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Seventeenth Report of the Library Committee to the Senate Oct 31, 1946

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Array THE UNIVERSITY OF BRITISH COLUMBIA
SEVENTEENTH  REPORT
of the
LIBRARY  COMMITTEE
to
THE  SENATE
Covering the Period
September 1945 - August 1946
October, 1946 The University of British Columbia,
Vancouver, Canada.
President N. A. M. MacKenzie, M.M., LL.M., LL.D., K.C.,
Chairman of the Senate,
The University of British Columbia.
Dear Slr:-
As Chairman of the Library Committee I have
the honour to submit, for the consideration of Senate,
the Seventeenth Report of the Librarian of the University,
covering the period from September 1, 1945, to August 31,
1946.
All of which is respectfully submitted.
T. Larsen
Chairman.
October 21, 1946. REPORT OF THE LIBRARIAN
Prof, T. Larsen,
Chairman, Library Committee,
The "University of British Columbia.
Dear Sir:
I have the honour to submit, for the information of the
Library Committee, the Seventeenth Report of the Librarian of the
University, covering the period September 1, 1945 to August 31, 1946.
During these twelve months the Library has felt the full
impact both of the arrival on the campus of thousands of returned
veterans, and of the rapid broadening of the University's curriculum.
Indeed, it operated throughout the year in something not far short of
a state of emergency,
A special session for veterans was held in May and June, vi th
the result that University classes met during all but five of the 52
weeks under review. Registration for the regular summer school was
approximately 2500, and while it was in session demands on the Library's
service departments were appreciably heavier than they were in the winter
session only a few years ago. The staff had only the briefest of respites
between terms, and this not only frayed nerves, but made it impossible to
attend to the innumerable small jobs that must be done sooner or later,
but have to be put aside when reading rooms and stackrooms are crowded.
In former years service demands could be counted upon to drop sharply
during May and June, and this provided time in which to plan changes, make
advance preparations, consider book needs and book orders, bring files up
to date, and so on. Careful work of this kind during the slack months Page two
added much to the quality of the service the staff was able to give during
the rest of the year, and it is to be hoped that the University will soon
be able to revert to its regular schedule of sessions.
The new demands made upon the Library have seemed to be
virtually endless. The new Faculty of Law appeared on the scene with
little more than a fortnight's notice, and its need for books was naturally
immediate and pressing. In the summer of 1946 Pharmacy, Architecture,
Music, Slavonic Studies and Agricultural Engineering were added to the list,
to mention only entirely new departments. In addition, new courses and
revisions of courses have appeared in virtually every department, and the
teaching staff has at least tripled in size.'
As a result, in addition to an imperative necessity to expand
the book collection and facilities of the Library quantitatively, to keep
pace with the vastly increased student registration, the Library has been
under great pressure to expand into new fields and improve the quality of
its collections. This latter pressure has been most welcome, but unfortunately it has come at a time when conditions in the book market make
careful and systematic book-buying an extremely difficult task.
It would seem, for example, that it should be a simple matter
to secure additional copies of the books selected by the teaching staff
for "required reading." Many of them are familiar titles that have been
used, in successively revised editions, for a good many years. At the
moment, however, many of them are unobtainable. Hundreds are out of stock,
and the scarcity of paper makes it impossible for the publishers to say
when they will be available, and in what quantity. The commonest of Page three
classics - books that we have always been able to take it for granted
that we could buy at a moment's notice - have dropped out of print.
Standard reprint collections such as the Everyman and Modern libraries
have had hundreds of titles temporarily out of print. Of 18 books ordered
recently from a third well-known series, only two could be supplied. For
a time dictionaries were so scarce that they were rationed, and a routine
order for two large Merriam-Websters was not filled for nearly a year. In
addition, many books printed in England have been issued in such small
numbers that even an air-mail order, sent off immediately after publication
was announced, has not arrived in time to secure a copy. Time and again
the Library has had to turn to the second-hand market - which today is
coming more and more to coincide with the rare book market - to secure
additional copies of the most familiar standbys.
As a result of all this, the Library has not been able to
expand its book collection quickly enough to keep pace with new demands.
Money has not been the difficulty, for the Board of Governors have been
able and willing to provide funds for any reasonable requirement. The
books themselves have simply been unobtainable. Fortunately conditions
are now improving; but it will be a year at least before the Library .
will even be able to place in its "required reading" and reference rooms
the number of titles and the number of copies that should be there. Page four
The H. R. MacMillan Collection in Forestry
The outstanding gift received during the year came from
Mr* H. R, MacMillan, who offered to make aval lable to the University
sufficient funds to enable the Library to acquire a comprehensive collection
of books, periodicals, pamphlets, etc., relating to Forestry. Early in
the New Year the Librarian discussed the project with Mr. MacMillan, who
responded by making an immediate gift of f3,000.00, earmarked for two
purposes: first, to make it possible for the Library to secure for two
months the services of an experienced Forestry library specialist, who could
advise on matters of policy, and, secondly, to permit the Library to commence
the purchase of periodical sets.
Under the terms of this grant Miss Ina Rankin, of the Library
of the University of Michigan, spent July and August in Vancouver, and
helped plan the acquisition of the projected collection. By the end of
her visit the scheme had been worked out in all but its lesser details, and
the Library was ready to go ahead with book buying on a considerable scale,
Mr. MacMillan thereupon most generously agreed to make a further sum not
exceeding $10,000,00 available, and this will be paid over in instalments
of $2,000,00 as the money is required and previous expenditures are
accounted for,
Mr. MacMillan's gift will enable the Library to build up a really
outstanding collection of material not only on Forestry, but also on any
related fields that are important to the forest industries in British Columbia,
Let us hope that it is only the first of a series of such collections,
each closely related to some phase of the economic life of Western Canada,
that the Library will be able to place on its shelves. Page five
Mr, MacMillan's generosity to the Library was not confined
to the field of Forestry. In the course of the year he presented two
collections of general literature, consisting in all of more than 100
volumes, and in July he gave to the University a most interesting original
water-colour sketch of the Spanish village at Nootka Sound. The sketch,
which was probably painted in the autumn of 1792, is beautifully executed,
*
and ia perfect condition.
The A. J, T. Taylor Arctic Collection
The other outstanding gift of. the year was presented by Mrs.
