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Report of the University Librarian to the Senate of the University of British Columbia 1980

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Array REPORT of the UNIVERSITY LIBRARIAN to the
of the UNIVERSITY of BRITISH COLUMBIA
1979/80 The Report
of the University Librarian
to the Senate
of the
University of British Columbia
Sixty-fifth Year
1979/80
Vancouver
December 1980 Cover:  In the thirties the University kept its books in the Library at one
end of the Mall and its cows in barns at the other. A bucolic vista
such as this was a possibility, but this photograph was faked by a
person whose name and motive are unknown.  From the University
Archives, Special Collections Division. TABLE OF CONTENTS
I. Introduction 1
II. Library Space 2
III. Collections 5
IV. Technical Processing and Systems 10
Public Services 14
VI. Prospects 18
Appendix A Size of Collections - Physical Volumes
B Growth of Collections
C Library Expenditures
D Recorded Use of Library Resources
E Interlibrary Loans
F Reference Statistics
G Computer Assisted Reference Searches
H Library Organization
J Library-Supported Reading Rooms
K Senate Library Committee 1 -
I.  INTRODUCTION
Although history is continuous, we are in the habit of dividing our times
by decades, and investing the transitional year with a special significance.
This was the perspective taken in last year's annual report, with its title
"The University of British Columbia Library in the Seventies." This year
the approach has been repeated: in 1980 the Library became the subject of a
number of studies, all of them aimed at preparing for the next ten years.
The transitional year provided a chronological vantage point from which we
could look both backward and forward.  The 64th Annual Report having dealt
with what went before, this 65th Annual Report deals mostly with what may
follow.
Every aspect of the Library has been or is now the subject of intensive
study and evaluation.  The Library's space requirements has been investigated
by a President's Committee.  The technical processing activities of the
Library have been formally and exhaustively reviewed. A project aimed at
refining the ways in which the collection is developed is under way. And
the public services of the Library system were assessed by the users, through
a public opinion survey.  The information assembled by these various studies
is as voluminous as it is valuable for planning. This present report can
only summarize the findings and present status of these separate but interrelated inquiries - 2 -
II.  LIBRARY SPACE
The 63rd Annual Report for 1978/79 drew Senate's attention to the gravity of
the Library system's situation in respect to physical space, stating: "It is
now time to plan for the replacement of the Main Library by a new research
library building, one that will not be full on the day of its opening, but
that will carry the Library forward well into the twenty-first century.
The President responded promptly to this statement, and to Senate's own
expression of concern, by establishing a President's Committee on Library
Space Requirements.  This Committee, under the chairmanship of Dean Peter
Larkin, represents with its over thirty members the interests of all those
faculties most directly affected by library developments.  Its terms of
reference require it to study the present library space situation and
projections of future needs, to prepare a comprehensive plan for meeting
those needs and to recommend to the President priorities for library construction.
The Committee completed its first major report in April, 1980; a summary of
its contents may be found in the June 18th issue of UBC Reports.  It found
that with the exception of the Law Library, all campus libraries would be
out of space for collections growth before the end of the decade; that some
were already out of space; that existing buildings were deficient in terms
of space for users and personnel as well as for collections; and that many
buildings were also deficient in terms of contemporary building and safety 3 -
codes.  It concluded that an early beginning should be made on providing
new space for library growth and presented two alternative plans, the major
difference between them being that one called for a separate Science Library
and the other proposed that the science collections and services remain in
an expanded or new Main Library.  The views of users were solicited on the
desirability of these two alternatives. Recognizing that the planning and
siting issues raised by either of the alternatives were so detailed as to
be beyond the ability of the Committee to study, it recommended that the
next steps toward the development of a plan be turned over to the University's
new Facilities Planning Office.
The President accepted the Committee's recommendations, and instructed the
Facilities Planning Office to commence work on further studies, to be
completed as quickly as possible. During the summer months both that Office
and the Library committed much time and energy to describing and estimating
the size of what must by their nature be large and complex structures.
This Report covers the academic year and must conclude with events occurring
before the end of August. At that time, the Facilities Planning Office had
completed preliminary siting studies, had determined the campus pattern of
library use, and described the operating relationships between various
branches and divisions of the library system.  Options for construction were
beginning to emerge from these studies, ones that during the fall would be
placed before the President's Committee on Library Space Requirements, the
President's Land Use Committee, the Senate Library Committee, the Senate Committee on Academic Building Needs, Senate itself, and early in 1981 the
Board of Governors and the Universities Council of B.C. III.  COLLECTIONS
As well as taking note of decades, libraries celebrate the attainment of
numerical landmarks. Just last year the Library added its second millionth
catalogued volume.  It is likely that the third millionth will be added
around 1990.  So attuned are we to the printed page and the bound volume
that we tend to overlook the fact that the Library is also the repository
for information stored in other forms, such as microfilm and magnetic tape.
In fact, those items now exceed in number the conventional books and journals.
Taking everything into account, the Library can be said to contain over five
million bibliographic items.  It remains the second largest collection in
Canada, being still considerably smaller than that at the University of
Toronto, and marginally ahead of that at the University of-Alberta.  In
comparison with research libraries at universities in the United States, it
ranks about thirty-fourth, which is largely a reflection of the greater
antiquity of universities and libraries in that country. However, this
Library ranked fortieth in that same list a decade ago, which is an indication of both our rate of progress and the rate of regress of other institutions .
