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Report of the University Librarian to the Senate Jan 31, 1973

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 REPORT
of the
UNIVERSITY
LIBRARIAN
to the SENATE
UNIVERSITY OF BRITISH  COLUMBIA  LIBRARY
VANCOUVER  1971-72
57th YEAR The Report
of the University Librarian
to the Senate
57th Year
September 1971 to August 1972
Vancouver
January 1973 TABLE OF CONTENTS
Introductory Remarks 1
The Physical Library 2
Public Services
Branches, Divisions, Subject Collections       7
2. Reading Rooms
3. Copying 12
Collect ions
1 Funds 14
2 Collections 16
3. Systems and Processing 17
4. Use 19
Admini strat ion
1. Budget 2'
2. Relationships 22
3. Personnel 26
Appendix A Library Expenditures 2o
B Size and Growth of Collections 29
C Recorded Use of Library Resources 30
D Reference Statistics 32
E Library Organization 33
F Library Supported Reading Rooms 36
G Senate Library Committee 38 Introductory Remarks.
Although the use of the  ibrary system continues to increase, symptoms of
present and future difficulties are becoming more obvious
For the second year in succession, recorded loans exceeded two mi  on
terns, despite a decline in the number of students attending the University.
With the completion of the new Sedgewick Library delayed by problems within
the construction industry, crowding of existing  ibraries continued to
prevail.  But even the advent of a new building with large study areas w
not offset a shortage of space for collections, which has already resulted
in the deposit in storage of tens of thousands of volumes.
Collections continued to grow, but at a reduced rate, principally because
increases to acquisition funds are not keeping pace with inflation in
costs of  ibrary materials.
The test of a successful library is that its patrons can gain access to
the items they need when they need them.  Unless measures are  taken to
reverse present trends, the Library wi]  begin to fail that test more and
more frequently, either because materials are at an inconvenient distance,
or because they have not been acquired in the first place. The Physical Library
There was little change in the system of libraries and reading rooms during
the year.  No major buildings were completed, although some new reading
rooms were set up, raising the total number from thirty-eight to forty-one,
and a Data Library was established in a sma   room in the Civil Engineering
Bu iId ing.
In May, steady progress toward the completion of the new Sedgewick Library
was halted by a dispute between the construction industry and the trade
unions, with the result that the opening of the building wi  be postponed
unti  the new year.  The undergraduates of 1972 were thereby denied the
benefits of a better library, although the building wi   be available in
time to eliminate the annual spring seating crisis.
The delay in completion of the Sedgewick Library had repercussions in the
Main Library.  The Asian Studies Division and the Map Division had been
scheduled to move into the space vacated by the Sedgewick Library, moves
which in turn would have provided needed shelves for the collections of
government publications and microforms and for seating in the Special
Collections Division, eliminated years ago by the invasion of map cabinets.
As a further result, the collections in the Asian Studies Division, a
arge part of which are already in storage, filled al  shelves to capacity,
and additions to the map cabinets had to be stopped, in order not to place
a further load on the floor on which they stand.   t now appears that
conditions can not be improved unti  the spring of 1973, and that unavoidably disruption to service will occur during the academic year. Early in 1972, al  additional space in the expanded Woodward Library was
made available, increasing seating capacity to 980 seats and providing
space for about an additional 100,000 volumes.  Expansion of the Woodward
Library was made possible through the generosity of the P.A. Woodward
Foundation, with matching funds from the federal Health Resources Fund.
The Library is now physically  inked to the recently completed Instructional Resources Centre, allowing t to function as an integral part of
the U.B.C. Health Sciences Centre.
The planning of a new Law Library proceeded as part of the planning for
the building of the Faculty of Law, to be located on the site of the
present temporary law buildings, and to incorporate the older Faculty
structure which is the present home of the Law Library.  In August pre>
liminary drawings were completed by the architect.  They provide for a
three-story structure, situated on the south west corner of the site,
directly north of Brock Hall.  Seating for five hundred and twenty-five
is provided for the Faculty's projected maximum enrollment of seven hundred,
and shelving for one hundred and fifty thousand volumes, some in a compact
storage unit, wil  be available for a collection which already numbers
seventy-five thousand volumes.  Since the old Faculty building will be
remodelled as part of the project, some inconvenience to library users
must result unti  construction is completed around September 1974
Late in August the Government of British Columbia provided $400,000 toward
the construction of an Asian Studies Centre, in which will be located the
present Asian Studies Division. This project had ts origin in the presentation to the University by the Sanyo Corporation of the structural members from ts Expo 70 building. The Canada-Japan Friendship Society undertook
a fund drive which has so far resulted in gifts, in addition to that from
the provincial government, of $400,000 from the Government of Canada,
$200,000 from the Japan World Exposition Fund and $500,000 from the
Federation of Economic Organizations of Japan.  Other contributions are
anticipated which wi  enable the building to be completed during 1975
No other  ibrary buildings are in the planning stage, although a number
have been proposed.  This is a situation about which the University can
not afford to be complacent, since many faculties and departments, most
notably in the areas of science, applied science and education, are
receiving substandard library service. Moreover, the failure to proceed
quickly, with the further decentralization of ibrary collections and services has created a serious situation in the Main Library, which is
beginning to deteriorate as a facility for advanced study and research in
the humanities and social sciences.
