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Report of the Library Committee to The Senate Sep 30, 1927

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Array THE LIBRARY
** —^
^REPORT OF
The Library Committee
TO
The Senate
T
VANCOUVER, ^BRITISH COLUMBIA,
SEPTEMBER, 1927 September 27th, 1927.
L. S. Klinck, Esq., D.Sc, M.S.A., LL.D.,
Chairman of the Senate,
President of The University of British Columbia.
Sir:—
The Library Committee presents herewith, in
accordance with the instructions contained in the
Senate's resolution of December 15th, 1926, a Report
made by the Librarian, and considered and approved
at a meeting of the Committee held on Monday, September 19th, 1927.
Very truly yours,
H. F. ANGUS,
Chairman. Professor H. F. Angus,
Chairman of the Library Committee,
The University of British Columbia.
Sir:—
I beg to present, for your information and that of the Committee, a Report on the Library as from January 1st to August 31st,
1927. Taken in conjunction with the Interim Report, presented to
the Committee January 9th, and by it transmitted to the Senate
January 20th, it covers the main activities of the Library since its
installation in August, 1925, at the new building in Point Grey.
BOOK STOCK AND RECENT ACQUISITIONS
The University's book collection now numbers approximately
63,500 volumes. On August 31st the accessioned volumes numbered
60,316. The estimated number of duplicates is 3,200. The number
of pamphlets is about 9,300. The increase in accessioned volumes
since the preparation of the Interim Report has been 3,094.
Since the last Report the most notable additions have been:
cost
Journal de Mathematique, Series 1, Tome 1  (1836) to
Series 9, Tome 5 (1926)  '. $870.00
Dowling Geological Library   235.00
Tabulae Biologicae      64.00
Journal of Genetics, Vol. 1 (1910) to Vol. 16 (1926),
not complete   104.00
Biometrika, Vol. 1 (1901) to Vol. 17 (1925)   320.00
University of California Publications in Zoology (completion of set)      71.00
Crelle.    Journal   fur   die reine und angewandte Math-
ematik, Bd. 1 (1826) to Bd. 154 (1926) 1202.00 Report of Library Committee
During the summer special efforts have been made to bring to
completion many important sets of which recent or older volumes
were missing. Special appropriations for this purpose were voted
by the Library Committee, and competitive quotations from dealers
secured. Several orders have been placed, and the books may be
expected in time for use in the coming session. Among the more
notable of these should be mentioned:
to cost
American Society   of   Civil   Engineers;   Transactions,
Vols. 26-70  $202.50
Anglia, Bd. 46-49     16.00
Institute of Electrical Engineers' Journal, Vols. 60-63....$ 70.00
Mathematische Annalen, Bd. 91-95      32.00
New Statesman, Vols. 7-16     20.00
Zeitschrift fur Physik, Bd. 4-35   120.00
Coates' Herd Books, Vols. 1, 2, 4, 5, 7, 11, 15-17,
19-68    £22 10s. Od.
Faraday Society, Vols. 17-21  £11 14s. Od.
Institute of Metals (London) Journal, Vols. 1-34..£16   0s. Od.
Zoological Record, Vol. 45-61  £12   0s. Od.
Two important sets have also been added to the Library as
gifts. The Royal Horticultural Society of England has presented
the complete set of its Journal (40 volumes)—worth $200.00—
while the Hispanic Society of America has given its entire ten series
of extremely valuable publications, 163 volumes in all. Many of
the series are sumptuously bound and superbly illustrated. The
published price of the series is about $620.00, and, earlier issues being exhausted, the value of the set is increasing every year.
REGISTRATION
The records show that 2,268 persons have used the Library
during the past year. Of these 1,421 were degree course students,
253 were students attending Summer Session, while 589 were extramural readers.
