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Report of the University Librarian to the Senate of the University of British Columbia Jan 31, 1979

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I   I The Report
of the University Librarian
to the Senate
of the
University of British Columbia
Sixty-third Year
1977/78
Vancouver
January 1979 TABLE OF CONTENTS
I. Introduction
II. The Development of Collections
III. Physical Access to Collections
IV. Bibliographic Access to Collections
V. Services
VI. Conclusion
1
2
9
17
21
24
Appendix A Size of Collections - Physical Volumes
B Growth of Collections
C Library Expenditures
D Recorded Use of Library Resources
E Interlibrary Loans
F Reference Statistics
G Library Organization
H Library Supported Reading Rooms
J Senate Library Committee I.  INTRODUCTION
In the past few years these annual reports have focussed on the costs of
the Library and especially those of its collections which, subject to the
pressures of inflation and currency devaluation, have been of particular
concern. Although these conditions still prevail, this year's annual
report has a different emphasis, and a broader perspective.  It deals
generally with the topic of published information, and it attempts to
relate this Library's experience to the global phenomenon that has come
to be known as the information explosion.  The University deals in knowledge: its purpose is the creation, preservation and dissemination of
knowledge.  These processes are continuous, interrelated and endless,
and they impose specific requirements on the University's Library, which
must acquire, store and provide access to the published results of
intellectual activity.  Thus this report will speak mainly of the growth
of collections, the housing of collections, and the bibliographic apparatus
needed to make these collections useful.  It will describe the measures
that are being taken to deal with the reality of constant growth, and
propose additional measures which must be taken, if the library is to
continue to be an accessible, manageable resource for the University, and
beyond it, the community. - 2 -
II.  THE DEVELOPMENT OF COLLECTIONS
Just ten years ago, in 1967/68, the Library was on the threshold of a
million-volume collection. At 943,990 volumes, it had doubled in size
in nine years, quadrupled in eighteen.
In 1977/78 the collection reached another threshold, being close to two
million volumes in size.  Thus it has doubled again in a decade. Looked
at another way, as many volumes were added in the past ten years as were
acquired in the first fifty-two years of the Library's existence. No
matter how one views the statistics, the rate of growth has been phenomenal.
If this University's experience were unique, one might conclude that the
Library had acquired an unusual appetite for books. However, in Canada
U.B.C. is not alone in undergoing a period of rapid expansion of its
Library's collections.  Some libraries, such as those at McMaster University
and Queen's University, exceeded U.B.C.'s growth rate, while the University
of Alberta Library almost equalled it.  The surge of development experienced
by Canadian academic libraries was partly attributable to the publication
of three reports in the sixties, reports which drew the attention of the
12 3
universities to the relative weakness of their libraries. ' '  Canadian
university libraries did not compare favourably with those at U.S. institutions of comparable size and with similar academic programmes.  Thus in the
sixties and early seventies, Canadian academic libraries grew more quickly
than their U.S. counterparts.  In 1967/68, among the members of the
Association of Research Libraries, U.B.C. ranked in the lower third in
terms of its collections size. By last year, it was in the upper third.
Along with the libraries at the University of Alberta and McGill University,
which are only slightly smaller, U.B.C.'s Library is now of the same
approximate size as those at the University of Missouri, the University of
Florida, the University of Kansas, Pennsylvania State University and
Rutgers University.
But the growth of libraries everywhere, in Canada, the U.S., Great Britain,
Germany, Japan, has been in recent times exceptional.  If libraries are suddenly larger, it is because they are responding to the reality of what
has been termed the age of information.  Giving to the word "information"
the broadest possible meaning, the characterization of our times as a
special age is accurate, for we live in a period which is witness to an
unprecedented amount of investigation, study, invention and creativity.
A concomitant of these activities is the process of making a permanent
record: writing and publication.
All one need do to perceive the extent to which these developments have
affected the University as well as the Library is to compare the Calendars
for 1967/68 and 1977/78.  Ten years ago, the University offered 2,139
courses of instruction during the winter session.  This year it offers
3,205. Now there are 1,818 full-time faculty members.  Then there were
1,267.  This is not because of the insidious workings of some variant of
Parkinson's Law.  There is simply more to be taught. Work within traditional disciplines has become increasingly specialized, and the exploration
of new relationships among disciplines has yielded entirely new fields of
study. And this in turn results in yet more research, writing and publication.
In light of the above, and given that a library's collection must reflect
the diverse and numerous interests of its users, the recent growth of
U.B.C.'s Library while extraordinary seems less difficult to explain.  It
was, in a sense, ordained.  But it was extraordinary, and it was neither
easy to afford nor to accomplish.
In the ten years since 1967/68, $16,375,484 has been spent on collections
and binding, and in the year 1977/78 the cost of collections alone was
$2,473,368, up a staggering $519,247 in one year.  The following table
charts this decade of expenditures on collections and on their preservation
through binding. - 4
Table 1
Expenditures on Collections and Binding, 1967/68 - 1977/78
1967/68
$ 1,099,233
1968/69
1,109,920
1969/79
1,240,000
1970/71
1,341,807
1971/72
1,432,902
1972/73
1,463,130
1973/74
1,513,856
1974/75
1,629,797
1975/76
1,885,287
1976/77
2,108,164
1977/78
2,650,621
Although in any one year there is not a perfect correspondence between
the amounts spent and the number of physical volumes added to the collections, the following table does illustrate a trend: more buys less.
Table 2
Net Growth of Collections in Physical Volumes, 1967/68 - 1977/78
1967/68
$  98,998
1968/69
119,569
1969/70
129,283
1970/71
162,428
1971/72
144,505
1972/73
136,626
1973/74
85,528
1974/75
82,086
1975/76
93,803
1976/77
87,817
1977/78
90,403 The reason why more buys less is well known: the prices of books,
periodicals and other library materials are as much subject to inflation
as the prices of other commodities.  Take, for example, the average
prices of books published in the United States and in the United Kingdom,
In 1967 the average price of U.S. books was $8.43, and in 1977 it was
$18.03.  The average prices of U.K. books in those years were #1.83 and
£4.46.  The percentage increases are 114% and 141% respectively.  U.S.
periodical prices showed an even more spectacular increase: from $8.56
per subscription to $24.59, an increase of 187%.
Particularly in recent years, fluctuations in the value of Canadian
currency have joined inflation in contributing to the higher cost of
maintaining the Library's collections.
Table 3
Foreign Currencies: Canadian Dollars per Unit
September 1977
August 1978
Increase
U.S.
1.0746
1.1504
7.05%
U.K.