A. J. T. Taylor, who gave to the Library the fine collection of books on
the Arctic, and to a lesser degree the Antarctic, that had been assembled
by her late husband. The 500 volumes are worth at least $4,000.00. Many
of them were purchased with the help of Stefansson, the explorer, who was a
close personal friend of Mr, Taylor's, The most interesting item in the
collection is probably a copy of the quarto edition of Samuel Hearne's
Journey to the Northern Ocean. This bears the book-plate of Samuel Wegg,
Governor of the Hudson's Bay Company, and the man who instructed Hearne
to make his great trek to the Arctic. The book later passed into the hands
of Thornton W. Townsend, a noted collector of Arctic literature, and it
bears both his book-plate and note in his handwriting. In 1933 the volume was
purchased for Mr. Taylor by Stefansson, who commented upon its value and
history in an autograph note. Finally, some previous owner has laid in a
brief signed note by the famous French explorer, La Perouse,
Special book-plates have been prepared for both the Taylor
Collection and the MacMillan Collection in Forestry. Page six
Other Notable Gifts
A number of other gifts deserve more than passing notice,
Mr. P. R. Pettipiece presented the files of many of the
Socialist newspapers that he had edited in Vancouver and elsewhere during
a lifetime devoted in great part to working-class journalism. Very few
copies of these papers are known to be in existence, and it is entirely
possible that some of the volumes are unique.
Through the good offices of Mr. Gordon Bell the B. C. Underwriters' Association were persuaded to give to the Library a set of the
fire underwriters' maps of the City of Vancouver. Possession of these maps,
which are probably the most detailed ever made for the city as a whole,
is a rare privilege, which the University greatly appreciates,
Last autumn Major-General H. F. G. Letson, M. C, formerly a
member of the staff of the University, presented his personal library in
the field of electrical and mechanical engineering. During the summer,
he also placed in the Library, on deposit, his valuable collection of
military and naval books and periodicals.
In April the Library received from Dr. A. H. A. Henderson, of
Aberdeen, Washington, a first instalment of a substantial personal library
that she intends to give to the University. This initial gift consisted
of 190 volumes, largely relating to British and American Colonial history,
and including such outstanding sets as Winsor's Narrative and Critical
History and IV volumes of the Original Narratives of American History series,
The extra copies of many standard works that were included were specially
welcome at this time, when demands upon the Library are out of all proportion to the book supply. Page seven
Mr. A. E. Miller, of Penticton, permitted the Librarian to
select nearly 400 volumes from his personal library, which he was dispersing
before moving to the Coast. The books relate mostly to art and literature,
and include many volumes filled with fine colour reproductions, as well
as a first edition of Dickens' Christmas Carol.
In July Mr, H. Mortimer Lamb gave the Library a number of books
and magazines and a fine painting of totem poles by the local artist, Jack
Shadbolt. The same month Mrs. Lucy Edwards Crittenden, a member of the class
of Arts '25, presented an interesting collection of books, pamphlets, etc.,
relating to John Ruskin, who was an intimate friend of her mother and
grandfather. Several of the items are autographed by Ruskin.
In August the Library received, through the Prime Minister, the
Rt. Hon. W. L, Mackenzie King, copies of Field Marshall Montgomery's two
volumes, Normandy to the Baltic and El Alamein to the River Sangro.
Use of the books is restricted, in accordance with Viscount Montgomery's
positive instruction, but they may be consulted by any responsible person
within the Library building.
During the summer the Department of Forestry placed in the
Library the complete set of the proceedings of the Sloan Commission on
Forestry that had been presented to it after the publication of the final
Report. This Invaluable record posed somewhat of a problem, for its
thousands of pages contained much material that would be of great use to
students of Forestry, but the typescript was in a highly perishable form.
A solution was found when it was discovered that the B. C. Lumber & Shingle
Manufacturers' Association had had the greater part of the evidence
mimeographed for the use of its members. The Association has promised to Page eight
do its best to assemble a number of sets for the Library, and it is hoped
that half a dozen copies may be obtained in this way.    The original copy
is accompanied by three boxes of briefs and exhibits,  extremely few copies
of which will be available elsewhere.
Thanks to the generosity of the Vancouver Sun,  the Library will
shortly possess a large Recordak microfilm reader.    The order was placed early
in the summer,  and delivery is expected in October.    Equipment of the kind is
now essential, and the use of so fine a reader will be greatly appreciated
by the staff and research students.
Other donors who deserve much more than the passing reference
here possible include the following:-
Mrs. J. Kaye Henry, who presented several hundred volumes of
general literature; Mr. William Dorbils, who from time to time has sent the
Library interesting items of Canadiana, with the request that they be added
to the Howay-Reid collection; Mr.  Cecil Killam, for a beautiful set of
Van
Balzac's complete works; Miss C. J. DeV.^Steenwyck,  for a gift comprising 28
volumes,  including several titles by T. S. Eliot in fine editions; Miss Lucille
Malkin, who presented 100 volumes of general literature;  the Victoria
Committee of France-Canada,   for books in the field of French art and
literature;  to the Henry George Club of Victoria,  for a 12-volume set of
the life and works of Henry George; Dr.  Sylvia Thrupp, who presented a
fine 21-volume run of the British Magazine;  Dr. P. A. Boving, for a large
collection of miscellaneous agricultural books and bulletins,  many of which
filled gaps in the Library's files; Miss Julia C. Stockett,  who presented
a number of new novels with the request that they be included in the libraries
supplied to the University's two residence camps; Mrs. E. G. Sutcliffe, who Page nine
gave a most useful collection of musical scores, both instrumental and vocal;
Rev. W. T. Kelling, who presented a copy of the famous Mappa Mundi in
Hereford Cathedral that he himself had drawn many years ago; Dr. L. M. Greene,
of Smithers, who presented a run of the British Medical Journal; the Red Cross
Superfluities Shop, which gave the Library an extra set of the Encyclopedia
of Canada and other works; Mrs. R. C. W. Lett, who sent the Library a dozen
books on spiritualism; Dr. G. M. Ehlers, of the University of Michigan, who
presented a fine copy of Rominger's now rare work on Fossil Corals; Mrs. L.
W. Peel, who presented a run of the Illustrated London News; the Eastman Kodak
Company, which added to the Library's material on calendar reform; Prof. T.