The registration of students at the University for the session
1926-27 was 1,582. One hundred and fifty-six of these students—
practically 10 per cent.—did not avail themselves of the privileges
of the Library. Nevertheless, the proportion of users—90 per cent,
of  the enrolment—shows  a  gain  of 2 per cent, on the preceding The University of British Columbia
year, thus continuing the steady increase^ as shown in the following
table:
Library                Percentage
Year          Student Enrolment
Registration          of
: Enrolment
1918-19
538
338
63
1919-20
890
485
54
1920-21
962
622
65
1921-22
1014
681
67
1922-23
1194
819
69
1923-24
1308
934
80
1924-25
1451
1169
80
1925-26
1463
1282
88
1926-27
1582
1421
90
The enrolment by '.
Faculties and Years is shown below:
:—
Faculty of Arts and Science:
Registered
Enrolment
Readers
Percentage
1st Year
539
536
2nd   "
250
245
3rd   "
185
195
4th  "
153
116
Partial
50
1177
1092
93
Faculty of Applied
Science:
1st Year
77
41
2nd   "
51
44
3rd   "
24
19
4th   "
37
35
Partial
19
— 208
— 139
62
Nursing:
1st Year
11
2nd   "
5
3rd   "
6
4th
4
5th
5
Partial
4
—   35
33
94
Carried forward 1420
1264 Report of Library Committee
Enrolment
Brought forward 1420
Registered
Readers
1264
Percentage
Faculty of Agriculture:
1st Year
2nd   "
3rd   "
4th  "
Partial
15
10
5
5
14
49
49
100
Graduates:
Arts & Science
Applied Science
Agriculture
42
1
3
46
46
100
Teacher Training Course
67
67
67
100
Summer Session:
Extra-Mural
1582
487
1426
253
589
90%
2268
CIRCULATION
During the twelve months from September 1st, 1926, to August
31st, 1927, (the date of the preparation of this Report), the Library loaned a total of 78,721 volumes. For the corresponding period
in 1925-26 the loans were 45,441 volumes. The increased use of
the Library was thus 33,280 volumes, or over 73%.'
"Ordinary" (or 7-day) loans amounted to 30,307 volumes, as
against 24,321 for the preceding twelve months; "Reserved" loans
to 46,276 books, compared with 19,412 volumes, while loans to
Summer Session students were 2,138, as against 1,708 for the preceding year.
The comparisons by months are as follows:— The University of British Columbia
Ord. 7-day loans
Reserved loans
Summer
Session
1926-27
1925-26
1926-27
1925-26
1926-27
1925-26
Sept. '26
1110
405
Oct.
3942
3058
Nov.
4197
3415
4784
1322
Dec.
2560
1559
6483
3754
Jan. '27
3266
3366
4041
1657
Feb.
4268
3419
5288
2262
Mar.
4149
3597
7230
3419
Apr.
2599
1915
11106
4877
May
867
850
7344
2121
June
618
616
July
1492
1199
1248
1092
Aug.
1239
895
890
616
30307
24321
46276
19412
2138
430
1708
Increases
5,986
vols.
26,864
- vols.
vols.
The steady annual growth in the use of the Library can be
seen in the following table, which gives the record of Ordinary
Loans since these were systematically kept:
ORDINARY LOANS
1919    1920    1921    1922    1923    1924    1925    1926    1927
Jan.
759
1179
1540
1736
1940
2254
3366
3266
Feb.
760
1189
1501
1710
1767
2139
3419
4268
Mar.
655
1194
1524
1604
1702
2142
3597
4149
Apr.
379
684
853
1147
1104
1271
1915
2599
May
289
531
666
743
702
847
850
867
June
285
487
641
732
656
680
616
618
July
370
477
602
831
931
1012
1199
1492
Aug.
436
533
597
888
703
603
895
1239
Sept.
550
975
1147
938
1224
405
1110
—
Oct.
740
1327
1762
1938
2174
2325
3085
3942
—
Nov.
917
1542
1568
1874
1970
2159
3415
4197
—
Dec.