The situation is not difficult to comprehend. There are eight stack floors
in the Main Library. The top floor is divided between the manuscript
holdings of the Special Collections Division and the Reading Room of the
School of Librarianship.  The seventh floor s the work area of the Processing Divisions.  The sixth floor is taken up by the Government Publications and Microforms Division and the unbound current newspapers.  The
fifth floor is occupied by unbound periodicals, reference and bibliographic
materials, and a part of the applied science collections.  The collection
proper is located on the first four floors of stacks When the term ended last spring, the shortage of shelf space became
immediately apparent, for as thousands of books were returned by borrowers, in several areas books would not fit on the shelves. As a
palliative, fifty thousand volumes of periodicals were scheduled for
remova to storage by December 1972, where they will join thirty-five
thousand books withdrawn a year ago. When this operation is completed,
visitors to the stacks wi  observe that there wil  be some sma  amount
of space available for expansion, but it should not be assumed that the
problem s solved.
Approximately half of the annual accessions, that is, around seventy-five
thousand volumes, are being added to the main stacks every year.   f. for
example,  ibraries for science and education existed, some of these volumes would be destined for them, but as things stand they must find space
n the Main Library.  Seventy-five thousand volumes occupy about seventy
five hundred square feet of stack space. A cursory inspection of the
stacks s sufficient to demonstrate that this quantity of space does not
exi st.
The total of eighty-five thousand volumes which have been moved into the
compact storage area in the Woodward Library completely occupy that space
There s no other storage space for books on campus.  Thus if no relief is
forthcoming more books and periodicals, and ones which are more frequently
used than those already withdrawn, must be sent to commercial storage
where access wil  be even more difficult.
t should be noted that unlike scientists, humanists and social scientists rely to a great extent on being able to browse and scan in the stacks, and
that by consigning their working collections to storage, serious harm is
being done to the quality of their work.  Further, the whole operation of
moving books to storage, of changing location records, and of retrieving
terns is a non-productive use of staff time and thus of University funds.
There are few options now available to the University  One is to begin
work immediately on a Science Library, which in addition to the benefits
t would produce for students and faculty members, would have the result
of moving over a hundred and fifty thousand volumes, and one of the fastest
growing parts of the collection, from the Main Library.  Another option
would be to find another space for the Processing Divisions, and thereby
regain one stack floor.  Yet another option would be to construct storage
space, or to plan and budget for the increasing use of commercial storage
space. Another alternative is to let things go, and trust to blind luck
and human ingenuity to solve the problems posed by an ever growing collection. And that would be the purest folly I I I   Public Services
Branches, Divisions and Subject Collections.
Despite the decrease in enrollment, use of collections in the
library's divisions and branches increased by nearly 5% over the previous year. Wei  over half the total of volumes loaned was from branch
libraries, indicating once again that a we 11-developed system of branch
libraries encourages greater use of collections.  n 1970/71, branches
accounted for 409,329 more loans than the Main Library; last year the
difference widened to 424,248 volumes. The two departments registering
the greatest increase were the Government Publications Division and the
Curriculum Laboratory.
In January a standard format for recording the volume of business conducted at reference desks was adopted by the three provincial university
libraries.  Statistics gathered at U.B.C. during the first eight months
of 1972 are displayed in Appendix D.  Responses to inquiries have been
tabulated under three headings: 1) directiona questions, ones which
involve no direct use of  ibrary catalogues or materials; 2) reference
questions, inquiries which involve the use of library collections or
catalogues but which consume no more than fifteen minutes; 3) research
questions, inquiries which require more than fifteen minutes and which
might involve anything from an extended search for information to the
compilation of a bibliography.
Divisions and branches responded to an impressive total of nearly one
hundred and forty thousand inquiries in eight months, pointing to an
extrapolated annual total of over two hundred thousand responses during
the academic year The statistics reveal some expected patterns.  For example,  t comes as
no surprise that nformation and Orientation Division answers more
directional and reference questions than any other, or that the complexities of government publications and microforms should cause the division
responsible for them to rank second in terms of reference and research
questions.  However, the statistics do point to one unexpected situation:
the Main Library still carries the heavier load of reference service,
in contradistinction to the branch  ibraries which sustain more than half
of the loans. With the opening of the new Sedgewick Library this situation
may change to some degree, but t is possible that the continued concentration of the research collections in the Main Library may cause this
pattern of reference service to continue, at least until branch  ibraries
for science and education are opened.
The Information and Orientation Division continued and improved its programmes, offering guided tours, printed materials for self-conducted tours,
and lectures to classes.  During the year  ,752 students appeared n the
Library for tours and basic instruction, self-tour materials were picked up
by the thousands of copies, and staff members delivered specialized lectures to many individual classes.  Orientation programmes are under further
revision, in anticipation of the new Sedgewick Library, which wi  when t
opens produce fundamental changes in undergraduate  ibrary use.  Despite
its preoccupation with students, the Division continued to produce JMj^.C.
Library News, directed to all faculty members. One ssue this year consisted of a Faculty Library Guide, which prompted much favourable comment
readers. The Crane Library, now internationally known as a pioneer organization in
library service to the blind and partially sighted at institutions of
higher education, was the recipient of a grant from Canada Manpower's
Local Initiatives Project, which enabled it to step up its programme of
recording of instructional materials. The growing library of tapes is
being made available through the Interlibrary Loan Division to students
at universities and colleges throughout Canada and the United States;
such loans increased by 40% in the past year.
The Data Library, a facility operated jointly by the Library and the
Computing Centre, was set up to acquire, store and make available for use,
information of a basically statistical nature in machine readable form.
Through a survey it was discovered that the University had already
obtained or created many data files, and where possible these have been
relocated in the Data Library where they will be available for general use.
The initial collection is oriented toward the social sciences, but will
not be restricted in its scope as it grows.