Larsen, who presented a most useful collection of texts and works on Anglo-
Saxon, Old English, and Middle English; Mr. J. S. Garrett, who sent to the
Library 35 volumes from his late father's library, including a run of the
minutes of the conferences of the superintendents of insurance 1914-41; Mrs.
P, W. Barker, who presented a number of medical books from her late husban d's
library; Mr. H. S. Fowler, who presented a number of volumes of the Mining
and Scientific Press and other periodicals lacking from our files; Mrs, R,
H. Mullin, who gave a set of the Studies in the Psychology of Sex, by Havelock
Ellis; Mrs, Gordon Bell, who presented several German sets from her father's
library; the Yancouver Medical Association, the Vancouver General Hospital
and Mrs, G. W. Knipe who donated valuable collections of medical books and periodicals; Mr. E. W. Eastham, who presented a number of yearbooks, etc., and many
pamphlets in his own field of plant pathology; the Provincial Library, for two
valuable sets of legal periodicals; the Library of the University of Western
Ontario, which has from time to time sent us most useful items from its
duplicate files; the Royal institute of International Affairs, the Canadian Page ten
Institute of International Affairs, the Carnegie Institution of Vfeshington,
the Huntington Library, the James F. Lincoln Arc Welding Foundation, and
scores of other institutions and corporations that have made their publications
freely available.
Other donors who must be noted include Mr, J, Duff, of Sidney;
Mrs. F. A. Lovick, of Ladner; Sir Thomas White, of Toronto; Mr, Thomas E,
Donnelley, of Chicago; Mr. John Helders; the Vancouver Daily Province, for
copies of B. A. McKelvie's Maquinna the Magnificent; Dr, W. H. Burnett;
Mr. H. C. Palmer, of Duncan; Dr. J. C. Webster, of Shediac, N. B.; Mr. L. W.
McLennan, of Oleum, California; Dr. Basil Mathews; Mr. G. S. Roe; the estate
of the late R. A. Wilson; Dr. C. W. Vrooman; Mr. Charles J. Woodsworth, of
Ottawa; Prof. Marcus L. Ward, of the University of Michigan; Dr. R. A.
Wilson; and Mrs. Jonathan Rogers, who presented a facsimile of the original
letter from Captain Vancouver that she gave recently to the Yancouver
City Archives.
Finally, a special word of thanks is due to the staff of the
University, who, now as always, have been most generous in their gifts.
Names not included in the above lists, but which must on no account be
omitted, include President MacKenzie, Dr. I. M. Cowan, Dr. W. N. Sage,
Dr, I, Maclnnes, Dr. A. P. Maslow, Dr. G. B, Riddehough, Dr. Vyner Brooke,
and Dr. T. J. Oleson,
The Library's general book fund received two gifts during the year -
a cheque for $200^00 from the students attending the special veterans' Spring
Session, and $100,00 from the Summer Session Association. In addition, the
class of Agriculture '21, which last spring celebrated the 25th anniversary of
the graduation of the first class in the Faculty, gave Dean Clement the sum of Page eleven
$175,00,  to be spent on books for the Library that would be of special
interest to the Faculty of Agriculture,
The Book Collection
The number of books accessioned in the regular series was 9,301,
In addition 3,778 volumes  in the Howay-Reid Collection were accessioned
in a special series, as were 539 volumes from the Pound Collection,    In all
no less than 13,618 volumes were thus accessioned during the year.    This is
much more than double the rate of growth that was considered the Library's
normal rate of expansion only a year or so ago.
While it is true that many of the books accessioned had been
received before September 1, 1945, so many of the books presented to the
Library since that date had not yet been accessioned at the end of the academic
year that the one total roughly balanced the other.
The number of volumes in the Library,  including uncatalogued
material, now certainly exceeds 170,000,    When the new stackroom is completed,
and the book stock is arranged in proper order,  it will not be difficult
to count the books and ascertain the exact total.    In the meantime,  the
estimate given must suffice.
Staff Additions
The Library staff has doubled in number during the year.    On
September 1,  1945,  it consisted of 16 full-time persons;  a year later the
list  included 32 full-time people,  plus a trained librarian who was working
half-time.    Three additional appointments were pending at the end of th©
year,  and it is probable that the staff will number 40 by the time the
addition to the Library building is  completed and fully staffed. Rage twelve
All departments have shared in this expansion. The Reference,
Cataloguing, and Circulation Departments each added an additional trained
librarian, and a fourth trained person is working half-time in the Order
Department, Three more trained librarians are very badly needed, but it
has been impossible to secure them up to the present.
Three sub-professionals - that is, persons who have graduated from
a university but have not attended library school - were also added to the
staff. Two of these are in the Reference Department, and one in the Order
and Periodicals Department. These are the first appointments of the kind
that have been made in the Library,
The number of clericals employed has increased from 5 to 11,
and will increase still further. Most of the additions have been in the
Cataloguing and Circulation Departments.
The Stackroom Attendant added to the staff on September 1, 1945,
has proven invaluable, and deserves great credit for the marked improvement
in the orderliness and appearance of the books on the shelves. Owing to
the vastly increased use being made of the Library, however, his task is now
beyond the capacity of any one person. For the present part-time student
assistants are being employed, but a full-time assistant will undoubtedly
be essential in the enlarged building.
Circulation
So far as the main loan desk and the reserve desk were concerned,
circulation practically doubled in volume in 1945-46 as compared with 1944-45,
It would undoubtedly have been higher still if more copies of many books in
great demand had been available, and if the Library building had been
capable of serving more people. Page thirteen
Study groups, evening course students, and other readers
registered with the Department of University Extension borrowed a total of
10,053 volumes, or about 500 more than in 1944-45. Of this total plays
sent to 130 drama groups scattered all over the Province accounted for 4,364.
Circulation Statistics
1945-46
_L «? *x*I:™ te O
General  Reserve
Total
September
2669
1602
4271
October
5033
5472
10505
November
5789
5791
11580
December
2756
2651
5407
January
5591
3643
9234
February
6537
4305
10842
March
5836
5423
11259
April
2255
3143
5398
May
1506
350
1856
June
1065
313
1378
July
2671
2352
5023
August
1915
1258
3173
46633
36303
Extension
Nursing
TOTALS .