1.8702
2.2132
18.3%
Germany
.4642
.5712
23.05%
Switzerland
.4465
.6848
53.37%
Japan
.004032
.006050
50.05%
That the decline in value of the Canadian dollar would have an impact on
the collections budget is made obvious by the next table, showing the
distribution by country of the Library's expenditures on collections, a
distribution which reflects both the reality of world publishing and the
university's academic programme; about three-quarters of our dollars are
spent on English language materials. 6 -
Table 4
Percentage of Collections Expenditure by Country, 1977/78
U.S.
38,4
U.K.
18.9
Canada
16.6
Germany
10.4
Netherlands
6.2
Japan
2.4
Switzerland
1.6
Others
5.5
The University's administration, Board of Governors and Senate, through
massive increases to the Library's budget, have succeeded thus far in
saving the collections programme from disaster. Had that support not
been forthcoming, additional scores of journal subscriptions would have
been cancelled, and thousands of essential works would not have been
purchased.  Given the short print runs of academic publications, that
damage could never have been repaired.  Regrettably, this has been the
fate of many great research libraries in these times.  U.B.C. can count
itself among the fortunate minority.  Last year its expenditures on
collections placed it tenth In rank order among the members of the
Association of Research Libraries. Five years ago it was In twenty-
third place.  Formerly ahead of U.B.C. in expenditures on collections,
and now behind, are such distinguished institutions as Cornell University,
Princeton University and the University of Michigan.
It is earnestly hoped that U.B.C. can continue to ward off the twin
threats of inflation and devaluation, and maintain its collections
programme.  The emphasis, it should be noted, is on maintenance, not
expansion, which is to say that the Library should continue to acquire
materials, and predominantly current materials, which are directly
relevant to the University's present programme of teaching and research.
Experience indicates that meeting present needs requires an accession
rate of 90,000 to 100,000 volumes annually, plus other forms of publications such as government documents, microforms, maps and recordings. 7 -
If this proves to be possible, what are the implications?
First, it seems clear that maintaining the collections will cost more
every year. No country has halted inflation, so the costs of library
materials will continue to rise along with wages and other prices. No
one is predicting the early recovery of the Canadian and U.S. dollars;
in fact, some predict that both will continue to decline in value against
major European and Asian currencies.
Second, if world production of books and periodicals continues to increase,
the maintenance of a constant accession rate implies increasing selectivity.
How this will be felt will depend on the production rates of those countries
from which U.B.C. acquires most of its materials, mainly those in the
English-speaking world. Any expansion of the University's programme
involving a need for new categories of material will also imply greater
selectivity.  This prospect underlines the fact that no library can
contain everything, and leads to the realization that libraries are and
must be interdependent.  Some outcomes of the condition of interdependence
are discussed later in this report.
Third, the maintenance of a constant accession rate will result not in
the doubling of the collection in the next ten years, but in increasing
its size by half. Late in the nineteen eighties, the Library will attain
its third millionth volume.
The question is: where will the next million volumes be housed? - 8 -
Notes
1. Williams, Edwin E.  Resources of Canadian university libraries for
research in the humanities and social sciences.  Ottawa, National
Conference of Canadian Universities and Colleges, 1962.  87 p.
2. Bonn, George S.  Science-technology literature resources in Canada.
Report of a survey for the Associate Committee on Scientific
Information. Ottawa, National Research Council, 1966.  80 p.
3. Downs, Robert B.  Resources of Canadian academic and research
libraries.  Ottawa, Association of Universities and Colleges of
Canada, 1967.  301 p. III.  PHYSICAL ACCESS TO COLLECTIONS
There are only so many ways of dealing with the fact that the growth of
libraries is perpetual. One way is to build more space. Another is to
make more efficient use of existing space. Another is to diminish the
physical size of items in the collections, through microphotography.
And another is simply to diminish the collections in size, through
weeding. At U.B.C, all of these options have been and are being
exercised.
That the Library would attain a collection of two million volumes before
1980 was foreseen in the middle nineteen sixties.  In 1965, the Board
and Senate adopted Policies Governing the Establishment and Growth of
Branch Libraries and Reading Rooms Outside the Main Library Building,
and thus gave their imprimatur to the development of a decentralized
library system for the expanding campus.  In June 1966 the Library
produced A Plan for Future Services, based on this policy, and on projections to 1975 that forecast a student body of 22,000, a faculty of
1,422 and a collection of 2,000,000 volumes.  As it turned out, these
projections were realistic.  The basic approach of the plan was to
locate collections and services in proximity to users, wherever they
were on campus.
It is useful to review the proposals made in that document in the light
of what has been accomplished.  There is a disparity, and that disparity
accounts for the serious predicament in which the Library now finds
itself, concerning space for its collections.  In this review, the
emphasis will be on the space required for physical volumes, not on the
space needed by users and staff, although there are shortages in these
two respects also.
Main Library
Proposed:  An addition to the Main Library of 76,300 square feet, to
contain the School of Librarianship, the Processing and
Systems Divisions, the Library Administration, Staff Room
and Bindery.  It was anticipated that this would release 10
33,100 square feet in the Main Library, for stack space,
reading areas and other services.
Outcome:  An addition to the Main Library has proved not to be
feasible, for a number of site and architectural reasons.
A separate building, now nearing completion, will house
the Processing and Systems Divisions.  This will free some
22,000 square feet in the Main Library for other purposes,
if obstacles do not prevent its use.  The Main Library is
discussed at length in a later section of this chapter.
Undergraduate Library
Proposed: A new undergraduate library, with a maximum capacity of
200,000 volumes.
Outcome:  The Sedgewick Library was opened in January 1973.  It
has a capacity of 200,000 volumes, and now holds nearly
150,000 volumes.  Its departure from the Main Library
freed 22,950 square feet, which was occupied by the Asian
Studies Division, the Map Division, and part of the
Cataloguing Division.
Woodward Biomedical Library
Proposed: An addition, to increase the capacity of the Library to
200,000 volumes.
Outcome:  The addition was completed in 1970, giving the whole
facility a capacity of 280,000 volumes.  This Library now
contains over 220,000 volumes.
Science Library
Proposed: A library to contain 200,000 volumes.
Outcome:  Not constructed. Had it been, 12,500 square feet plus
stack space have been freed in the Main Library for other
purposes, and new space would have been available for the
expansion of the science collections. 11 -
Physical Sciences Library
Proposed:  If new construction for the departments concerned brought
them together, a library comprising the present Mathematics
Library, and Physics and Chemistry Reading Rooms, with an
upper limit of 80,000 volumes.