Through the Science Division, the Library continued to exploit on behalf
of faculty members and graduate students the National Science Library's
collection of bibliographical tapes. A total of twenty-eight subscriptions
serving almost double that number of users provides current awareness
reports on subjects within fields of speciality. As more bibliographical
tapes are created and acquired by the National Science Library, the scope
of the programme will be extended; moreover, during the year the National
Library of Canada announced its intention of offering a similar service to
the humanists and social scientists.  In the immediate future, the Library hopes   to   install   a  terminal   connected  to the  U.S.   National   Library  of
Medicine's MEDLINE   system,  which wi       permit   the   terminal   operator to
conduct on-line  searches of medical   and   related   literature.     Thus  the
Library offers  the  fu 1     range of   reference  services,   based on  the
expertise  of   individual   staff members at  one extreme and   the  capability
of  the computer at  the other. 2.     Reading   Rooms.
During  the year,   the Senate  Library  Committee approved  two new   reading
rooms,   for Agricultural   Economics,   and Audiology       In addition     the
completion of  the Buchanan   tower occassioned  the   rebirth of old   reading
rooms   in  new  surroundings  and combinations,   and  the  death  of one   reading
room,   Social   Sciences.     The forty-two   reading   rooms  now contain  74,436
volumes,   and maintain 2,383   subscriptions.     Expenditures on  new materials
from   library and  faculty  budgets  approached $83,000.     Since almost  all   of
these materials are  duplicated   in       braries on campus,   some might   regard
these   reading   rooms as   luxuries.     But   it must  be   remembered  that   they
simplify  the       ves of  faculty members and graduate students,   and contribute
to the   intensification of the use of materials.     As evidence of  that,   the
estimated yearly occupancy  of al     reading   rooms,   based on  the number of
users   in any   three  hour period,  was   101,115,     up   from 97,900   last year
and   loans jumped  from 52,749  to 72,063 12
3.  Copying
Use of copying machines continued to increase in 1971/72, by 36.6% compared
to a 19.4% increase last year. Of the 2,592,286 copies made,  ,653,110
were made by or for library patrons, and the balance were made for such
libra ry purposes as catalogue card reproduction and document preservation
Copying machines, viewed by almost everyone as one of technology's
happiest boons, continue to be viewed by publishers and authors with a
variety of emotions ranging from alarm to anger. At issue s whether or
not the  beral unregulated use of copying machines, particularly by
educators, directly results n a loss of income to authors and publishers,
Clearly, where there are instances of such practices as the copying of
substantial portions of textbooks for large classes, there must be a loss
assuming that f the copy machine didn't exist the text book would have had
to be purchased.  t is this kind of copying, and this assumption, that
leading authors and publishers to press for legislation that will impose
imitations on this blanket copying, and provide for financial compensation
when it does occur. What stands in jeopardy s the existing opportunity
for the individual to make or have made for him a single copy for "purposes
of private study, research, criticism, review, or newspaper summary."
Both in the United States and Canada the laws of copyright are under revision, and legislators are grappling with the problem of defining the
limits of public and private right in the area of information.  Universities
and professional and scholarly associations should be watching developments
carefully, and considering what their positions in respect to these matters
will be; further, they should be addressing themselves to the federal
1  Copyright Act, R.S., c.55, s. 17 (2)(a) 13
government now, for it might be too late to alter the direction of things
once a draft act is presented in Parliament. 14
V.     Collections
Funds,
Inflationary  trends are as  evident   in  the  bookstore as   in  the  supermarket       Between   1970 and   1971,   prices  of  U.S.   hardcover books  and
periodical   subscriptions   rose  by   13.6% and   12%   respectively;   globally,
the   rate  of   increase   in  costs  of published materials   is  no  less   than
10% per annum,
In   1971/72,   the Library's  expenditures  for collections were $1,286,401
an   increase of 5.9% over  1970/7 nsufficient  to offset   the effects of
rising costs.     To worsen   the picture     the  sudden   revaluation of currencies which   took place  during  the   fal     cost   the Library  an estimated
$27,089   in  purchasing  power,   reducing   the effective   increase  to 3.7%
f  the amount of  significant materia     being pub     shed were   less,   or   if
the University were   restricting     ts  academic programme,   the disparity
between  costs and  fund   increases might  have  no significant effect  on
collection  development.     But   in fact,   collecting policies  are  being
altered  to adjust  to  the situation.     Setting as a priority   the collecting
of current       terature   in  fields of   interest   to the  University,   the  Library
has  curtailed  the purchase of out-of-print materials  and   research collections.     Because  such  strides were made   in  the   last  half of the  sixties
in  developing  the   retrospective collections  to new   levels of  strength and
significance,   this necessary change   in policy has  not greatly affected  the
usefulness of  the  Library,   and  has  gone  for  the most part undetected except
by  those  faculty members who have  had a particular   interest   in  some  special
area  not presently wel     represented   in   the  collections. 15
However, the funds for retrospective purchases have now been cut to the
imits of safety and if the disparity between budget and cost increases
continues, the next cuts wi  not be so easy to bear.  The area of the
budget most  ikely to be reduced wi  be that used for the duplication
of materials which wi  affect both students and faculty members
although in different ways.  n the case of the former, if the Library
s unable to buy sufficient copies of books in high demand, access to
materials wi  suffer, particularly for those students in large classes;
further declines in enrollment may alleviate this. As for the faculty
the duplicate and in some cases u_p_ to quintup cate) subscriptions
which are critical to the usefulness of reading rooms may have to be
cancelled, and the placing of new subscriptions strictly curtailed 16
2.  Col lections
At the end of the fiscal year, the collections were just a couple of
hundred volumes short of the mi  ion and a half mark.  f the  ibrary's
holdings in government publications are included, the collections exceed
two million terns. The full enumeration of the collection may be found
in Appendix B.