82936
9534
5010
92470
General
Reserve
Total
2136
976
3112
7998
9341
17339
9043
11673
20716
3579
5213
8792
9164
7702
16866
9667
8841
18508
9482
10384
19866
6029
9564
15593
4260
2946
7206
2670
3351
6021
5999
7358
13357
2726
3160
5886
72753
80509
153262
10053
3200
166515
Missing Books
As there were never less than 2,000 students on the campus during
1945-46, it was not possible to take the usual annual inventory of the book
collection. How many books disappeared during the year is therefore not
accurately known, but the Circulation Department is aware of 274 losses,
including 112 books off the required-reading shelves. Coming at a time vhen
it is virtually impossible to replace many books, this last figure is most
serious. The vast majority of the students play the game, but registration Page fourteen
has increased so much that the statistically small minority who do not are now
numerically important. Sad experience has shown that many of them are completely unscrupulous about book thefts, particularly if a textbook is involved.
This latter aspect of the thieving problem is not a new one; indeed, in
normal times the Library avoids owning any of the prescribed texts because,
sooner or later, they are certain to be stolen. Because of the present book
shortage, which has freq pntly made it impossible for the Book Store to
secure sufficient texts to go around, the Library has tried to help out by
purchasing textbooks and placing them on the required-reading shelves. Even
though the exceptional circumstances that has resulted in them being there
must be perfectly well known to the students, thieving is worse than ever.
Last autumn, for example, at the earnest plea of a desperate professor, the
Library circularized former students who had taken a certain course, and
succeeded in purchasing 10 copies of a textbook that was in very short supply.
Seven of these were stolen almost as soon as they reached the shelves, and the
three survivors were only retained by keeping them unier lock and key.
Rental Collection
It will be recalled that a rental service was started on a small
scale by the Circulation Department in October 1944. Although it has not
grown greatly, the books are appreciated and the service is paying its way.
The number of titles available is usually about fifty, and it remains at that
figure because books are transferred to the general collection relatively
quickly. When other duties do not press as heavily on the staff as they do
at the moment, the collection can undoubtedly be expanded to advantage and
developed considerably.
Rental rates continue to be three cents per day, with a minimum Page fifteen
charge of five cents, and, as already noted, the collection carries itself
without difficulty.
Reference Department
The hordes of students in attendance in 1945-46 vastly increased
the work of this Department. The strain on the staff has been terrific,
here as elsewhere, particularly as the special Spring Session swallowed up
the slaok months that are usually spent in preparing for the winter rush.
Additions were made to the staff, and the Library was most fortunate in the
people it was able to secure; but even so, months must pass before any new
staff member, no matter how capable, can become sufficiently familiar with the
Library, its book stock, and the special needs of student and faculty groups,
to carry a full share of any department's burden.
During the fall of 1945 an effort was made to continue the policy •
of offering instruction in the use of the Library to students interested in
special subject fields. Talks were given to Social Work, Civil Engineering,
Public Health Nursing, and Forestry students, as well as to the freshman class
in Agriculture, but routine duties at the Reference Desk have become so heavy
that for the present this most important service will have to be curtailed,
A special classroom and other facilities for this type of instruction will be
provided in the addition to the Library building, and it is hoped that many more
talks may be given in 1947 and succeeding years.
Miss Mary Henderson was in charge of displays during the year,
and she contrived to produce a very interesting series in spite of the
difficulty in obtaining materials. Mrs. Edward Lipsett again very graciously
placed her remarkable collections at our disposal, and a number of striking Page sixteen
exhibits were arranged in the autumn term, A travelling display of publications loaned by the Canadian Institute of International Relations attracted
much attention, and so did the displays of large photographs - a dozen or
more to the series - that were furnished by the British Information Office,
in Ottawa.
The Reference staff has had very little time to devote to the
map collection; nevertheless, most of the maps owned by the Library before
1940 have now been accessioned. A considerable number of large dissected
wall-maps, specially designed for classroom use, have been added to the
collection, and the demand for these, coupled with the expressions of appreciation the service has inspired, show that this type of service fills a distinct
need.
While in Chicago in" December, 1945, Miss Smith investigated the
possibility of having the Library placed on the list of institutions to share
in the distribution of World War II maps that is now unler way in the United
States. Nothing came of this directly, but eventually, in June, 1946, Dr,
Luther Evans, Librarian of Congress, wrote to inquire if the Library would
care to receive a series of from 3000 to 8000 maps to be distributed by the
United States Office of Strategic Services. The offer was accepted with
alacrity, and several hundred maps have already been received,
Interlibrary Loans
It may be well to recall the statistics of loans in the last
few years:- Borrowed
Loaned
Total
.
178
-
-
185
122
100
222
137
130
267
48
65
113
138
172
310
Page seventeen
Borrowed       Loaned
1941-42
1942-43
1943-44
1944-45
April-August 1945
1945-46
Two or three conclusions may be drawn from these figures. First,
the number of loans made is increasing slowly but steadily. Secondly, no
effort is being made to "push" the service on our own campus; on the contrary,
owing to the pressure of routine work, the Reference staff has been compelled
almost to discourage loans, and to limit them to items that are vitally
necessary. Thirdly, other libraries are looking to us more and more
frequently for material. In part this is clearly due to the Bibliographic
Center in Seattle, which acts as a clearing house for thousands of inter-
library loan requests, and can forward promptly an inquiry about books we
possess that are not available elsewhere.
The Library Catalogues
The Cataloguing Department worked throughout the year at a pace
that cannot possibly be maintained for long, but thanks to their tireless
efforts it is once again possible to say that all books acquired by purchase
have been catalogued and placed on the shelves. Many books given to the
Library have also been dealt with and placed in circulation, but the pressure
of work was so great that many volumes not urgently required have been put to
one side until more time and staff are available to deal with them. Towards
the end of the year it was found necessary to resort to some temporary
(meaning thereby incomplete) cataloguing, notably in the case of many books
for the Faculty of Law, which for the moment is not interested in complete
entries in the standard form. Page eighteen
When Miss Doreen Woodford returned to the Department in November
the cataloguing of Canadiana was placed in her charge. Remarkable progress
has since been made with the Howay-Reid Collection, but in recent months
ordinary library demands have become so great that Miss Woodford has been
devoting a good deal of time to general cataloguing. Some comfort may be
drawn from the fact that the Howay-Reid books can be handled much more comfortably and efficiently when they are housed in an adequate room, as they
will as soon as the addition to the Library is completed,
A total of 72,331 cards were added to the Library of Congress
Depository Catalogue this year. These brought the total number of cards in
the file that supplements the printed edition of the catalogue proper to
324,254. As noted in a previous report, several plans are under consideration
whereby the supplement to the printed set can be kept up-to-date in printed
form, and the probability is that one or other of them will take effect wihin
a few months.