Certainly there have been factors militating against the growth of library
collections, even though the world's presses continue to pour forth a torrent
of publications.  Inflation and the devaluation of the Canadian dollar in
relation to foreign currencies have been formidable problems with which the
University has striven to contend, not just in respect to library materials, - 6
but also in connection with other imported goods vital to research and
teaching, such as scientific equipment.  In 1975/76 the Library spent less
than half of what it spent on collections last year.  It is anticipated that
expenditures this year will exceed three million dollars, another one of
those landmark figures, and a staggering one. And yet the accession rate
has not risen in the same time period; on the contrary, a decline in the
number of accessions is anticipated in the current year, despite a further
impressive increase to the collections budget of a quarter of a million
dollars.
Since this increase amounts to over nine percent in one year, why should
the accession rate decline? First, it should be noted that this percentage
increase exceeds that made to the University's budget; presumably the
financial calculations of the Ministry of Universities, Science and Communications, and the Universities Council of B.C. are based on estimates of
what the rise in the Canadian cost of living index will be.  That increase
directly affects the largest component of the University's budget, namely
salaries.  In the case of library collections, the Canadian situation is
all but irrelevant: it is a simple reality that most of the world's academic
writing and publishing takes place beyond our borders. The rate of inflation
in those countries has been as high or even higher than our own, and to make
matters worse for us, our dollar has been diminishing in value in relation
to other currencies.  The effects of this situation are immediately apparent
to anyone who takes a trip abroad.  The Library's predicament is that it
must constantly deal in an international marketplace. The costs of journals have been rising more steeply than the costs of books.
Among the reasons for this phenomenon are shorter print runs for increasingly
specialized journals; more titles; bigger issues; and higher postal rates.
For the last five years, journal prices have risen at a rate between 17% and
20% per year.  The increases to the collections budget have been used
primarily to meet higher subscription costs, while at the same time the
Library has been forced to place restraints on the adding of new subscriptions.
In the current year, subscriptions are expected to cost over $1.6 million
over $200,000 more than in 1979/80.  Since any programme of cancellations
requires the careful, title-by-title examination of subscription lists, in
consultation with members of faculty, it is not something that can be
accomplished in a fortnight.  Therefore the Library had no recourse but to
recommend to the Senate Library Committee that the entire increase of
$250,000 be allocated to serials, and that budget items for the purchase of
books be held to existing levels or reduced.  In anticipation of a further
shortfall in 1981/82, planning for periodical cancellations is under way.
For the sake of simplicity and brevity, an account like this cannot begin
to convey the complexity of detail involved in the creation of an academic
research collection.  The task is a formidable one: given the millions of
new publications appearing every year around the globe, which ones are
appropriate to the specific needs of the institution? And how does a
library go about identifying and obtaining them? - 8 -
At U.B.C. the business of collection development, like the Library itself,
is sixty-five years old; routines have been established, arrangements have
been made for the collaboration of faculty members and libraries in the
process, and staff members have developed the expertise necessary to search
out and obtain tens of thousands of items every year. However, it is
not wise to be complacent about such an important process, even when it
functions relatively smoothly and meets with general satisfaction,
an inquiry has been launched into the policies and procedures involved in
the development of our collections, the object being to ensure that
development does accord with the needs of the University community,
is all the more important in present economic circumstances.
Fortunately, a methodology for carrying out such an investigation has been
developed by the Association of Research Libraries through its Office of
Management Studies.  This methodology has been employed with satisfactory
results at a number of major institutions in the United States, such as
Stanford University and the Massachusetts Institute of Technology.  Ours
will be the first Canadian library to utilize it.
In March a Task Force was established within the Library to carry out what
has been termed a Collections Management Project, in two phases.  The first
phase concentrated on defining the information, primarily statistical and
financial, needed for the detailed management of the collection and the
collections budget, and on determining the role of librarians in the public
and technical services in relation to the selection of library materials for - 9 -
the collections.  The Task Force completed the first phase of its work in
June, making twenty-five specific recommendations directed toward the
modification of automated systems, ones that would yield cost and use
information in greater detail.  The involvement of librarians in the
selection process was the subject of a survey; the information obtained by
this survey will be studied by the Task Force during the second phase.  That
second phase will focus on the external factors affecting collection development, the role of the faculty, and the state of communications between the
users of the collection and those who guide its growth.  This part of the
investigation will begin in the fall of 1980, and will probably be completed
in the summer of 1981. When the Collections Management Project is completed,
the most important aspects of the process of collections development will
have been examined and evaluated.  It is anticipated that there will be
modifications and refinements to ensure that collections expenditures best
meet research and teaching needs. 10 -
IV.  TECHNICAL PROCESSING AND SYSTEMS
In libraries it is usually the case that the attainment of some high
figure represents success.  This is not the case with cataloguing backlogs.
There is no satisfaction to be derived from reporting that the number of
items waiting to be catalogued reached almost 77,000, representing enough
work to occupy the Catalogue Divisions for a year.
Yet in terms of productivity, the outputs of the Divisions compared
favourably with those for other years over the past decade.  In fact, more
titles were catalogued in the past year than in any year since 1975/76; it
was the fourth most productive year in the history of the Library, measured
in those terms. Why, then, should there be a backlog?
The simple answer is that there is more work to be done than there are
staff hours in which to do it.  That there is more work is an outcome of
many factors, the most significant of which is that in the past several
years the Library has been acquiring through purchase and gift a greater
number of books than previously.  Given that the collections budget has
been under pressure from inflation and devaluation this would appear at
first glance to be an anomaly
It must be recalled that in the middle of the decade the Library was faced
with a budget shortfall in respect to periodical costs, similar to the one
it faces now. At that time, it was decided that periodicals should not be 11
allowed to consume more than 50% of the budget. Experience at other
institutions had indicated that if no restraint was imposed, periodical
costs would quickly erode a library's capacity to acquire new monographic
titles. At. U.B.C. it was anticipated that the accession rate for monographs
would remain constant, because the costs of books were also rising. However,
the inflation rate for books did not equal that for periodicals, with the
unexpected result that a higher proportion of total accessions were books
Since each new book title requires individual cataloguing, whereas subsequent issues of a periodical title do not, a backlog began to develop.
