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Nineteenth Report of the Library Committee to the Senate 1948-11

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 THE UNIVERSITY OF BRITISH COLUMBIA
NINETEENTH    REPORT
of the
LIBRARY       COMMITTEE
to
THE    SENATE
Covering the Period
September 1947 - August 194$
November, 194$ The University of British Columbia
Vancouver. Canada
President N. A. M. MacKenzie, C.M.G., M.M., LL.M., LL.D., K.C.,
Chairman of the Senate,
The University of British Columbia.
Dear Sir:
As Chairman of the Library Committee I have the honour
to submit, for the consideration of Senate, the Nineteenth
Report of the Librarian of the University, covering the period
from September 1, 1947, to August 31, 194$.
All of which is respectfully submitted.
Ian McTaggart Cowan
Chairman.
November 30, 194$. REPORT OF THE LIBRARIAN
Dr. Ian McT. Cowan
Chairman, Library Committee,
The University of British Columbia.
Dear Sir:
I have the honour to submit, for the information of the
Library Committee, the Nineteenth Report of the Librarian of the
University, covering the period September 1, 1947, to August 31,
194$.
During the twelve months under review the difficulties
and discomforts under which the staff have been working for several
years reached a climax.  In November, building operations on the new
north wing reached the point at which it was necessary to remove
the entire back wall of the original structure, and for most of
the winter only a temporary plywood partition stood between the
library and the outside, world. This was quite insufficient to keep
out dirt, cold, or drafts, and working conditions in certain parts
of the building—notably at both the Circulation Desk and the
Reference Desk—became extremely trying. Most of the stackroom
carrels were without heat all through the winter months, and both
staff and students frequently had to carry on while pipe-fitters,
pneumatic drill operators, and steel workers plied their trades
within a few feet of them.
All this happened at a time when the library was
endeavouring to serve 9300 students, the largest enrolment in the
University's history.  The difficulties involved were immense, for
although the library's own staff and book stock had grown substantially in recent years, the actual space and service
facilities available were not much greater than they had been in
1925, when student enrolment was only 1463. If relief in the form
of additional accommodation had not been visibly coming nearer day
by day, it is certain that many of the staff would have sought
jobs elsewhere; nor could they have been blamed for doing so.
Completion of the North Wing
The new wing dominated the library's thinking and working
during the year to so great a degree that it may be well at this
point to anticipate events and bring the narrative down to date.
In spite of many delays and complications the new
addition was virtually completed by the end of September, 194$.
It was most unfortunate that the original schedule, which called
for completion in July and August, could not be adhered to, for,
with the opening of the fall term, the library was compelled to
take possession of areas in which the contractor or his subcontractors had not entirely completed their work. This applied
even to the old main reading room, where a number of alterations
were made, and the main circulation desk rebuilt. Owing to a long
delay in the delivery of the new mill-work required for the desk
the staff had to carry on in make-shift quarters until late in
October; and their experience was typical.
The Reference Department transferred its operations to
the new Ridington Reference Room (6000 square feet) on Monday,
September 20. At that time a good deal of finishing work remained
to be done, and only a few chairs and tables were available for readers. The new Reserve Reading Room (4500 square feet) was brought
into use on October 4, and the new Periodical Reading Room (2500
square feet) followed after a further interval. Meanwhile the
Catalogue and Acquisitions Departments had moved into their new
quarters.  The last important area to be occupied will be the Music
and Art Room, which has been formed by throwing together the old
Periodical Room, the original Seminar Room, and the room occupied for
many years by the Burnett ethnological collection.  The whole space
measures approximately $0 feet by 32 feet, and will provide a reading
room, work room, and stack room for books in the fields of art,
architecture, and music, as well as for the library's collection of
gramophone records. All being well this new accommodation should be
ready for use by January 1st, 1949.
Finishing work on various levels in the main stack room
continued throughout the autumn. Erection of the new steel shelving
was completed in September, but this, too, had fallen badly behind
schedule. The first of the new steel shelves were not installed until
late in July but, thanks to the energy and complete disregard for
personal comfort and convenience with which the staff tackled the
immense job of moving the entire book stock, the task was nearing
completion by the time the session commenced.  A great deal of
shifting and rearranging remains to be done within specific areas,
but much of this can be postponed until next summer. Meanwhile the
entire stack room—old and new--will receive a thorough cleaning,
for the filth that was deposited on books and shelving while building
operations were under way has to be seen to be believed. \
5
On the whole the new wing has already proven itself to be
the convenient and comfortable building we hoped it would be.
Some minor additions and alterations are now seen to be desirable
(for example, some of the smaller work rooms are noisy, and acoustic
tile should be added here and there to counteract this), but these
are no more numerous nor serious than was to be expected.  The
delivery of certain important equipment—notably the steel files for
the new reference desk—has been much delayed, and it will probably
be another six months before the number of tables and chairs in the
reading rooms is adequate. At the moment about 300 more seats than
we had last year are available for readers; this may be increased to
600 without any undue crowding as soon as the necessary furnishings
can be obtained.
The special facilities provided in the new building are
proving popular with both the students and the teaching staff.
The Howay-Reid Collection of Canadiana is now 'properly shelved and
housed in the area formerly occupied by the Catalogue Department.
Four seminar rooms have been in use this autumn, and two more can
be made available as soon as we have tables and chairs to furnish
them.  The large lecture room, seating over 100, is in use, and we
hope that before long the projection room will be ready as well.
A sectional chesterfield and comfortable study tables await Faculty
members in the special Faculty Reading Room, and a range of stack-room
carrels reserved exclusively for Faculty use is close at hand.
The attached plans o'f the main entrance floor and the
concourse floor of the Library show clearly the general arrangement
of the reading rooms, offices, etc., now available.  They do not show either the top floor of the new wing, which is devoted in great
part to seminar rooms and a lecture room, or the lower levels of
the stack room. A substantial portion of the new stack space which
is not being equipped with shelving immediately has been turned over
temporarily to the University Museum and the University Art Centre.
The former occupies an area two decks in height under the new
Reserve Reading Room. The Art Centre has converted a large section
of stack level #1 into an exhibition gallery, and is using the large
shaft at the south-east corner of the building (marked "future
stacks" on the floor plans) for a workshop.
