.
Subscriptions to journals continue to demand a large share of the collections
budget, although more than a thousand subscriptions were cancelled in 1976.
Journal prices increased by more than 9% in 1976/77.  As for books, the
analysis of invoices paid by the Library shows that from 1975/76 to 1976/77
books from the U.S. increased in average price from $9.80 to $11.70, books
from the United Kingdom increased from $9.40 to $11.76, and books from
Canada from $7.90 to $8.78.  For the mix of books acquired by the Library
system, the average price increased by more than 21%.
Thus the combined effects of inflation and currency revaluation more than
offset generous increases to the collections budget. - 4
What the future would appear to hold, then, is continuing reductions in
library services and in the scope of collections development. As stated
above, the University is not in a position to buy the Library out of its
difficulties.
It should be noted that the Library is not alone in facing such predicaments.  Every department and faculty on campus could make a similar
statement in regard to present economic realities.  But the Library is
almost unique in reporting annually to Senate, and takes this opportunity
to draw that body's attention to one example of a general and pervasive
situation. - 5 -
III. COLLECTIONS
The gradual decline in the growth rate of Library collections has been
mentioned in the foregoing pages; detailed statistics may be found in
Appendices A and B.
To the collection in the Main Library were added 52,276 volumes, while
1,085 were permanently withdrawn.  To the collections in the branch
libraries and reading rooms 40,567 volumes were added, while 3,941 were
withdrawn.  Thus during the fiscal year ending March 31, 1977, there were
92,843 volumes added and 5,026 volumes withdrawn, for a net growth of
87,817 volumes.
Appendix B reveals the variety of formats of material collected and maintained by the Library.  Uncatalogued government publications, for example,
numbered 465,618 by the end of the year, while maps numbered 115,574.
Converting the microform statistics to volume equivalents (on the basis
of one roll of microfilm counting as one volume, and the total of microcard,
microfiche and microprint sheets being divided by 1.4) the U.B.C. Library
microform collection numbers 1,309,850 equivalent volumes. When the
catalogued physical volumes, the uncatalogued government publications,
and the microform equivalent volumes are added together, the Library can
be said to hold 3,626,848 equivalent volumes.  This figure does not include
audio-visual materials, maps, manuscripts and other materials too different
in character to be usefully counted together.
At the end of June the Library lost the services of Robert M. Hamilton,
Assistant Librarian for Collections, who retired after guiding collections
development since 1964.  In that year the Library's collection numbered
about 614,000 volumes.  In the intervening years Mr. Hamilton supervised
the unprecedented tripling in size of the collections, years during which
the Library matured as a centre for research and study.  In 1964, U.B.C.
would have ranked 59th among the then 64 members of the Association of
Research Libraries, in terms of its holdings of physical volumes; in 1976/77
it ranked 24th out of 94 members.  The quantification of Mr. Hamilton's
achievement, impressive as it is, tells nothing of the quality of the
collection which has been assembled here: and it is the high quality
that is frequently commented upon by both our own and visiting faculty
members.  The University Is greatly in Mr. Hamilton's dept. IV.  PUBLIC SERVICES
Measures of the two basic public services provided by the Library to users
are to be found in Appendices D and E.  The total number of circulation
transactions, including both general circulation and interlibrary loans,
rose from 2,257,487 in 1975/76 to 2,321,271 in the year under review.
This overall increase of 63,784 transactions,2.8% more than in the previous
year, reverses a trend in which total circulation declined since 1973/74.
New loan policies, introduced in January 1977 and described below, probably
had the effect of minimizing the increase; had the old policies remained
in effect, the renewal of loans would have increased the number of recorded
transactions.
Reference activity continued to increase, as it has done in every recent
year.  There were 314,880 questions answered in 1976/77, compared with
304,022 in 1975/76.  Reference questions from persons and organizations
not affiliated with U.B.C. made up a significant part of the total, and
it has been determined that such questions typically take up more staff
time than questions from U.B.C. users, who are more familiar with the
Library system.  A survey taken in the previous year indicated that over
a quarter of the time of reference staff is consumed in providing service
to off-campus users.
Recognizing that the primary responsibility of the Library is to provide
materials and services to the U.B.C. community, a Task Force on Extended
Services was established to determine the nature and extent of the Library's
obligations to those outside the community.  Its recommendations were
reviewed and approved by the Senate Library Committee, and are now being
implemented as University policy.  In summary, these recommendations
called for charges to be established or existing fees to be increased to
a realistic cost-recovery level for any Library services beyond those
basic ones associated with locating and using materials on the premises.