Outcome:  Not constructed.
Forestry/Agriculture Library
Proposed:  This Library was under construction at the time the Plan
was published in 1966.
Outcome:  The MacMillan Library has already exceeded its capacity of
40,000 volumes, and parts of its collection are already in
storage."
Education Library
Proposed: A library to contain a maximum of 120,000 volumes.
Outcome:  Progress was made toward the planning of this library as
part of an addition to the Scarfe Building, a project which
was at one time a Senate priority.  That project is at a
standstill.  The growing collection in the Curriculum
Laboratory is gradually eliminating all study space.  The
bulk of the education collection remains in the Main Library,
where it occupies about 1,500 square feet and is expanding.
Law Library
Proposed: A new Law Library, to contain up to 150,000 volumes.
Outcome:  The new Law Library was completed in 1975.  It contains
about 110,000 volumes today.
Music Library
Proposed:  The Music Library was under construction in 1966.
Outcome:  The Music Library has reached capacity; in the future
student seating will be sacrificed to make room for the
growing collection. - 12
Social Work Library
Proposed: An expansion of the Social Work Reading Room in Graham House.
Outcome:  New area was provided for the Marjorie Smith Library, which
is now approaching maximum collection capacity.
Map Library
Proposed: A merger of all campus map collections in a then proposed
Earth Sciences Building.
Outcome:  The Earth Sciences Building was not constructed.  The
Library's Map Division remains in the Main Library.
To summarize, although many objectives of A Plan for Future Services were
achieved, some vital ones were not.  The failure to construct an addition
to the Main Library, a Science Library and an Education Library has had a
serious impact on the situation in the Main Library.  Space for the anticipated two million volume collection was not provided, with the result
that the Library was forced into a series of ad hoc storage arrangements.
As for the three million volume collection, space for that is not under
construction, nor is it part of the University's current building programme.
In the first paragraph of this chapter the alternative methods for dealing
with the growth of collections were itemized. Anyone who reflects on this
situation will come to the conclusion that since libraries cannot add
shelves indefinitely, remote storage must be inevitable. Perhaps it is.
But before storage is pursued as a desirable objective, consideration should
be given to the present and future implications of adopting, or being
forced to adopt, the storage principle at this point in this Library's
history.
It is a fact that some library branches are already full, and others will
soon be full.  Included in this group is the Main Library, the shelves of
which have twice been weeded in recent years to make room for incoming
accessions. Last year the Main Library stacks held almost 800,000 volumes;
weeding has reduced the number to about 765,000, and yet the stacks are - 13 -
still crowded and difficult to manage. Assuming a steady accession rate,
space must be found for 350,000 to 400,000 volumes in the stacks over
the next ten years.  If no new space is available, that means that half
the books now on the shelves will be retired to storage, or that new
accessions must be sent directly to storage.  The former alternative might
be acceptable if half the present stack collection were inactive and of
infrequent interest to users. But such is not the case.  The least active
titles have already been removed from the shelves and sent to storage. As
for new materials, the evidence is that the newer an item, the greater the
likelihood that it will be wanted by a user. No matter how the problem is
approached, the outcome is unpalatable.
A second point about storage: it reduces the "browsability" of the collection.
Despite the existence of a catalogue and of scores of published subject
bibliographies, users still rely heavily on scanning the shelves to locate
material of interest to them. The importance of this means of discovery
should not be minimized, particularly for those working in the humanities
and social sciences, whose literature is less well indexed than literature
in the sciences.
Third, storage imposes delay.  For some this does not matter.  For others,
it is an annoyance. But for many, particularly students working toward
essay and examination deadlines, a book which is not available today might
as well not exist.
Fourth, storage increases operating costs. Much is made of the supposed
capital economies allowed by remote, compact storage. But if these
economies exist, they are offset and eliminated over time by costs of
working with storage libraries, not to mention the costs of delay imposed
on the user.  The tasks involved in placing material in storage are
essentially human ones, and therefore storage is labour intensive. An
item must be selected for storage, usually on the basis of some criteria
such as frequency of use and age of publication; this requires title-by-
title judgement.  Then the item has to be physically removed to storage
and reshelved, possibly according to a new numbering system. A record
has to be made that the item's location has changed, so one or more 14
catalogues must be revised. Retrieval demands more time: when an item is
wanted, a staff member has to visit the storage area, locate the desired
item, and bring it to the user. Later, it must be returned. Multiply
these routines by a factor of several hundred thousands, and one can
readily perceive why storage is not to be advocated if one is concerned
about costs of operations, let alone the quality of service to patrons.
Already over 140,000 volumes are in storage in four locations, two in
the Main Library, one in the Woodward Library, and one in the Law Library.
Locations for all these items have not been posted, because staff time for
this work is not available; this task will only be accomplished gradually.
The items in storage were selected because it appeared, on the basis of
previous circulation records, that they were not in high demand. However,
as the quantities of material stored increases, so will the number of items
retrieved for examination and possible borrowing.
Tne storage areas in the Main Library already being full to capacity, what
will become of new accessions? There are two buildings under construction
which will increase the amount of shelving available to the Library system.
When the Asian Centre is completed, the Asian Studies Library will move
from the south wing of the Main Library. It will vacate stack space on
stack levels 2 and 3 which can be opened to the main stack area, to contain
about 110,000 volumes. When the Processing Divisions move to two levels of
a new multi-purpose building, they will vacate the seventh stack level, and
the lowest level of the south wing, an area which had been at one time the
original Sedgewick Library study area. Renovation of the seventh stack
level for the Government Publications and Microforms Division, now in
cramped quarters, is planned. That division will vacate part of stack level
six, making space for an additional 140,000 volumes available. Progress
with planning for these developments is delayed, because proposed renovations
in the stacks have brought to the fore the painful fact that the Main
Library does not meet contemporary building, fire or safety codes. A
means of dealing with this situation is being sought as this report is
being written. Clearly, the space is urgently needed. 15 -
The south wing being only eighteen years old, renovation will be easier
to carry out. What had been a study area, then a work area, will be
converted to stack space, to contain approximately 100,000 volumes.
If all renovations can be carried out, the capacity of the open stack
areas will be increased by about 350,000 volumes. At a steady growth
rate, that should serve for eight to ten years.
In addition, a basement in the multi-purpose building mentioned above is
being partly converted to storage shelving, with a capacity of about 200,000
volumes.  The principal use for that area will be to contain overflow from
the branch libraries which have already reached or exceeded capacity, or
will do so in the next few years.  That storage space too should be filled
within eight to ten years.
