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Report of the University Librarian to the Senate of the University of British Columbia Mar 2, 1983

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Array leport of the university librarian
to the senate
UNIVERSITY OF BRITISH COLUMBIA LIBRARY
1981-82 The Report
of the University Librarian
to the Senate
of the
University of British Columbia
Sixty-seventh Year
1981/82
Vancouver
February 1983 Introduction
Students and faculty members at the University of British Columbia enjoy the
use of one of Canada's richest library resources. Statistics from the most recent
cumulation (1981/82) prepared by the Association of Research Libraries give UBC's
library a composite ranking of fifteenth among its membership of 101 major North
American academic research libraries.*  A "snapshot" of the Library's position in
relation to some specific factors considered in developing the index ranking shows
the Library in thirtieth position (second in Canada) in the number of volumes held;
fifth (first in Canada) in total microform holdings; and twenty-third (second in
Canada) in the number of its current periodical subscriptions. Recognizing that
such statistics are in no way a qualitative measurement of library collections or
services, one must still conclude that the UBC Library has grown remarkably well
in a relatively short span of years and that it has received outstanding support from
the University.
While traditional measures of collection size and rate of growth must be used
with caution in assessing the quality of a contemporary research library, they do at
least provide one indication of the level of support the Library has received over
the years. The University can and should take satisfaction from the creation of a
major research library in just sixty-seven years, many of them marked by financial
crises which must have made library collections a difficult priority to maintain.  At
the same time, it must be aware of the problems facing all major research libraries
today. For the most part, they are familiar ones, though they have grown in
magnitude:  shortages of space, reductions in staffing, deterioration of collections,
and the difficulty of providing materials promptly in a universe where the range of
potential needs has become almost unlimited.  The problems are not incapable of
solution, but some are beyond the resources of any individual institution.
♦The ARL Library Index attempts to rank member libraries by correlation of the
ten most significant factors relating to library size. The same index places the
University of Toronto Library sixth overall and the next Canadian member, after
UBC, in twenty-eighth place. In recent years those involved with the management of research libraries have
come to recognize the growing importance of cooperation and to accept as
inevitable an increasing interdependence among libraries. This report could offer a
litany of abbreviations representing important library cooperatives and agencies
formed to deal with common problems: RLG (Research Libraries Group), OCLC
(Online Computer Library Center), UTLAS (University of Toronto Library
Automation Systems), WLN (Washington Library Network), ARL (Association of
Research Libraries), CARL (Canadian Association of Research Libraries), CRL
(Center for Research Libraries), CIHM (Canadian Institute for Historical
Microreproductions), and on and on to local undertakings such as BCUC (British
Columbia Union Catalogue), FIN (Federated Information Network) and NET (B.C.
Post-Secondary Interlibrary Loan Network).  Most of these are the result of group
efforts to apply technology more efficiently to library and information tasks.  The
introduction of technological change can at times be uncomfortable, even
alarming, but only through the successful use of technology can major libraries -
highly labour intensive operations - hope to maintain and expand their services.
The impact of such cooperative enterprises may not be immediately apparent
to many library users at UBC  Most visible, perhaps, is the computer-output
microfiche (COM) catalogue, located in every branch of the library system. How
many realize, however, that most of the cataloguing information on which it is
based is obtained by online communication with UTLAS? The resulting records are
compiled in data files in Toronto, where they are used periodically in the
production of the B.C. Union Catalogue (a COM catalogue of the holdings of post-
secondary, plus some public and special libraries in B.C.). Our own COM catalogue
is produced locally from copies of the data tapes sent from Toronto to UBC. As
our technological environment continues to evolve, we may soon see a version of
the highly successful Washington Library Network system established in B.C. to
manipulate catalogue information - a first step, we hope, towards an interactive
online public catalogue.
Traditional interlibrary loan service is also being affected by technological
change. So far, this is most apparent in the United States, where participation in
the OCLC cataloguing service has led to the creation of an enormous data base of
library holdings and an online system for locating and requesting materials held by other libraries.  As one might hope, response time to interlibrary loan requests
improved substantially.  At a time when the purchasing power of library collections
budgets is shrinking, the significance of faster, more convenient access to other
collections is obvious.  At UBC as well we are profiting from access to large
bibliographic files and improved communications to locate materials held by other
research libraries.  Within the Province, resources have for the most part been
identified in the B.C. Union Catalogue, and for libraries in post-secondary
institutions NET, the B.C. Post-Secondary Interlibrary Loan Network, provides the
means by which those resources may be shared. In spite of these systems, however,
interlibrary loan activity in B.C. has thus far failed to achieve a high level of
resource-sharing. Accessing other collections costs money, and funds are scarce.
Librarians and those who use and fund libraries must come to realize that
interlibrary loan costs are nominal compared with the cost of purchasing,
cataloguing, and storing materials that may be infrequently used.
Cooperation in the development of collections is another area of considerable
interest to libraries, particularly as access to specialized resources through
interlibrary loan becomes faster. For many years librarians have talked about
rationalizing collections. Little has been achieved because university programs
remain competitive and resistant to rationalization. Lately, however, even the
largest and richest research libraries have begun to acknowledge that they cannot
hope to satisfy specialized research needs solely from their own collections. The
Research Libraries Group (RLG), a nationwide network of research libraries in the
United States (including among its twenty-five "owner" members the libraries of
such notable institutions as the University of California at Berkeley, Columbia,
Yale, Stanford and Princeton universities), has undertaken an important
commitment towards the identification of areas of specialization in their library
collections.  A data base of information about member libraries' collecting patterns
has been established for use in comparing and analyzing existing collections and for
identifying designated primary collecting responsibilities among member libraries.