There would be fewer complimentary library cards issued.
At the same time, loan policies were changed in ways which were aimed at
improving the availability of materials to University users by providing
for extended loans and by eliminating overdue fines except in cases where
another borrower was clearly inconvenienced, - 7
In 1976/77 public service staff provided orientation and/or instruction
in the use of the Library to more than 10,000 students and visitors. The
year also saw the expansion of the Library's computer-based bibliographic
service to include many additional data bases in the sciences and social
sciences.  Late in the year terminals were installed In the Science and
Social Sciences Divisions of the Main Library, and in the Law Library.
The Woodward Library's well-established MEDLINE service continued to be
heavily used, accounting for most of the 2,436 searches completed in
1976/77.  However, the volume of use dropped considerably after April 1,
1977, when it became necessary to charge faculty and students for some of
the costs involved in their searches. - 8
V.   TECHNICAL SERVICES AND SYSTEMS
Some impression of the magnitude of the workload of the Processing Divisions
may be gained from a consideration of these few selected statistics:  new
serial subscriptions placed, 2,145;  serial subscriptions cancelled, 1,439;
current serial records maintained, 19,532; volumes processed through the
Acquisitions Division, 55,761;  requisitions typed, 92,309; blanket and
approval plan volumes acquired, 13,771;  items processed through the Pre-
bindery, 21,311;  titles catalogued, 60,258;  items processed through the
Cataloguing Divisions, 123,024.
While much of this work must be performed manually and requires human
judgement, much is also amenable to handling by computer, and is being
performed by systems which were designed and implemented many years ago.
Now rising pressures on available staff time are adding new impetus to
the work of automating routines, particularly those which are time-
consuming, onerous and labour-intensive.  Consider these additional
statistics:  catalogue card sets produced, 75,092;  cards filed in the
Main Library's union catalogue, 500,450; cards filed in other catalogues
in the Library system, 938,865.  Consider also that those nearly a million
and a half cards had to be pre-sorted for filing, filed, and that filing
checked; and that about thirty catalogue cabinets would be needed to hold
those cards. Clearly, the card catalogue suggests itself as the next
candidate for computerization.
In fact, the computerization of the card catalogue is no longer just an
option, but a necessity.  The Library can not find the staff time to
continue to maintain it, nor in many locations the physical space to
house it.  In this, U.B.C. is not alone among North American research
libraries.  In Canada, the University of Toronto has already pointed
the way by closing its catalogue and substituting for it a machine-
produced microfiche catalogue.
It is, in fact, the University of Toronto's Library Automated System
which U.B.C. will be using to produce its microfiche catalogue, at
least initially.  Current accessions will be catalogued on that system.
The conversion to machine-readable form of the existing catalogue record, - 9 -
and the integration of all library records of holdings into one data base
are planned.  One end result will be a microfiche catalogue which is
exhaustive, and which will be inexpensive to reproduce and disseminate on
and off campus, in academic departments as well as libraries.  Further,
the new data base will be susceptible to on-line and off-line searching
in greater depth than is now possible.  It can also be used to produce
special catalogues for particular groups of users, in the form of microfiche, or printed lists of cards; in fact, the whole card catalogue could
be regenerated, if this became necessary.  This project will take years
to accomplish and is of such a magnitude that it has province-wide
ramifications, as discussed in Section VII of this report.
The staff of the Library and scores of others on and off campus were
saddened on March 1st to hear of the passing of Percy Fryer, who had been
the University's Binder for twenty-five years, beginning in 1951. Under
his direction the Bindery turned out more than 330,000 volumes, representing
nearly 20% of the present collection. His contribution to the preservation
of the collection can be perceived by any user of the Library. What his
colleagues will remember is his helpfulness in bringing his special knowledge
to bear on problems involving rare and unusual materials, in performing
work in emergencies; and what they will miss is his friendship. - 10 -
VI.  LIBRARY SPACES
Because the U.B.C. Library is a decentralized system, the space conditions
of its various components differ.  Some branches foresee no space
difficulties for several years, for example the Sedgewick Library, the Law
Library, the Marjorie Smith (Social Work) Library, the Animal Resource
Ecology Library and the Data Library.  Others are being assisted in one
way or another:  the Crane Library is being expanded; the Biomedical Branch
Library (Vancouver General Hospital) is being enlarged and remodelled;
the Music Library will add some new shelving.  The Woodward Library is
tending toward fullness, but is not yet overcrowded and does have some
compact storage space in its basement.