467
2124
1033
8382
1056
1080
1208
1173
1559
2560
—
11635
13963
15683
16387
19412 27666
18498
Average!
Monthly ^708     690     969    1163    1307    1365    1618   2306   2312
Circul'n J (3 mos.) (8 mos.) Report of Library Committee
CHECKING THE COLLECTION
The annual check of the Library took place as usual at the close
of the term. The work took nearly three weeks, and was done by
the Circulation Department, with the help of four student assistants.
The result showed that 166 volumes were missing during the
year, while there were outstanding losses from preceding years (exclusive of books bought for replacements) totalling 171 volumes.
Thus the total net losses of books and catalogued pamphlets since
the organization of the Library amounted, on June 1st, to 337
volumes, the gross loss at that time being 872 volumes.
Mimeographed lists of missing volumes were prepared and forwarded to all members of the teaching staff. Janitors brought in
some books from locker rooms and class rooms. Several volumes
were found behind rows of shelved books when the collection was
re-arranged owing to its unequal growth. Thirteen books missing
from this year's check have been recovered.
Circulation and consultation considered, thel average annual loss
of less than 75 volumes, while regrettable, is very low. Experience
in previous years would indicate that a good proportion of the 166
volumes missing at the beginning of vacation will yet be found—
many of them during the first month of the Session. The loss in
1925 was 247 volumes, and in 1926 140 volumes.
BINDING
Eight hundred and seventy-two books have been bound since
January of this year—159 on the balance of appropriation allowed
for the University year 1926-27, and 713 on that) of this year.
This work included not only the completed volumes of periodicals and serials for the current year, but also a number of paper-
bound books remaining from earlier purchases. The Library is
now almost abreast of these arrears. But the purchase or presentation of valuable long sets involves heavy expenditures in this department. The gift of the valuable set of the Royal Horticultural
Society's publications, for instance, will cost about $150.00 for
binding. The fine set of Crelle acquired this year is bound in 78
volumes, and the binding cost $110.00. The University of British Columbia
With twelve years' of use, in the case of many of the Library's
books, the cost of binding repairs is steadily increasing. Only in
special cases are these volumes rebound. In some instances it is
cheaper to] buy a new book than go to this expense. Repairing the
binding extends the useful life of a volume from two to five years,
according to use.
The appropriation for Binding for the University years 1925-
26 and 1926-27 was in each case $3,000.00. The average cost of
binding, for the 872 books bound since January, works out at $2.04
per volume.
RE-ARRANGEMENT OF MAIN COLLECTION
Immediately after the completion of the annual check of the
book stock, the whole collection of over 60,000 volumes had to be
moved to new positions in the stack.
This was necessary owing to its unequal growth. Some sections, notably Generalia (Section "A"), Education ("L"), Mathematics ("QA"), Chemistry ("QD"), have grown beyond the provision made for them at the time the collection was transferred to
the new building. For the past two years Education has received a
special book grant of $1,000.00, and purchases represented by this
amount, combined with the ordinary growth of other sections, made
additional shelf room a necessity.
This room was secured by utilizing the west half of Tier 2,
which had been given over to bound and unbound newspaper files,
unbound government documents, and duplicates. The bulk of the
latter were placed on the upper shelves of the Packing and Receiving Room. For the newspaper and documents, Tier 1 was fitted
up with temporary trestles and tables. This arrangement gave an
expansion of one-half tier, equal to an increase of about 20 per
cent, of the former accommodation.
The work of transfer took about six weeks, each volume being
vacuum-cleaned before placed in its new position, and the whole
stack thoroughly dusted. Four student assistants helped the staff
in the work, at a cost of about $125.00. 10 Report of Library Committee
ADDITIONAL SHELVING IN STACKS
The continued growth of the book collection will necessitate
early attention to the need of increased shelf-room. The re-arrangement reported in the preceding paragraphs will take care of the
situation for another year, but by that time the whole tier should
be shelved. Half of it will be required for books, while the remainder will be necessary for the bound and unbound newspapers
and unbound government documents at present distributed on trestles
and tables over the whole tier. On shelved stacks they will take 50
per cent, of the room they now occupy.