To date over 150 primary collecting responsibilities have been assigned throughout
RLG's membership. It is worth noting that this program rests on the assumption
that specialized resources can be shared and that each member should not attempt
to collect in depth in all areas of specialization. Another area of concern for research collections is the physical deterioration
of many books printed during the past hundred years. Because of the high acid
content of the paper on which most books were printed, millions may become too
fragile to use in future.  A number of organizations have begun to address the
problem.  The Library of Congress in the United States and the National Library of
Canada are actively pursuing new techniques for the mass deacidification of books.
At the same time, publishers are being encouraged with some success to use acid-
free paper for books of lasting importance.  The Library of Congress is also
experimenting with new techniques for more permanent storage of information; the
optical disk, each of which can store approximately 315 books, indexed for
computer-access, is a promising format for storage and retrieval. Other
organizations, including the Research Libraries Group and the Canadian Institute
for Historical Microreproductions, are producing microform copies of books that
might otherwise be lost to future generations.
Many research libraries have appointed preservation specialists and have begun
to formulate plans for the preservation of deteriorating books in their collections.
At UBC funding has not yet been available to support a systematic preservation
program. Small quantities of rare materials have been restored, and the Library is
undertaking a campaign to publicize the need for proper care and handling of
library materials. Overcrowded bookstacks and the lack of appropriate
environmental controls add to the problem. In the next few years, we must find
the means to give more attention to the physical condition and preservation of our
collections.
Technology will do little in the foreseeable future to alleviate the need for
library space.  As noted earlier, the UBC Library already has one of the largest
collections of microform materials in North America. Investment in major
microform sets has enriched the collection by the equivalent of almost two million
volumes while occupying only a small fraction of the space that would be required
for the same materials in hard copy. It will be some years before other
technological changes, such as optical disk storage or remote access to machine
readable publications by electronic means, have any significant impact on space
requirements. Without minimizing the importance of the new technologies, it is
safe to assume that the needs of most library users will continue to be met from the traditional collections for some time to come. It is equally safe to assume that
the UBC Library, as a major resource for the Province, will not be able to save any
appreciable amount of space through cooperation with other libraries in
rationalizing collections development.  The existence of UBC's library collections
may permit other post-secondary libraries in B.C. to save money and space, but it
is usually UBC that must retain the vast numbers of specialized, less frequently
used research materials.
Reference was made in last year's report to the need for substantial increases
in funding for computing resources. Our present difficulties in finding funds to
improve automated systems are part of a larger issue, which may require a
reassessment of the way in which we are accustomed to thinking about the
allocation of library resources. Research libraries are, quite properly, collections-
oriented. Our tendency, and this report is no exception, is to measure the strength
of an academic research library by the size of its collections (qualitative
measurements may also be made, but with much less confidence).  A more
meaningful measurement in future would consider as well the library's success in
providing efficient and cost-effective access, not merely to its own growing
collections, but also to the resources of other libraries and information suppliers.
The use of technology to control and disseminate information about new
publications has raised expectations at a time when the proportion of significant
literature that a library can hope to collect has been sharply reduced. No longer is
the library user's awareness of the relevant literature bounded by the library's
catalogues, the printed indexes to journal articles, a few specialized bibliographies
and personal knowledge of less formally published research. Computer-assisted
bibliographic searches, constantly improving in scope and coverage, reveal far
more of the potentially relevant literature than any one library could possibly
provide from its own collections.  Advances in technology can help libraries to
meet such needs by improving access to materials in their own collections and by
offering more immediate access through interlibrary loan services and, ultimately,
through electronic document delivery systems to resources they do not own. In
order to make this possible, however, libraries will have to spend more on access
services, including computer systems, telecommunications and document delivery.
Increased funds are required during this transitional period to allow the intro- duction of technological developments that will enhance service, and traditional
budgets will have to be adjusted as well to encompass both the acquisition of
resources and the cost of ensuring access to resources available elsewhere.
More than ever before the quality of the Library's services and the degree to
which it can satisfy the information needs of a specialized and diverse teaching and
research community will be influenced by external relationships: participation in
the network of research libraries; careful selection from and utilization of a wide
range of technological developments as they become available; close cooperation
with the University's computing facilities in promoting access to information in
new formats; and active involvement in developing new approaches to some of the
common problems facing libraries today.
The Library can expect new demands on its staff, in terms both of acceptance
of the impact of technology on traditional services and of the need to develop new
skills in the management of information resources. The UBC Library is fortunate
in this respect; staff members have been involved with "new" technologies since
the early 1960's and have acquired the experience and skills needed to assess and
utilize technological developments appropriate to our requirements.
The purpose here is not to promote the use of technology for its own sake, but
to recognize the inevitability of a transformation that began some time ago and is
now accelerating. Whether we like it or not, the economic and technological
environment in which today's library must operate has changed and will continue to
evolve. If the Library is to be effective in the 1980's and beyond, it must be in a
position to capitalize on developments that will bring expanded information
resources to the University community. Review of 1981/82
Financial Constraints
As the academic year began, the Library faced an extended period of staff
shortages arising from a freeze on hiring. Coming at a time when staff turnover is
highest and when most public service units are entering their busiest period of the
year, the freeze required continued shifting of staff to maintain long service
schedules while many positions remained unfilled.  Throughout the Library, priority
was given to the immediate requirements of public service; new backlogs developed
and old ones grew larger. Permission was soon received to fill critical public
service vacancies, but more than thirty positions remained vacant at the end of
January, 1982.