Again, because it was expected that the quantity of material requiring
cataloguing was bound to fall off, some processing staff positions were
transferred to the public service, where user demands were mounting.  In
1980 there are ten and a half fewer positions in the Processing Divisions
than there were in 1970.  But that is not the whole story.
During the seventies, hours worked by staff members decreased as a result
of collective bargaining.  In small offices, the impact of this decrease
might not have been too perceptible. However, in larger working units the
effects of such a decrease are significant, and can be demonstrated,
In 1970, there were 149 staff members in the Processing Divisions, worUing
261,405 hours per year. An additional 5,128 hours of student assistance
was available, for a total of 266,533 hours. By 1980, the work week had been reduced by two and a half hours, an
additional week in vacation had been provided to many staff members, B.C.
Day had been proclaimed, nine union meetings of an hour's duration were
allowed under a negotiated contract, and sick leave had been extended by
three days.  This year there are 138% staff positions in the Processing
Divisions, providing 218,682 hours. Hours of student assistance have
risen to 6,232, for a grand total of 224,914 hours
This represents a decrease in staff hours of 15.6% in ten years, and a loss
of over 40,000 working hours.
It is not implied here that these benefits were undeserved by the staff
members concerned, but it must be pointed out that their cumulative effect
is significant, and has not been offset by the hiring of additional staff.
Given the University's present financial situation, there is not much
likelihood that it will be offset.
In a search for solutions to this predicament, an exhaustive review of the
Technical Processing Divisions was initiated in October 1979, and completed
in July 1980.  The workload and productive capacity of every section of the
divisions were investigated, enumerated, and described in a survey document
of 113 pages.  This document provided both the depth of information and the
perspective needed to frame a number of long-term and short-term recommendations
aimed at achieving a better balance between work input and output. But it
appears that even the implementation of all these recommendations will not 13 -
close the gap between work and workers and result in a reduction of the
backlog.  Therefore a further study has been started, and a Task Force on
Cataloguing Alternatives has been set up to determine whether all materials
entering the cataloguing workflow do in fact require full cataloguing, and
whether there are forms of cataloguing which, while of a lower bibliographical
standard, would be suitable for many items.  Some compromise between high
standards and user access must be found, or the backlog will continue to
grow and produce increasing frustration for our patrons. 14 -
V.  PUBLIC SERVICES
In 1973/74 the recorded use of library materials exceeded 2.3 million loans
for the first time. Had there not been a major change to loan policies a
few years ago, creating longer loan periods and decreasing the number of
renewed loans, that figure would probably have risen to two and a half
million or more.  Instead, loans have fluctuated around the 2.3 million
mark for most of the decade, reflecting perhaps a stabilized enrollment
But among academic libraries in North America, that is one of the highest
rates of use reported.
The other major indicator of library use, the number of questions answered
at public reference desks, has risen steadily from a quarter of a million
in 1972/73 to over three hundred and forty thousand in 1979/80, an increase
of about 36%. And this figure too might have been higher, had not the public
service staff invested so much time in training students to make more
effective use of the Library, and in preparing instructional sheets and
other publications to answer many of the questions repeated frequently by
users.  Over twelve thousand persons availed themselves of special library
instruction in classrooms and on tours, or roughly a half of the Jail/
spring enrollment.  This statistical evidence of increased reference use
supports the experience of staff members, who report that the Library
system seem to be more intensively used with each passing year.
Although statistics reveal something about the rate of library use, they
tell us nothing about its quality, and the satisfaction or dissatisfaction 15
experienced by the users.  In 1966 the Library took its own pulse by
conducting an extensive survey of user opinion, the results of which
assisted in modifying and planning library service throughout the seventies
The time having arrived for another similar review, a Task Force on a
Library Survey was established in November 1979.  This hard-working group
of librarians devised and tested a questionnaire, decided on a sampling
strategy, and conducted a survey during the second week of March.  The
survey more than succeeded: the Task Force underestimated the enthusiasm
of the users for recording their views, and a second printing of the
questionnaire had to be rushed before the survey was into its second day
In the end, over six thousand completed questionnaires were turned in,
having been completed by students and faculty members from every part of
the campus.  The responses have been tabulated by computer, and the Task
Force is engaged in interpreting the results and writing a report, to be
completed in the new year
The questionnaire did include a final "bottom-line" question which asked
users to indicate their general level of satisfaction with the Library
system.  The results:
Excellent    18.4% Poor 1.8%
Good        56.5% No opinion      .9%
Adequate     16.7% No reply       5.7%
To learn that so few individuals found the Library unsatisfactory came as a
relief, for like the technical services, the public services have also 16
experienced an attrition in available staff time over the past ten years
In 1970 librarians, supporting staff and student assistants provided
484,008 hours of work directly on behalf of users.  In 1980 that figure
was down to 454,867 hours, a decrease of 6%. Yet during the seventies,
the library system expanded with the construction of the Sedgewick Library,
the new Law Library, the addition to the Woodward Library and the creation
of new services such as on-line information retrieval and the Data Library.