The complete printed edition of the Library of Congress catalogue,
consisting in all of 167 volumes, has now been received, and this serves as a
reminder that the Library's collection of catalogues is becoming somewhat
notable. Many years ago the Library subscribed to the printed edition of the
great General Catalogue of the Bibliotheque Nationale, in Paris, and the volumes
issued in France during the war years were received recently. This great set
is now within a dozen volumes or thereabouts of completion, after having been
in progress for nearly 70 years. Within a few months the Library should also
possess a facsimile copy of the old edition of the British Museum Catalogue,
whi-ch has been described as the greatest single bibliographic tool in existence. Page nineteen
The revised edition of this Catalogue has progressed no further than the
letter "C", owing both to the stupendous labour involved in recataloguing
so enormous a library, and the depressions and wars that have occurred since
the project was started. It is to be hoped that it will soon be appearing
at least as fast as in 1938, which was at the rate of three or four volumes
per annum.
During the year the Library also completed its sets of the
facsimile reprint editions of Evans' American Bibliography and its successor,
the American Catalogue.
Periodicals
The addition of a new Faculty, several new Departments, and many
new courses has occasioned an immense amount of work for the Periodicals
Department. Much of this has had to be done personally by Mr. Lanning, as
no assistant was available who was qualified to carry on the complicated
negotiations now necessary to secure subscriptions to new periodical s, back
files of established titles, and so on.
A list of the principal new acquisitions will best indicate the
great scope of the development that took place in the Library's periodical
collections this year„
Important new sets acquired included the following:-
CANADIAN POETRY MAGAZINE, v. 1, 1936, to date.
EGONOMETRICA, v. 1, 1933, to date.
ARNOLD ARBORETUM JOURNAL, v. 11, 1930, to date.
HISPANIA, v. 1, 1918, to date (lacking a few numbers).
JAPAN SOCIETY, TRANSACTIONS, v. 1-38, 1892-1939.
MADRONO, v, 1, 1916, to date,
MEDICAL LIBRARY ASSOCIATION BULLETIN, v. 17, 1927, to date
(lacking a few numbers).
UNIVERSITY OF MICHIGAN, MUSEUM OF PALAEONTOLOGY,
CONTRIBUTIONS, v. 1, 1924, to date.
UNIVERSITY OF MONTREAL, INSTI'i'ui BOTANIZE, CONTRIBUTIONS,
v. 1, 1922, to date, Page twenty
NORTH CMTRAL cEDUCATIONj ASSOCIATION qjARTERLY,
v. 1, 1926, to date.
ROYAL CANADIAN MOUNTED POLICE QUARTERLY, v. 1, 1933, to date
(lacking a few numbers),
SHOULDER STRAP (B. C. POLICE), v. 1, 1939, to date.
In addition, the first of the periodicals purchased for the H. R,
MacMillan Collection in Forestry arrived before the end of August, These
included:-
AMERICAN BOTANIST, v. 1, 1901, to date
AMERICAN FERN JOURNAL, v. 1, 1910, to date
MORTON ARBORETUM BULLETIN, v. 1, 1925, to date.
RHODORA, v. 1, 1899, to date.
SARGENTIA, v. 1, 1932, to date (lacking a few numbers).
TORREY BOTANICAL CLUB, MEMOIRS, v. 1, 1889, to date {lacking
a few numbers)
TORREYA, v. 1, 1901, to date (lacking 2 numbers).
The Library subscribed to fifteen new periodicals that commenced
publication in 1945-46. As the titles indicate, they covered a surprisingly
wide variety of subjects:-
BRITISH COLUMBIA DIGEST
CANADIAN DIGEST
CANADIAN EDUCATION
INDEX TO CURRENT HOSPITAL LITERATURE
INTERNATIONAL JOURNAL
INTERNATIONAL NURSING BULLETIN
JOURNAL OF COLLOID SCIENCE
JOURNAL OF DOCUMENTATION
JOURNAL OF GERONTOLOGY
JOURNAL OF POLYMER SCIENCE
NORTHERN REVIEW
PARU
SCIENCE ILLUSTRATED
WORLD REPORTS
WORLD'S POULTRY SCIENCE JOURNAL
Subscriptions have also been placed to the following 54 established
journals, and the probability is that it will be necessary eventually to
acquire back files of many of them.  (Titles prefixed by the symbol "#" were
gift subscriptions.) Page twenty-one
ADVERTISING AGE
AGRICULTURAL INSTITUTE REVIEW
ALBERTA FOLKLORE QUARTERLY
AMERICAN FUR BREEDER
BREEDERS' GAZETTE
CANADIAN BOOKSELLER...