The situation was further complicated by the fact that all but the most junior
positions are normally filled from within. As each senior library assistant vacancy
was filled, a series of vacancies at more junior levels resulted, each of which had
to be cleared, posted, and filled.  The recurring delays caused serious and prolonged
dislocation in many divisions. Twenty-two positions remained frozen until the end
of the fiscal year, for a saving of $202,000.  As a result, staff shortages continued
in some divisions until the end of March, 1982. By that time the problem had
changed: the freeze had given way to retrenchment.
The process of identifying permanent reductions in the 1982/83 budget was
long and difficult. As collections funding had been under extreme pressure for
some time, the budget review focused on staff and services. With the assistance of
the Senate Library Committee, several areas of potential savings were identified
and ranked in order of acceptability. To meet the final retrenchment figure of
$379,000 in annual operating costs, it was necessary to give up, among other things,
ten and one-half staff positions for an annual saving of more than $242,000. The
most visible, and probably the most regrettable, effect of retrenchment for the
Library was the elimination of the Reading Rooms Division and the reduction of
the Ecology Library from branch to reading room status.  More general services,
such as the Library's hours of operation, were preserved. Examination of the requirements of the Library system leads to the
inescapable conclusion that further rounds of budget-cutting will call for either a
revision of users' priorities or a restructuring of the system itself.
The economics of the situation are straightforward. In 1981/82 28.5 percent
of the library budget was expended for collections, 64.1 percent for staff, and 7.4
percent for supplies, computer service costs, machine rentals, postage and other
essentials. While it would be difficult to avoid cuts in collections and other costs,
the bulk of any further savings would have to come once again from the staff
component of the budget.
The Library's staff expenditures may be grouped as follows: 3.4 percent for
staff who work on collections development; about 32 percent for those in systems
and processing; and 64.5 percent for staff in public service divisions.  Little could
be saved in the collections area, and savings in processing and systems could be
made only at the cost of more rapidly growing backlogs. If further reductions are
required, it seems inevitable that they must come largely from the Library's public
service units.
The system of branch libraries distributed over and beyond the UBC campus
grew in order to provide scattered and diverse academic units with the library
services they required. By the end of 1981/82 there were fifteen external
branches, counting the Film Library. Altogether the system now maintains twenty-
three reference and information stations and twenty-seven separate locations
where circulation transactions take place.  While the hours of library service vary
with the number and needs of the users to be served at each branch, they are
limited in the aggregate by what can be afforded. The Main Library building is
open during the Winter Session for 88 hours per week, Sedgewick for 100 hours, and
Woodward for 94 hours. The compounding of a large number of service points,
some of which call for several staff at busy times, long hours of service, and a
considerable degree of subject and area specialization results in a requirement for
a substantial staff. Unless the number of service points or the hours of service can
be reduced, further trimming of the public service establishment will be difficult.
Assuming a willingness on the part of the University community to see the
present system restructured, further organizational changes would still be difficult to carry out without extensive planning and major financial decisions. New space,
more amenable to organizational change than the present Main Library, would be
required. Earlier annual reports have outlined the process by which the Library's
space situation has been assessed, described, and communicated, first to the
University as a whole and then to the Universities Council. The practical outcome
of that lengthy process has yet to take shape.
In the meantime, existing library space has continued to grow more
inadequate.  The Main Library is notoriously deficient under the Building Code.
The system remains complex, dispersed, and heavily weighted with service points.
There are few, if any, opportunities to recentralize or combine units because of
space and other constraints.
This University Library faces no problem more immediately critical than its
lack of adequate functional space. Inaction now almost certainly guarantees that
still more substantial quantities of collections must be withdrawn to storage,
regardless of the frustrations that this will cause to users. It will also mean that
any major restructuring of the Library's services cannot be undertaken because
space, layout, and Building Code requirements have locked us into the present
system.
Public Services
The Library's public services were most affected by the unusual circumstances
that prevailed in 1981/82. One division was eliminated, a second changed its
nature radically, while responsibilities and services in some other areas were
expanded. At the same time, the net effect of staff losses at a time when hours of
operation remain long has been increased difficulty in maintaining desk schedules,
particularly when absences occur because of vacations, illness or time accrued for
extra shift work.
While staffing for some long-standing Library services was being reduced,
elsewhere the Library's responsibilities and staffing were increased in 1981-82. In
the spring the Film Library, formerly operated as a part of the University's Space
and Audio-Visual Services, was attached to the Library, joined soon afterwards by
the Centre for Human Settlements A/V Reference Library. At the same time the 10
Health Science Library Network took shape, with a supporting service unit in the
Woodward Biomedical Library and branches at the Children's/Grace/Shaughnessy
hospital complex and at St. Paul's Hospital. Together with the Biomedical Branch
Library at the Vancouver General Hospital, these elements form a system that
draws on the strong Woodward Library collections to supplement working
collections in each of the branches. Network staff in the Woodward Library
arrange for interlibrary lending, provide back-up reference service, and assist in
coordinating collections and services in the hospital branches. These libraries are
linked by computer terminal and by the Faculty of Medicine's delivery truck, and
the system is based on the understanding that resources intelligently shared provide
the best level of service for the user from the funds available. Planned since 1978,
the expansion of health science library service was made possible through grant
funding provided to assist with increased enrollment of undergraduates in the
Faculty of Medicine.
Statistics for the traditional measures of use of library service by its public,
chiefly the students and faculty of the University, show slight declines again in
1981/82.  Reference and information questions answered during the year ending
June 30, 1982 totalled 322,560, compared with 337,732 during the previous year, a
drop of 4.5 percent.  Much of the decrease is accounted for by one location, the
Biomedical Branch Library.