This is the Library's first provision for expansion, the tier being left unshelved, with this end in view, at the time the building
was erected.
An approximate estimate of $26,000 was given by the Snead
Iron Works, Jersey City, for this installation, at the time this firm
put in the present stacks.
EVENING ATTENDANCE
The Library has been kept open thirteen hours daily during the
regular sessions—from 8.45 a.m. to 9.45 p.m. The attendance during the evenings has shown an increase nearly proportioned to the
larger use made of the Department's facilities. The average for
the period October, 1926, to April, 1927, was 73. The monthly
averages were as follows:—
Total
Evenings open
Averages
October
792
24
33
November
1284
25
50
December
1781
18
99
January
379
19
20
February
976
24
40
March
2310
26
89
April
4176
24
174
General
average
73
An important enlargement of the Department's service was
initiated during the year, when the library hours during the Summer Session were made the same as during the autumn and spring The University of British Columbia 11
terms. It is questionable whether the use made of the Reading
Rooms by students of the Summer Session justifies the expense and
trouble involved. Hourly records made of the attendance show an
average of six students for the 24 days at 6 p.m. and thereafter.
For the first 19 days the average evening attendance at or after 6
p.m. was only a fraction over three. The average attendance between 4 p.m. and 6 p.m. was 23. Several students expressed the
opinion that keeping the Reading Rooms open till 6.00 p.m. would
meet present requirements. The cost of this extra service is, however, negligible.
Though ordinarily the Reading Rooms give sufficient accommodation for students, the 250 reader-capacity of the three main rooms,
of 48 in the Periodical Room and 39 in the Study Carrels in the
Stacks, is frequently insufficient for those desirous of studying therein. On several occasions students were unable to find seats, and, on
one morning in March, 88 such students were counted.
LIGHTING
Reorganization of the lighting equipment and service in the two
wing reading rooms was undertaken by the Building and Grounds
Staff during the year, as the result of which these rooms have excellent illumination—-10 foot-candles at all parts of the reading
tables. Similar work is in progress in the Concourse at the time of
preparation of this Report, and this room will likewise be adequately
lit in readiness for the autumn session.
GOVERNMENT PUBLICATIONS
For ten years the Library Staff has been engaged in an effort
to secure complete files of needed Dominion Government documents,
and with only partial success. The frequent reorganization or
transfer of departments or bureaux of issue, the lack of any catalogue giving the publications as printed, the issuance of new or the
discontinuance of old publications, changes in title, the control of
distribution by the departments, instead of one central office,—
these were among the difficulties that prevented satisfactory service.
These difficulties were not peculiar to this Library, but were
shared by every university library, and by the important public
libraries throughout the Dominion.   The matter was discussed at one 12 Report of Library Committee
of the special meetings of Canadian librarians, held in connection
with the annual conference of the American Library Association at
Toronto in June. The need for improvements in availability and
distribution, particularly of those public documents relating to agriculture, animal husbandry, geology, horticulture, economics and
history, was one of the factors that led to the organization of the
Canadian Library Association. The more satisfactory distribution
of required government publications to libraries of research was one
of the assignments the Executive was instructed by the Canadian
librarians to undertake at once. Some progress can already be reported. Mr. Acland, Dominion King's Printer, who was in attendance by instruction of the Secretary of State, spent an afternoon in
conference with a Committee, and promised co-operation. Your
Librarian was appointed a sub-committee to make further arrangements with the King's Printer, and went to Ottawa for that purpose.
As a result, a monthly list of Dominion documents will henceforth
be published. The King's Printers of their respective provincial
governments will forward lists of their publications for inclusion
therein, while, on behalf of the libraries, the Canadian Library
Association will classify the libraries of the Dominion into categories,
each of which will receive, on publication, their selected and required
documents. It is, hoped, therefore, that this source of longstanding
and vexatious dissatisfaction will shortly be permanently removed.