#CAMSI JOURNAL
CANADIAN GRAIN JOURNAL
CANADIAN HORTICULTURE
#CANADIAN SCIENTIST
CARIBOO DIGEST
CHANNELS
COAL TECHNOLOGY
COMMERCE JOURNAL  (UNIVERSITY OF
TORONTO)
CONTEMPORARY VERSE
ENGINEERS'   DIGEST
EVERYBODY'S POULTRY JOURNAL
FARM ECONOMIST
FEED BAG
FINANCIAL POST
FRUIT PRODUCTS JOURNAL
FUR TRADE JOURNAL OF CANADA
GANTS DU CIEL
GARDENERS'   CHRONICLE OF AMERICA
HOLLYWOOD QUARTERLY
HORIZON
HORTICULTURE
INDEX SOCIETY
JEWISH CENTRE WORKER
JOURNAL OF PHYSICAL EDUCATION
JOURNAL OF SOCIAL HYGIENE
JUNIOR HISTORICAL JOURNAL
#LIBRARY CHRONICLE
MARKETING
METALLURGIA
MISSISSIPPI VALLEY HISTORICAL REVIEW
NATIONAL FEDERATION OF SETTLEMENTS
NATIONAL FUR NEK©
NATIONAL HORTICULTURE MAGAZINE
NULAID NEWS
OCCUPATIONAL PSYCHOLOGY
OIL AND GAS JOURNAL
POETRY (AUSTRALIA)
POULTRY TRIBUNE
PRINTERS'   INK
PRISON WORLD
PUBLIC ADMINISTRATION REVIEW
SOUTERLY
TECHNICAL BOOK REVIEW DIGEST
THEATRE NOTEBOOK
TROLLOPIAN
TURKEY WORLD
WESTERN. PRODUCER
#WOOD PRESERVING NEWS
Finally, the Library has substantially increased its holdings of
the following fifteen titles:-
AGRICULTURAL ENGINEERING
AMERICAN JOURNAL OF PSYCHIATRY
ARCHITECTURAL RECORD
ARNOLDIA
BIBLIOGRAPHICAL SOCIETY (London)
UNITERSITY OF CALIFORNIA, PUBLICATIONS IN GEOLOGY
UNIVERSITY OF CALIFORNIA, PUBLICATIONS IN HISTORY
COMMONWEAL
COMPARATIVE PSYCHOLOGY MONOGRAPHS  (now complete)
CURTIS«S BOTANICAL MAGAZINE
HOARD'S DAIRTMAN
IMPERIAL  INSTITUTE,  BULLETIN
JOURNAL OF AESTHETICS
PROGRESSIVE EDUCATION
WOOD PRESERVING NEWS Page twenty-two
French Periodicals
As soon as it was possible to communicate freely with booksellers
in France, the Library set about the task of filling in the periodical sets
that had been interrupted by the war. As the following report indicates, the
Library has been fortunate in its contacts, and there is reason to hope that
most of the important sets can be completed in time.
The war-time gap has been filled completely in the case of the
following titles:-
ANNALES DE CHEMIE
JOURNAL DE CHEMIE PHYSIQJE ANNALES DE PHYSIQUE
LE LAIT L'INSTITUT PASTEUR, ANNALES
SOCIETE CHIMIQUE DE FRANCE,  BULLETIN   L'INSTITUT PASTEUR,. BULLETIN
We have secured some of the missing numbers of the ANNALES DE
GEOGRAPHIE,  the REVUE DE PARIS,  and the REVUE HORTICOLE,  and a large part
of the missing file of the following:
ACADEMIE DES SCIENCES,   COMPTES RENDUS
JOURNAL DE MATHEMATI$JE
REVUE HISTORIQJE
REVUE HORTICOLE
The back numbers  of the    ANNALES D'HISTOIRE SOCIAL and of BIBLIO
have been ordered, and it is probable that all of them will be forthcoming
in time.    No report has been received as yet regarding the following:-
"  LAROUSSE ILLUSTRE MENSUEL
MERCURE DE FRANCE
REVUE DE LITTERATURE COMPAREE
REVUES DES ETUDES GREQUES
REVUE D'HISTORIE LITTERAIRE DE FRANCE
Periodicals formerly received, but which ceased publication
during the war include L'EUROPE NOUVELLE, L'ILLUSTRATION, NOUVELLE REVUE
FRANCAISE,   and REVUE DES DEUX MONDES. Page twenty-three
A considerable number of new French periodicals have made their
appearance, and after as careful investigation as circumstances permitted
the Library has placed a number of subscriptions. These will be reported
in detail in the next annual report,
German Periodicals
The position as regards German periodicals remains obscure, and
it may be some time before it clarifies to any considerable extent. Meanwhile
the Library has suffered one serious disappointment. Some time ago the
National Research Council made elaborate plans to secure for Canadian libraries
a share of what remained in the warehouses of the German periodical publishers,
and our Library submitted a detailed list of its requirements. Unfortunately
nothing seems to have come of the scheme, possibly because bombing damage was
found to be more extensive than anticipated. As the months slipped by, it was
decided that it would be prudent to secure from Edwards Brothers all volumes
of scientific titles that they have reprinted, under license from the Custodian
of Enemy Property in the United States. Unfortunately a few important titles
are not included in their list, but the volume of material available is
nevertheless substantial. Most of the reprinted files commence in 1940, and
not in 1939, owing to the later entry of the United States into the war.
Costs will be about 25% higher than pre-war subscription rates, but the
material simply must be secured if at all possible. Deliveries commenced in
August, and will continue for some time.
Other Foreign Periodicals
The Library has been able to complete its files of HEREDITAS and
ACTA MATHEMATICA, both of which are published in Sweden, and to fill in the
war years of LA CELLULE (published in Belgium) and GENETTCA and BIBLIOGRAPHICA Page twenty-four
GENETICA (published in Holland). NEUE RUNDSCHAU, which ceased publication
in Germany during the war, has resumed in Sweden, and the Library has
secured this new series from number 1, Little has been learned as yet about
two Italian periodicals, CIRCOLO MATEMATICO DI PALERMO, RENIDCONTI, and the
INTERNATIONAL INSTITUTE OF AGRICULTURE, nor has any report on periodicals yet
been received from Japan.
Law Periodicals
The Library and Faculty are currently receiving twenty-one of the
periodicals indexed in the Wilson INDEX TO LEGAL PERIODICALS. In addition,
subscriptions have been placed for a dozen or fifteen series of law reports,
etc. Long runs of about half these serials have already been secured. A
more detailed report is planned for next year.
New Departments
Additional periodicals will obviously be necessary for the new
departments of Architecture, Pharmacy, and Slavonic Studies, and for such
new courses as that devoted to American Literature. A good many of these
were being arranged for, and one or two had actually been received, by the
end of August, but the details properly belong in next year's report.
Binding
Binding details, like other data relating to finances, are best
tabulated by the financial rather than by the academic year. The figures
here given therefore apply to the financial year 1945-46 (April 1, 1945 to
March 31, 1946).