Interlibrary borrowing and lending activities declined slightly last year, but
more significantly over the past two years. In 1981/82 the Library lent 21,097
items to other institutions, compared with 21,245 in 1980/81 and 24,042 in 1979/80,
a drop of 12.2 percent in two years. The greatest change was in loans made
through the B.C. Post-Secondary Interlibrary Loan Network, a reflection perhaps of
restraint in borrowing, imposed by the difficult financial situation of many
participating libraries. The UBC Library was no exception to the trend, borrowing
6,117 items from other libraries, compared with 7,168 in 1980/81 and 8,175 in
1979/80. This amounts to a decrease of 25.2 percent over the two-year period.
Circulation statistics, which record the items lent to borrowers from the
Library system, excluding interlibrary activity, show a decline of 1.7 percent in
1981/82. Over the past two years, the number of transactions has declined by
100,457 or 4.5 percent, but is still well over the two million level. 11
Changes on the order of those experienced in reference and circulation
statistics are not very significant over a two-year period. Declines recorded in a
number of library units were largely offset by increases elsewhere.  Service points
where questions are answered, instruction is provided, books are issued, assistance
in the use of facilities is offered, remain busy and must be staffed.
Collections
1981/82 was a year of some drama in the collections area.  At the start of the
year we expected that the budget would not be increased over the 1980/81 level.
In order to cope with the effects of inflation, book funds were set at low levels and
serial cancellations worth $150,000 were made.  Late in the fiscal year the
University was able to provide $702,000 in emergency funding for collections,
understood at the time to be non-recurring, rather than a continuing increase. (We
were pleased to learn at the beginning of the next fiscal year that the additional
funding would be continued.) The increase allowed a significant improvement in
the purchase of books and microform collections.
The uncertainty of collections funding during prolonged periods of restraint for
the University has re-emphasized the importance of private donations. The Library
was particularly fortunate last year in receiving generous support for the
collections from private sources. The late Dr. W.K. Burwell left the Library a
legacy to be used in two areas:  $50,000 for the purchase of medical collections,
and a much larger amount, in excess of $360,000, for materials in anthropology,
sociology and psychology. Other notable donations have come from the estates of
Dr. Honor Kidd Timbers and Dr. Coolie Verner, and from the Ernest Theodore
Rogers (1939) Fund. In addition, the Law Foundation continued its strong support
of collections in the Law Library.  Contributions to the Friends of the Library fund,
used primarily to purchase special materials for the collection, came through the
Alumni Association from numerous individual benefactors, many of whom
contribute annually to the support of the Library. '
The larger donations received by the Library tend to be related to specific
subject areas and have been used to supplement regular library expenditures in the
areas designated by the donors. The availability of such funding has allowed the 12
continued development of those collections at a level to support specialized
teaching and research.  Over a period of time, this pattern of expenditure could
result in some unevenness in the collection. We must hope in future for continued
private support, with guidelines that are flexible enough to permit the development
of areas of the collection that might otherwise be overlooked.
Federal Government grants have also contributed to the growth of specific
collections. These have included funds from the Social Sciences and Humanities
Research Council for the purchase of periodical backfiles in Japanese economic
history and in music, and for the purchase of materials in epigraphy. Funding made
available under the Cultural Property Export and Import Act enabled the Library to
acquire a notable item for its collection of materials about British Columbia: the
sketchbook of H. Bullock Webster, containing ninety-two coloured or wash sketches
of B.C. life.
Individual donors have also contributed materials of value to the collection.
Perhaps the most notable single gift in recent times came from Dr. John
Steelquist, of California, who donated a rare copy of Captain Vancouver's Voyage
of Discovery.  This copy is one of a special proof edition published prior to the first
edition. Since only eight copies were ever produced, it represents a valuable and
very handsome addition to the Library's excellent B.C. collection.
Technical Processing and Systems
Backlogs of material waiting to be catalogued continued to be a problem for
the technical processing operation as well as an inconvenience to patrons. After
more than a year during which slight reductions were made in the size of the
backlog, it began to grow again. However, the rate of growth was nominal and is
not expected to change significantly or to disrupt the present service level.
Changes in collections funding, currency exchange rates, and inflation are the
major factors which influence the workloads and backlogs in processing.
Revision of Senate policy affecting Departmental Reading Rooms in 1981/82
will have a delayed effect on the technical processing operations. There will
eventually be some small reduction in workloads, but during the transition extra 13
work is required to change catalogue records and to shift reading room serials to
departmental accounts.
Use of new technologies in processing continued to be an important concern.
During the year, good progress was made in the design and development of several
new support systems, including online serials check-in, online invoice processing,
online spine label production, and redevelopment of the Acquisitions/accounting
system.  Most of these developments are planned for implementation during
1982/83.  However, a start was made on preliminary testing of serials check-in and
invoice processing.
Systems development is an activity that applies to all parts of the library, not
just technical processing. Systems staff have worked to improve the Library's
microcatalogues, and have developed the means to automate the delivery of
overdue notices. The latter innovation is important because of the rising cost of
postage, and should provide, as well, a better and faster method of notifying users
of books overdue or recalled.
Systems development is also an area where the Library cannot function
independently.  The UBC Computing Centre is a key partner to any Library systems
development.  Computing resources available through the Computing Centre are in
great demand and, while the unversity has provided increased funding for
computing resources, more is needed.  The growth rate for computing at UBC
exceeds 30% annually, and there is no indication that this will decline.