Remaining libraries have either reached or exceeded their capacity to deal
with collections or users, or both.  Both the MacMillan Library and the
Mathematics Library can gain space for collections only at the expense
of readers' seats, at a time when readers complain that they can't find
a place to sit.  The alternative is for those libraries to consign materials
to storage, which will render the collections less useful and more difficult
of access.
The Curriculum Laboratory, which serves the Faculty of Education, has been
cutting back its seating space for the last five years in order to contain
the expanding collection.  Library conditions for students and faculty in
Education can only be described as substandard and deteriorating.  The
materials they need are split between the Curriculum Laboratory and the
Main Library; in the Main Library education materials have joined other
materials in storage.  Seating is restricted for users in both locations.
Regrettably, plans for the expansion of the Scarfe Building, which include
an enlarged Curriculum Laboratory/Education Library, have been in suspension
for more than a year, partly as a result of the Senate Committee on Academic
Building Need's decision that this project should have a lower priority.
The contract for construction of the long-awaited Library Processing Centre
was awarded during the summer and excavation began at the end of August.
The building, which is expected to be ready for occupancy in September, 1978, will house the Processing and Systems Divisions now mostly accommodated
in levels one and seven of the Main Library and in the Sedgewick Library.
The move will ameliorate two problems.  First, the now scattered divisions
will be centralized in satisfactory working space.  Second, space will be
regained in the Main Library, particularly on stack level seven.  The present
intention is to relocate the Government Publications and Microforms Division
from level six to level seven, and to expand the stack collection on level
six; this will provide for about four years of normal collections expansion,
and is thus a welcome although stopgap solution to the general problem of
the growing collections. Another stopgap solution was the conversion of
the former Anthropology Museum space into a compact book storage area.
It is already filled.
Other space developments during the year saw the Data Library relocated
to prime space in the Computer Sciences Building, and the Animal Resource
Ecology Library moved to well-renovated space in Hut B-6.
Unfortunately, no progress was made in the completion of the Asian Centre.
Until that project is completed the Asian Studies Division must remain
in the Main Library with its collections split between the Division, the
Main stacks and storage.
The most critical space problem faced by the Library and perhaps by the
University, because of its magnitude, is in the Main Library building.
Antiquated and falling increasingly short of contemporary standards, it
is inconvenient and uncomfortable for users and staff and unable to contain
all the materials needed by students and faculty.  During the summer of
1977 some 75,000 volumes had to be added to the 50,000 of its volumes
already in storage.  It will be more than a year before the series of
relocations entailed by this large shift has been completed; a further
shift will be needed when the Processing Divisions move out. All of
this is extremely expensive of staff time, but is essential if incoming
accessions are to be shelved in their proper order.  Storage entails even
more expense:  the location record must be changed for 75,000 volumes, and
until the catalogue data base exists this work must be performed manually.
The books themselves must be marked so that they will be returned to
storage and not to the stacks if they have been circulated on loan. - 12
Further, there is the expense of retrieving volumes from a distant
location.
All of this greatly inconveniences the user, and impairs his access to
information. Not only must he suffer a delay in obtaining the items he
wants, but also he may not encounter useful materials through browsing.
To the scientist, so dependent on highly developed indexing and abstracting
systems based on a clear and fixed vocabulary, this may not matter; in
any case, browsing is not profitable in science subjects, since the shelf
classification scheme can not keep pace with new developments, nor reflect
interdisciplinary relationships.  But to the humanist and social scientist,
the loss of the ability to scan and browse in a large and diversified
collection is a crippling handicap; it serves to defeat the purpose for
which the collection was developed in the first place.
Yet despite the costs and the unpopularity of closed-access storage, the
immediate future holds out no alternative.  That there would be such a
crisis was foreseen, and has been the subject of many earlier reports.
The alternatives, set down in order of greatest satisfaction, are:
1. A new building to replace the Main Library somewhere near its present
site.  The existing building could be usefully renovated for many
other purposes which need to be satisfied at the north end of the
campus. A new Main Library would permit the centralization of some
services and could be designed to be operated more economically than
the present building, while displaying a larger collection. At an
estimated cost of $23,000,000, such a structure would call for the
special consideration by government.
2. The development of a Science Library somewhere in the south-east
quadrant of the campus.  This building would release a substantial
amount of space in the Main Library, while raising the level of
library service to the scientific community.