The Library has been attempting to do more with less, and to protect
patrons against any major deterioration in the level of service.  It has
been necessary to reduce schedules slightly, and some popular services,
such as the faculty delivery, have been discontinued.  The point has now
been reached that should any further reduction in available staff time occur,
the results would be painfully perceptible, in the shape.of greatly reduced
schedules or the closing of branch libraries.  In such a situation it is
fruitless for anyone on campus or off campus to ask for additional services,
or the restoration of the conditions of 1970.
It is in this climate that the Library has become involved in providing
support to the expansion of the medical teaching programme. What this
development calls for is the strengthening of collections and services at
St. Paul's Hospital, at the new Children's/Grace/Shaughnessy Hospital site,
and even at the Woodward Library, where the completion of the Acute Care
Hospital has created a demand for clinical collections simlar to those at
the Vancouver General Hospital.  In addition, all of these locations must
be linked to one another and to the Woodward Library, in order to maximize - 17 -
the use of local resources not just on behalf of medical students, but also
on behalf of all health care personnel at all hospitals.  In being asked to
assume these new responsibilities, the library has taken the position that
expanded services to the medical sector, as beneficial as they might be to
students, medical practicioners and the public, must be matched by additional
financial support.  Clearly, in the absence of a supplementary budget, any
expansion in this sector can only be at the expense of the programmes and
services now supporting teaching and research in other departments and
faculties.  This point is well understood and accepted by the Faculty of
Medicine, and preliminary supplementary funding has already been provided;
nevertheless, assurance of adequate continuing funding is still awaited
from the government, VI.  PROSPECTS
In The Mission of The University of British Columbia, published in November
1979, the President set the course for the future development of the
University. Although only one of the goals and objectives he has defined
deals explicitly with the Library, others contain implications for the
development of its services and collections.  Collectively, the goals and
objectives point to a University which places greater emphasis on graduate
and professional studies, on the maintenance of standards of excellence in
teaching and research, and on community relations
Recognizing that the Library is essential to the accomplishment of academic
goals, the President has set as an objective for 1980 the following: "To
maintain and expand the collections and resources of the Library in order
to provide the best possible support for the University's academic programs,
scholarship and research.  UBC's library system is a major provincial and
national resource which is called upon daily to meet the needs of a wide
range of people outside the University, particularly in the professions,
other educational institutions, industry and government. It is essential
that the quality of the Library's collection and service not be eroded.  The
objective is therefore to fund the Library on a basis which is not tied to
student enrolment
The last sentence is an important one: it acknowledges that student numbers
are but one factor in the costs of library operations, and are by no means 19
the major factor. More significant are such things as the growth of knowledge
the numbers of publications appearing in subjects related to the University's
interests, the scope of the University's programme of instruction as
reflected in its faculties, departments, institutes, programmes and courses,
and, as noted previously, economic factors such as inflation and currency
devaluation.  The Library is undoubtedly not the only entity on campus so
affected. But the inappropriateness to the Library's real situation of
formula budgeting based on enrolment is enough to make a re-examination of
this approach crucial.
The Mission Statement having provided a chart for the University's future,
it is necessary to forecast the course of the Library's own development.
Although the word "futurology" may have been an invention of the seventies,
man has always tried to imagine what might lay ahead. Over the years there
has been no dearth of predictions concerning libraries and information.
One recalls from the forties and fifties the prediction that libraries would
be replaced by microforms, and that the contents of the British Museum and
the Library of Congress would be available to all in a microdot format,
housed in a file no larger than a shoebox.  In the sixties one heard that
the computer would replace books, journals, libraries and librarians
These radical predictions have not come to pass as yet: the pace of development has been slower, the direction sometimes different, and unforeseen
practical and economic obstacles imposed themselves in the path of
revolutionary technological change.  The ruminations that follow are more
conservative, but they may be more realistic. 20 -
One must first examine the condition of that which is most basic to the
library: information itself, in the broadest sense of that word.  That
there has been a so-called information explosion in the past quarter
century is widely recognized, has been documented, and the reasons for its
occurrence are known.  It seems likely that new information, in the shape
of facts, theories, opinions, ideas, fictions and sentiments, will continue
to come into existence at least at current rates.  Given that the world's
population is increasing, and that literacy and education continue to
spread among the populations of both economically developed and developing
countries, the rate at which new information is produced could increase.
Information is one thing: its publication and dissemination is another.
It has been frequently observed that much that is published did not deserve
publishing.  This may be true, but it seems not to have any effect on the
will to publish or the act of publication. Neither the creators, nor those
keepers of the gate, the editors and the publishers, seem to be able to
restrain a flood of new books and journals.  In any case, it is only by
means of publication that the worth of any form of expression can be judged
by the community at large.  It is probable, then, that new publications
will continue to appear at least at the current rates, and perhaps at
increased rates.
But will publication be so heavily dependent on print and paper? Will more
authors record their ideas not on blank sheets, but in computer files, to
which their readers will have access through terminals in their homes, 21
creating what one author has dubbed "the on-line intellectual community"?
Will many other documents appear in microform only?
In fact, there are trends in these directions.  The Library already contains
more information on microform than it does on paper, and much of that
information is not available in any other format.  The Library has a separate
branch, the Data Library, dealing exclusively with statistical information
in machine-readable form.  The Library is linked electronically to computer-
based indexes to scientific literature, and for some of these there is no
printed equivalent.  But experience to date suggests that new information
technologies are not replacing or supplanting print and paper, but
supplementing it, and in some respects actually leading back to it. Not
only do the computer-based indexes refer in the main to printed literature,
most of it to be found only in libraries, but there is also a demand from
users, when confronted with a computer data base or a roll of microfilm,
for their own "hard copy".  The advent and proliferation of different
means of recording and storing information has been accompanied by the
greatest burgeoning of books and journals the world has ever known, and by
the highest consumption of paper, as individuals create their own materials
with copying machines and computer printers. Authors in the future may
indeed have different options open to them where the dissemination of their
thoughts is concerned.  For some purposes, the familiar printed format may
always be the format of choice, for its convenience, portability, and direct
accessibility. Microphotographic and electronic formats will have other
advantages, and will attract certain kinds and uses of information appropriate 22
to these media.