Other external relationships include those with suppliers of services such as
UTLAS (for cataloguing) and with institutions involved cooperatively in the
planning and development of catalogue systems such as the B.C. Union Catalogue
and the B.C. Library Network (BCLN).  The B.C. Union Catalogue Project allowed
the automation of catalogue records for all post-secondary libraries in B.C.
Further enhancements of library processing and systems will be possible through
the BCLN development, which is now in progress. 14
Personnel
After thirty years of continuous service in the Library, I.F. (Bill) Bell retired
on June 30, 1982. Serving in senior administrative positions throughout the period
of most rapid growth in the Library, Mr. Bell had a profound influence on library
priorities, the quality of its staff, and the nature of its services.
On graduating from UBC's honours English program in 1950, Mr. Bell worked
briefly as a library assistant, then proceeded to the University of Toronto, where
he obtained a Bachelor of Library Science degree in 1952.  Returning to UBC, he
worked successively in the Reference and Loan divisions, as Head of the Loan
Division, and then as Supervisor of Circulation Services.  From 1964 until his
retirement, he held the appointment of Associate University Librarian.
The contributions that he made to the development of the UBC Library as a
major research facility are manifold. The objectives that he pursued with great
vigour and determination helped to make the Library what it is today. Selection of
professional staff, with emphasis on the recruitment of specialists to provide
advanced reference service, was one of the areas in which his experience and
judgement were of critical importance to the Library's future. His concern for the
introduction of modern management techniques and sound financial policies was
also of lasting benefit to the Library; many of the changes he introduced at UBC
were subsequently adopted by other Canadian university libraries.
Mr. Bell was active in professional organizations, serving on a variety of
library association committees and as President of the Canadian Association of
College and University Libraries in 1971/72. His continuing interest in English
literature is evident in his many bibliographical publications and in his
contributions over the years to Canadian Literature. A member of the
Bibliographical Society of Canada for more than twenty years, he served as
President of that organization from 1967 to 1969.
Bill Bell's mark on the Library is an enduring one. Colleagues and friends
throughout the University wish him a long and enjoyable retirement. Main Library
General Stacks 1
Fine Arts
Humanities 5c Social
Sciences Reference
Science Reference
Special Collections
SUBTOTAL
Appendix A
SIZE OF COLLECTION- PHYSICAL VOLUMES
% Increase
March 31/81
Additions
Deletions
March 31/82
vs. 1981
862,967
34,140
743
896,364
85,641
4,192
9
89,824
47,269
2,490
312
49,447
15,530
648
210
15,968
53,729
1,682
7
55,404
1,065,136
43,152
1,281
1,107,007
+ 3.9
Branches & Reading Rooms
Animal Resource Ecology
Library
Asian Studies Library
Biomedical Branch Library
Crane Library
Curriculum Laboratory
Law Library
MacMillan Library
Marjorie Smith Library
Mathematics Library
Music Library
Reading Rooms2
Sedgewick Library
Woodward Library
SUBTOTAL
TOTAL
14,803
305
117,989
11,786
23,248
1,784
7,385
184
63,906
6,145
120,262
3,162
37,121
2,702
14,331
722
22,501
1,311
33,944
2,195
123,028
5,186
171,524
6,475
248,649
10,610
998,691
52,567
2,063,827
95,719
13
15,095
-
129,775
2
25,030
206
7,363
569
69,482
43
123,381
98
39,725
78
14,975
84
23,728
71
36,067
995
127,219
1,887
176,112
61
259,198
4,108
1,047,150
+ 4.9
5,389
2,154,157
+ 4.4
Storage
153,194
191
153,384
GRAND TOTAL
2,217,021
95,910
5,390
2,307,541
+ 4.1
Notes:     1.   Includes some minor Main Library collections.
2. Includes the Data Library and bibliographic material in the
Library Processing Centre. Appendix B
GROWTH OF COLLECTIONS
March 31, 1981
Net Growth
March 31, 1982
Volumes - Catalogued
Documents - Uncatalogued
Microfilm (reels)
Microcards (cards)
Microprint (sheets)
Microfiche (sheets)
Aperture Cards
Films
Filmloops
Filmstrips
Video Tapes
Slides
Slide/Tape Shows
Transparencies
Photographs
Pictures
Posters
Maps
Manuscripts+
Sound Recordings
Computer Tapes
Air Photos
2,217,021
577,193
67,388
111,976
1,082,500
1,216,254
2,589
86
15
3,306
414
28,577
11
1,700
21,489
69,248
2,878
133,531
4,476    l.f.
113,648
425
70
90,520
27,866
2,726
30,250
133,420
155
129
524
10
1,220
550
100
4,428
230
10,346
3
2
l.f.
2,307,541
605,059
70,114
111,976
1,112,750
1,349,674
2,589
86
15
3,461
543
29,101
11
1,710
22,709
69,798
2,978
137,959
4,706    l.f.