3. The building of a central storage library to hold the overflow of
materials from the library system.  Such a storage library could - 13 -
usefully be shared by other academic and non-academic libraries in
the province, which must all face eventually a full-shelf situation.
The Ministry of Education has expressed some interest in this concept.
4.  The rental of storage space near U.B.C.
Whatever alternative is chosen, this much is true:  the problem of library
space will not go away.  If ignored, the University community can anticipate
increasing problems of access, accompanied by higher operating costs. - 14
VII. U.B.C. LIBRARY IN A PROVINCIAL LIBRARY NETWORK
In last year's annual report, it was asserted that "...provincial and
federal governments should have an interest in the welfare of libraries
like this one, and should be asked to provide funds for the maintenance
of resource collections... Again, it should be acknowledged by the provincial and federal governments that they have a role to play in
facilitating the sharing of collections on the one hand, and on the other
of ensuring the most efficient use of public funds committed to the
purchase of library materials."  (p.11)
The practical implications of this contention were spelled out in a special
report to the B.C. Post-Secondary Coordinating Committee in August 1976,
Developing Library Service for Post-Secondary Education in British Columbia,
by B. Stuart-Stubbs and Ross Carter,  Briefly, the report called for:
- accelerated development of collections at college libraries
- support for resource collections at university libraries
- development of collections for extension and continuing education
students
- creation of a funded interlibrary loan network
- dissemination of information about the holdings of the university
libraries
- establishment of a computer-based catalogue-support-union-catalogue
system
- establishment of a telex communications network
- establishment of an inter-institutional delivery system
These proposals dealt only with libraries in the post-secondary sector.
Unlike many other jurisdictions, British Columbia is without an agency
with responsibility for monitoring and assisting in the development of
libraries of all types.  It lacks a provincial library or other coordinating
body which would be concerned with public libraries, government libraries
and special libraries, as well as university, college and school libraries.
This has meant that projects which because of their scope, complexity or
cost required provincial planning and funding have either been deferred
or undertaken on some partial basis by informal groupings of libraries. - 15 -
It is gratifying that the Ministry of Education has responded constructively
to the above proposals. A college collections development project is in
its first stages.  A post-secondary interlibrary loan network has been
established, greatly improving access to university collections for college
students throughout the province.  In connection with this, a telex network
has been created.  Information about university library holdings, based on
available but incomplete data bases, has been made available on microfiche;
in U.B.C.'s case, one hundred and sixty-eight microfiche costing $18.00
displayed all serial holdings and all holdings of monographs acquired since
1968.
It seems likely that the Ministry will take the major step of supporting
the computerization of all post-secondary library catalogues.  The impact
of this on U.B.C.'s catalogue has been touched upon in Section V.  The
usefulness of a union catalogue of all library holdings for the purposes
of collections sharing and rationalization is readily apparent.
In all of these developments, U.B.C. Library, by virtue of the size, and
range excellence of its collections and services, must be a major factor,
serving as a provincial resource. However, it remains this University's
Library, and that is the basis on which it is at present funded.  Thus
while recognizing the importance of this Library to the province, and in
a provincial network of libraries, and while expressing a willingness to
participate in the development and operation of such a network, it is
essential that the University make it clear to the community and to the
government that it cannot at present afford to enlarge its mandate.  To
return to the third objective stated in the Introduction, whatever is done
on behalf of the province at large must not be to the detriment of students
and faculty at U.B.C.  To judge from the current response of the Ministry
of Education, this point is understood and accepted. - 16 -
VIII.  CONCLUDING REMARKS
This report began with a statement about the basic objectives of the
Library.  The collection continues to grow, and despite a decline in rate
of growth, that growth is sound.  The Library is well and heavily used.
And while the Library receives its share of complaints, it also receives
a generous number of expressions of satisfaction.  It is fair to say that
some progress is being made toward meeting objectives.