The rate of increase to the collection of books and journals diminished
in 1971/72, dropping from 164,117 volumes in 1970/7 to 146,089 volumes
last year.  Three factors were involved in this decline: first, the
already mentioned drop in purchasing power; second, the elimination
last year of the backlog of uncatalogued books, the cataloguing of which
had swelled the earlier totals; and third, the reduced number of reading
terns requiring cataloguing.  But even with a diminished rate of
growth, the collection in terms of physica volumes alone w   pass two
mi 11 ion by 1976
Growth s already posing surious problems, and, as has already been
pointed out in the second chapter of this report, problems which are going
to get much worse. Whether the University opts for additional branch
libraries, a storage  ibrary, or space for the processing divisions,  t
sti  take approximately three years to create the necessary physical
space. Thus very  ttle time remains in which the University can make and
implement its decision.  f that  ittle time is allowed to elapse, the users
of the Library must contemplate the possibility that within the Main Library
books wi   be stacked on carrel Is, tables, and on the floor, and that the
stacks w   be closed to public access 3,     Systems  and  Processing.
t  has  already  been noted   that additions  to  the collection  dropped  by
about   18,000     terns   in   1971/72,   and   the explanation  for  this  decline
has  been  given.     By  contrast,   production of card  sets   increased   from
83,400   to 98,310.     This  statistical   anomaly   is accounted   for by  the
fact  that a  backlog   in  card production was  one of  the   results of  last
year's  crash programmes   to eliminate  the uncatalogued  backlog  and  to
complete   the       sting of  the   reading   rooms.     Although  over  two and a
million cards were  filed   last year,   the card production and  filing
backlog has  not   been completely eliminated yet,   and   there   is a  delay
between  the  shelving of a  newly  catalogued  book and   the appearance of
cards  for    t   in  the catalogue.     The effects of  this   situation,  which
should  be   rectified within  a year,   are alleviated  by  the public  availability of current   lists  of   incoming  titles produced  by   the acquisitions
system.
The automation programme  took another  forward  step  on  July   1st when   the
Library's  new mini-computer went   into daily operation.       n   the  first
phase of development  this  computer wi       monitor  the  twenty-nine  terminals,
now used  for collecting    nformation about materials  on order,   in processing,   in   the  bindery,   on   loan or  lost.     The capacity of  the  system has
increased,   but   for the  next phase of  development,   the Library must
wait   for the  commercial  production of a   terminal   satisfactory  for     ibrary
operations,   one which  has   the  capacity  of  sending  and   receiving messages
with- combinations of   inputs provided  by   borrower's  badges,   standard keypunch cards,   and  keyboards.     When  better terminals  are  obtained and  the 18
mini-computer is connected to a large on-line computer system in the
next stage of development,  t wi  be possible to provide more sophisticated and individualized service, and to eliminate the fine system
for delinquent borrowers, a feature of the present as much disliked by
the  ibrary staff as by the students.
With the exception of the installation of the mini-computer, very little
new development has taken place during the year.  Some improvements were
made to existing systems but most of the year has been spent in reviewing
systems and preparing for a changeover in the computer in the Data Processing Centre, which is used by the Library for its regular processing.
Unfortunately, the budget cutback which took place in the middle of the
fiscal year made t necessary to cease publication of the monthly accession  ists, and to delay for one year the publication of a new edition
of the serials  ist. As a replacement for the former, the Systems Division s developing an alternative method of notifying faculty members
about new purchases, using an SDI approach that wi  produce  stings
in response to individual or group interest profiles.  The interest profiles wi  provide a means for extracting from the machine-readable
acquisitions file appropriate titles based on classification and keywords, 19
4.  Use.
For the second year in succession, loans exceeded two million items, and
although enrollments in both winter and summer sessions dropped, over a
hundred thousand more items were borrowed.  The following table  reveals
a trend toward increasingly heavy library use. These figures are based
on actual loans, since the use of materials within libraries can not be
measured systematically; however, a few samples suggest that the total
use of items is double the number of items borrowed.
Winter/Spring
Academic Year Per Capi ta Loans
1962/63 36.8
1963/64 38.3
1964/65 43.5
1965/66 43.7
1966/67 44.7
1967/68 44.0
1968/69 48.8
1969/70 51.1
1970/71 51.9
1971/72 53.0
Ten Year Increase 44.0%
Undoubtedly there is a limit to the figure for per capita loans, but
that limit was not reached in the past year.
Although some divisions and branches recorded significant increases and
other decreases in loans, overall use of the Main Library's divisions and 20
the branch  ibraries went up by 4.5% and 4.2% respectively.  However, when
the figures for loans to other ibraries are isolated, an increase of 19.2%
is revealed, pointing to the growing importance of U.B.C.'s collections as
a source of support for other universities and colleges. Wei  over half
of the loans to other libraries were to institutions in British Columbia.
No part of the  ibrary's collections pose greater problems than do the
ournals.  The community of users is divided in its attitude:  some
favour the idea of never circulating periodicals, so that they can always
be found on the shelves; others say that periodicals should be treated no
differently than books, and made available for borrowing by a  on equal
terms.  The Senate Library Committee has revised the loan regulations
many times in an attempt to find a middle way, and the Library has purchased duplicate titles of many heavily used journals.  Nevertheless,
complaints about access to journals continue.