123,994
428
72
Thickness of files in linear feet. Appendix C
LIBRARY EXPENDITURES
Fiscal Years, April /March
Year
Salaries <3c
Wages
Collections
Binding
Other
Totals
1972/73
3,178,630
(63.67)
1,308,537
(26.21)
154,593
[3.09)
350,455
(7.02)
4,992,215
1973/74
3,522,626
(65.11)
1,348,775
(24.93)
165,081
[3.05)
373,302
(6.90)
5,409,784
197'4175
4,263,647
(67.44)
1,502,317
(23.76)
127,480      1
[2.01)
428,391
(6.77)
6,321,835
1975/76
5,344,412
(69.78)
1,741,021
(22.73)
144,266      1
[1.88)
428,696
(5.59)
7,658,395
1976/77
5,755,893
(66.79)
1,954,121
(22.67)
154,043
[1.78)
752,810
(8.73)
8,616,867
1977/78
6,303,582
(66.54)
2,473,368
(26.11)
177,253      1
[1.87)
518,360
(5.47)
9,472,563
1978/79
6,515,980
(62.65)
2,722,613
(26.18)
184,223      1
[1.77)
976,638
(9.39)
10,399,454
1979/80
7,227,991
(65.16)
2,872,972
(25.90)
195,527      1
J.76)
795,386
(7.17)
11,091,876
1980/81
8,074,711
(62.62)
3,311,221
(25.68)
234,778      1
[1.82)
1,272,232
(9.85)
12,892,942
1981/82
8,901,978
(64.11)
3,781,209
(27.23)
174,402      1
[1.26)
1,027,039
(7.40)
13,884,628
The figures above include expenditures from special grants,
as well as those from the regular library budget.
Percentages of annual expenditure are shown in parentheses. Appendix D
RECORDED USE OF LIBRARY RESOURCES
Years ending June 30
GENERAL CIRCULATION
1979/80
1980/81
1981/82
Wilson 335,313 331,284 313,648
Music 52,355 51,686 51,706
SUBTOTAL 387,668 382,970 365,354
INTERLIBRARY LOANS*
To Other Libraries 24,042 21,245 21,097
From Other Libraries 8,175 7,168 6,117
TOTAL INTERLIBRARY LOANS 32,217 28,413 27,214
GRAND TOTAL (General Circulation
<5c Interlibrary Loans) 2,287,254 2,220,631 2,181,794
%Increase
Decrease vs.
1980/81
Main Library
General Stacks
417,960
425,038
412,969
_
2.8
Reserves
32,853
24,076
31,398
+
30.4
Extension
7,605
6,400
6,174
-
3.5
Fine Arts
101,052
105,765
102,833
-
2.8
Government Publications
123,753
124,477
103,798
-
16.6
Maps
10,538
10,648
9,719
-
8.7
Special Collections
20,273
17,088
18,317
+
7.2
SUBTOTALS
714,034
713,483
685,208
-
4.0
Branch Libraries <5c Reading Rooms
Asian Studies
21,646
19,539
20,998
+
7.5
Crane
37,723
38,615
38,492
_
0.3
Curriculum Laboratory
186,927
177,453
174,292
-
1.8
Ecology
10,816
8,660
10,442
+
20.3
Law
144,939
123,732
117,722
-
4.9
MacMillan
46,161
45,302
46,608
+
8.5
Marjorie Smith
18,493
18,135
19,553
+
7.8
Mathematics
18,591
19,026
19,657
+
3.3
Medical Branch
37,604
36,633
39,170
_
6.9
Music
42,636
45,814
47,437
+
3.5
Reading Rooms
76,000
72,333
68,652
-
5.1
Sedgewick
326,852
305,933
303,385
-
0.8
Woodward
184,947
184,590
197,610
+
7.1
SUBTOTAL
1,153,335
1,095,765
1,104,018
+
0.8
Use of Recordings
5.3
0.0
4.6
0.7
14.7
4.2
1.7
♦Interlibrary Loans are presented in greater detail in Appendix E. Appendix E
INTERLIBRARY LOANS
Years ending June 30
To Other Libraries
- Original Materials
General
Federated Information Network*
BC Medical Library Service
BC Post-Secondary Library Network2
Bamfield Marine Station
SUBTOTAL
- Photocopies
General
Federated Information Network
BC Post-Secondary Library Network
Bamfield Marine Station
SUBTOTAL
TOTAL INTERLIBRARY LENDING
1979/80
1980/81
1,962
1981/82
1,707
Percentage
Increase/Decrease
vs 1980/81
2,085
- 13.0
1,267
1,269
1,298
+ 2.3
3,628
4,118
5,000
+ 21.4
3,922
2,676
2,260
- 15.5
11
9
15
+ 66.7
10,913        10,034
10,280
+ 2.5
2,000
1,908
2,079
+ 9.0
840
679
742
+ 9.3
10,174
8,535
7,867
- 7.8
115
89
11,211
21,245
129
+ 44.9
13,129
10,817
- 3.5
24,042
21,097
- 0.7
From Other Libraries
- Original Materials
General
BC Medical Library Service
SUBTOTAL
- Photocopies
TOTAL INTERLIBRARY BORROWING
2,657
2,256
1,988
- 11.9
990
793
3,049
556
-29.9
3,647
2,544
- 16.6
4,528
4,119
7,168
3,573
- 13.3
8,175
6,117
- 14.7
FIN, a network of public libraries operating since December 1974 under the aegis of the
Greater Vancouver Library Federation. It provides access to the UBC collections for its
own members and for some B.C. Government libraries in Victoria.
NET, a network of B.C. public university and college libraries, since September 1977. Appendix F
REFERENCE & INFORMATION QUESTIONS ANSWERED
July, 1981
- June, 1982
Directional
Reference
Research
% Increase/
Decrease vs
Questions
Questions
Questions
TOTAL
1980/81
Main Library
Fine Arts
12,555
15,508
1,848
29,911
Government Publications
739
22,543
918
24,200
Humanities
1,883
9,305
771
11,909
Information Desk
14,621
46,766
—
61,387
Map Collection
351
3,544
133
4,028
Science Division
572
5,913
1,076 *
7,561
Social Sciences
468
13,879
741 *
15,088
Special Collections
3,385
5,937
1,173
10,495
SUBTOTAL
34,524
123,395
6,660
164,579
(1980/81)
(42,526 )
(122,633 )
(6,902 )
(172,061
-4.3%
)
Branch Libraries
Asian Studies
2,006
3,104
2,477
7,587
Crane
1,832
1,451
426
3,709
Curriculum Laboratory
11,407
15,314
140
26,861
Ecology
1,706
3,516
229
5,451
Law Library
3,708
4,405
1,507 *
9,620
MacMillan Library
1,732
6,418
225 *
8,375
Marjorie Smith
2,013
3,118
511
5,642
Mathematics Library
1,322
1,176
361
2,859
Medical Branch (V.G.H.)