Yet there are some areas of concern and some forbidding signs. Particularly
distressing are those matters over which the Library has little control:
the state of the economy, government policy toward the universities, and
the repercussions arising from these. Most of the Library's problems could
be relieved if there were more money to spend, for collections, for staff,
for buildings.  In present circumstances, it seems that to hope for such
relief would be to hope in vain. The University has been more than fair
in its treatment of the Library.  It cannot be reasonably expected to
devote more of its resources to the Library at heavy expense to its
other components.  In this situation, one can only offer renewed assurance
to the University that the Library will continue to serve the University
and the community to the best of the abilities of its staff and with all
the resources it is able to muster. Appendix A
SIZE OF COLLECTIONS - PHYSICAL VOLUMES
Main Library
General Stacks
Asian Studies
Fine Arts
Humanities & Social
Sciences & Reference
Science Reference
Special Collections
SUBTOTAL
March 31, 1976
Additions
Withdrawals
Marct
t 31, 1977
761,029
34,650
959
794,720
71,035
9,700
1
80,734
62,866
3,707
18
66,555
:e           37,138
1,750
16
38,872
14,031
427
89
14,369
44,071
2,042
2
46,111
990,170
52,276
1
,085
1,
041,361
Branches and Reading Rooms
Animal Resource Ecology
Crane Library
Curriculum Laboratory
Law Library
MacMillan Library
o
Biomedical Branch
Mathematics Library
Music Library
3
Reading Rooms
Sedgewick Library
Social Work Library
Woodward Library
SUBTOTAL
TOTAL
Storage
GRAND TOTAL
13,212
373
34
13,551
6,225
255
3
6,477
35,372
5,196
1,034
39,534
99,713
4,928
29
104,612
33,726
2,473
10
36,189
24,445
1,189
7,563
18,071
17,791
915
188
18,518
24,394
1,684
52
26,026
94,457
8,071
786
101,742
135,490
6,926
987
141,429
10,355
924
305
10,974
206,979
7,633
40,567
466
214,146
702,159
11,457
731,269
1,692,329
92,843
12,5422
1,772,630
71,234
7,5162
78,750
1,763,563
1,851,380 Notes
1. Figures include some minor Main Library collections.
2. Materials removed from the Biomedical Branch (Vancouver General
Hospital) to storage in Woodward Library are shown here as deletions
from the branch collections and additions to storage,
3. Data Library volumes are included with reading rooms. Appendix B
GROWTH OF COLLECTIONS
Volumes - Catalogued
Documents - Uncatalogued
Films, Filmloops, Filmstrips
& Video Tapes
Slides & Transparencies
Pictures & Posters
Microfilm (reels)
Mlcrocard (cards)
Microprint (sheets)
Microfiche (sheets)
Maps
Manuscripts*
Recordings
Magnetic Tapes
Air Photos
March 31, 1976
Net Growth
March 31, 1977
1,763,563
87,817
1,851,380
434,647
30,971
465,618
2,789
199
2,988
9,795
6,902
16,697
66,898
3,045
69,943
45,541
3,997
49,538
111,680
-
111,680
885,000
50,750
935,750
610,465
106,542
717,007
109,945
5,629
115,574
3,617 l.f.
100 l.f.
3,717 l.f
59,835
2,303
62,138
165
117
282
70
_
70
*Thickness of files in linear feet Appendix C
LIBRARY EXPENDITURES
Fiscal Years, April - March
Salaries & Wages
Books & Periodicals
Binding
Supplies & Equipment
1974/75
4,263,647
1,502,317
127,480
428,391
1975/76
5,344,412
1,741,021
144,266
428,696
1976/77
5,755,893
1,954,121
154,043
752,810
Estimated
1977/78
6,350,000
2,065,000
175,000
750,000
TOTALS
6,321,835
7,658,395
8,616,867
9,340,000 Appendix D
RECORDED USE OF LIBRARY RESOURCES
September 1976 - August 1977
% Increase/
Decrease over
GENERAL CIRCULATION
1973/74
1974/75
1975/76
1976/77
1975/76
Main Library
General Stack Collection
483,699
465,534
427,094
454,310
+ 6.4%
Reserve Circulation
35,383
31,656
19,657
16,775
-14.7%
Extension Library
5,317
3,831
4,356
5,764
+32.3%
Asian Studies Division
13,691
18,586
17,943
23,003
+28.2%
Fine Arts Division
74,145
81,097
88,359
97,055
+ 9.8%
Government Publications
130,491
148,980
149,975
109,430
-27.0%
Map Collections
9,320
7,650
9,928
12,503
+25.9%
Special Collections
20,068
19,571
19,051
17,667
- 7.3%
SUBTOTAL
772,114
776,885
736,363
736,507
-
Branch Libraries &
Reading Rooms
Animal Resource Ecology
6,598
9,651
8,447
9,773
+15.7%
Crane Library
43,085
48,626
31,293
52,700
+68.4%
Curriculum Laboratory
239,365
249,054
225,261
252,129
+11.9%
Law Library
135,054
124,169
142,628
153,440
+ 7.6%
MacMillan Library
39,323
41,860
41,193
42,956
+ 4.3%
Marjorie Smith Library
11,900
12,969
12,603
14,017
+11.2%
Mathematics Library
22,976
18,972
19,251
19,283
+ 0.2%
Medical Branch Library
27,606
26,947
27,469
30,390
+10.6%
(V.G.H.)