It will be. recalled that Mr. H. W. Brooks, who had done the
Library's work for a good many years, found it necessary to retire in May,
1945. With the help of Mr, Brooks a satisfactory contract was negotiated Page twenty-five
with his successor, Mr. M. I. Sochasky, and this became effective in August,
In order to safeguard the Library's position the University purchased Mr,
Brooks'   stock of buchram and other supplies that had been acquired specifically
for use in binding the Library's books, and this stock was turned ever-to Mr,
Sochasky when he commenced during our work.    Owing to the fact that praotically
no binding was done in the months of June and July, the Library's schedule
was badly upset, and extraordinary circumstances,  such as the sudden demand
for a great deal of work for the new Faculty of Law, made it impossible t©
catch up quickly with the old routine.    Difficulties of this sort will
evidently continue for a time, as the volume of work now required is greater
than Mr. Sochasky has been able to handle steadily to date,
B inding costs have risen,  but  in view of the upward movement
of almost all prices,  the Library is still faring exceptionally well.
The following table summarizes the work done during the year:-
Volumes of periodicals bound 1150 $2236.70
Paper-bound books bound 226 351.65
Rebinds and repairs 78 108.30
Newspapers 2 11.00
Miscellaneous 54 74.52
Repairs made in Library  (labour cost) 28.80
1510 |2810.97
The binding appropriation for the year was $2900,00,
Comparative costs under the old and new contracts have worked out
in actual practice as follows:-
Average cost per volume
1944-45 New contract
Periodicals #1.85 $2.09
Paper-bound books 1.22 1,60
Rebinds and repairs 1.29 1,46 Page twenty-six
Sixteen long sets were included in the work done in 1945-46, and this
enabled $fe© Library to take advantage of quantity discounts.    Much the most
important of these was a long run of Spanish classics, amounting in all to 117
volumes.
Gramophone Records
The circulation of recordings has soared with the student registration,
and the number of records handled at the Library's loan desk in 1945»46 was more
than double the total for 1944-45, Individual students in particular have taken
advantage of the service, which now makes a highly important contribution to the
cultural life of the University, so many concerts were organized by groups of
students that it is certainly correct to say that on the average a concert was
held every week-day throughout the year.
A total of 237 recordswere added to the Carnegie music set, and more
than a hundred more were placed in the supplementary collection maintained by
the Department of University Extension. It has been found necessary to duplicate many of the more popular symphonies, suites, etc., and it will soon be
essential to have many of them in triplicate.
Circulation through the Extension Department decreased somewhat, owing
to the closing of many of the Army, Navy, and Air Force stations that formerly
received recordings regularly, but it is apparent that demand from other quarters
will quickly restore and probably increase the total. No less than 115 listening
groups borrowed records during the year, some of them as often as once a week.
Programmes for children continued to be .so popular that a number of new records
were secured specially to meet their needs.
Statistics covering the five academic years in which individual students
have been permitted to borrow records follow. Page twenty-seven
Gramophone record loans
Academic year
1941-42 1942-43 1943-44 1944-45 1945*46
1605
2932
3367
3075
7740
472
38
396
205
474
232
224
258
1413
243
1246
58)
)
788)
1124
330
378
383
395
399
650
1120
3960
4947
3877
27
 2
31
11
r" riii 'mwiiii
3540
6141
9626
9479
13314
Art loan
collection
To individual students
To student groups
For instructional purposes
To University staff
To Canadian Broadcasting
Corporation
To Extension Department
Special loans
Total
The Library embarked upon an interesting experiment a year ago
when, at cthe suggestion of Miss Anne Smith, Head of the Reference Department,
steps were taken to assemble an Art Loan Collection, and make it available
to the students. A group of local artists were asked to loan original works
to the Library, and the response was most generous. President MacKenzie very
kindly arranged for insurance to coverthe inevitable fire risks involved,
and the pictures were then offered on loan to any registered student. The
response was encouraging, and demand soon outstripped the supply of water-
colours and oils. A number of prints from the Carnegie Art set were thereupon added to the loan collection, and proved most popular. In all, 37
original works and 14 prints were made available, and at one time or another
pictures were in the hands of 40 borrowers. Three water-colours and one oil
painting were sold during the year, so that some of the .artists at least
received some slight financial recompense for their kind cooperation. Page twenty-eight
This first experimental year has shown that the Art Loan idea
has great possibilities, but these cannot be developed to any extent until
the Library has room in which to expand its activities. Meanwhile, it is
hoped that it will be possible to increase the number of paintings and prints
available to some extent during the current year.
An informal Art Loan Committee was formed to act as an advisory
body and, generally speaking, supervise the experiment. The members were:
Mrs. C. Vyner Brooke, Mrs. Lawren Harris, Mrs, N, A. M. MacKenzie, Mrs, C.
E, Dolman, Miss Anne M. Smith, Mr, John Creighton, and the Librarian,
University Publications
A more complete report on this subject should be possible in another
year. Meanwhile three points of interest may be noted.
First, the Library has terminated the series of Reprints that
were distributed as exchange material over a period of seven or eight years.
The Librarian felt quite definitely that this distribution was most wasteful,
as the money expended could be used to much greater advantage in assisting
in the publication of original material.
Secondly, the Calendar, the Announcement of the Summer Session,
and the Requirements for University Entrance, all serial publications, now
constitute a "General Series" of the "Publications of the University of
British Columbia," This notation first appeared on the Calendar for the
session 1945-46, and as it was felt that the volume number of this series
should coincide with the sessional number, the 1945-46 Calendar became
Volume 31, Number 1, of the new "Publications,"
Thirdly, the Library is making an effort to secure copies of all
publications issued on the campus, classify them in four series, and issue Page twenty-nine
them as "Publication" in the Biological Sciences, the Physical Sciences, the
Social Sciences, or Language and Literature, The three titles distributed to
date are all in the Biological Sciences series:-
no. 1, University Research Forest,
no, 2. Some Factors that Influence Poultry Farm Incomes,
no. 3. Report on a survey of Medical Education in Canada
and the United States, by C. E. Dolman,
An Editorial Committee has been appointed by the President, and
it is hoped that plans to develop these series may be under way shortly.