6,706
9,127
701  *
16,534
Music Library
2,275
9,464
595
12,334
Sedgewick Library
9,134
14,715
134
23,983
Woodward Library
7,121
24,670
3,235 *
35,026
SUBTOTAL
50,962
96,478
10,541
157,981
(1980/81)
(55,277 )
(98,580  )
(11,714  )
(165,  571
-4.6%
)
GRAND TOTAL
85,486
219,873
17,201
322,560
(1980/81)
(97,803 )
(221,213  )
(18,616 )
(337,632  )
- 4.5%
49,338 questions (47,853 in 1980/81) in Reading Rooms are not included.
* Patrons served through computer-assisted bibliographic searches are included in the reference
statistics under "research questions". A separate table showing the number of computer
searches is provided in Appendix G. Appendix G
COMPUTER-ASSISTED REFERENCE SEARCHES
July 1981 - June 1982
UBC Searches Total Current
Student      (excluding Reference &        Data        Awareness
No. of Special Student       Non-UBC     ILL Veri- Bases Profile
Division
Searches    S<
5arches(a)
Specials)    S<
sarches(b)
fication(c)
Searched(d) &
Reports(e
Ecology Library
24
9
14
—
1
36
—
Law Library
35
11
—
8
16
234
—
MacMillan Library
89
18
20
2
49
117
Medical Branch
Library - VGH
530
—
271
3
256
1,220
19
Science Division
1,126
24
104
33
965
1,243
—
Social Sciences
Division
304
143
77
22
62
337
—
Woodward Library
1,808
40
532
32
1,204
3,302
881
TOTALS
3,916
245
1,018
100
2,553
6,489
900
(1980/81)
(3,398)
(339)
(1,097)
(123)
(1,839)
(6,473)
(681)
(a) "Student Special" searches are limited searches provided to UBC students at a flat fee. The relatively
low number done in the Woodward Library results from the exclusion of MEDLINE searches, which are
normally inexpensive, from the special rate.
(b) Full costs, including staff time, for computer-assisted searches are charged to patrons not associated
with the University.  The number of searches is therefore relatively low, although the searches that
are done for non-UBC patrons tend to be complex and often require the use of several data files.
(c) Staff searches are usually for the purpose of verifying the existence and location of documents, and
ordering them on-line as interlibrary loans.  Computer-assisted searching methods have become
increasingly helpful to this process, particularly in the sciences.
(d) A single reference search may involve the use of more than one data base (i.e. MEDLINE and
Psychological Abstracts).  Staff time required for a reference search may vary depending on the
number and combination of data bases used.
(e) Figure represents the number of monthly updates distributed to patrons. Current awareness (SDI)
profiles are included in the "patrons served" total only when they are initially established or
subsequently revised. Appendix H
LIBRARY ORGANIZATION
1981/82
ADMINISTRATION
Mclnnes, Douglas N.
Bell, Inglis F.
de Bruijn, Erik
Jeffreys, Anthony
MacDonald, Robin
Watson, William J.
Keate, Heather
ACQUISITIONS
Davidson, Joyce
Acting University Librarian (July 1, 1981 - May 31,
1982)
University Librarian (June 1, 1982 - )
Associate Librarian (to June 30, 1982)
Assistant Librarian - Administrative Services
Assistant Librarian - Collections
Assistant Librarian - Technical Processes
and Systems
Assistant Librarian - Physical Planning and
Development
Acting Assistant Librarian - Public Services
(July 1, 1981 - )
Interim Planning Coordinator, Health Sciences
Library Services (Feb. 1,
1982 - )
Head
ANIMAL RESOURCE ECOLOGY LIBRARY
Nelson, Ann
Frye, Judith
Head (to May 31, 1982)
Acting Head (Feb. 15, 1982 - Aug. 31, 1982)
ASIAN STUDIES
Ng, Tung King
Head
BIBLIOGRAPHY
Cole, John
Elliston, Graham
Forbes, Jennifer
Hallonquist, P. Lynne
Johnson, Stephen
Mcintosh, Jack
Shields, Dorothy
Bibliographer - Science (to June 30, 1982)
Bibliographer - Serials
Bibliographer - English Language
Bibliographer - Life Sciences
Research Bibliographer
Bibliographer - Slavonic Studies
Bibliographer - European Languages Appendix H
(continued)
BIOMEDICAL BRANCH LIBRARY (V.G.H.)