It is a pleasure to acknowledge the help and cooperation
that the Library has received from Mr. C. J. Thompson, the University's
architect, throughout the years the north-wing was under construction. He has done his utmost to give us the largest and best building
that could be secured for the money available, and visitors well
qualified to judge have expressed unstinted admiration for his
achievement. It is a pleasure, too, to express the Library's
appreciation of the help and advice received from Mr. Eric Melanson,
Superintendent of Construction for the Architect. While scrupulously
fair to the contractors, Mr. Melanson took the trouble to learn
something of the Library's special needs and problems, and these he
kept in mind as the work progressed. As a result he was able to
advise on innumerable matters affecting the comfort and convenience
of the building, and to arrange for many small improvements that
could be secured without additional expense, providing the contractors knew about them at an early enough stage of construction. HtStltVC        BOOK.
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The Book Collection
During the year 962$ volumes were accessioned, catalogued,
and added to the main book collection, while approximately 1400
volumes were classified and catalogued for the Howay-Reid Collection
of Canadiana.  In addition the Library acquired from the University
of Toronto a very large collection of periodicals which came
originally from the Library of the Royal Canadian Institute, but
none of this material arrived in time to be accessioned or catalogued
before the end of the year under review.
In the ordinary course of events this report would doubtless have stated that the total number of volumes in the Library on
September 1, 194$, was about 190,000. This figure would have been
arrived at by adding the year's accessions to the total given in
1947, and making any necessary allowances for discards, duplicates,
and so on. Last April, however, the entire book collection was
measured with a foot rule, in order that we might know accurately
what shelving had to be set aside for the various subject fields in
the enlarged stack room. When the figures were totalled it became
evident at once that the Library was very much larger than had been
thought. Indeed, leaving only very scanty room for immediate
expansion (except in the shelving devoted to government documents
and unbound periodicals), we found that the Library would fill
shelving that, according to the manufacturer's tables, should have a
capacity of well over 300,000 volumes. Next spring, when the
session ends, it should be possible to make an actual count of the
books in the building, and they will probably be found to total
about 260,000 volumes. $
Several factors prevented us from being aware of the
actual size of the Library until moving day approached. For one
thing,' a great deal of material was stored in the boiler room, various
basements, and other odd corners, where its bulk could not be
estimated accurately. For another, the Catalogue Department many
years ago decided not to accession (and, as a consequence, not to
include in the official count of the number of books added to the
Library) any books of less than 100 pages unless they were valuable
or rare.  The 190,000 volumes included in the numbered series were
therefore larger, on the average, than we expected, and this total
included only a few of the many thousands of smaller volumes and
pamphlets that filled shelf after shelf in the stack room.
The H. R. MacMillan Collection in Forestry
Difficult working conditions brought the buying programme
for this collection almost to a standstill for a time, but It is now
once again proceeding satisfactorily.  Consultations have been held
both with the new Head and other members of the staff of the Department of Forestry, and with the Director and staff of the Dominion
Forest Products Laboratory. We are greatly indebted to Mr. MacMillan
for his continued support of the project, and the fine collection of
material that is being brought together should ultimately be of great
service to the lumber industry generally as well as to students on
the campus. 9
Gifts
It is a pleasure to report that many useful and interesting
gifts were received in the course of the year.
Mr. H. R. MacMillan, continuing his generous interest in
the Library,"^presented several important early accounts of voyages
relating to this region, including Portlock's Voyage Round the World
17$5-17$$, Dixon's A Voyage Round the World 17$$, and Cox's Adventures
on the Columbia River, as well as a number of National Forest Park
Guides and the interesting publications of the Newcomen Society.
The Library also received, through Mr. MacMillan's kindness,
many valuable maps, including Arrowsmith's Chart of the World on
Mercator's Projection (1790), two old maps of Upper Canada, and a
number of maps of great historical interest, among them a set of
charts by Buache.
The Library owes a special debt to Mr. William Dorbils
for the gift of a large number of books which included several important works in the field of bibliography and a most useful working
collection of Canadiana consisting of more than 250 volumes.
Mr. Dorbils has always taken a keen and practical interest in the
growth of the Howay-Reid Collection and in accordance with his
intention, all titles or editions that were included in his gift and
not already represented in this special Collection were placed there.
From Mrs. C. 0. Scott the Library received a very welcome
gift of about 350 volumes. The books, which consist chiefly of
Canadiana and publications in the field of international affairs,
form a most useful and valuable addition to our collection.
From Mr. D. A. MacGregor the Library received the final 10
instalment of a large number of newspaper cartoons covering the war •
years.  Dr. Harry V. Warren presented his annual gift of the London
Times, weekly edition, and the London Observer. Mr. David Paul
sent to the Library the London Times., September 1946-June 194$,
continuing a previous gift of the Times for the war years.    .
The Vancouver Daily Province gave the Library a long run
of the Vancouver Sun, the Magazine Sections of the Province itself
for the years 1924-44, and the Financial Page for 1945.  The
Vancouver Sun presented a subscription to its microfilm edition
which is now being received from the photographer month by month,
commencing with the issue of October 1, 1947.  Sun Directories Limited
very kindly sent to the Library the volumes of the B. C. Directory
that had been missing from our file.  From the Vancouver City Hall
came a long run of the B. C. Gazette.
A number of books in the field of Law were received from
Lieut-Corn. J. Ronald Doull through his mother, and a miscellaneous
collection of standard works and the first ten volumes of the
Canadian Bar Review from Mr. Arthur Cobourn. Mr. W, W. Lefeaux
gave to the Library a set of the Report of the Sirois Commission with
the 19 volumes of appendixes and supplements.
Mrs. Jessie Tulk presented several sets of standard works
including The Drama and The Makers of Canada, and Mr. Dennis M.
Churchill added to our collection half a dozen useful items in
several subjects.  Gifts from Mr. Lester McLennan of Richmond,
California, included a copy of the 2nd edition of The Emigrant by
Head,. Arfwedson's The United States and Canada, and Casgrain's
Histoire de l'Hotel-Dieu de Quebec. A most interesting volume, 11
The History of the Revolutions in England Under the Family of the
Stuarts from the Year 1603 to I69O (London 1711), was received from
Mrs. T. R. Pearson of South Westminster, and. a copy of the Works of
Horace. the first edition printed in what is now the Dominion of
Canada (l$45), was given to the Library by Mrs. S. J. Willis of
Victoria.
The Library of the University of Western Ontario presented
two bound volumes of Grip, eight numbers of the Bulletin of the Museum
of Modern Art, and other useful items. An almost complete file of
Buschings Wflchentliche nachrichten von neuen landcharten geographischen,
statistischen und historischen buchern und sachen. was received from
the Vancouver Public Library, and a very useful run of the Journal of
Heredity from Mr. G. S. Ketcheson.
A large and useful collection of books and booklets on art,
periodicals, librettos and scores came to the Library from Dr. J. C.