To the library, which will continue its functions as the collector and
preserver of information, this will mean a proliferation of formats, new
and constantly developing equipment to provide access to these formats,
and a more formidable task in organizing collections and services in an
attempt to make matters more comprehensible to patrons.
On the side of the patrons, a greater investment of their time will be
required to learn the means of access to more abundant information in a
variety of formats.  Contrary to expectations, technology has not made life
simpler, but more complex, in almost every dimension; as in life, so in the
library.
Twenty years ago, it was supposed that new technology would bring about
economies, and indeed at the level of unit costs it can often be demonstrated
that this is the case, in operations ranging from automobile assembly to
accounting.  Costs of books and periodicals are higher then ever before in
this century, but at the same time the products of the new technology are
by no means cheap.  It would be a pleasure to predict that the costs of
information will decline, but given the proliferation of both information
itself and the formats in which it is recorded, one can only foresee a
continuing need for support of the Library, in order that it may fulfill
its responsibility of collecting, preserving and providing the University
with an appropriate selection of information relating to its interests. 23
This has implications for capital as well as operating budgets: throughout
the eighties, and although present planning will hopefully result in an
expanded and renovated Main Library, the inadequacy of many smaller branches
to contain collections and serve users will become increasingly apparent
and call for rectification
To summarize, if the Library of today is a large and complex institution,
in 1990 it will be even larger and more complex.  In the intervening years,
its physical plant will need to be in almost a constant state of contruction
and renovation.  Its collections in all formats will grow, with the proportions among formats changing, so that relatively more information will
require mechanical and electrical devices for access.  The task of
organizing individual items of information so they can be located will be
even more formidable; the computerized systems that had their origins in
the mid-sixties will be more sophisticated, and those systems will be on-line
and available to users, so that access to the Library's catalogue information
will be possible wherever there is a computer terminal.  Staff members,
already subject to formal and informal continuing education as new
technology permeates the world of information, will increasingly play the
role of specialists and teachers, for users will require more not less
assistance in dealing with any other than their own sub-discipline.  In
all, it promises not to be an easy decade. But it will not be dull. Appendix
: A
SIZE OF
COLLECTIONS -
PHYSICAL VOLUMES
March 31/79
Additions
Withdrawals
March 31/80
Main Library
General Stacks
792,673
30,461
1,831
821,303
Asian Studies
100,737
7,664
3
108,398
Fine Arts
75,009
4,441
33
79,417
Humanities & Social
42,909
2,620
101
45,428
Sciences Reference
Science Reference
14,766
431
18
15,179
Special Collections
50,229
1,438
2
51,665
SUBTOTAL
1,076,323
47,055
1,988
1,121,390
Branches & Reading Rooms
Animal Resource Ecology
14,145
343
5
14,483
Library
Biomedical Branch Library
20,408
1,099
	
21,507
Crane Library
7,028
125
1
7,152
Curriculum Laboratory
48,555
7,802
372
55,985
Law Library
112,490
3,865
4
116,351
MacMillan Library
39,950
2,562
8,1023
34,410
Marjorie Smith Library
12,109
1,185
35
13,259
Mathematics Library
20,323
1,087
25
21,385
Music Library
29,307
2,167
105
31,369
Reading Rooms
113,057
4,703
432
117,328
Sedgewick Library
154,785
9,106
281
163,610
Woodward Library
229,289
9,453
13
238,729
SUBTOTAL
801,446
43,497
9,375
835,568
TOTAL
1,877,769
90,552
11,363
1,956,958
Storage
141,096
9.437
28
150,505
GRAND TOTAL
2,018,865
99,989
11,391   2,107,463
Notes:  1,  Includes some minor Main Library collections.
2. Includes the Data Library and bibliographic material
in the Library Processing Centre.
3. Includes 7,676 volumes removed to storage.
4. Includes 1,761 volumes processed directly to storage
and 7,676 volumes removed from the MacMillan Library
to storage. Appendix B
GROWTH OF COLLECTIONS
March 31, 1979
Net Growth
March 31, 1980
Volumes - Catalogued
2,018,865
88,598
2,
,107,463
Documents - Uncatalogued
525,510
28,801
554,311
Microfilm (reels)
65,355
(126)*
65,229
Microcards (cards)
111,976
111,976
Microprint (sheets)
1,010,750
47,500
1.
,058,250
Microfiche (sheets)
969,721
92,617
1,
,062,338
Aperture Cards
2,589
2,589
Films
51
34
85
Filmloops
15
15
Filmstrips
2,996
60
3,056
Video Tapes
98
289
387
Slides
24,219
3,015
27,234
Slide/Tape Shows
11
11
Transparencies
1,640
10
1,650
Photographs
15,206
3,888
19,094
Pictures
62,960
5,450
68,410
Posters
2,629
150
2,779
Maps
126,012
4,094
130,106
Manuscripts
4,067 l.f.
277 l.f.
4,344 l.f
Sound Recordings
80,080
17,284
97,364
Computer Tapes
320
51
371
Air Photos
70
70
* The decrease is the outcome of a splicing program together with a revision
of the previous count.