BOOK APPROPRIATIONS
Despite the recognized fact that the authorities of the University
have, since its organization, made appropriations for books that are
generous when compared with the institution's income, and when
considered in relation to the many competitive demands due to rapid
growth, the fact remains that the book funds are inadequate to meet
the needs of the departments.
The main appropriation for Books and Magazines for the
present University year is $5,500.00. Of this sum $1,000.00 is represented by a special grant for the Department of Education, leaving $4,500.00 for the remaining 24 departments. Subscriptions to
periodicals and serials take $2,500.00. There is thus left $2,000.00
for book purchases,—an average of a little over $80.00 per department.    It is obviously   impossible  to   keep  abreast   of   new  book The University of British Columbia 13
material, or to build up and strengthen the book resources of the
Library by the purchase of fundamental, or even necessary current
works, with any such amount. It is true that in the past much has
been accomplished in this direction, but this has been due to supplementary and special grants.
In order to secure specific information from Heads of Departments as to their book needs, a circular letter was sent out early in
September, asking the following questions:—
1. Do you consider the annual appropriation for your Department for Books and Magazines adequate?
2. If not, what sum, in your opininon, is necessary for your
regular annual book needs ?
3. What sum (if any) is urgently required within the next
(say) five years for special (as distinguished from annual)
requirements, e.g., sets of serials, proceedings, transactions,
and costly works of reference?
A summary of the answers given has been forwarded to the
President, with the Library Estimates for the coming University
Year.
For the purpose of this Report, it is sufficient to state that the
total given by 24 departments, as representing their yearly book
needs, is $8,490.00. Of the two departments that could not report,
owing to the absence of their Heads, one can safely be assumed to
require an additional $1,000.00 a year. Thus the estimated sum of
about $9,500.00 can be regarded as the amount required, in the judgment of the departments themselves, as necessary for their ordinary
yearly book needs.
In addition, the replies to the questionnaire make clear the fact
that the amountf at present spent on periodicals, serials, proceedings,
etc.--$2,5O0.0O—should be increased by $1,000.00 a year. This
would make the ordinary book and periodical appropriation $13,000
a year.
Further, the departments report requirements totalling over
$9,000.00 a year, distributed over a period of five years, for the
purchase of new, and completion of partly purchased, book material.
Many heads of departments forwarded, with their replies, lists of
these desired works, and estimates of their cost. 14 Report of Library Committee
Thus, in the judgment of those most familiar with the literature
of their respective subjects, the Library's book fund needs may be
stated at $22,000.00 a year for the ensuing five years.       i
GIFTS
A friend of the University, who desires to remain officially
anonymous, has offered a gift of $1,500.00, the cost of placing
stained glass in the nine panels of the lunette window in the inner
hall of the building. They will show the arms of Canada, and of
eight of the nine provinces, each surrounded by an appropriate
wreath.
The University has also received, from the Hudson's Bay Company and the Native Sons of British Columbia, a collection of eight
pictures, each depicting some notable and historic episode in the
history of the Province. All were painted by Mr. John Innes, of
Vancouver.
The subjects are:—
1. Commander1 Vancouver's meeting with Spaniards off Point
Grey, A.D. 1792.
2. Alexander Mackenzie recording his arrival at the Pacific,
A.D. 1793.
3. Simon Fraser in the Fraser Canyon on his journey to the
sea, A.D. 1808.
4. The Hudson's Bay Company's fur brigade passing down
the Okanagan, A.D. 1825-35.
5. James Douglas building the Hudson's Bay Post at Victoria,
A.D. 1843.
6. James Douglas taking the oath as first Governor of British
Columbia, A.D. 1858.
7. Finding of placer gold by pioneer miners in the Cariboo,
about A.D. 1858.