As a step toward further revision of policy, two surveys of use were made
n the Main and Woodward  ibraries.  t was learned that the lending of
periodical volumes in itself does not account for the majority of instances
when a borrower can not obtain the volume he wants  In fact, 75% to 80%
of the cases of failure to find the desired volume were attributable to
other causes; and in most cases, staff assistance could produce the tern
n minutes.  However, a further reduction in loan periods would improve
the prospects for all users, particularly if faculty members and graduate
students would cooperate by returning borrowed items on their due dates. 21
V. Admin i strat ion
1.  Budget
The  Library's   total   expenditures  for  1971/72  amounted   to $4,680,882,   a
4.27o   increase over the previous year.     The percentage of  the  University's
budget  committed   to  the  Library  continued  to  decline   slightly,   from  7.96%
in   1968/69,   to 7.54%   in   1969/70,   to 7.44%   in   1970/71,   to 7.11%   in   1971/72.
The  Canadian  average was 7.4%  last year.     The per capita  expenditure,
based  on winter enrollment  figures  only,  was $236.10,   the  Canadian  average  for this   statistic  being $242.10.     Measured   in   these  terms,     U.B.C.'s
library   is  the   least expensive  of all   university   libraries   in  British
Columbia and Alberta.  Although  U.B.C.'s   library   is  the  second   largest   in
Canada,   it   ranks   third   in  expenditures,   after Toronto and Alberta. 22
2.  Relat ionships
In the fall of 1970 British Columbia's three provincially supported
university libraries established an informal organization called Tri-
University Libraries, with the objectives of maximizing the use of
resources and reducing overall costs through cooperation and integration.
Notable progress is being made in attaining these goals.  Continuing
consultation among collections development officers has made it possible
to avoid expensive duplication and triplication of major acquisitions.
Insofar as the universities' curricula permit it, responsibilities for
collecting in specific subject areas are being allocated among the
three libraries.  Development of automated systems is proceeding along
parallel lines; work on a single system for acquisitions is well advanced,
Common policies on public service are being developed, and special codes
governing loans to colleges and other types of libraries are in preparation.  Cooperative processing is resulting in faster and cheaper cataloguing of new materials.
In December, the B.C. Library Development Commission released a report
entitled A Proposal for Province Wide Organization of Library Services
in British Columbia.  This report is directed toward the improvement of
public library services in the province, through the creation of a network centred on the Commission, which would develop a bibliographic
centre and a provincial collection resource centre.  It recommends:
"In addition the Committee recommends that formal agreements be
entered into between the provincial resource centre and the lib-
braries of the province's universities to ensure that the resources 23
of these academic libraries are available as requ i red to meet the
specialized needs of public library users throughout the province.
Access to the collections of the academic and special libraries
through inter-library loan provides the greatest assurance of
meeting, at reasonable cost, the demands for materials which cannot be supplied from the collections of public library systems or
the provincial resource centre.  Similar agreements should be
reached with the community colleges and other institutions of
post-secondary education in order to make the fullest possible
use of their specialized collections.  Such agreements would, of
course, be reciprocal in nature and would permit access by academic libraries to the collections of the provincial resource
centre and of the public library systems.  Similar reciprocal
agreements between the provincial resource centre and the various
libraries which serve agencies and departments of the federal
government, as well as those serving business and industry, would
provide access by all potential users to the resources represented
by these often highly-specialized collections.  Through a suitable
pattern of reciprocal agreements the academic, governmental, public
and special libraries of British Columbia would form a single information network calculated to ensure to the citizens of the province
access to superior library and information services at the most
reasonable cost possible."
B.C. Library Development Commission. A Proposal for province-
wide organization of library services in British Columbia.
Submitted to the British Columbia Library Development Commission by its Committee on Library Development. Victoria, 1971
p. 30-31. 24
Because of its collection strength, U.B.C. Library will undoubtedly
act as a principal resource in the network, and in fact, the increasing
interlibrary loan activity mentioned earlier is an indication that it is
already assuming that responsibility. An important question to be resolved
is from which source will funds be derived to support this increased
activity. Will the University, at a time when its revenues are declining,
be expected to pay additional amounts to support a provincial library
network? Will the Library be expected to allocate more of its resources
to the network, at the expense of services to students and faculty? Or
will the provincial government finance the components of the network with
special subventions, perhaps based on the contribution made to the network by each participating institution?  These questions are being raised
with the B.C. Library Development Commission now by the Tri-University
Libraries organization.
Another cooperative development which is in progress is the creation of
a library at the Bamfield marine biological station, a project of the
Western Canadian Universities Marine Biological Society.
All three provincial universities, have contributed funds toward the
purchase of a collection; selection of materials is being coordinated
through U.B.C.'s Institute of Animal Resource Ecology Library, and materials are being acquired and catalogued by U.B.C. Library's processing
d i v i s i on s.
The library system is guided in its development by the Senate Library
Committee, the membership of which is listed in Appendix G.  But in
addition to the Senate Committee, valuable assistance is rendered by a 25
number of other faculty and interfaculty committees.  Among these is
the Biomedical Library Committee, which this year received the resignation
of its long time chairman, Dr. William C. Gibson.  His contribution to the
University and its libraries has been immense.  He has effectively
marshalled the financial resources necessary to provide a high level
of library service not only for his own discipline but for all of the
health and life sciences; the Woodward Biomedical Library owes its existence in large measure to his work. The Senate and the University is
permanently in his debt. 26
3.     Personnel
In   1971/72   the  Library  establishment  consisted  of  one  hundred  and  one
librarians  and   three  hundred  and   seventy-four  supporting   staff.      In
addition,   four  hundred  and   sixty-nine   students  were  appointed   to  part-
t ime pos i t i ons.