Music Library
26,473
27,468
33,624
38,279
+13.8%
Reading Rooms
75,447
75,195
83,907
78,642
- 6.3%
Sedgewick Library
433,681
396,286
377,882
367,927
- 2.6%
Woodward Biomedical
204,380
189,408
195,110
183,053
- 6.2%
SUBTOTAL
1,265,888
1,220,605
1,198,668
1,242,589
+ 3.7%
Recordings
Wilson Recordings
Collection
Music Library
Record Collection
SUBTOTAL
247,146
255,498
261,278
280,150
+ 7.2%
33,906
37,920
38,976
40,756
+ 4.6%
281,052
293,418    300,254
320,906  + 6.9% Appendix D (Continued)
1973/74
1974/75
1975/76
INTERLIBRARY LOANS
To Other Libraries
- Original Materials
General
To FIN libraries*
To BCMLS**
To SFU***
To U. Victoria***
To BCIT***
To Bamfield***
SUBTOTAL
- Photocopies
General
To FIN libraries
To SFU***
To U. Victoria***
To BCIT***
To Colleges***
To Bamfield***
SUBTOTAL
TOTAL INTERLIBRARY
LENDING
From Other Libraries
~ Original Materials
General
From BCMLS
- Photocopies
TOTAL INTERLIBRARY
BORROWING
GRAND TOTAL
(General Circulation
& Interlibrary Loans)
*   Federated Information Network (Greater Vancouver Libraries)
**  B.C. Medical Library Service
*** Loaned via special Simon Fraser University unit
1976/77
% Increase
Decrease Over
1975/76
5,582
7,362
3,078
1,941
-36.9%
-
/Q 685 \
(9 mos.)
1,314
1,459
+11.0%
1,415
1,997
2,298
2,975
+29.5%
1,396
1,645
987
1,090
+10.4%
299
314
364
306
-15.9%
106
89
53
100
+88.7%
-
-
-
13
100%
8,798
12,092
8,094
7,884
- 2.6%
6,991
8,142
3,591
1,412
-60.7%
-
/o 183n
(9 mos)
571
736
+28.9%
4,227
2,951
2,446
1,875
-23.3%
1,020
1,492
1,245
1,307
+ 5.0%
335
269
178
766
+330.3%
181
416
142
428
+201.4%
27
30
90
85
- 5.6%
12,781
13,483
8,263
6,609
-20.0%
21,579
25,575
16,357
14,493
-11.4%
2,613
2,657
2,020
2,580
+27.7%
473
919
1,164
694
-40.4%
3,241
3,801
2,661
3,502
+31.6%
6,327
7,377
5,845
6,776
+15.9%
2,346,960
2,323,860
2,257,487
2,321,271
(+63,784)
Overall
% increase =
+ 2.8% Appendix E
REFERENCE STATISTICS
September, 1976 - August, 1977
Directional
Questions
Reference
Questions
Research
Questions
Total
Percentage
Increase/
Decrease
Main Library
Asian Studies
1,383
3,735
1,384
6,502
Fine Arts
9,449
9,639
1,110
20,198
Government Publications
498
24,480
664
25,642
Humanities
2,191
8,706
715
11,612
Information Desk
14,762
59,972
-
74,734
Map Collection
378
3,469
232
4,079
Science
590
7,300
756
8,646
Social Sciences
636
17,140
822
18,598
Speicial Collections
900
7,512
271
8,683
30,787
141,953
5,954
178,694
+0.7%
(1975/76)
(27,677)
(144,399)
(5,435)
(177,511)
Branch Libraries
Animal Resource Ecology
1,809
2,369
149
4,327
Crane Library
2,813
3,422
522
6,757
Curriculum Laboratory
7,179
14,122
121
21,422
Law Library
3,205
3,630
1,672
8,507
MacMillan Library
2,199
4,760
235
7,194
Marjorie Smith Library
307
1,586
135
2,028
Mathematics Library
947
1,180
278
2,405
Medical Branch Library
(V.G.H.)