+ Thickness of files in linear feet. Appendix C
LIBRARY EXPENDITURES
Fiscal Years, April/March
Year
1970/71
1971/72
1972/73
1973/74
1974/75
1975/76
1976/77
1977/78
1978/79
1979/80
Salaries &
Wages
2,584,069
2,896,602
3,178,630
3,522,626
4,263,647
5,344,412
5,755,893
6,303,582
6,515,980
7,227,991
Collections
1,214,875
1,286,401
1,308,537
1,348,775
1,502,317
1,741,021
1,954,121
2,473,368
2,722,613
2,872,972
Binding
126,932
151,501
154,593
165,081
127,480
144,266
154,043
177,253
184,223
195,527
Supplies &
Equipment
482,787
346,378
350,455
373,302
428,391
428,696
752,810
518,360
976,638
795,386
Totals
4,408,663
4,680,882
4,992,215
5,409,784
6,321,835
7,658,395
8,616,867
9,472,563
10,399,454
11,091,876 Appendix D
RECORDED  USE  OF LIBRARY   RESOURCES
September  1979  - August  1980
GENERAL CIRCULATION
1976/77
1977/78
1978/79
1979/80
% Increase/
Decrease over
1978/79
Main Library
General Stack Collections
454,310
425,211
442,606
422,346
-
4.6%
Reserve Circulation
16,775
17,401
15,080
33,432
+
121.7%
Extension Library
5,764
5,943
8,450
6,512
-
22.9%
Asian Studies Division
23,003
17,856
18,183
21,245
+
16.8%
Fine Arts Division
97,055
96,747
95,700
102,534
+
7.1%
Government Publications
109,430
141,013
128,760
125,634
-
2.4%
Map Collections
12,503
11,824
10,870
10,423
-
4.1%
Special Collections
17,667
17,651
19,164
20,135
+
5.1%
SUBTOTAL
736,507
733,646
738,813
742,261
+
0.5%
Branch Libraries &
Reading Rooms
Animal Resource Ecology
9,773
11,178
11,441
10,510
-
8.1%
Crane Library
52,700
51,713
46,219
38,140
-
17.5%
Curriculum Laboratory
252,129
254,022
209,155
188,267
-
10.0%
Law Library
153,440
138,942
140,087
143,738
+
2.6%
MacMillan Library
42,956
44,503
47,334
46,576
-
1.6%
Marjorie Smith Library
14,017
19,251
18,694
19,049
+
1.9%
Mathematics Library
19,283
19,504
18,388
18,758
+
2.0%
Medical Branch Library
(V.G.H.)
30,390
32,554
36,559
36,895
+
0.9%
Music Library
38,279
40,029
42,735
42,627
-
0.2%
Reading Rooms
78,642
76,824
73,170
76,97 7
+
5.2%
Sedgewick Library
367,92 7
344,561
339,805
322,849
-
5.0%
Woodward Library
183,053
,242,598
191,575
187,425
186,138
-
0.7%
SUBTOTAL                1
1,224,656
1,171,012
1,130,524
-
3.5%
Use of Recordings
Wilson Recordings
Collection
280,150
312,375
331,756
332,257
+
0.1%
Music Library
Record Collection
40,756
45,672
52,393
52,573
+
0.3%
SUBTOTAL
320,906
358,047     384,149
384,830
+   0.2% Appendix D
(continued)
INTERLIBRARY  LOANS
To Other Libraries
Original  Materials
Photocopies
TOTAL   INTERLIBRARY
LENDING
From Other Libraries
Original Materials
Photocopies
TOTAL  INTERLIBRARY
BORROWING
GRAND  TOTAL
(General  Circulation   &
Interlibrary  Loans)
1976/77 1977/78 1978/79 1979/80
7,884 11,533 10,940 10,921
6,609 11,705 13,258 13,507
14,493
3,274
3,502
6,776
23,238
3,243
3,549
6,792
24,198
3,521
4,131
7,652
24,428
3,406
4,534
7,940
%   Increase/
Decrease  over
1978/79
.2%
1.9%
1.0%
+       9.8%
+        3.8%
2,321,271       2,346,379        2,325,824        2,289,983
1.5%
Interlibrary Loans are presented in greater detail in Appendix E, Appendix E
INTERLIBRARY LOANS
1
To Other Libraries
- Original Materials
General
Federation Information NetworkJ
B.C. Medical Library Service
B.C. Post-Secondary Library Network
Bamfield Marine Station
SUBTOTAL
1977/78
11,533
1978/79
Percentage
Increase/Decreasi
1979/80    over 1978/79
2,132
1,979
1,987
+        .4
1,477
1,331
1,236
-     7.1
3,466
3,401
3,743
+   10.1
4,428
4,198
3,951
-     5.9
30
31
4
-   87.1
10,940
10,921
- Photocopies
General
Federation Information Network
B.C. Post-Secondary Library Network
Bamfield Marine Station
SUBTOTAL
TOTAL INTERLIBRARY LENDING
2,012
1,977
2,041
+
3.2
797
843
900
+
6.8
8,860
10,313
10,459
+
1.4
36
125
107
-
14.4
11,705
13,258
13,507
+
1.9
23,238
24,198
24,428
+
1.0
From Other Libraries
- Original materials
General
B.C. Medical Library Service
SUBTOTAL
- Photocopies
TOTAL INTERLIBRARY BORROWING
2,453
790
2,961
560
2,461
945
- 16.9
+   68.8
3,243
3,549
3,521
4,131
3,406
4,534
-     3.3
+     9.8
6,792
7,652
7,940
+     3.8
FIN, a network of public libraries operating since December 1974 under the aegis of
the Greater Vancouver Library Federation.  It provides access to the UBC collections
for its own members and for some B.C. Government libraries in Victoria.