Readers would be ill-advised to accept with a sigh of relief the short-term
solutions outlined above.  There are assumptions in the foregoing calculations.  One is that something can be done with stack levels six and seven;
this remains to be seen.  The other is that the accession rate will continue
at the present level.  If it diminishes, less space will be needed. But
what if it should increase?
In any case, after eight years there will be a crisis.  The Main Library,
most branch libraries and all storage areas will be full.  The University
will need all that time, given the pace at which building projects are
now moving, to deal with that future crisis.  It can't wait until the
crisis is upon it.
It is now time to plan for the replacement of the Main Library by a new
research library building, one that will not be full on the day of its
opening, but that will carry the Library forward well into the twenty-
first century, which at that point will only be ten to fifteen years
away; and one that will meet the needs of those major faculties, such as
Arts, Education, Commerce and Science, which the Library is increasingly
unable to meet. 16
Such a proposal raises many questions. Where will such a major structure
be situated? What will it cost? What will become of the Main Library
building?
The siting of a major library building should be determined within the
context of a master campus plan.  Obviously, given the faculties and
students it must serve, a new research library must be somewhere near
the centre of the northern half of the campus. This is not an impossibility, since there are a number of not-so-temporary temporary buildings
occupying a major segment of the north campus.
Before the size and cost of this building can be estimated, some detailed
programming would need to be carried out.  Very tentatively, the cost
might be on the order of thirty million dollars.
As for the Main Library, whatever its future uses, it would need to be
extensively remodelled once it was vacated. With its central location
and variety of spaces, it recommends itself as the future site of the
university administration.  Other areas can be converted to general purpose classrooms and seminar rooms, now in short supply.  The stacks could
be closed off to public access and redeveloped as a general university
storage facility. Again, renovation of the building should be carried
out in the context of a master plan. The Main Library could be remodelled
for a variety of purposes.
To recapitulate, the University, in not meeting the objectives of the
1966 Plan for Future Services, has scarcely enough space to hold today's
collections, and is not in a position to accommodate the three million
volume collection which is now in prospect. To cope with the next period
of collection growth, some seven storage areas will be used; but these
are not even a second best alternative, considered from the points of
view of user access and operating efficiency. Planning should commence
immediately for a new major structure which will correct present deficiencies and provide for collections, users and staff projected for at least
thirty years. IV.  BIBLIOGRAPHIC ACCESS TO COLLECTIONS
Beginning in January the Library stopped producing catalogue cards for
works published in 1978, a first step toward the complete closure of the
card catalogue and its substitution by a catalogue on computer output
microfiche, or COM.  To understand how and why this event occurred, it
is necessary, as in the case of the growth of the collection itself, to
look for reasons in developments external as well as internal to the
University.
Ultimately, it is the swelling tide of new publications that has forced
changes in methods of catalogue production and maintenance not just at
U.B.C, but at libraries everywhere.  That the body of world literature
was increasing at an accelerating pace was recognized by librarians in
the nineteen fifties and sixties.  The question was: how to describe
adequately and currently what was emerging from the world's presses, so
that access to individual items would be possible?
Obviously, to make the most efficient use of available time, it would be
desirable to prepare a catalogue description for each new item just once,
and thereafter to avoid recataloguing in libraries everywhere.  The
achievement of such an objective would depend on international consistency
in cataloguing practices, and on methods of exchanging bibliographic
information. Work began on the development of standards for cataloguing,
and for the entry of cataloguing information into machine-readable form
for computer handling. Ultimately this work was subsumed in 1973 under a
programme mounted by the International Federation of Library Associations,
supported by U.N.E.S.C.O., under the title of U.B.C, standing in this
instance for Universal Bibliographic Control.
This programme was based on a number of general principles, easy to
describe if not so simple to implement.  Each country, through its
national library or some other national agency, would undertake to catalogue all publications originating within its borders.  Cataloguing would
be carried out according to conventions which would be standard inter- 18 -
nationally. Catalogue descriptions would be recorded in machine readable
form, again according to international standards.  Thus the cataloguing
of an item would be performed once, in the country of its origin, and the
results of that work would be available to libraries everywhere for use
in compiling their individual catalogues.
This enormous undertaking, involving hundreds of thousands of new items
every year, is beginning to bear fruit.  In a small way, this library is
contributing to it.  In recent years, the library has been under contract
to the National Library of Canada to provide cataloguing information for
all new books being published in western Canada.  The library obtains from
publishers galley sheets for forthcoming books.  Cataloguing information
is supplied to the publisher, who prints it on the back of the title page.
The same information is sent to the National Library, which uses it to
compile the published national bibliography Canadiana; and the National
Library also distributes the information in machine-readable form, on
magnetic tape.  The printed bibliography and the magnetic tapes are exchanged
internationally.
The developments occurring under the rubric of Universal Bibliographic
Control have been roughly contemporaneous with the unprecedented growth
of this Library's collection and with its distribution among a number of
new library branches and divisions, both of which have resulted in an
equally remarkable growth in card catalogues.  That growth continued at
a steady rate, reflecting the maintenance of the existing accession rate.
In the calendar year 1977, 1,342,300 cards were filed into catalogues,
about a third of those going into the Main Catalogue, the rest into other
catalogues. These cards required 1,120 drawers, equivalent to nineteen
sixty-drawer cabinets.
The card catalogue has many commendable assets.  Its organizing principles
are relatively easy to grasp, and many users can have access to it simultaneously.  In short, it works. But its disadvantages now outweigh its
advantages.  To begin with, it consumes floor space.  If space were
available for the indefinite expansion of catalogues that might be acceptable. But in some areas, such as the Main Library, there is no more - 19 -
space into which the catalogue can expand and still be convenient to users.
The card catalogue is difficult and expensive to maintain: every card must
be hand filed; each book moved to storage must be re-listed; international
standardizations necessitate thousands of revisions; and labour costs
always increase. When a library is short of space, is anticipating the
addition of another million volumes, and is contemplating the relocation
of hundreds of thousands of items, it is bound to seek a means other than
the card catalogue to provide bibliographic access to collections.
It is at this point that international and local developments intersect.
Now, cataloguing information for a high percentage of the output of the
world's presses is available in machine-readable form.  This cataloguing
information, supplied on magnetic tapes, can be obtained through a number
of pioneering computer systems, one of which, developed at the University
of Toronto, is now being used by the U.B.C Library.  These systems allow
a cataloguer to search a data base incorporating tapes from many countries
to locate a record for an individual item which the library has in hand,
to adapt that record to local needs, to instruct the computer to file that
record with other library records, and to obtain from the system a catalogue
product in some form.  These systems initially were devoted to card production.  That still left the cards to be filed, however.