New Building
The completing of plans for the large addition now beiag made
to the Library building took a great deal of the Librarian's time during
the last year. Consultations were held with representatives of Snead & Company,
who installed the stackroom in the present building, in Toronto in March, and
at the Company's factory at Orange, Virginia, in May. Following these talks
it became apparent that it might be possible to redesign the stackroom in
the wing on the new "modular" principle. This was found to be practicable, and
in June Snead & Company sent one of their engineers to Vancouver to work out
details with Messrs. Sharp & Thompson, the University's architects, and the
Librarian, The advantages gained by the use of "modular" construction are
tremendous, as it makes it possible to use what would normally be stackroom
space for a great variety of purposes, including offices, sorting rooms, small
reading rooms, service desks, seminar rooms, etc. This being so, the delay
occasioned by the change in plans was well worth while.
An  additional advantage of the change is that a much higher proportion
of the materials required for the stackroom can now be purchased locally, as
little more than the shelves themselves and miscellaneous equipment will ha^e
to be manufactured in the United States, Page thirty
Tenders for the addition were invited before the end of the year
under review, and it may be permissible to add that the contract for the
building was actually awarded before the end of September,
It is a great pleasure to express our thanks to Mr. C. J. Thompson,
of Sharp & Thompson, for his untiring efforts to give the Library as nearly
as possible precisely the accommodation and facilities the staff felt were
essential; to the President and the Board of Governors for the freedom they
accorded the architects and the Librarian within the limits of the appropriation
available; and, finally, to the University community as a whole for the friendly
support they have given to the entire project.
Finances
The Library budgets for the last two financial years have included
the following appropriations:-
1944-45 194&.46
Books and Magazines $11,630,00 |14,990,00
Equipment 450.00 -   '    #
Binding 2,600,00 2,900.00
Supplies and Expenses 1,900,00 2,400,00
16,580.00 20,290,00
#provided for in 1945-46 from 1944-45 credit balances.
It was obvious, however,  that the 1945-46 budget could be little
more than a token tabulation,  as it was impossible to forecast with any
accuracy the demands that would be made upon the Library many months later.
In actual fact the expenditure on books during the financial year was as
follows:-
Orders outstanding,  April 1,  1945 $3,360,00
Books and Magazines  (regular budget) 14,990,00
Special grants:- Page thirty-one
Special grants:-
Gramophone records
Foreign periodicals
Reference Department
Librarian's Fund
Extra copies
Committee Fund and departments
History
Directed Reading Courses
Other book funds:-
Gift, Lincoln Welding Company
Gift, I.O.D.E.
Fines
Faculty of Law
$300.00
500,00
900.00
1,600,00
500.00
2,000,00
300.00
280.93
109.66
400.00
471.00
4,258.19
#29,969.78
The balance carried forward at the end of the year was |5083,45,
so that the amount actually expended on books during the year was $24,886,33.
This total does not include expenditures from the Special Fund,  which is held
in reserve by the Bursar as a trust account,  to be expended at the discretion
of the Librarian,  or from the fund-provided by the Lady Lions Club to buy books
to be placed in the two residence camps.
Staff
On September 1, 1946, the staff of the Library was composed as
follows :-
Librarian's Office
W. Kaye Lamb,  Ph.D.
Evelyn Hearsey
Mrs.  R. Gordon-Findlay
Reference Department
Anne M.  Smith, M.A., B.L.S.
Mrs, Dorothy Chatwin, M.A.,  B.L.S.
Betty Henderson, M.A.,  B.L.S.
Mrs. M. Kerr,  B. A.
Winifred Irwin, B.A.
Mary DiFlorio
Librarian
Order Clerk
Stenographer
Head
Assistant
Assistant
Sub-professional
Sub-professional
Clerical Page thirty-two
Cataloguing Department
Dorothy M. Jefferd
Doreen Woodford, B.A., B.L.S.
Margaret Howieson, B.A., B.L.S.
Hilda S. Cartwright
Barbara Conway
Betty Hodgkinson
Mrs. Noreen Jeffs
Orders, Periodicals and Binding
Roland J. Lanning, B.A., B.L.S.
Dorothea Aylen, B.A., B.L.S.
Robert Neale
Mrs. Shirley Rowley, B.A.
Joyce Wilson
Sheila Donald'-
Circulation Department
Mabel M. Lanning, B.A., B.L.S.
Eleanor B. Mercer, M.A., B.L.S.
Isabel Hoggan, B.A., B.L.S,
Dorothy Rolfe
Mrs. V. B. Arnott
Doreen Yorkston
Extension Library
Eleanor Gibson, B.A. , B.L.S.
Mrs. R. Macfarlane
Head
Assistant
Assistant
Clerical
CI eri cal
Clerical
Clerical
Head
Assistant (part-time)
Stackroom Attendant
Sub-professioaal
Clerical
Clerical
Head
Assistant
Assistant
Clerical
Clerical
Clerical
Assistant
Clerical
Library Committee
The Committee appointed by Senate in October, L945, was composed
as follows:-
Dr, J, C. Berry       Representing the Faculty of Agriculture
Dr. A. E. Hennings     Representing the Faculty of Applied Science
Prof. T. Larsen        )
Dr.  I. M.  Cowan        ) Representing the Faculty of Arts
Dr. M.  Y. Williams  )
At the first meeting held after these appointments, Prof. Larsen
was unanimously electa chairman for the year 1945-46. Page thirty-three
Conclusion
In closing, I wish to express my great indebtedness to and my
equally great appreciation of the way in which the Library staff rose to the
occasion this last year, and wrestled successfully with the hundred and one
problems posed by the immensely increased student registration. The senior
members in particular have put in a great deal of extra time, and have worked
virtually without respite throughout the year, I think it can be said that
they enjoyed the work, and certainly considered it well worth doing; but there
is a limit to human endurance, and more than one member of the staff is now,
in my opinion, approaching it. Fortunately several of the persons added to
the various departments have now been here sufficiently long to be reasonably
well acquainted with the institution, and the responsibilities carried by
some of the staff should decrease somewhat on that account.
To the Library Committee the Librarian is once again much indebted
for help and advice, and in particular for a freedom of action that has eased
many of the difficulties inevitably met with in a very unusual year.
Finally, the Librarian, like everyone else on the campus, owes
much to Dr. N. A. M. MacKenzie, President of the university. His willingness
to devote time and attention to Library problems, sometimes at very short
notice, and the sympathy with which he has presented the Library's needs and
problems to the Board of Governors, has meant a very great deal to all concerned,
Respectfully submitted,
W. KAYE LAMB,
Librarian,
October, 1946,

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