The   rate of  turnover  for  the   supporting  staff   rose  from 37.2%  to 42.8%,
reversing   the  downward   trend which  has  been  established   for many  years.
As   recently  as   1969/70,   the   rate was  49%.     No  single  explanation  for  the
increase   in  the  past year  has   been  discovered,   although   it   is  probable
that   the   facts   that most  of  our employees are young,  many  are married
to  students  and   faculty members,   and   few   regard   the  Library  as  a  career,
all   militate  against   long   tenure.
In August, Norman  Colbeck  severed  his  formal   relationship with   the
Library,   although   he   remains  and will   always   be  a  Library  dweller.     Mr.
Colbeck  held  a  unique  position   in   the   library:     he was  one  of  the
Library's  greatest   benefactors,   having  donated   to   the   University  his  own
unequalled  collection  of  Pre-Raphaelite   literature,   and  he was  also  the
Library's   bibliographical   consultant   in  his   field  of  speciality,   and
the  curator of  the  collection which  he  continued   to develop.     Many  people
work and  have worked   jn   the  Library,   but  of  few could   It   be  said   that
they  graced   the  Library,   as  did  Norman  Colbeck,
Regrettably,   the year was  not without   its   tragedy.     The  sudden   illness
and  death   in May  of Pat  O'Rourke,   senior Stack  Supervisor,   came as  a
sad   shock  to his  co-workers,     Mr.   O'Rourke joined   the  staff   in   1965,
after a military  career and   subsequent work with  the Corps of  Commis- 27
sionaires.  He became more than his title implied; he was a man of all
parts, rendering assistance wherever and whenever needed, offering
advice and counsel to his fellows, and radiating kindness and good
humour everywhere. 28
APPENDIX A
LIBRARY  EXPENDITURES
Fiscal   Years,  April-March
1969/70 1970/71 1971/72 1972/73*
Salaries & Wages 2,204,115 2,584,069      2,896,602 3,255,000
Books and  Periodicals       1,127,291 1,214,875       1,286,401 1,300,465
Binding 112,709 126,932 151,501 155,248
Supplies,   Equipment 428,873 482,787 346,378 366,015
3,872,988        4,408,663      4,680,882 5,076,728
Estimated   Expenditures 29
APPENDIX  B
SIZE AND  GROWTH  OF  COLLECTIONS
March 31 Net Additions      Withdrawals      March 31
1971 1971/72 1971/72 1972
Volumes  -  Catalogued                         1,355,270 146,089 1,584 1,499,775
Documents                                                    669,175 63,027 -— 737,202
Films  and   Filmstrips                                     569     	
Microfilm   (reels)                                      30,275 5,069 —- 35,344
Microcard   (cards)                                    108,320 3,360 --- 111,680
Microprint   (sheets)                               698,000 34,500 — 732,500
Microfiche  (cards)                                 412,018 113,772 --- 525,790
Maps                                                            75,203 5,511 493 80,211
Manuscripts                                              2800  Ft.* 200  Ft.*   3,000  Ft.*
Phonograph  Records                                   24,150 1,675 250 25,575
Th ickness of Files APPENDIX C
Recorded Use of Library Resources
September 1971 - August 1972
30
GENERAL  CIRCULATION
1968/69      1969/70      1970/71       1971/72
Main Library
Genera] Stack Collection
472,204
551,450
524,142
542,687
Reserve Circulation
51,910
41,763
35,839
37,148
Asian Studies Division
5,957
8,354
7,452
9,076
Fi ne Arts Divis ion
30,130
42,360
49,841
59,160
Government Publications
58,324
61,397
88,756
94,083
Map Collections
4,249
6,375
8,184
7,939
Speci al Col lections
7,844
10,809
15,357
12,580
SUB-TOTAL
630,618
722,508
729,571
762,673
Branch Libraries and
Reading Rooms
Animal   Resource  Ecology                   1,997 3,066
Crane  Library                                     --- --- 22,341 25,117
Curriculum  Laboratory 143,890 164,935 215,327 229,448
Law  Library 84,497 103,231 122,055 125,493
MacMillan   Library 21,165         24,473 28,303 29,517
Marjorie  Smith   Library 20,705         20,824 18,420 16,270
Mathematics   Library 18,543         21,982 18,459 20,763
Medical   Branch,   V.G.H. 26,315         27,811 26,677 29,881
Music  Library 13,696        16,379 18,687 20,606
Reading Rooms                                     ---                  — 52,7^9 72,063
Sedgewick  Library 434,890 502,444 491,241 474,981
Woodward  Biomedical 97,279 112,025 122,644 139,716
%   Increase/
Decrease over
1970/71
+
3.5%
+
3.6%
+
21.8%
+
18.7%
+
6.0%
-
3.0%
-
18.1%
+    4.5%
+
53.5%
+
12.4%
+
6.5%
+
2.8%
+
4.3%
-
11.7%
+
12.5%
+
12.0%
+
10.3%
+
36.6%
-
3.3%
+
13.9%
SUB-TOTAL
860,980      994,104    1,138,900    1,186,921
+    4.2% 31
RECORDINGS
Record Col lection
Music Library Record
Col lection
SUB-TOTAL
EXTENSION LIBRARY
Volumes for Extension
Courses
Drama Col lection
SUB-TOTAL      5,185    5,490    5,710   6,061   + 6.1%
INTERLIBRARY LOANS
1968/69
1969/70
1970/71
1971/72
%
82,32 1
95,203
108,834
122,219
+
12.3%
24,335
26,340
34,259
35,452
+
3.5%
106,656
121,543
143,093
157,671
+
10.2%
4,382
4,940
5,150
5,381
+
4.5%
803
550
560
680
+
21.4%
3,077
3,474
3,652
4,518
+ 23.7%
835
1,416
1,245
1,321
+    6.1%
1,718
1,735
2,037
2,457
+ 20.6%
318
382
290
412
+ 42.1%
5,948
7,007
7,224
8,708
+ 20.5%
4,518
4,961
6,139
6,722
+    9.5%
2,309
1,943
2,699
2,901
+    7.5%
1) U.B.C  Inter 1 ibrary Loan Uni ts
Original Materials
To Other Libraries
To B.C. Med.Lib. Service
From Other Libraries
From B.C. Med.Lib. Service
SUB-TOTAL
Photocopies
To Other Libraries
From Other Libraries
SUB-TOTAL       6,82 7    6,904    8,838    9,623    + 8.9%
2) Special Inter1ibrary Loan Unit
Original Materials
To Simon Fraser University
To University of Victoria
To B.C. Inst, of Tech.