Increasingly, libraries are turning to computer-produced microform catalogues.
And that is the medium chosen by U.B.C.  It is easy to use, compact, and
inexpensive to duplicate.  In a few years' time, it will be joined by another
means of catalogue access: direct access by computer terminal not only to
the catalogued materials, but also to materials in process and on order.
Some persons may find this prospect daunting, but tomorrow's students will
not: they are learning to use computers in elementary school.
But this Library is not acting independently in implementing these major
changes in its cataloguing practices.  It is working in concert with all
libraries at post-secondary institutions in British Columbia.  The Ministry
of Education, aware that only by the sharing of library collections can all
students begin to enjoy some equality of opportunity for access to literature,
has funded the development of a B.C. Union Catalogue.  This enterprise has 20
required all libraries to cooperate in entering their catalogue records
into a machine-readable data base that can be used both to generate local
catalogues, and to produce a single union catalogue of all their holdings.
This union catalogue, also produced on COM, is being distributed throughout the province, so that students and faculty can locate materials anywhere,
and obtain them through interlibrary loan.
The simplicity with which this project can be described tends to obscure
its size, complexity, and revolutionary nature.  To use the adjective
"revolutionary" is entirely appropriate.  The university, college and
institute libraries of B.C., with government financial support and encouragement, have collectively agreed on common cataloguing standards, are all
carrying out their current cataloguing procedures on one computer-based
system, and are systematically converting all catalogue records retrospectively, a task which will take several years. Non-academic libraries are
joining this project.  Ultimately the holdings of the majority of the
province's academic, public, government and special libraries will be
represented in one bibliographic data base. Maintained by a computer
located in B.C., it will in several years' time be accessible on-line,
providing citizens with a greatly enhanced capability for retrieving
information.  In effect, there will not be a multiplicity of library
catalogues, but only one; instead of hundreds of cards, describing dozens
of copies of the same book in many libraries, there will be one record in
the computer, which can be summoned up to appear in any library's electronic
catalogue. 21 -
V.  SERVICES
In 1977/78 there were 2,346,379 recorded loans.  Unrecorded use of materials
within libraries would probably double that figure.  Few, if any, academic
libraries in North America have attained such a high level of use, regardless
of size of student body or size of collection.  There are probably several
reasons for U.B.C.'s experience.  The automated circulation system, in
operation since the middle sixties, makes for ease of borrowing.  The
decentralization of collections has made materials more accessible.  The
Library has carried out a comprehensive programme of orientation and instruction, which last year involved more than ten thousand persons.  The collections
have been carefully developed to meet actual needs. And not least, there is
a tradition of teaching at U.B.C. that places emphasis on research and reading.  In 1961/62 the full time winter enrollment at U.B.C. was roughly half
of what it is today. But circulation has quadrupled, not doubled, since then.
Yet the rate of annual increase has slowed.  This could be attributed to
diminished increases in enrollment, or it may be that an inherent maximum
has been reached: students can only read so much in a given period of time.
Another factor might be the implementation two years ago of new loan regulations which permitted extended loans and thereby decreased the number of
loan renewals.
Although the numbers involved are not great in relation to the total
circulation, it is noteworthy that interlibrary lending jumped by 60% in
one year, following two years of decline.  It was in January 1976 that
U.B.C joined the University of Toronto in implementing an interlibrary
loan fee, as the only means of dealing with the mounting staff costs of
providing materials to other institutions.  This brought about a decline
in transactions.  But in September 1977 the Ministry of Education funded
*
a B.C. Interlibrary Loan Network Project, the purpose of which was to make
the lending of materials by the universities to the colleges and to one
another more efficient and less expensive, and this reversed the statistical
trend.  Some basic findings of the Project: U.B.C supplied 73% of the loans.
the other two universities supplying the balance; turnaround time was faster
and unit costs were lower at U.B.C, presumably because of efficiencies and - 22
economies made possible by the larger volume of business.  The high
percentage of filled loans may be attributable simply to the size and
richness of U.B.C.'s collections, and tends to underline the importance
of this Library as a provincial resource.  The establishment of this
network is naturally linked to the development of the Union Catalogue,
the existence of which should further increase the province-wide use of
U.B.C.'s collections.
Measured reference activity has increased by 25% in the five years that
statistics have been collected systematically.  On the other hand, computer
searches were fewer in number this year, but this was to be expected:
1977/78 was the first year during which these special services were offered
on a partial cost recovery basis.  There was also a pronounced decline in
the number of directional questions, but this in fact may be evidence of
the effectiveness of the library's orientation programmes, which involved
tours, lectures and a plethora of free and readily available printed
guides; assisted also by an increasing number of directional and informational signs and posters, the user is getting better at finding his own
way around libraries.  In the Main Library, U.B.C.'s imitation of the
catacombs, particular attention has been given to graphics, and directional
questions dropped off there by almost 10%.
One other feature of this age of information: the appearance of increasing
numbers of indexes, abstracts and bibliographies, essential if individuals
are to identify the materials they require. Mastering this species of
publication is the task of the reference librarian.  It is a pleasure to
report that a considerable number of commendatory letters have been received,
expressing appreciation for the quality of service provided by the Library's
information specialists.  It should also be noted that during this year two
important works, authored by U.B.C librarians, were added to the body of
reference literature:
Microforms Research Collections: A Guide, by Suzanne Dodson.  (Westport,
Conn., Microform Review, 1978. XXVI, 410 p.)
The Religious Life of Man: Guide to Basic Literature, by Leszek M,
Karpinski.  (Metuchen, N.J., Scarecrow Press, 1978.  XX, 339 p.) 23
Further, many librarians in the public, technical and administrative
services of the Library, were engaged in teaching courses and workshops at institutions throughout the lower Mainland. All these
developments attest to the vitality of the Library's programme of
service to the university and the community.
Notes
1.  A separate report on the project may be obtained from the Office
for Library Coordination, 7671 Alderbridge Way, Richmond, B.C.,
V6X 1Z9, under the title Interlibrary Loan and Post-Secondary
Libraries in British Columbia; Report of a Project, September 1977
April 1978. - 24 -
VI.  CONCLUSION
The emphasis in this annual report has been on information: its acquisition,
organization for public access, housing, and rate of growth.
The University, through its support of the collections budget during recent
difficult years, has shown its determination to continue to meet the many
and diverse needs of the users of the Library.  In converting its cataloguing
records to machine-readable form, the Library is attempting to provide access
to the contents of the collections both more efficiently and effectively.