Berry. Dr. Dorothy Blakey Smith presented a file of the Ubyssey for
1917-1$ and 191$-22, and Professor L. A. MacKay contributed an
interesting collection of contemporary poetry. Mr. Sydney Scott gave
to the Library several cartons of miscellaneous books, pamphlets
and papers, many of which fill gaps in our own files.
Other gifts of use and value to the Library were received
from the following:
Mrs. W. E. Adams, Mr. G. A. Cran, Mr. H. L. Draper of Haney,
B. C., Mr. Rodolphe Paradis, Mrs. W, Garland Foster of White Rock,
B. C, Mr. Jack Priest, Mr. Clifford Carl of Victoria, Mr. Peter G.
Castran, Rev. J. Elmer Whelpley, Mrs. A. Marton, Mr. W. P. de Vries,
Mr. Roy Stevens and Miss Stevens, Mrs. H. Clayton, Mr. John A. Bunn,
Lulu Island, B. C, Mr. James Manson, Mrs. H, V. Hummell, 12
Mrs. Newton W. Rowell of Ottavra, Mr. C. H. Bastin, Mrs. J. H. Watson,
Mr. Fisher Davidson of Toronto, Miss C. J. de Van Steenwyk,
Mr. Frank H. Brown, Mr. G. H. Shepherd, Mr. J. B. G. Cooper,  Estate
of the late George McCrossan, Estate of the late Dr. R. H.
McCutcheon, The Toronto Public Libraries, New Westminster Public
Library, the Library of the Royal Bank of Canada in Montreal, the
Allan Hancock Foundation Library of the University of Southern
California, Northwestern University, the Henry E, Huntington Library
of San Marino, Cal., the Canadian Library Association, Mount Allison
University Library, the Library of the University of Western Ontario,
the College of Forestry Library of the University of Washington in
Seattle, Notre Dame University, the Canadian Medical Association in
Montreal, Library of the Royal Veterinary and Agricultural College of
Copenhagen, The Empire Club of Canada, Canada Press Club of Winnipeg,
B. C, Research Council, and the Canadian Federation of Labour.
Members of the University staff continue to show their
interest in the Library.  Among those who have presented useful gifts
during the year are Dr. Klinck, President MacKenzie, Dean Gage,
Dr. Cowan, Professor Soward, Dr. Murdoch, Mr. Petersen, Dr. Stanley,
Professor Cooke, Mr. T. R. McCloy, Dr. Brooke, Dr. Isabel Maclnnes,
Dr. Ranta, Professor Read, Professor Larsen, and the Class of
Sociology 400. 13
The Library Staff
On September 1, 1947, the staff consisted of 42 persons.
By the autumn of 194$ the total had increased to 50, of which 20 were
occupying professional positions. Another $ staff members were
university graduates and ranked as Library Assistants (i.e., sub-
professionals) .
The most important developments were the organization of a
full-fledged Acquisitions Department, and the opening of a bindery.
The new department will handle all accessions, regardless of source
(purchase, gift, exchange, etc.), and will also look after the
disposal of duplicate material, of which a considerable amount has now
accumulated. Mr. Samuel Rothstein, who joined the Reference Department in 1947, was appointed Head of Acquisitions as from July 1, 194$.
Our well-equipped bindery, which is situated at the north
end of stack level #2, was ready for work by the middle of October,
194$. The staff consists of Mr. H. W. Brooks, an expert bookbinder
of long experience, and a sewing girl. An apprentice will probably be
added to the staff at a later date. The bindery operates under the
direction of Mr. R. J. Lanning, Head of the Periodicals and Binding
Department.
The staff of the Catalogue Department remains at 10, and
this will probably be quite sufficient until the addition of a Medical
School, or some other major expansion on the campus.  The Reference
Department's staff increased to 12, of whom 7 are trained librarians,
and when the Fine Arts Room opens In January the total will rise to 13.
The Circulation Department has a full-time staff of 11, and in
addition employs a corps of part-time student assistants.  In all
probability the staff of the service departments will have to be 14
increased further another year, as the rush of students besieging
the reference and circulation desks in the enlarged building is even
greater than we anticipated.
Staff changes during the year were relatively few. Miss
Nora Gibson resigned in the spring to accept a position with the
Canadian Broadcasting Corporation, and on July 1 her place as Extension
Librarian was taken by Miss Edith Stewart, who served in this position
for a time some years ago. Miss-Margaret Mackenzie, formerly on the
staff of the University of Manitoba, joined the Reference Department,
as did Miss Joan O'Rourke, who graduated in June from the University
of Toronto Library School.  Of the eight Library Assistants (i.e.,
sub-professionals) on the staff in 1947-4$, one is now teaching, while
another, Miss Lois Crook, was awarded a bursary by the Staff Association of the Vancouver Public Library, and is now attending Library
School in Toronto.  The other six are valued members of our staff this
year.
Circulation
The number of books circulated from the main Loan Desk was
121,69$ in 1947-4$, as compared with 100,281 in 1946-47, an increase
of about 21$.  In view of the extremely cramped quarters in which the
staff worked, the mere handling of so many books was no mean achievement.  The circulation of "reserve" books rose from 7$,7$7 in 1946-47
to 97,$37 in 1947-4$. The only space available for the "reserve"
section of the Circulation Department was part of the main hallway,
but, as the increased use made of the books shows, the students much
preferred to have them there, rather than in the Armouries as in
1945-46. 15
Circulation through the Extension Department and in the
Nursing Reading Room showed little change, and the total for all
departments was 232,456 in 1947-4$, as compared with 191,736 in the
previous year.  The increase was approximately 21$.  This was much
the busiest year the Library has ever had, and it is interesting to
note that circulation in the three months January-March, 194$,
exceeded that for the entire academic year 1943-44.
It is already evident that circulation figures will show
another and still greater increase in 194$-49.  This will probably
be most marked in the case of periodicals and "reserve" books, both
of which are now for the first time housed in adequate quarters.  The
increase in "reserve" circulation is specially notable- because the
Library has returned to the popular "open shelf" plan in the new
Reserve Book Reading Room.  This means that students now actually
borrow only the books they wish to study for a considerable time,
whereas formerly, when the "closed shelf" system was in use, they had
to charge books out, even though they wished only to examine them
briefly or browse through them.  In other words, even if "reserve"
circulation figures for 194$-49 (with open shelves) were no higher
than those for 1947-4$ (with closed shelves), these would indicate a
substantial increase in the actual use of "reserve" books.  The point
is worth noting, for it.illustrates the important truth that
statistics can only indicate in a very rough and ready way the use
that is being made of the Library.  At best they show only a part of
the picture, and even that part may not be in perfect focus. 16
Circulation Statistics
Total Circulation
in 1943-
-44
$9,749
1944-
-45
92,
,470
1945-
-46
166;
,515
1946-47
191,736
1947-
-48
232.