8. The overland pioneers   journeying   through   the   Rockies,
A.D. 1862.
The collection is known as "The Hudson's Bay Company and
the Native Sons of British Columbia Permanent Loan Collection."
It was formally presented to the University by the Governor of the The University of British Columbia 15
Company, Mr. Charles Vincent Sale, at an appropriate ceremony,
presided over by the Chancellor, on Wednesday, September 21st.
The gift was accepted by Mr. H. C. Shaw, of the Board of Governors. In accordance with arrangements made by the Board, all
the pictures are hung in the Library building.
DISCIPLINE
It is a pleasure to report that the great majority of the student
body takes a pride in the building, and appreciates the facilities it,
and the growing book collection, give to their work. There is a
noticeable development in the interest taken in both. Conversation
in the public rooms is decreasing, and a "tradition of quiet" becoming established.
COMMITTEE
The Library Committee consists of:
Prof. H. F. Angus, Chairman, representing the Faculty of Arts and
Science.
Dr. A. E. Hennings, representing the Faculty of Arts and Science.
Dr. G. G. Sedgewick, representing the Faculty of Arts and Science.
Prof. H. R. Christie, representing the Faculty of Applied Science.
Prof. H. M. King, representing the Faculty of Agriculture.
Dr. L. S. Klinck, ex-officio.
John Ridington, Secretary.
Regular meetings of the Committee are held monthly on the
second Wednesday during the Session. Seven meetings have been
held since January, when the Interim Report was presented to the
Senate.
The Staff of the Library is as follows:
John Ridington, Librarian.
Dorothy Jefferd, Cataloguer.
Frances Woodworth, Reference Librarian and Circulation.
Lionel Haweis, Accessions and Government documents.
Roland Lanning, Periodicals.
Mabel Lanning, Asst. in Circulation (8 months' appointment).
Harold Gibbard, Call Boy (10 months' appointment).
Alice E. Hearsey, Stenographer.
Mary Robertson, Typist. 16 Report of Library Committee
Attached to this Report is a copy of the Rules and Regulations
for the Library, prepared by the Committee for the approval of
Senate, in accordance with instructions contained in a resolution
passed December 15th, 1926.
Respectfully submitted,
JOHN RIDINGTON,
Librarian.
September 17th, 1927. The University of British Columbia 17
LIBRARY REGULATIONS
LIBRARY PRIVILEGES
The privileges of the Library are open to the following:—
1. Officers of the University and members of its Teaching
Staff.
2. Students enrolled for the Winter and Summer Sessions.
3. Graduates of this University, students not in residence proceeding to B.A. or other degrees, and to other persons in
the Province engaged in serious study, for which the University's book collection is of service. The latter class are
enrolled as "Extra Mural" Readers. They will be charged
an annual fee of $1.00, and also pay all postage costs.
HOURS OF SERVICE
The Library is open on week-days (except University holidays)
as follows:—
During the Winter Session from 8.45 a.m. to 9.45 p.m., except
on Saturdays, when it closes; at 5 p.m.
In the Summer Session from 8.45 a.m. to 4 p.m., except on
Saturdays, when it closes at noon.
In vacation, f romf 9.00 a.m. to 5 p.m., except in the months of
June, July and August, when it closes at 4 p.m. On Saturdays it closes at noon.
Hours of servicei may be changed from time to time by resolution of the Library Committee. Information regarding such changes
will be posted on the Library Notice Board.
REGISTRATION OF READERS
Before book loans are made to any user of the Library, he
must register as a reader. Application for registration should be
made at the Loan Desk. The registration card is kept on file, and
a serial number awarded to each borrower. After registration, all
book loans are recorded under the number of the borrower. 18 Report of Library Committee
RESTRICTED MATERIAL
Books belonging to the under-named groups may be taken from
the Library only by special permission of the Librarian. Practically
they do not circulate.
A. General Reference books, encyclopaedias, dictionaries, atlases,
etc.