SUB-TOTAL
Photocopies
To Simon Fraser University
To University of Victoria
To B.C. Inst, of Tech.
SUB-TOTAL       6,276     9,516     5,523    7,210    + 30.5%
* Until 1970, figures represent total requests received, rather than requests filled,
Grand Total 1,623,286  1,868,466 2,040,272 2,140,514  (+100,242)
+ 4.9%
709
1,074
1,200
1,354
+   12.8%
56
291
191
241
+ 26.1%
31
29
22
52
+   136.0%
796
M394
1,413
1,647
+   16.6%
5,545
8,402*
4,231
5,862
+ 38.5%
620
868*
1,144
1,137
.6%
111
246*
148
211
+ 42.5% 32
APPENDIX  D
Reference  Statistics
^January  to August   1972)
Directional        Reference Research Total
Questions Questions Questions
Ma i n   L i brary
Information  Desk
5,858
34,405
	
40,263
Asian   Studies
145
861
412
1,418
Fine Arts
2,444
5,339
127
7,910
Government  Publications
46
12,765
605
13,416
Human i t i es
1,687
4,741
343
6,771
Map   Col 1ect ion
287
1,985
58
2,330
Sci ence
354
5,406
486
6,246
Social   Sciences
633
8,027
867
9,527
Special   Collect ions
285
2,402
203
2,890
SUB-TOTAL 11,739 75,931 3,101 90,77i
Branch  Libraries
Animal   Resource  Ecology
Crane  Library
Curriculum  Laboratory
Law  Library
MacMi1 Ian  Li brary
Ma rj o r i e   Sm i t h  L i b ra ry
Mathematics   Library
Medical   Branch  Library   (VGH)
Music  Library
Sedgewick  Library
Woodward  Library
SUB-TOTAL
GRAND  T0TALS-
Total   does  not   include 34,695 questions of  various   types
answered   in  campus   reading   rooms  during   1971/72.
287
1,198
81
1,566
622
735
95
1,452
1,207
3,857
324
5,388
234
925
280
1,439
215
2,198
200
2,613
161
393
45
604
432
1,091
253
1,776
671
2,631
118
3,420
1,511
3,543
228
5,282
1,864
5,958
145
7,967
3,444
12,377
568
16,389
10,648
34,911
2,337
47,896
22,387
110,842
5,438
138,667- 33
APPENDIX E
LIBRARY ORGANIZATION
ADMINISTRATION
Stuart-Stubbs, Bas i1
Bel 1, Ingl is F.
Hami1 ton, Robert M.
Mclnnes, Douglas N.
MacDonald, Robin
de Bruijn, Erik
ACQUISITIONS
Omelusik, Nicholas
ASIAN STUDIES
Ng, Tung King
BIBLIOGRAPHY
Keate, Heather
El 1iston, Graham
Mercer, Eleanor
Sh ields,. Dorothy
Jeffreys, Anthony
Johnson, Stephen
BINDERY
Fryer, Percy
CATALOGUE DIVISION
El rod, J. McRee
Little, Margaret
Original Cataloguing
Bailey, Freda
Catalogue Preparations
Turner, Ann
Searching/LC Cataloguing
Balshaw, Mavis
CIRCULATION
Butterfield, Rita
CRANE LIBRARY
University Librarian
Associate Librarian
Assistant Librarian - Collections
Assistant Librarian - Public Services
Coordinator of Technical Processes and
Systems
Administrative Services Librarian
Head Librarian
Head Librarian
Bibl
Bibl
Bibl
Bibl
Bibl
ographer - Science
ographer - Serials
ographer - English language
ographer - European languages
ographer - Life Sciences
Research Bibliographer
Foreman
Head Librarian
Assistant Head
Head
Head
Head
Head Librarian
Thiele, Paul
Head 34
Appendix  E  cont'd
DATA  LIBRARY
Dobbin,   Geraldine
FINE ARTS   DIVISION
Dwyer,   Melva
ANIMAL  RESOURCE  ECOLOGY  LIBRARY
Nelson,   Ann
MACMILLAN  LIBRARY
Macaree,  Mary
GIFTS  Sr  EXCHANGE
Selby,   Joan
GOVERNMENT  PUBLICATIONS
Dodson,   Suzanne
HUMANITIES
Forbes,   Charles
INFORMATION &  ORIENTATION
Chew,   Luther
LAW  LIBRARY
Shorthouse,   Thomas
MAP  DIVISION
Wilson,   Maureen
MARJORIE  SMITH  LIBRARY
Freeman,   George
MATHEMATICS  LIBRARY
Melntosh,Jack
MUSIC  LIBRARY
Burndorfer,   Hans
READING  ROOMS
Harrington,   Walter
Acting Head
Head Librarian
Head Librarian
Head Librarian
Head Librarian
Head Librarian
Head Librarian
Head Librarian
Head Librarian
Head Librarian
Head Librarian
Head Librarian
Head Librarian
Head Librarian 35
Appendix E cont'd