,456
1946-47
1947-4$
General
Reserve
Total
General
Reserve
Total
September
3707
2334
6041
4303
2062
6365
October
13145
11492
24637
1$204
13184
313$$
November
14381
12046
26427
176$5
13$33
3151$
December
5350
6885
12235
9263
7449
16712
January
13717
7269
209$6
177$$
13711
31499
February
15630
$363
23993
16430
13145
29575
March
14$07
10857
25664
17794
147$4
3257$
April
7337
9688
17025
$277
127$5
21062
May
15$6
$2
166$
1946
63
2009
June
1594
21
1615
1700
57
1757
July
565$
6497
12155
4669
4191
$$60
August
3369
3253
6622
3639
2573
6212
100281
787$7
179068
12169$
97$37
219535
Extension
1039$
10621
Nursing
2270
2300
191736
232456 17
Missing Books
It was not possible to take an inventory in 194$, but a complete
check of the book stock is planned for May, 1949.
The "closed" stack used for "reserve" books in 1947-4$ reduced
losses from this collection very materially, but the service given to
the students was, of course, less satisfactory from their point of
view.  It is hoped that the much better physical accommodation
provided in the new building will enable us to revert to the popular
"open shelf" system without any great increase in book loss.
Reference Department
The Reference Department and the Circulation Department
suffered most from the dirt, cold, noise, and general inconvenience
arising from building operations that had to be endured throughout
the academic year 1947-4$,  These conditions, plus the immense volume
of routine work that had to be handled at the desk, forced the
Reference staff to curtail certain services and postpone the inauguration of others. Miss Smith was again unable to give any special
bibliographical lectures.  (This important service, it may be added
parenthetically, was resumed on a small scale in the autumn of 194$.)
Work on the map collection remained at a standstill, and little could
be done beyond lending classroom maps to professors.  In spite of
this the collection continued to grow, thanks in great part to
Dr. Lewis Robinson, who secured for us an important collection of
Canadian and foreign maps.
The collection of government documents continues to expand
in size and usefulness.  The work of checking and filing accessions 1$
has become so complex that, in order to minimize the inconvenience
that must arise when a staff change occurs, care of the collection
has been portioned out to a large group of the staff.  Individual
assignments are reshuffled from time to time so as to give each member
as broad an acquaintance as possible with the collection as a whole.
This was only one of a number of problems in the field of
procedures that had to be dealt with in 1947-4$,  The sudden growth
in the size of the Reference Department, coupled with the fact that
many of the ten persons who composed it in the fall of 1947 were
inexperienced, made it essential to organize the work more strictly,
and establish routines which would be standard for the department and
therefore quickly understood by all members of it.  The necessary
procedures were worked out by Miss Mary Rendell, First Assistant, to
whom our thanks and much credit are due.  Miss Rendell also undertook
to supervise the work of each new staff member for an orientation and
training period of two weeks.  The plan worked well, and had the dual
effect of making newcomers feel more at home, and of enabling them to
be of real help to the department with a minimum of delay.
Personnel problems in general received a great deal of
attention during the year.  A Personnel Institute conducted in
Vancouver by Mr. Louis Kroeger, of San Francisco, under the auspices
of the British Columbia Library Association, was attended by some
twenty members of the staff, including eight from the Reference
Department.  All of us found the sessions most valuable, and various
suggestions and recommendations made by Mr. Kroeger have been carried
into effect.  The Reference Department instituted weekly staff meetings,
at which various aspects of the department's work were discussed, and 19
experiments were also made with a staff evaluation scheme.  The
California Library rating was used, and the results were, in
Miss Smith's opinion, of definite value.  It was felt, however, that a
rating scale of our own, adapted to our special needs, would be
preferable to the California scale, and it is hoped that this may be
developed in due course.
Little need be said about the work of the department
generally except to repeat the plea made in last year's report that
professors making essay and study assignments should work in closer
cooperation with the Library.  In particular, advance notice of assignments would be greatly appreciated.  Only in this way can the Library
make its limited resources of maximum use to the students—and with
enrolment at its present peak every book must be used in the-most
effective way if standards are not to fall seriously.
Interlibrary Loans
During the academic year 1947-4$ the Library borrowed 253
volumes on interlibrary loan, and lent 21$ to other institutions.
Nineteen films and photostats were also secured in lieu of interlibrary
loans, and these brought the total number of transactions to 490, an
increase of 20$ over the previous year.
Statistics for the years 1943-4$ follow:-
1943-44 (April-March)
1944-45 (April-March)
1945 (April-August)
1945-46(September-August)
194-6-47 (September-August)
1947-4$(September-August):
Books
Photostats and
microfilm
Borrowed
Loaned
100
130
65
172
199
Total
122
137
4$
13$
205
222
267
113
310
404
253
21$ 471
19
19
490 20
Now that courses leading to the Ph.D. degree have been
added to the curriculum the number of loans will doubtless increase
still further.  The service is one that the Reference Department is
happy to make available to the campus, although the great pressure of
routine work makes it necessary at the moment to limit it to the most
pressing needs of the staff and research students.
Displays
Miss Doreen Fraser was in charge of this work throughout the
year, and in addition to the usual book displays she was able to
arrange special showings of various sorts. One popular series consisted of displays illustrating the activities of various student
clubs, including the Players' Club, the Physics Club, the Soaring
Club, the University Radio Society, and other organizations.
Current-affairs maps were shown through the year on two portable notice
boards in the main hallway, and in addition a number of art displays
were arranged there.  These included collections of photographs and
several one-man shows by local artists, notably Mr. Jack Shadbolt,
Mr. George Doubt, Mr. Bruce Boyd, Mr. John Wright, and Mr. Fred Amess.
Art Loan Collection
Lack of space and pressure of routine work made the management of this collection a difficult problem, but the service was
maintained in spite of these obstacles.  A "loan day" was arranged
once a month, and the opportunity to borrow original paintings and
good prints was much appreciated by the students. Mrs, Fred Amess and
Mrs. Pat McPherson were of great assistance, for they acted as
intermediaries between the Library and the B. C. Branch of the 21
Federation of Canadian Artists, secured new pictures for us, and
arranged for the return of others to their owners.  Some new equipment
was secured during the year, including 25 standard-sized picture
frames, measuring 22 by 28 inches.  These have been finished in various
attractive shades, and have been specially designed to accommodate
unframed pictures lent to the collection.