7,112
5,798
395
13,305
Music Library
2,463
7,450
710
10,623
Sedgewick Library
12,711
14,699
602
28,012
Woodward Library
4,482
23,991
3,133
31,606
45,227
83,007
7,922
136,186
+7.6%
(1975/76)
(38,549)
(78,207)
(9,755)
(126,511)
GRAND TOTALS
76,014
224,960
13,876
314,880
(1975/76)
(66,220)
(221,966)
(15,170)
(304,022)
+3.6%
35,352 questions in Reading Rooms not included in totals. Appendix F
LIBRARY ORGANIZATION
ADMINISTRATION
Stuart-Stubbs, Basil
Bell, Inglis F.
Hamilton, Robert M.
Mclnnes, Douglas N.
MacDonald, Robin
Mercer, Eleanor
Watson, William J,
de Bruijn, Erik
ACQUISITIONS
Harrington, Walter
ASIAN STUDIES
Ng, Tung King
BIBLIOGRAPHY
Elliston, Graham
Forbes, Jennifer
Jeffreys, Anthony
Johnson, Stephen
Mcintosh, Jack
Mercer, Eleanor
Palsson, Gerald
Shields, Dorothy
PIWPERX
Fryer, Percy
CATALOGUE DIVISION
Elrod, J. McRee
Original Cataloguing
Bailey, Freda
Catalogue Preparations
Baldwin, Nadine
Searching/LC Cataloguing
Balshaw, Mavis
Joe, Linda
University Librarian
Associate Librarian
Assistant Librarian - Collections
(until June 30, 1977)
Assistant Librarian - Public Services
Coordinator of Technical Processes
and Systems
Acting Assistant Librarian - Collections
(from July 1, 1977)
Assistant Librarian - Physical Planning
and Development
Administrative Services Librarian
Head Librarian
Head Librarian
Bibliographer - Serials
Acting Bibliographer - English Language
(from July 1, 1977)
Bibliographer - Life Sciences
Research Bibliographer
Bibliographer - Slavonic Studies
Bibliographer - English Language
(until June 30, 1977)
Bibliographer - Science
Bibliographer - European Languages
Foreman (retired November 19, 1976;
died March 1, 1977)
Head Librarian
Head
Head
Head (until April 30, 1977)
Head (from July 1,1977) Appendix F (Cont'd...)
- 2 -
CIRCULATION
Butterfield, Rita
Head Librarian
CRANE LIBRARY
Thiele, Paul
Head
CURRICULUM LABORATORY
Hurt, Howard
Head
DATA LIBRARY
Ruus, Laine
Head
FINE ARTS DIVISION
Dwyer, Melva
Head Librarian
ANIMAL RESOURCE ECOLOGY LIBRARY
Nelson, Ann
Head Librarian
MACMILLAN LIBRARY
Macaree, Mary
Head Librarian
GIFTS & EXCHANGE
Elliston, Graham
Head Librarian
GOVERNMENT PUBLICATIONS
Dodson, Suzanne
Head Librarian
HUMANITIES
Forbes, Charles
Head Librarian
INFORMATION & ORIENTATION
Sandilands, Joan
Head Librarian
INTERLIBRARY LOAN
Friesen, Margaret
Head Librarian
LAW LIBRARY
Shorthouse, Tom
Head Librarian Appendix F (Cont'd.,.)
- 3
MAP DIVISION
Wilson, Maureen
Head Librarian
MARJORIE SMITH LIBRARY
de Bruijn, Elsie
Head Librarian
MUSIC LIBRARY
Burndorfer, Hans
Head Librarian
READING ROOMS
Omelusik, Nicholas
Head Librarian
RECORD COLLECTION
Kaye, Douglas
Head
SCIENCE DIVISION & MATHEMATICS LIBRARY
Brongers, Rein
Head Librarian
SEDGEWICK LIBRARY
Erickson, Ture
Head Librarian
SERIALS DIVISION
Turner, Ann
Head Librarian
SOCIAL SCIENCES DIVISION
Carrier, Lois
Head Librarian
SPECIAL COLLECTIONS DIVISION
Yandle, Anne
Selby, Joan
Head Librarian
Curator, Colbeck Collection
SYSTEMS DEVELOPMENT
Dennis, Donald
Dobbin, Geraldine
Systems Analyst
Systems & Information Science Librarian
WOODWARD LIBRARY
Leith, Anna
Head Librarian
BIOMEDICAL BRANCH LIBRARY
Freeman, George
Head Librarian Appendix G
Adult
Education
Agricultural
Economics
Anthropology-
Sociology
Applied Science/
Mechanical Eng.