RECORD COLLECTION
Kaye, Douglas
SCIENCE DIVISION
Brongers, Rein
SEDGEWICK LIBRARY
Erickson, Ture
SERIALS DIVISION
Joe, Linda
SOCIAL SCIENCES DIVISION
Carrier, Lois
SPECIAL COLLECTIONS DIVISION
Yandle, Anne
SYSTEMS DEVELOPMENT
Dennis, Donald
Dobbin, Geraldine
WOODWARD LIBRARY
Leith, Anna
BIOMEDICAL BRANCH LIBRARY
Cummings, John
COLBECK ROOM
Colbeck, Norman
Head
Head  Librarian
Head  Librarian
Head Librarian
Head  Librarian
Head  Librarian
Systems Analyst
Systems £•   Information   Science
Li brarian
Head Librarian
Head Librarian
Curator APPENDIX  F
LIBRARY  SUPPORTED
READING   ROOMS
AS  OF AUGUST   19/2
36
Academic Planning
Mai n Mai 1 North
Administration Bldg.
Agricultural Economics  Ponderosa Annex D
Room 105
Anthropology-Sociology       Henry Angus  Bldg,
Room 305
App1ied Science
Arch i tecture
Asian Studies
Aud i ology
Chem. Engineering
Chem i st ry
Classics
Commerce
Civil Engr. Bldg.
Room 305
F. Lasserre Bldg.
Room 9B
(Basement)
Buchanan Bldg.
Room 2208
2150 Western Parkway
Campus
Chem. Engr. Bldg.
Room 310
Chemistry Bldg.
Room 261
Buchanan Bldg.
Room 2218
Henry Angus Bldg.
Room 6
(Basement)
Comparative Literature  Buchanan Bldg,
Room 210
Compu t ing  Cent re
Creat i ve Wri ti ng
Civil   Engr.   Bldg,
Room  238
Brock Hall
South Wing
Room 204
Economics-History Buchanan  Tower
Room   1097
Elect. Engineering   Elect.Engr.Bldg.
Room 428
(Enter Room 434)
Buchanan Tower
Room 697
Buchanan Tower
Room 897
Geography Bldg.
Room 140
Engli sh
French
Geography
Geology
Geophys ics
H i span ic-Ital ian
Home Economics
Geological Sciences
Bldg. -Room 208
Geophysics Bldg.
2nd. Floor, South
Buchanan Bldg.
Room 2220
Home Ec. Bldg.
Room 112
Inst, of Industrial   Henry Angus Bldg.
Relat ions
Library School
Lingu i st i cs
Mechanical Engr.
Metallurgy
Room 310
Library North Wing
8th Floor
Buchanan Bldg.
Room 227
Mech. Engr. Bldg.
Room 200A
Metallurgy Bldg.
Room 319 Microbiology Wesbrook Bldg. Political Science    Buchanan Bldg.
Room 4 Room 1220
Mineral Engr. Min. Engr. Bldg. Psychiatry Health Sc. Centre
Room 201 2255 Wesbrook Roac
Pharmacology Wesbrook Bldg. Psychology Henry Angus Bldg.
Block C  Room 221 Room 203
Pharmacy Cunningham Bldg. Rehabilitation       Hut M S 1
Room 160 Medicine Room 20
Philosophy Buchanan Bldg. Slavonic Studies     Buchanan Bldg.
Room 3270 Room 2251
Physics Hennings Bldg. Theatre Frederick Wood
Room 311 Theatre
Physiology Med. Science Bldg,
Block A
Room 203
Room 21 1 38
APPENDIX G
Senate Library Committee
1971/72
Miss D. Allen
Mr. W.M. Armstrong
Dr. P. Burns
Mr. F.J. Cairnie
Dr. D.H. Chitty
Dr. W.C. Gibson
Dr. R.F. Gray
Dr. F.A. Kaempffer
Dr. J.M. Kennedy
Dr. S. Lipson
Dr. J. Mao
Mr. K.R. Martin
Dr. M.F. McGregor (Chairman)
Mrs. A. Piternick
Dr. S. Rothstein
Chancellor A. McGavin
President W. Gage r  ££. .
Mr.   J.E.A.   Parnall Ex-off.c.o
Mr.   B.   Stuart-Stubbs
Terms  of  Reference:
(a) To advise and  assist   the  Librarian   in:
(i)     formulating  a policy for  the development of   resources  for
instruction  and   research;
(ii)     advising on  the allocation of book  funds   to  the  fields  of
instruction  and   research;
(iii)     developing  a  general   program of   library  service  for all   the
interests  of  the University;   and
(iv)     keeping himself   informed  about  the   library  needs of   instructional
and   research  staffs,   and keeping  the academic  community   informed
about   the   1 i brary;
(b) To   report   to  Senate  on matters  of  policy  under discussion   by   the
Comm i ttee.

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