The Library Catalogues
The work of the Catalogue Department has gone on so steadily
that there is little to report about its activities.  As noted above,
a total of 9268 volumes were accessioned and catalogued for the main
collection and another 1400 volumes were classified and catalogued for
the Howay-Reid Collection. New entries reported to the Pacific Northwest Bibliographic Center, in Seattle, totalled 6934, and discards
reported numbered 661.
Packing and moving operations took a great deal of time and
energy.  Virtually every catalogue, shelf list, etc., in the department's keeping was moved and completely rearranged, and the department
itself was the first to move into the addition to the library building.
The new quarters there have been found to be most comfortable, and the
general lay-out is proving as convenient in practice as it looked on
paper.
Periodicals
As the University's curriculum continues to expand both in
area and depth, the pressure upon the Library to add new periodicals
to its holdings continues to be very great indeed.  The decision to
embark upon Ph.D. courses will inevitably increase this pressure still
further, as work of a proper standard cannot be carried on unless the 22
key files required are made available.
In last year's report the fact was noted that 90 new titles
had been added to the Library's holdings in 1945-46, and that no less
than 187 additional periodicals had been added to the list in
1946-47, Another 135 titles have been added in 1947-4$, which means
that additions over the three-year period 1945-4$ reached the astonishing total of 412. What this means in additional subscription and
binding costs will be readily appreciated.  It illustrates, too, the
fact that the Library is a service institution which must expand (and
inevitably become more costly) as campus needs expand.  Like the
power house, the demands made upon it are in great part beyond its
own control, and provision of the funds necessary to buy essential
books and magazines should be given a priority at least on a par with
the University's expenditures for coal and electricity.
It should be noted that additions are made to the periodical
list only after most careful consideration, and care is taken to
secure the best available title in any given field.  If the publication selected is only a few years old, an effort is made to secure all
back numbers to date.  If the back file is extensive, the Library
consults the departments interested concerning its value, and may
acquire the numbers issued over a period of five, ten, or even twenty
years, as seems advisable or necessary.
Relatively few people on the campus probably are aware of
the tireless search for volumes and individual issues missing from
our files that is conducted year in and year out by Mr. R. J. Lanning,
Head of the Periodicals Department.  It is certainly not appreciated
by the students who handle periodicals carelessly, nor by professors
who risk their loss by abusing privileges and removing them from the 23
library building for reasons that are actually quite inadequate.
The time and money that must be devoted to making good the losses
that result are by no means negligible, to say nothing of the inconvenience suffered by others.  When facilities within the Library for
the use of periodicals were both limited and inconvenient a case could
be made for taking them elsewhere, but a general tightening-up of
regulations is now clearly in order.
A list of new periodicals and important back files acquired
during 1947-4$ is given below. For convenience they have been
divided into a number of categories, as in previous reports.
(1) Important New Sets Acquired or Long Files added:
General Collection
(# indicates that current subscription to the
title was first placed in 1947-4$)
ACTION CANADIENNE-FRANCAISE, v. 1-20, 1917-192$ (all published)
ALPINE GARDEN SOCIETY JOURNAL, v. 1, 1930 to date
# BRITTONIA, v. 1, 1931 to date
# BRYOLOGIST, v. 1, 1$9$ to date (Library already had a few volumes)
(not quite complete)
CHINESE SOCIAL AND POLITICAL SCIENCE REVIEW, v. 1-24, 1916-1940
(not quite complete)
CIBA REVIEW, v. 1-5 and CIBA ZEITSCHRIFT, v. 4-9, 1937 to date
EDUCATION ADMINISTRATION AND SUPERVISION, v. 1-10, 1915-1924
FIELD MUSEUM.  Publications.  Anthropology, v. 16, 1923 to date
FUNDAMENTA MATHEMATICAL  long file to complete Library set,
1920-1939
HARVARD UNIVERSITY.  PEABODY MUSEUM.  Selected volumes of Memoirs,
Papers, and Reports
# HELVETICA PHYSICA ACTA, v. 1, 192$ to date
# IBIS, ser. 5, v. 1, 1883 to date
INSTITUTE OF PETROLEUM JOURNAL, v.l, 1914 to date (not quite
complete)
# JOURNAL OF COMPARATIVE LEGISLATION, n.s.v. 7, 1906 to date (second
set for Law)(not quite complete)
# JOURNAL OF CONSULTING PSYCHOLOGY, v. 1, 1937 to date (not quite
complete)
JOURNAL OF PHYSIOLOGY, v. 59, 1924 to date
# LONDON AND CAMBRIDGE ECONOMIC SERVICE.  Memoranda, No. 2, 1924
to date (not quite complete)
# MEMORIAL DES SCIENCES MATHEMATIQUES, no. 1, 192 5 to date (not quite
complete) 24
ft    MUSICAL ASSOCIATION, Proceedings, v. 9, 1$$2 to date (not quite
complete)
NATIONAL ASSOCIATION FOR THE .PROMOTION OF SOCIAL SCIENCE, 1857,
1862, 1864, 1$66 to end of set (1886)
NATIONAL GEOGRAPHIC MAGAZINE, v. 1-17, 1891-1916 (first three
volumes incomplete)
OTTAWA. UNIVERSITY. REVUE DE L'UNIVERSITE D'OTTAWA, v. 4, 1934 to
date
# PARASITOLOGY, v. 17, 1925 to date
# POLAR RECORD, No. 5, 1933 to date
REVUE FRANCO-AMERICAINE, v. 1-10, 1908-1913 (all published)
# ROYAL STATISTICAL SOCIETY, v. 7$, 1914 to date
# SOCIETE DE BIOLOGIE, COMPTES RENEWS, v. 87, 1922 to date (not quite
complete)
SOUTHERN REVIEW, v. 1-7, 1935-1942 (all published)(not quite
complete)
ZEITSCHRIFT FUR HYGIENE UND INFEKTIONSKRANKHEITEN, v. 1-21, 23, 27
1886-1896.