Freeman, George Head
CATALOGUE RECORDS
Turner, Ann
Bailey, Freda
Head
Deputy Head <5c Bibliographic Control Librarian
CATALOGUE PRODUCTS
Joe, Linda
Willoughby, Patrick
Head (to June 30, 1982)
Acting Head (July 1, 1982 - Aug. 31, 1982)
CIRCULATION
Butterfield, Rita
Head
CRANE LIBRARY
Thiele, Paul
Head
CURRICULUM LABORATORY
Hurt, Howard
Head
DATA LIBRARY
Ruus, Laine
Head
FINE ARTS
Dwyer, Melva
Head
GIFTS & EXCHANGE
Elliston, Graham
Head
GOVERNMENT PUBLICATIONS & MICROFORMS
Dodson, Suzanne
Head
HAMBER LIBRARY (Children's/Grace/Shaughnessy Hospitals)
Nelson, Ann Head (June 1, 1982 - ) Appendix H
(continued)
HEALTH SCIENCES LIBRARY NETWORK SERVICES
Price, Jane Co-ordinator (May 17, 1982 - )
HUMANITIES
Forbes, Charles
Head
INFORMATION & ORIENTATION
Sandilands, Joan
Head
INTERLIBRARY LOAN
Friesen, Margaret
Head
LAW LIBRARY
Shorthouse, Tom
Head
MACMILLAN LIBRARY
Macaree, Mary
Head
MAP DIVISION
Wilson, Maureen
Head
MARJORIE SMITH LIBRARY
de Bruijn, Elsie
Head
MUSIC LIBRARY
Burndorfer, Hans
Head
READING ROOMS
Omelusik, Nicholas
Head
ST. PAUL'S HOSPITAL LIBRARY
Saint, Barbara
Head (July 1, 1982 - )
SCIENCE DIVISION & MATHEMATICS LIBRARY
Brongers, Rein
Head Appendix H
(continued)
SEDGEWICK LIBRARY
Erickson, Ture
Head
SERIALS DIVISION
Baldwin, Nadine
Head
SOCIAL SCIENCES DIVISION
Carrier, Lois
Head
SPECIAL COLLECTIONS DIVISION
Yandle, Anne
Selby, Joan
Head
Curator, Colbeck Collection
Acting Head (July 1, 1982 - June 30, 1983)
SYSTEMS DEVELOPMENT
Dennis, Donald
Dobbin, Geraldine
Systems Analyst
Systems & Information Science Librarian
WILSON RECORDINGS/COLLECTION
Kaye, Douglas
Head
WOODWARD LIBRARY
Leith, Anna
Head Appendix I
LIBRARY SUPPORTED READING ROOMS
AS OF AUGUST, 1982
Adult Education
Agricultural Economics
Anthropology-Sociology
Applied Science/Mechanical Eng.
Architecture
Asian Studies
Audiology
Chemical Engineering
Chemistry
Classics
Commerce
Comparative Literature
Computer Centre
Creative Writing
Economics-History
Electrical Engineering
English
Room 20
5760 Toronto Road
Ponderosa Annex D
Room 105
Anthropology-Sociology Building
Room 2314
Civil & Mechanical Engineering Bldg.
Room 2050
Frederick Lasserre Building
Room 9B (Basement)
Buchanan Building
Room 2208
James Mather Building
Fairview Crescent, Room 205
Chemical Engineering Building
Room 310
Chemistry Building
Room 261
Buchanan Building
Room 2218
Henry Angus Building
Room 307
Buchanan Building
Room 227
Computer Sciences Building
Room 302
Buchanan Building
Room 4258
Buchanan Tower
Room 1097
Electrical Engineering Building
Room 428 (Enter by Room 434)
Buchanan Tower
Room 697 Appendix I
(continued)
Extended/Acute Care
French
Geography
Geology
Geophysics
Hispanic-Italian
Home Economics
Institutional Analysis & Planning
Library School
Linguistics
Metallurgy
Microbiology
Mineral Engineering
Oceanography
Pharmacology
Philosophy
Physics
Health Sciences Centre
Room M40, Extended Care Unit
Buchanan Tower
Room 897
Geography Building
Room 140
Geological Sciences Building
Room 208
Geophysics Building
2nd Floor, South
Buchanan Building
Room 2220
Home Economics Building
Room 210
Main Mall N. Administration Bldg.
Room 140
Main Library, North Wing
8th Floor, Room 831
Buchanan Building
Room 0210
Metallurgy Building
Room 319
Westbrook Building
Room 300
Metallurgy Building
Room 319
Biological Sciences Building
Room 1449
Medical Sciences Building
Block C, Room 221
Buchanan Building
Room 3270
Hennings Building
Room 311 Appendix I
(continued)
Physiology
Political Science
Psychiatry
Psychology
Religious Studies
Slavonic Studies
Theatre
Transportation Studies
Medical Sciences Building
Block A, Room 201
Buchanan Building
Room 1220
Room 22, Health Sciences Centre
2255 Wesbrook Road
Henry Angus Building
Room 207
Buchanan Building
Room 2250
Buchanan Building
Room 2251
Frederick Wood Theatre
Room 211
Auditorium Annex
Room 100 Appendix J
SENATE LIBRARY COMMITTEE
1981/82
Mrs. M.F. Bishop
Dr. K.O.L. Burridge
Mr. K.D. Freeman
Mr. C. Fulker
Dean P.A. Larkin (Chairman)
Mr. R.K. Paterson
Mrs. A. Piternick
Miss R. Robinson
Dr. G.G.E. Scudder
Mr. G.M. Shepard
Dr. J.G. Silver
Dr. CE. Slonecker
Dr. M. Smith
Dr. N. Sutherland
Dr. J. Wisenthal
EX-OFFICIO
Chancellor J.V. Clyne
President D. Kenny
Mr. K.G. Young
Mr. D. Mclnnes
Terms of Reference
(a) To advise and assist the Librarian in:
(i) formulating a policy for the development of resources for
instruction and research;
(ii) advising on the allocation of book funds to the fields of
instruction and research;
(iii) developing a general program of library service for all the
interests of the University; and
(iv)        keeping himself informed about the library needs of instructional
and research staffs, and keeping the academic community informed
about the Library.
(b) To report to Senate on matters of policy under discussion by the Committee.

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