However, the predictable growth of the collections toward the third millionth
volume imposes a need for space to contain them. All available space will
be filled at the end of eight years.
Given the amount of time required for the completion of even minor building
projects, planning for a new research library should begin now. Main Library
Appendix A
SIZE OF COLLECTIONS - PHYSICAL VOLUMES
March 31, 1977  Additions  Withdrawals  March 31, 1978
General Stacks
Asian Studies
Fine Arts
Humanities & Social
Sciences Reference
Science Seference
Special Collections
SUBTOTAL
794,720
34,839
64
,660
764,899
80,734
11,580
18
92,296
66,555
4,705
3
71,257
38,872
1,857
56
40,673
14,369
441
232
14,578
46,111
2,514
13
48,612
1,041,361
55,936
64
,9822
1,032,315
Branches and Reading Rooms
Animal Resource Ecology
Biomedical Branch
Crane Library
Curriculum Laboratory
Law Library
MacMillan Library
Marjorie Smith
Mathematics Library
Music Library
3
Reading Rooms
Sedgewick Library
Woodward Library
SUBTOTAL
TOTAL
Storage
GRAND TOTAL
13,551
319
11
13,859
18,071
1,584
300
19,355
6,477
309
3
6,783
39,534
5,667
987
44,214
104,612
4,237
19
108,830
36,189
2,214
327
38,076
10,974
710
78
11,606
18,518
1,000
61
19,457
26,026
1,756
65
27,717
101,742
8,361
M
,112
108,991
141,429
10,700
4,
,281
147,848
214,146
7,508
18
221,636
731,269
44,365
7
4
,262
768,372
1,772,630
100,301
72
,244
1,800,687
78,750
62,3465
141,096
'
' ' " ' " ' '
1,851,380
1,941,783 Notes
1. Including some minor Main Library collections.
2. Of this number, 62,066 were relegated to storage.
3. The Data Library is included under Reading Rooms.
4. Of this number, 280 were relegated to storage.
5. In total, 62,346 volumes were added to storage. Appendix B
GROWTH OF COLLECTIONS
March 31, 1977
Net Growth
March 31, 1978
Volumes - Catalogued
1,851,380
90,403
1,941,783
Documents - Uncatalogued
465,618
31,954
497,572
Microfilm (reels)
49,538
7,975
57,513
Mlcrocard (cards)
111,680
296
111,976
Microprint (sheets)
935,750
51,000
986,750
Microfiche (sheets)
717,007
127,718
844,725
Films, Filmloops, Filmstrips
& Video Tapes
2,988
85
3,073
Slides & Transparencies
16,697
7,640
24,337
Pictures & Posters
69,943
4,596
74,539
Maps
115,574
3,875
119,449
*
Manuscripts
3,717 l.f.
100 l.f.
3,817 l.f.
Sound Recordings
62,138
4,679
66,817
Computer Tapes
282
5
287
Air Photos
70
_
70
*Thickness of files in linear feet Appendix C
LIBRARY EXPENDITURES
Fiscal Years, April - March
Salaries & Wages
Books & Periodicals
Binding
Supplies & Equipment
1975/76
5,344,412
1,741,021
144,266
428,696
1976/77
5,755,893
1,954,121
154,043
752,810
1977/78
6,303,582
2,473,368
177,253
518,360
Estimated
1978/79
6,588,494
2,550,000
180,710
969,438
TOTALS
7,658,395
8,616,867
9,472,563
10,288,642 Appendix D
GENERAL CIRCULATION
Main Library
General Stack Collection
Reserve Circulation
Extension Library
Asian Studies Division
Fine Arts Division
Government Publications
Map Collections
Special Collections
SUBTOTAL
RECORDED USE OF LIBRARY RESOURCES
September 1977 - August 1978
1974/75
1975/76
1976/77
1977/78
% Increase/
Decrease over
1976/77
465,534
427,094
454,310
425,211
- 6.4%
31,656
19,657
16,775
17,401
+ 3.7%
3,831
4,356
5,764
5,943
+ 3.1%
18,586
17,943
23,003
17,856
-22.4%
81,097
88,359
97,055
96,747
- 0.3%
148,980
149,975
109,430
141,013
+28.9%
7,650
9,928
12,503
11,824
- 5.4%
19,571
19,051
17,667
17,651
-
776,885
736,363
736,507
733,646
- 0.4%
Branch Libraries &
Reading Rooms
Animal Resource Ecology
9,651
8,447
9,773
11,178
+14.4%
Crane Library
48,626
31,293
52,700
51,713
- 1.9%
Curriculum Laboratory
249,054
225,261
252,129
254,022
+ 0.8%
Law Library
124,169
142,628
153,440
138,942
- 9.4%
MacMillan Library
41,860
41,193
42,956
44,503
+ 3.6%
Marjorie Smith Library
12,969
12,603
14,017
19,251
+37.3%
Mathematics Library
18,972
19,251
19,283
19,504
+ 1.1%
Medical Branch Library
26,947
27,469
30,390
32,554
+ 7.1%
(V.G.H.)
Music Library
27,468
33,624
38,279
40,029
+ 4.6%
Reading Rooms
75,195
83,907
78,642
76,824
- 2.3%
Sedgewick Library
396,286
377,882
367,927
344,561
- 6.3%
Woodward Biomedical
189,408
195,110
183,053
191,575
+ 4.7%
SUBTOTAL
1,220,605
1,198,668
1,242,589
1,224,656
- 1.4%
Recordings
Wilson Recordings
Collection
Music Library
Record Collection
SUBTOTAL
255,498
37,920
293,418
261,278
38,976
300,254
280,150
40,756
320,906
312,375
45,672
358,047
+11.5%
+12,1%
+11.6% APPENDIX D (Continued)
INTERLIBRARY LOANS*
1974/75
1975/76
1976/77
1977/78
% Increase/
Decrease Over
1976/77
To Other Libraries
Original Materials
12,092
8,094
7,884
11,533
+46.3%
Photocopies
13,483
8,263
6,609
11,705
+77.1%
TOTAL INTERLIBRARY LENDING
25,575
16,357
14,493
23,238
+60.3%
From Other Libraries
Original Materials 3,576 3,184 3,274 3,243 - 0.9%
Photocopies 3,801 2,661 3,502 3,549 + 1.3%
TOTAL INTERLIBRARY BORROWING 7,377 5,845 6,776 6,792 +0.2%
GRAND TOTAL (General Circula-
tion & Interlibrary Loans)  2>323»860  2,257,487  2,321,271  2,346,379
+ 1.1%
*Interlibrary Loans are presented in greater detail in Append
ix E APPENDIX E
INTERLIBRARY LOANS
To Other Libraries
- Original Materials
General+
Federated Information Network
B.C. Medical Library Service
Simon Fraser University*
University of Victoria*
B.C. Institute of Technology*
B.C. Post-Secondary Library Network*
Bamfield Marine Station*
SUBTOTAL
1974/75   1975/76   1976/77   1977/78
Increase    Increase
(Decrease)   (Decrease)
from 74/75  from 76/77
%
%
7,362
3,078
1,941
2,132
(71.0)
9.8
685
(9 mos.)