(2) Shorter Runs of the Following Titles have been Acquired
(# indicates that current subscription to the title was
first placed in 1947-4$)
AGRONOMIA LUSITANA
AMERICAN FOUNDRYMEN'S ASSOCIATION, Transactions
# AMERICAN INSTITUTE OF PLANNERS, Journal
AMERICAN JOURNAL OF PHARMACY
# AMERICAN MICROSCOPICAL SOCIETY, Transactions
# L'ARCHE
# AUSTRALIAN JOURNAL OF EXPERIMENTAL BIOLOGY AND MEDICAL SCIENCE
AUSTRALIAN JOURNAL OF SCIENCE
# BIOMETRICS
# CANADIAN FISHERMAN
# COMPOSITIO MaTHLMaTICA
EDUCATIONAL ABSTRACTS
# EDUCATIONAL aND PSYCHOLOGICAL MEASUREMENT
# FARLOWIA
GENTES HERBARUM
INTERNATIONAL JOURNAL OF INDIVIDUAL PSYCHOLOGY
# JOURNaL OF CLINICAL PSYCHOLOGY
JOURNAL OF LABORATORY aND CLINICaL MEDICINE, 1931-1946 (not quite
complete)
MATERIALS FOR THE STUDY OF OLD ENGLISH DRaMa
# MENNINGER CLINIC, Bulletin
MENNONITE quarterly
# LA NEF
POETRY REVIEW, 1912-1923 (incomplete)
# POLAR TIMES
REVUE NaTIONALE (Montreal)
ROYAL INSTITUTE OF BRITISH ARCHITECTS, Journal
# SOUTHWESTERN JOURNaL OF ANTHROPOLOGY
# SPANISH REVIEW (all numbers published)
# TRIVIUM 25
(3) Other New Subscriptions: General Collection
(# indicates either a new publication or a
title of which the Library has or expects to
have a complete file in. the near future)
ACCENT
# ACTA CRYSTALLOGRAPHICA
ADVERTISING AND SELLING
AKADEMIIA NAUK S.S.S.R. Izvestia.  Otdelenie Literatury I Iazyka
AMERICAN BAR ASSOCIATION, Journal
AMERICAN DRUGGIST
AMERICAN EGG AND POULTRY MAGAZINE
AMERICAN FOUNDRYMAN
# AMERICAN STATISTICIAN
# APPLIED MECHANICS REVIEW
# APPLIED SCIENCE RESEARCH, Sections A and B
# ARBITRATION JOURNAL
# ARCHAEOLOGY (plus Annual Bulletin of the Association)
# ARCTIC
# ARTS ET LETTRES
# ASIAN HORIZON
ATHLETICS
# BEHAVIOUR
BEHIND THE HEADLINES
# BRITISH JOURNAL OF NUTRITION
ft    BRITISH JOURNAL OF PSYCHOLOGY, Statistical Section
# BULLETIN OF THE ATOMIC SCIENTISTS
CAHIERS D'ART
%     CHEMICAL ENGINEERING PROGRESS
# CHEMICAL SOCIETY, Quarterly review
CHRISTIAN SCIENCE MONITOR
COMMONWEALTH LAW REPORTS
CORNELL VETERINARIAN
CRAFT HORIZONS
DIGEST OF TREATMENT
# DOCUMENTS OF INTERNATIONAL ORGANIZATION
DOMINION SECURITIES CORPORATION, Quarterly Canadian Review
DOMUS (Milan)
DYESTUFFS
# EXCERPTA MEDICA (Sections 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, $)
# EXPERIENTIA
FAR EASTERN SURVEY
# GUIDANCE MONOGRAPHS
HEALTH EDUCATION JOURNAL
# HERE AND NOW
# INDUSTRIAL AND LABOR RELATIONS REVIEW
INDUSTRIAL NURSING
INSURANCE LAW REPORTER
# INTERIM
INTERIORS
# INTERNATIONAL CHILD WELFARE REVIEW
# INTERNATIONAL LAW QUARTERLY
IOWA LAW REVIEW
IRISH LAW REPORTS 26
# JOURNAL OF SOIL AND WATER CONSERVATION
JURIDICAL REVIEW
KENYON REVIEW
LONDON AND CAMBRIDGE ECONOMIC SOCIETY, Bulletin
MARITIME LAW REPORTS
MINING JOURNAL
MODERN HOSPITAL
# NETHERLANDS MILK JOURNAL
# NEW COLOPHON
NORTHERN IRELAND REPORTS
NURSING MIRROR
NURSING TIMES
ORION
# PACIFIC DISCOVERY
PACIFIC FISHERMAN
PERSONNEL
PETROLEUM REFINER
PHILOSOPHISCHES JAHRBUCH
# PHOENIX
# PHYSICS TODAY
£    PHYSIOLOGIA COMPARATA ET OECOLOGIA
if    PHYSIOLOGIA PLANTARUM
# PLANT AND SOIL
# POETRY COMMONWEALTH
# POETRY LONDON
POETRY QUARTERLY
PRAVDA
# QUARTERLY JOURNAL OF MECHANICS AND APPLIED MATHEMATICS
QUARTERLY JOURNaL OF STUDIES OF ALCOHOL
RECREATION REVIEW
RES JUDICATAE
# RESEARCH
ff    REVIEW OF METAPHYSICS
# REVUE CANADIENNE DE GEOGRaPHIE
# REVUE DE PSYCHOLOGIE
# REVUE D'HISTOIRE DE L'AMERIQUE FRANCAISE
ROYAL METEOROLOGICAL SOCIETY, Quarterly Journal
ST. JOHN'S LaW REVIEW
# SASKATCHEWAN HISTORY
SEWANEE REVIEW
SOCIETY OF PUBLIC TEaCHERS OF LAW, Journal
SOLICITOR
SOUTH ATLANTIC QUARTERLY
# TAX LAW REVIEW
TIDE
# TORONTO. UNIVERSITY, DUNLAP OBSERVATORY.  Contributions
VIRGINIA QUARTERLY REVIEW
# WEATHER
WESTERN ADVERTISING
WESTERN REVIEW
# YALE FRENCH STUDIES
# ZEITSCHRIFT FUR aNGEWaNDTE PHYSIK
ZEITSCHRIFT FUR SLaVISCHE PHILOLOGIE 27
(4) The H. R. MacMillan Collection in Forestry
During the year memberships were taken out in the
INSTITUTE OF PAPER CHEMISTRY and in the TECHNICAL ASSOCIATION
OF PULP AND PAPER INDUSTRIES (TAPPI).  As a result the Library
is now receiving the INSTITUTE'S JOURNAL and the various publications issued by TAPPI.
Other new subscriptions placed included the REVUE
INTERNATIONALE DU BOIS and LESNAYA PROMYSHLENNOST.
The Library's file of the publications of the SOUTH
AFRICAN FORESTRY SOCIETY was completed during the year.
The Department of Forestry turned over to the Library
its files of S A F AFFAIRS published by the Society of American
Foresters, and the NEWS BULLETIN published by the CANADIAN SOCIETY
OF FOREST ENGINEERS.