Architecture
Asian Studies
Audiology
Chemical
Engineering
Chemistry
Classics
Commerce
Comparative
Literature
Computing
Centre
Creative
Writing
Economics-
History
LIBRARY SUPPORTED READING ROOMS
AS OF AUGUST. 1977
Room 20
5760 Toronto Road
Ponderosa Annex D
Room 105
Anth. Soc. Bldg.
Room 2314
Civil & Mech. Eng.
Building, Room 2050
F. Lasserre Bldg.
Room 9B (Basement)
Buchanan Building
Room 2208
James Mather Bldg.
Fairview PI., Room 205
Chem. Engineering
Bldg., Room 310
Chemistry Building
Room 261
Buchanan Building
Room 2218
Henry Angus Bldg.
Room 307
Buchanan Building
Room 227
Electrical
Engineering
Elect. Engr. Bldg.
Rm. 428 (Enter by Rn
English
Buchanan Tower
Room 697
French
Buchanan Tower
Room 897
Geography
Geography Building
Room 140
Geology
Geological Sciences
Building, Room 208
Geophysics
Geophysics Building
2nd Floor, South
Hispanic-
Italian
Buchanan Building
Room 2220
Home
Economics
Home Economics Bldg.
Room 205A
Institute of  Auditorium Annex 100
Industrial Relations
Institutional Main Mall N. Admin. Bldg.
Analysis & Planning
Library
School
Linguistics
Computer Sciences Bldg. Metallurgy
Room 302
Brock Hall, South
Wing, Room 204
Buchanan Tower
Room 1097
Microbiology
Mineral
Engineering
Library North Wing
8th Floor
Buchanan Building
Room 227
Metallurgy Building
Room 319
Wesbrook Building
Room 300
Mineral Engineering
Building, Room 201 Appendix G (continued)
Pharmacology
Pharmacy
Philosophy
Physics
Medical Sciences Building
Block C, Room 221
Cunningham Building
Room 160
Buchanan Building
Room 3270
Hennings Building
Room 311
Physiology
Political
Science
Medical Sciences Building
Block A, Room 201
Buchanan Building
Room 1220
Psychiatry
Psychology
Rm. 22, Health Sciences Centre
2255 Wesbrook Road
Henry Angus Building
Room 207
Rehabilitation
Medicine
Hut B2
Room 26-27
Religious
Studies
Buchanan Bldg.
Room 2250
Slavonic
Studies
Buchanan Building
Room 2251
Theatre
Frederick Wood Theatre
Room 211 Appendix H
SENATE LIBRARY COMMITTEE
1976/77
Mr. W. H. Black
Dr. E.M. Fulton
Dr. M.C.L. Gerry
Dr. W.C. Gibson
Dr. R.F. Gosse
Dr. R.F. Kelly
Dr. P.A. Larkin
Mr. S.L. Lipson
Rev. J.P. Martin
Dr. M.F. McGregor (Chairman)
Mr. J.F. McWilliams
Dr. H. Mitchell
Dr. P.H. Pearse
Mrs. A. Piternick
Dr. M. Shaw
EX-OFFICIO
Chancellor D.F. Miller
President D.T. Kenny
Mr. J.E.A. Parnall
Mr. B. Stuart-Stubbs
Terms of Reference:
(a) To advise and assist the Librarian in:
(i)  formulating a policy for the development of resources for
instruction and research;
(ii)  advising on the allocation of book funds to the fields of
instruction and research;
(iii)  developing a general program of library service for all the
interests of the University; and
(iv)  keeping himself informed about the library needs of instructional
and research staffs, and keeping the academic community informed
about the library.
(b) To report to Senate on matters of policy under discussion by the Committee.

Cite

Citation Scheme:

        

Citations by CSL (citeproc-js)

Usage Statistics

Share

Embed

Customize your widget with the following options, then copy and paste the code below into the HTML of your page to embed this item in your website.
                        
                            <div id="ubcOpenCollectionsWidgetDisplay">
                            <script id="ubcOpenCollectionsWidget"
                            src="{[{embed.src}]}"
                            data-item="{[{embed.item}]}"
                            data-collection="{[{embed.collection}]}"
                            data-metadata="{[{embed.showMetadata}]}"
                            data-width="{[{embed.width}]}"
                            data-media="{[{embed.selectedMedia}]}"
                            async >
                            </script>
                            </div>
                        
                    
IIIF logo Our image viewer uses the IIIF 2.0 standard. To load this item in other compatible viewers, use this url:
https://iiif.library.ubc.ca/presentation/cdm.libsenrep.1-0115298/manifest

Comment

Related Items