1,314
1,459
1,477
115.6
1.2
_li997_
_2i298
2,975
3,466
73.6
16.5
| 1,645 !
!    987|
j 1,090
-
-
-
!   314 !
i    364 i
I   306
-
-
-
i      89 !
!    53 !
j   100
4,428
116.2
-
! 2,048 l
l___ 1
]  1,404j
j"1,496
196.0
-
13
30
-
130.8
12,092
8,094
7,884
11,533
(4.6)
46.3
- Photocopies
General+
Federated Information Network**
Simon Fraser University*
University of Victoria*
B.C. Institute of Technology*
Colleges of B.C.*1-
B.C. Post-Secondary Library Network*
Bamfield Marine Stationt
SUBTOTAL
TOTAL INTERLIBRARY LENDING
8,142
3,591
1,412
2,012
(75.3)
42.5
183
(9 mos.)
r 275sr(
571
--273I5T
736
~I7§75~
797
335.5
8.3
! 1,492 I
1,245!
1,307
-
-
-
!     269 !
178 |
766
-
-
-
I   416 !
142 1
1
428
-
-
-
! 5,128 !
L I ■
4,011 J
4,376
8,860
72.8
102.5
30
90
85
36
20.0
(57.6)
13,483
8,263
6,609
11,705
(13.2)
77.1
25,575
16,357
14,493
23,238
(9.1)
60.3
From Other Libraries
- Original Materials
General
B.C. Medical Library Service
- Photocopies
TOTAL INTERLIBRARY BORROWING
2,657
2,020
2,580
2,453
(7.7)
(4.9)
919
1,164
694
790
(14.0)
13.8
3,801
2,661
3,502
3,549
(6.6)
1.3
7,377
5,845
6,776
6,792
(7.9)
0.2
* Because of the number of significant changes in interlibrary loan activity in British Columbia
in the years covered by this table meaningful comparisons are difficult and sometimes impossible.
tUntil 1977-78 loans to public colleges in B.C. were included under the heading "General" for both
originals and some photocopies.  Other photocopies were handled through the SFU unit at UBC and
counted separately.
*FIN, a network of libraries operating since December 1974 under the aegis of the Greater Vancouver
Library Federation.  It provides access to the UBC collections for its own members and for some
B.C. Government libraries in Victoria.
* Prior to September 1977 loans were handled by the special Simon Fraser University Library unit at
UBC.
•NET, a network of B.C. public university and college libraries, since September 1977.
*BMS loans were handled by the SFU unit until September 1977, since then by UBC via the FIN telephone
line. Appendix F
REFERENCE STATISTICS
September, 1977 - August, 1978
Directional
Questions
Reference
Questions
Research
Questions
Computer
Searches
Total
Percentage
Increase/
Decrease
Main Library
Asian Studies
1,768
3,233
2,022
-
7,023
Fine Arts
8,228
9,093
1,054
-
18,375
Government Publications
670
30,747
816
-
32,233
Humanities
2,172
8,781
728
-
11,681
Information Desk
12,621
57,785
_
-
70,406
Map Collection
291
3,671
121
-
4,083
Science
596
7,231
1,525
154
9,506
Social Sciences
618
16,010
907
184
17,719
Special Collections
845
7,660
327
338
8,832
27,809
144,211
7,500
179,858
+ 0.7%
(1976/77)
(30,787)
(141,953)
(5,634)
(320)
(178,694)
Branch Libraries
Animal Resource Ecology
2,313
2,526
195
45
5,079
Crane Library
2,299
3,160
407
-
5,866
Curriculum Laboratory
10,037
16,850
96
-
26,983
Law Library
2,509
4,256
1,184
121
8,070
MacMillan Library
2,522
6,192
315
59
9,088
Marjorie Smith Library
274
1,658
149
-
2,081
Mathematics Library
917
1,348
241
-
2,506
Medical Branch Library
(V.G.H.)
4,720
7,409
543
_**
12,672
Music Library
2,386
7,623
722
-
10,731
Sedgewick Library
10,748
11,554
134
-
22,436
Woodward Library
3,579
27,313
1,846
1,192
33,910
42,304
89,889
5,832
1,397
139,422
+ 2.8%
(1976/77)
(45,227)
(83,007)
(5,806)
(1,558)
(135,598)
GRAND TOTALS
70,113
234,100
13,332
1,735
319,280
+ 1.6%
(1976/77)
(76,014)
(224,960)
(11,440)
(1,878)
(314,292)
Statistics on "computer searches" were previously included with "research questions,
involve the use of more than one reference data base.
Many
**Included In Woodward Library's statistics for computer searches.
48,537 questions (35,352 in 1976/77) in Reading Rooms are not included In Appendix F above. Appendix F (Cont'd...)
- 2 -
CATALOGUE PRODUCTS
From April 3, 1978.
Elrod, J. McRee
Joe, Linda
CIRCULATION
Butterfield, Rita
CRANE LIBRARY
Thiele, Paul
CURRICULUM LABORATORY
Hurt, Howard
DATA LIBRARY
Ruus, Laine
FINE ARTS DIVISION
Dwyer, Melva
GIFTS & EXCHANGE
Elliston, Graham
GOVERNMENT PUBLICATIONS & MICROFORMS
Dodson, Suzanne
HUMANITIES
Forbes, Charles
INFORMATION & ORIENTATION
Sandilands, Joan
INTERLIBRARY LOAN
Friesen, Margaret
LAW LIBRARY
Shorthouse, Tom
MACMILLAN LIBRARY
Macaree, Mary
MAP DIVISION
Wilson, Maureen
MARJORIE SMITH LIBRARY
Head (until July 14, 1978)
Acting Head (from June 5, 1978)
Head (from September 1, 1978)
Head
Head
Head
Head
Head
Head
Head
Head
Head
Head
Head
Head
Head
de Bruijn, Elsie
Head - 3 -
Appendix F (Cont'd...)