(5) Foreign Periodicals
Through the courtesy of the French Consul the Library
is receiving one-year complimentary subscriptions to the following journals:
L'ACADEMIE DES SCIENCES - Comptes Rendus
ANNALES DE MEDICINE
L'ANTHROPOLOGIE
BULLETIN CRITIQUE DU LIVRE FRANCAIS
FONTAINE
JOURNAL DE PHYSIQUE ET LE RADIUM
PARIS L'UNIVERSITE.  REVUE DE L'UNIVERSITE
REVUE METAPHYSIQUE ET DE MORALE
REVUE POLITIQUE ET PARLEMENTAIRE
SOCIETE DE CHIMIE BIOLOGIQUE - Bulletin
The Library is still struggling with the problem of
filling in the gaps in its files of important German periodicals,
subscriptions to which could not be maintained during the war.
Certain files, or parts of files, have been reprinted in
facsimile editions, but some time ago this programme was in great
part discontinued, presumably because communication with Germany
had been reestablished, and it was felt that files might be
available there. Recently, however, it has become clear that
most libraries on this continent can expect to secure little
material directly from Germany, and a new reprinting programme
is now gaining momentum. Thanks to this it seems probable that
we shall be able to fill in many of the important gaps that remain
during the next year or two. 28
(6) Periodicals Discontinued
Twelve periodicals received by the Library ceased publication
during the year.  Several of them were most useful titles which will
be missed greatly.  The list follows.
AGRICULTURAL AND INDUSTRIAL PROGRESS IN CANADA
ARTS
FORTNIGHTLY LAW REVIEW
JOURNAL OF LEGAL AND POLITICAL SOCIOLOGY
JOURNAL OF PHYSICS (U.S.3.R.)
MOTION PICTURE CRITICS' REVIEWS
RENAISSANCE
RESEARCH TODAY
S.P.E. (Society for Pure English) TRACTS
SCHOOL
WORLD BIOGRAPHY
WORLD ECONOMICS
In addition, two subscriptions were dropped, on the advice
of the departments chiefly concerned.
Binding
In the course of the year nearly 400 volumes were shipped
to the Canadian Binding Company in Hamilton, but in spite of this
arrears continued to pile up.  Binding costs are rising, but under
present conditions this is only to be expected.  The Art Bookbinder,
who did the bulk of our work in 1947-4$, was granted a 10$ increase
over his previous rates, and in the fall of 194$ a further bonus of
10$ had to be added.  In spite of this, our binding costs are still
considerably lower than those of most libraries that have not
binderies of their own.  Comparative figures for the last four years
are as follows:-
Average cost
per volume:- 1944-45 1945-46 1946-47 1947-4$
Periodicals "TTTs~5 ~$2.09 $2.13 $2.3$
Paper-bound books 1.22 1.60 1.66 1.77
Rebinds  and
repairs 1.29 1.46 1.23 1.69 29
As noted in last year's report, negotiations were in
progress a year ago with Mr. M. I. Sochasky, of the Art Bookbinder,
the object being an agreement whereby he might transfer his operations to the new wing of the Library, and devote his full time (or a
total of 40 hours per week) to the binding requirements of the
Library.  An agreement was eventually arrived at, but some months
later Mr. Sochasky asked to be released from it, for personal reasons.
Negotiations began soon after with Mr. H. W. Brooks, whose business
Mr. Sochasky had purchased in 1945, and who had done most of the
Library's work for many years previous to that date.  The proposal
made to Mr. Brooks was that he should supervise the building and
equipping of a complete bindery in the new north wing, and, when it
was ready for operation, join the staff as binder.  This Mr. Brooks
agreed to do, and provision for the purchase of the necessary
equipment was included in the Library's budget for 1947-4$,  The
new bindery turned out its first book in October, 194$, and has been
operating full-time ever since.  The staff consists of Mr. Brooks,
who at present is working 25 hours weekly, and a sewing girl employed
full time.  Later on it will probably be found advantageous to all
concerned if an apprentice is added to the staff.
It is too early to estimate the output of the new bindery
with much accuracy, but it is clear that the whole binding situation
will be far more satisfactory than formerly. As arrears on hand are
causing great inconvenience, shipments will continue to be sent to
the Art Bookbinder as usual for some time to come.
Binding statistics for the financial year 1947-4$ follow. 30
Volumes of periodicals bound
Paper-bound books bound
Rebinds and repairs
Theses
Canadian Library Binding Co.,
Hamilton:
Periodicals and paper-bound books 264
Rebinds and repairs
Miscellaneous binding costs
Less credits for materials supplied
Bound for Faculty of Law
TOTAL
»a««»«ae
1024
299
50
151
$2412.$0
510,56
$4.40
415.25
264)
123)
712.06
25
41.40
1936
$4176.47
175.00
4001.47
297
2233
In addition,the Faculty of Law had 94 volumes bound or
repaired in Eastern Canada at a cost of $260.$0.
Gramophone Records
As predicted last year, the number of gramophone records
circulated in 1947-4$ was not materially higher than in 1946-47,
The total reported last year was 22,617; this year the corresponding
figure rose slightly to 23,455.  Of these, 20,631 were borrowed through
the Main Library.  The collection now requires the services of a
full-time staff member, and a good deal of extra help is given at
busy hours by other staff members or student assistants.
The Extension Department lent 2824 records, or somewhat
less than in 1946-47.  As in previous years, these records were for
the most part borrowed by mail, and were sent in response to requests 31
from schools, camps, church organizations, Parent-Teacher organizations, and private listening groups scattered all over British
Columbia.
A total of 464 new records were acquired during the year.
Approximately 100 discs were discarded, which means that the collection now consists of 2500 records.  During the summer an attempt was
made to test play most of the older records in order to ascertain
their condition.  Those in extremely bad condition were withdrawn and
discarded. Many more which should have been withdrawn, but which
it is impossible to replace at the moment (either because funds are
lacking or, as is the case in many instances, because no other
recording is available), were marked "worn" and retained for the time
being.  It is a moot question whether or not this was a wise compromise; to withdraw them from the catalogue but retain them in a
special reserve collection might have been the better course.
Gramophone Record Loans
ndividual students
tudent groups
niversity staff
tation CBR
pedal loans
iain Library total
xtension Department
TOTAL
1941/2
1942/3
Academic lea
1943/4 1944/5
1945/6
1946/7
1947/$
1605
472
456
330
27
2932
3$
1671
37$
2
3367
396
14$9
3$3
31
3075
205
$46
359
11
7740
474
1124
399
15636
1216
2194
464
16322
666
3271
372
2 $90
5021
5666
4532
9437
19510
20631
650
1120
3960
4947
3$77
3107
2$24
3540
6141
9626
9479
13314
22617
23455 32
Finances
Expenditure on books and magazines in the financial year
1947-4$ (i.e., from April 1, 1947, to March 31, 194$) may be
summarized as follows:-
Carried forward from 1946-47 to
meet outstanding orders $1,686.34
Books and Magazines: regular appropriations
for 1947-4$ .21,250.00
Special departmental grants and appropriations:-
Architecture ................$500.00
International Studies
Law ................