B. Bound or unbound periodicals.
C. Publications of learned societies.
D. Rare or unusually valuable books.
E. Unbound material which would be difficult to replace if lost or
damaged in circulation.
F. Books whose circulation should, for special reasons, be restricted.
DURATION AND NUMBER OF LOANS
Except by special permission, students cannot have on loan
more than four books at any time. In general, books are loaned for
a period of seven days, or for two weeks during the summer vacation. These periods may be shortened at the discretion of the Librarian, or the Head of the Circulation Department.
All books are subject to recall at any time.
Loans may be renewed for like periods by registered students.
During the winter and summer sessions such renewals must be made
in person. No extension will be made by telephone, except in case
of illness or for other valid reason, or during vacation.
CHARGING AND DISCHARGING OF BOOKS
All books must be charged at the Loan Desk before being taken
from the Library. Any student removing a book from the Reading
Room or Stacks without first so charging it, renders himself liable
to suspension of library privileges, and to such further penalty as
the University authorities may impose.
Book loans must be personally discharged by the borrower.
This is done by handing the book to a member of the Library Staff
on duty at the Loan Desk. Leaving books on the counter of the
Loan  Desk,   without notification to the Circulation Staff, does not The University of British Columbia 19
constitute discharge of a loan, and any borrower so doing takes the
risk of loss and consequent fine.
Borrowers are requested to be particularly careful in filling out
call slips for book loans. The "call number" should be accurately
transcribed, and author and tittle given. A separate call slip must
be made out for each loan.
"RESERVED" BOOKS
Books assigned for class reading are, on notice from a member
of the Teaching Staff in charge of the Course, withdrawn from the
main collection, and placed in a "Reserved" Class. These are separately shelved in stacks behind the Loan Desk. They are loaned only
for use in the building, and for a period of two hours. They are
also loaned for over-night or Sunday use after 9 p.m. or 4.30 p.m.
on Saturdays, or, at the discretion of the Circulation Department, at
an earlier hour if not in general demand.
THESES
Unpublished theses of graduate students are loaned only upon
a written order from the Head of the Department under which the
work was done, and only for use in the Library building. Applications for such loans should be made to the Head of the Cataloguing
Department, at Room B.
FINES AND PENALTIES
Fines on overdue lonas are as follows:—
For non-return of ordinary loans 5c per day
For non-return of over-night or Sunday "Reserved" loans before
9 a.m 25c and 10c per hour thereafter
Fines imposed should be paid upon the return of the books
overdue. Library privileges of borrowers whose fines remain unpaid after a period of two weeks are cancelled.
Notices of overdue books are mailed to borrowers, but failure
to receive such notice in no way releases the borrower from the
penalty. 20 Report of Library Committee
STACK AND CARREL PRIVILEGES
Permission to use the stacks is granted only to graduate students
and to students in the senior years. Stack and Carrel privileges are
accorded only for assigned periods, and under special Regulations,
which may be seen on application at the Loan Desk, or on the Library
Notice Board.
GENERAL REQUIREMENTS
Quiet must be observed in all parts of the building—in cloak
rooms, halls or staircases. Audible conversation is not permitted in
the Reading Rooms.
Students who do not observe regulations, or whose conduct is
not governed by proper regard for other users of the Library, are
liable to the withdrawal of library privileges, and to other penalties
which may be imposed by the University authorities.
No borrower shall write on or mark a book belonging to the
Library, turn down leaves, or in any way mutilate or deface library
books. Fines will be imposed according to the extent of the damage, from 50 cents up to the cost of replacing the work by a new
copy.
Students are urged to exercise due care in the use of ink and
fountain pens in the Reading Rooms and other parts of the Library.
If damage is done, it must be paid for.
Every University student is expected to know the Library
Rules and Regulations that may, from time to time, be posted on the
Notice Board. Ignorance of these rules will not be accepted as an
excuse for their violation.

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