MUSIC LIBRARY
Burndorfer, Hans
READING ROOMS
Omelusik, Nicholas
SCIENCE DIVISION & MATHEMATICS LIBRARY
Brongers, Rein
SEDGEWICK LIBRARY
Erickson, Ture
SERIALS DIVISION
Turner, Ann
Baldwin, Nadine
SOCIAL SCIENCES DIVISION
Carrier, Lois
SPECIAL COLLECTIONS DIVISION
Yandle, Anne
Selby, Joan
SYSTEMS DEVELOPMENT
Dennis, Donald
Dobbin, Geraldine
WILSON RECORDINGS/COLLECTION
Kaye, Douglas
WOODWARD LIBRARY
Leith, Anna
Head
Head
Head
Head
Head (until April 2, 1978)
Head (from April 3, 1978)
Head
Head
Curator, Colbeck Collection
Systems Analyst
Systems & Information Science Librarian
Head
Head Appendix G
LIBRARY ORGANIZATION
ADMINISTRATION
Stuart-Stubbs, Basil
Bell, Inglis F.
MacDonald, Robin
Mclnnes, Douglas N.
Mercer, Eleanor
Watson, William J.
de Bruijn, Erik
ACQUISITIONS
Harrington, Walter
ANIMAL RESOURCE ECOLOGY LIBRARY
Nelson, Ann
ASIAN STUDIES
Ng, Tung King
BIBLIOGRAPHY
Cole, John
Elliston, Graham
Forbes, Jennifer
Jeffreys, Anthony
Johnson, Stephen
Mcintosh, Jack
Shields, Dorothy
BIOMEDICAL BRANCH LIBRARY (V.G.H.)
Freeman, George
University Librarian
Associate Librarian
Assistant Librarian - Technical Processes
and Systems
Assistant Librarian
Assistant Librarian
Assistant Librarian
and Development
Administrative Services Librarian
Head
Public Services
Collections
Physical Planning
Head
Head
Bibliographer - Science
Bibliographer - Serials
Bibliographer - English Language
Bibliographer - Life Sciences
Research Bibliographer
Bibliographer - Slavonic Studies
Bibliographer - European Languages
Head
CATALOGUE DIVISION
This section reflects the organization of the Division until April 2, 1978.
Elrod, J. McRee Head
Original Cataloguing
Bailey, Freda
Searching/LC Cataloguing
Joe, Linda
Catalogue Preparations
Baldwin, Nadine
CATALOGUE RECORDS
Head
Head (from July 1 until December 31, 1977)
Head
This section and the one following reflect the organization of Cataloguing from
April 3, 1978.
Turner, Ann
Bailey, Freda
Head
Deputy Head & Bibliographic Control Librarian Appendix G (Cont'd...)
- 2 -
Pharmacology
Medical Sciences Building
Block C, Room 221
Pharmacy
Cunningham Building
Room 160
Philosophy
Buchanan Building
Room 3270
Physics
Hennings Building
Room 311
Physiology
Medical Sciences Building
Block A, Room 201
Political
Science
Buchanan Building
Room 1220
Psychiatry
Rm. 22, Health Sciences Centre
2255 Wesbrook Road
Psychology
Henry Angus Building
Room 207
Rehabilitation
Medicine
Hut B2
Room 26-27
Religious
Studies
Buchanan Bldg.
Room 2250
Slavonic
Studies
Buchanan Building
Room 2251
Theatre
Frederick Wood Theatre
Room 211 Appendix H
LIBRARY SUPPORTED READING ROOMS
AS OF AUGUST, 1978
Adult
Education
Room 20
5760 Toronto Road
Electrical
Engineering
Elect. Engr. Bldg.
Rm. 428 (Enter by Rm. 434
Agricultural
Economics
Fonderosa Annex D
Room 105
English
Buchanan Tower
Room 697
Anthropology-
Sociology
Anth. Soc. Bldg.
Room 2314
French
Buchanan Tower
Room 897
Applied Science/
Mechanical Eng.
Civil & Mech. Eng.
Building, Room 2050
Geography
Geography Building
Room 140
Architecture
F. Lasserre Bldg.
Room 9B (Basement)
Geology
Geological Sciences
Building, Room 208
Asian Studies
Buchanan building
Room 2208
Geophysics
Geophysics Building
2nd Floor, South
Audiology
James Mather Bldg.
Fairview Pi., Room 205
Hispanic-
Italian
Buchanan Building
Room 2220
Chemical
Engineering
Chem. Engineering
Bldg., Room 310
Horn
Economics
Home Economics Bldg.
Room 210
Chemistry
Chemistry Building
Room 261
Institute of     Auditorium Annex 100
Industrial Relations
Classics
Buchanan Building
Room 2218
Institutional
Analysis & Plan.
Main Mall N. Admin. Bldg,
Room 140
Commerce
Henry Angus Bldg.
Room 307
Library
School
Library North Wing
8th Floor Room 831
Comparative
Literature
Buchanan Building
Room 227
Linguistics
Buchanan Building
Room 227
Computing
Centre
Computer Sciences Bldg.
Room 302
Metallurgy
Metallurgy Building
Room 319
Creative
Writing
Brock Hall, South
Wing, Room 204
Microbiology
Wesbrook Building
Room 300
Economics-
History
Buchanan Tower
Room 1097
Mineral
Engineering
Mineral Engineering
Building, Room 201 Appendix J
SENATE LIBRARY COMMITTEE
1977/78
Rev. P.C. Burns
Mr. R.T. Franson
Dr. E.M. Fulton
Dr. M.CL. Gerry
Dr. W.C. Gibson
Dr. R.H. Hill
Dr. L.D. Jones
Dr. P.A. Larkin (Chairman)
Mr. S.L. Lipson
Rev. J.P. Martin
Dr. Harvey Mitchell
Mr. J.F, McWilliams
Mr. P.H. Pearse
Mrs. A. Piternick
Mr. W.A. Rodgers
Dr. M. Shaw
EX-OFFICIO
Chancellor D. Miller
President D. Kenny
Mr. J.E.A. Parnall
Mr. B. Stuart-Stubbs
Terms of Reference:
(a) To advise and assist the Librarian in:
(i)  formulating a policy for the development of resources for
instruction and research;
(ii)  advising on the allocation of book funds to the fields of
instruction and research;
(iii)  developing a general program of library service for all the
interests of the University; and
(iv) keeping himself informed about the library needs of instructional and research staffs, and keeping the academic community
informed about the library.
(b) To report to Senate on matters of policy under discussion by the Committee, WHH1HI
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