Mathematics ........
,Pharmacy	
Slavonic Studies .,.
Social Work  .
  500.00
 10,000.00
.... 220.00
.... 2,000.00
.... 500.00
....   200.00
Miscellaneous credits, fines, etc.
Special book appropriation, March 194$
13,920.00
2,979.89
2,000.00
lotal  <p41 , 636,23
Expended to March 31, 194$  35,466.53
Carried forward to 194$-49 to meet
orders outstanding	
  !|>6,169.70
The total sum available for the purchase of books and
magazines in 1947-4$ was $41,636.23, as compared with $41,227.03
in 1946-47, but transactions actually completed within the year
totalled only $35,466.53, whereas the previous year they had totalled
$39,530.69. 33
Staff
On October 1, 194$, the staff of the Library was composed
as follows:
Administration
W. Kaye Lamb, Ph.D.
Ethel Fugler, B.A.
Ruth Asson
Reference Department
Anne M. Smith, M.A., B.L.S.
Mary Rendell, B.A., B.L.S.
Doreen Fraser, B.A., B.L.S.
Margaret Mackenzie, B.A., B.L.S.
Isabel Abernethy, B.A., B.L.S.
Isabel McDonald, B.A., B.L.S.
Joan O'Rourke, B.A., B.L.S.
Lily Kristjanson, B.A.
■ Muriel Martinson, B.A.
Naomi Grigg, B.A.
Mrs. Patricia Coates, B.A.
Mrs. Mary Wilson
Catalogue Department
Dorothy M. Jefferd
Mrs. Doreen McCloy, B.A., B.L.S.
T. R. McCloy, B.A., B.L.S.
Betty Henderson, M.A.  B.L.S.
Mrs. Betty Higman, B.A.
Mrs. Lillian Gumming
Mrs. F. Zacharias
Mrs. M. Price
Denise Boving
* e • •
Acquisitions Department
Samuel Rothstein, M.A., B.L.S.
Dorothea Aylen, -B.A., B.L.S.
Mrs. Shirley Rowley, B.A.
Evelyn Hearsey
Mrs. Frances Bryce
Mrs. Y. Forsythe
Librarian
Secretary to the
Librarian
Clerical
Head
First Assi
Senior Lib
Senior Lib
Junior Lib
Junior Lib
Junior Lib
Library As
Library As
Library As
Library As
Senior Cle
stant
rarian
rarian
rarian
rarian
rarian
sistant
sistant
sistant
sistant
rical
Head
First Assistant
Senior Librarian
Junior Librarian
Library Assistant
Clerical
Clerical
Clerical
Clerical
Clerical
Head
Junior Librarian
Library Assistant
Senior Clerical
Clerical
Clerical 34
Periodicals and Binding Department
Roland J. Lanning, 3.A., B.L.S.
Mrs. Helen Fraser, B.A., B.L.S.
Mrs. Pauline Cundill
Sheila Donald
Robert Neale
H. W. Brooks
Mrs. H. Pulfer
Circulation Department
Mabel M. Lanning, B.A., B.L.S.
Eleanor B. Mercer, M.A., B.L.S.
Margaret Howieson, B.A., B.L.S.
Mrs. Harold Hunter, B.A.
Dorothy Rolfe
Mrs. V. B. Arnott
Mrs. Patricia Chapman
Mrs. Kathleen North
Mrs. Joyce Olson
Miss Mary Campbell
Mrs. Elizabeth Thomson
Extension Library
Edith Stewart, B.A., 3.L.S.
Mrs. Pearl Cameron
Head
Junior Librarian
Clerical
Clerical
Stackroom attendant
Binder
Sewing Girl
Head
First Assistant
Junior Librarian
Library Assistant
Clerical
Clerical
Clerical
Clerical
Clerical
Clerical
Clerical
Senior Librarian
Clerical
Library Committee
The Committee appointed by Senate in October, 1947",
consisted of the following members:
Dr. J. C. Berry
Dr. D. C. Murdoch
Dr. I. M. Cowan )
Prof. A. C. Cooke)
Dr. Blakey Smith )
Prof. Gilbert Kennedy
Representing the Faculty of
Agriculture
Representing the Faculty of
Applied Science
Representing the Faculty of Arts
Representing the Faculty of Law
Dr. Cowan was unanimously re-elected Chairman at the first
meeting of the Committee held after Senate had made these appointments
It is a pleasure to acknowledge my indebtedness to the
Library Committee both for the active interest it took in Library 35
problems, and for the freedom of action it accorded the Librarian.
The Chairman in particular has devoted much time and careful consideration to various questions of policy, and his willingness to do
this at a time when he himself was specially busy has been deeply
appreciated.
As events have turned out, this report must serve as
my valedictory as Librarian of the University.  On September 10,
194$, I accepted the appointment of Dominion Archivist, and I shall
be leaving the Library at the end of the calendar year.
My eight and a half years at the University have been
stimulating and most rewarding.  Five of them were wartime years,
during which the Library progressed steadily but relatively slowly.
Those years were, nevertheless, a period of preparation and planning
for the future.  By 1944 I felt sure that a building programme was
in the offing, and the first sketch plans of the new north wing were
drawn in the spring of that year.  They were redrawn many times, and
considered by various members of the staff, in the two years that
followed.  As a result, we were able to give the University's
architect a very precise- idea of the accommodation we required as
soon as he was authorized to design an addition to the building.
By 1944 I had also become convinced that the Library of the University
of British Columbia was destined to become the most important research
collection in the Canadian West--a view that recent events have amply
justified.  The unprecedented expansion that has taken place during
the last three years has been guided with this destiny in mind, and 36
it can already be said that only three or four other libraries in
Canada now possess book collections comparable to or superior to
ours.
I wish specially to mention my appreciation of the honour
the University conferred upon me and upon the Library when I was
named a delegate to the Conference of the Universities of the
Commonwealth, which met in Oxford in July, 194$.  The conference
itself gave me an opportunity to meet people from other universities
scattered all over the globe, while the weeks I spent in Great
Britain enabled me to search book stores in London, Cambridge,
Oxford, and Edinburgh for many items that had long been on the
Library's "want" lists.
I leave the University unexpectedly and. with much regret,
but the attractions offered by an invitation both to direct the work
of the Public Archives and to plan a National Library for Canada will
be readily understood.
All of which is respectfully submitted.
W. KAYE LAMB
November, 194$ Librarian

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