NET, a network of B.C. public university and college libraries, since September 1977. Appendix F
REFERENCE STATISTICS
September, 19 79 - August, 1980
Percentage
Directional
Reference
Research
Increase/
Questions
Questions
Questions
Total
Decrease
Main Library
Asian Studies
2,007
3,654
3,663
9,324
Fine Arts
11,162
15,233
1,691
28,086
Government Publications
718
28,725
437
29,880
Humanities
1,898
9,190
734
11,822
Information Desk
16,053
50,227
23
66,303
Map Collection
385
3,566
82
4,033
Science
610
6,937
1,938
9,485
Social Sciences
526
16,088
*
871
17,485
Special Collections
2,161
6,962
612
9,735
35,520
140,582
10,051
186,153
+  1.6%
(1978/79)
(28,711)
(145,761)
( 8,762)
(183,234)
Branch Libraries
Animal Resource Ecology
2,170
2,926
349
5,445
Crane Library
1,863
2,385
632
4,880
Curriculum Laboratory
8,181
17,687
116
25,984
Law Library
2,969
3,810
1
,275
8,054
MacMillan Library
2,396
6,758
*
236
9,390
Marjorie Smith Library
1,118
2,406
308
3,832
Mathematics Library
1,197
1,208
2 72
2,677
Medical Branch Library
(V.G.H.)
9,679
11,502
1
*
,018
22,199
Music Library
2,237
8,257
787
11,281
Sedgewick Library
10,957
14,267
114
25,338
Woodward Library
6,221
27,515
3
*
,253
36,989
48,988
98,721
8
,360
156,069
(1978/79)
(47,847)
(95,760)
(9,
,332)
(152,939)
GRAND TOTALS
84,508
239,303
18
,411
342,222
(1978/79)
(76,558)
(241,521)
(18
,094)
(336,173)
+  2.0%
44,658 questions (46,746 in 1978/79) in Reading Rooms are not included in Appendix F.
* Patrons served through computer-assisted bibliographic searches are included in the
reference statistics under "research questions".  A separate table showing the numbers
of computer searches is provided in Appendix G. Appendix G
COMPUTER-ASSISTED REFERENCE SEARCHES
September, 1979 - August, 1980
UBC Searches
Student  (excluding
No of  Special   Student
Division   Se
arches
Searches
Specials)
Ecology Library
61
18
28
Law Library
131
27
20
MacMillan
Library
76
32
21
Medical Branch
Library (VGH)
402
Science
Division
1,128
Social Sciences
Division
293
Woodward
Library
1,134
TOTALS
3,225
(1978/79)
(1,653)
69
141
76
364
(a)
187
116
86
516
974
Non-UBC
Searches
47
38
29
36
(283)   (1,242)
151
(128)
(b)
Total
Current
Reference &
Data
Awareness
•LJjuj
Bases
Profiles
Verification
Searched
& Reports
15
66
	
37
393
	
23
213
905
37
506
1,736
(n.a.)
(c)
106
861
1,274
339
2,376
5,415
(2,937
(d)
10
589
608
(565)
(e)
(a) "Student Special" searches are limited searches provided to UBC students at a flat fee
of $5,00.  The relatively low number done in the Woodward Library results from the
exclusion of MEDLINE searches, which are normally inexpensive, from the special rate.
(b) Full costs, including staff time, for computer-assisted searches are charged to patrons
not associated with the University.  The number of searches is therefore relatively low,
although the searches that are done for non-patrons tend to be complex and often require
the use of several data files.
(c) Not recorded separately in 1978/79, staf.f searches are usually for the purpose of verifying the existence and location of documents, and ordering them on-line as interlibrary
loans.  Computer-assisted searching methods have become increasingly helpful to this
process, particularly in the sciences.
(d) A single reference search may involve the use of more than one data base (i.e. MEDLINE
and Psychological Abstracts).   Depending on the particular combination of data bases
required, this may involve a substantial amount of additional staff time.
(e) Figure represents the number of monthly updates distributed to patrons.  Current awarenes
(SDI) profiles are included in the "patrons served" total only when they are initially
established or subsequently revised. Appendix H
LIBRARY ORGANIZATION
1979/80
ADMINISTRATION
Stuart-Stubbs, Basil
Bell, Inglis F.
de Bruijn, Erik
Jeffreys, Anthony
MacDonald, Robin
Mclnnes, Douglas N.
Watson, William J.
University Librarian
Associate Librarian
Assistant Librarian -
Assistant Librarian -
Assistant Librarian -
Assistant Librarian -
Assistant Librarian -
Administrative Services
Collections
Technical Processes
and Systems
Public Services
Physical Planning and
Development
ACQUISITIONS
Harrington, Walter
Head
ANIMAL RESOURCE ECOLOGY LIBRARY
Nelson, Ann
Head
ASIAN STUDIES
Ng, Tung King
Head
BIBLIOGRAPHY
Cole, John
Elliston, Graham
Forbes, Jennifer
Hallonquist, P. Lynne
Johnson, Stephen
Mcintosh, Jack
Shields, Dorothy
Bibliographer - Science
Bibliographer - Serials
Bibliographer - English Language
Bibliographer - Life Sciences
Research Bibliographer
Bibliographer - Slavonic Studies
Bibliographer - European Languages
BIOMEDICAL BRANCH LIBRARY (V.G.H.)
Freeman, George
Head Appendix H
(continued)
CATALOGUE RECORDS
Turner, Ann
Bailey, Freda
Head
Deputy Head & Bibliographic Control Librarian
CATALOGUE PRODUCTS
Joe, Linda
Head
CIRCULATION
Butterfield, Rita
Head
CRANE LIBRARY
Thiele, Paul
Head
CURRICULUM LABORATORY
Hurt, Howard
Head
DATA LIBRARY
Ruus, Lame
Head
FINE ARTS
Dwyer, Melva
Head
GIFTS & EXCHANGE
Elliston, Graham
Head
GOVERNMENT PUBLICATIONS & MICROFORMS
Dodson, Suzanne
Head
HUMANITIES
Forbes, Charles
Head
INFORMATION & ORIENTATION
Sandilands, Joan
Head Appendix H
(continued)
INTERLIBRARY LOAN
Friesen, Margaret
Head
LAW LIBRARY
Shorthouse, Tom
Head
MACMILLAN LIBRARY
Macaree, Mary
Head
MAP DIVISION
Wilson, Maureen
Head
MARJORIE SMITH LIBRARY
de Bruijn, Elsie
Head
MUSIC LIBRARY
Burndorfer, Hans
Head
READING ROOMS
Omelusik, Nicholas
Head
SCIENCE DIVISION & MATHEMATICS LIBRARY
Brongers, Rein Head
SEDGEWICK LIBRARY
Erickson, Ture
Head
SERIALS DIVISION
Baldwin, Nadine
Head
SOCIAL SCIENCES DIVISION
Carrier, Lois
Head
SPECIAL COLLECTIONS DIVISION
Yandle, Anne
Selby, Joan
Head
Curator, Colbeck Collection Appendix H
(continued)
SYSTEMS DEVELOPMENT
Dennis, Donald
Dobbin, Geraldine
Systems Analyst
Systems & Information Science Librarian
WILSON RECORDINGS/COLLECTION
Kaye, Douglas
Head
WOODWARD LIBRARY
Leith, Anna
Head Appendix J
LIBRARY SUPPORTED READING ROOMS
AS OF AUGUST, 1980
Adult Education
Room 20
5760 Toronto Road
Agricultural Economics
Ponderosa Annex D
Room 105
Anthropology-Sociology
Applied Science/Mechanical Eng.
Anthropology-Sociology Building
Room 2314
Civil & Mechanical Engineering Bldg.
Room 2050
Architecture
Asian Studies
Frederick Lasserre Building
Room 9B (Basement)
Buchanan Building
Room 2208
Audiology
Checmial Engineering
James Mather Building
Fairview Crescent, Room 205
Chemical Engineering Building
Room 310
Chemistry
Chemistry Building
Room 261
Classics
Buchanan Building
Room 2218
Commerce
Henry Angus Building
Room 307
Comparative Literature
Buchanan Building
Room 227
Computer Centre
Computer Sciences Building
Room 302
Creative Writing
Brock Hall, South Wing
Room 204
Economics-History
Electrical Engineering
Buchanan Tower
Room 1097
Electrical Engineering Building
Room 428 (Enter by Room 434) Appendix J
(continued)
English
Extended/Acute Care
French
Geography
Geology
Geophysics
Hispanic-Italian
Home Economics
Institutional Analysis & Planning
Library School
Linguistics
Metallurgy
Microbiology
Mineral Engineering
Oceanography
Pharmacology
Pharmacy
Buchanan Tower
Room 697
Health Sciences Centre
Room M40, Extended Care Unit
Buchanan Tower
Room 897
Geography Building
Room 140
Geological Sciences Building
Room 208
Geophysics Building
2nd Floor, South
Buchanan Building
Room 2220
Home Economics Building
Room 210
Main Mall N. Administration Bldg.
Room 140
Main Library, North Wing
8th Floor, Room 831
Buchanan Building
Room 0210
Metallurgy Building
Room 319
Wesbrook Building
Room 300
Mineral Engineering Building
Room 201
Biological Sciences Building
Room 1449
Medical Sciences Building
Block C, Room 221
Cunningham Building
Room 160 Appendix J
(continued)
Philosophy
Physics
Physiology
Political Science
Psychiatry
Psychology
Religious Studies
Slavonic Studies
Theatre
Transportation Studies
Buchanan Building
Room 3270
Hennings Building
Room 311
Medical Sciences Building
Block A, Room 201
Buchanan Building
Room 1220
Room 22, Health Sciences Centre
2255 Wesbrook Road
Henry Angus Building
Room 207
Buchanan Building
Room 2250
Buchanan Building
Room 2251
Frederick Wood Theatre
Room 211
Auditorium Annex
Room 100 Appendix K
SENATE LIBRARY COMMITTEE
1979/80
Rev. P.C. Burns
Mrs. M.F. Bishop
Mr. R.T. Franson
Ms. P. Gouldstone
Dr. H.J. Greenwood
Dr. F.R.C. Johnstone
Dr. L.D. Jones
Dr. P.A. Larkin (Chairman)
Mr. F. Lee
Rev. J.P. Martin
Ms. M.C. MacPherson
Ms. A.J. Moonen
Mrs. A. Piternick
Dr. S.O. Russell
Dr. G.G.E. Scudder
Dr. 0. Sziklai
EX-0FFICI0
Chancellor J.V. Clyne
President D. Kenny
Mr. J.E.A. Parnall
Mr. B. Stuart-Stubbs
Terms of Reference:
(a) To advise and assist the Librarian in:
(i)  formulating a policy for the development of resources for
instruction and research;
(ii)  advising on the allocation of book funds to the fields of
instruction and research;
(iii)  developing a general program of library service for all the
interests of the University; and
(iv)  keeping himself informed about the library needs of instructional
and research staffs, and keeping the academic community informed
about the library.
(b) To report to Senate on matters of policy under discussion by the Committee,

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