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Report of the University Librarian to the Senate Apr 30, 1996

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Array LI  B C     LIBRARY
80TH   YEAR
REPORT  OF
THE  UNIVERSITY
LIBRARIAN
TO  THE  SENATE
1994/95 CONTENTS
Preface 1
Library Self Study and External Review 2-3
Restructuring the Library 4
Strategy: Services 5-8
Strategy: Collections 9-12
Strategy: Access 13-14
Strategy: Place 15-17
Strategy: People 18-19
Strategy: Partner 20-23
Strategy: Funding 24-26
Appendices 27-32
This Report marks a change in the period covered
by the Library's Annual Report from the academic-
year to the fiscal year. This ensures that statistics
presented in the Annual Report cover the same
period as those which the Library submits for other
reports and statistical returns. Because of this
change, the current Report only covers the period
September 1, 1994 to March 31, 1995, although
the statistics cover the period April 1, 1994 to
March 31, 1995. Next year's Report will cover the
full 1995/96 fiscal year. THE     NIVERSITY OF  BRITISH COLUMBIA LIBRARY ANNUAL REPORT
XI
PREFACE
The Library Annual Report
describes the major strategic
activities we have engaged in to
achieve the Library's mission:
To provide outstanding access
to the universe of recorded
knowledge and information.
Our focus is on how best to use
our resources of collections, people,
facilities and technology to
continuously improve our services
to today's users and to invest for our
future users. The Report lists the
seven major initiatives which will
guide us for the next few years and
the principles of our restructuring
plan. It also highlights our
accomplishments such as:
♦ extensive teaching programmes;
♦ increased acquisition of
electronic materials and access
to Internet sources;
♦ increased dialogue with users
through our focus group
project;
♦ enhanced services such as self-
service renewal and improved
access to materials awaiting
cataloguing.
Our first major focus for 1995/
96 is to prepare for the move of
collections and staff to Koerner
Library, and to complete the
organizational plan and service
model for the Koerner Library and
for those units that will remain in
the Main Library after the move to
Koerner Library.
The second major project is to
complete negotiations with the
vendor of our new Library system to
support acquisitions, cataloguing,
circulation, public access, serials
management, and commence data
preparation and system
implementation.
The third major focus is to
examine the report of the
University's review committee for
the UBC Library, and to use its
recommendations and the ongoing
plans for reorganization and future
services to make the Library the best
it can be.
My thanks to the Library staff
who are engaged in providing
ongoing quality services as well as
planning for future improvements.
The Library's human resources are
its greatest asset, and are essential to
its mission.
It is important as well to
acknowledge the contributions of
the many other stakeholders who
care about and shape the Library —
the many advisory committees, the
Senate Library Committee, and the
University Administration. We
welcome the new energy and
leadership provided by Dr. Maria
Klawe, Vice President Student and
Academic Services. The desires and
effort of all of these people make the
Library "the great Library" that it is.
Ruth J. Patrick, Ph.D.
University Librarian THE UNIVERSITY OF BRITISH COLUMBIA LIBRARY ANNUAL REPORT
C     LIBRARY
LIBRARY SELF STUDY AND
EXTERNAL REVIEW
Self Study and Major Initiatives
The Library's self study,
Towards 2000 and Beyond: A
Progress Report and Self Study, was
published in December 1994.
Developed to assist the Library in
charting its future course as well as
to provide information for the
University's Review Committee for
the UBC Library, it considered the
environmental factors and planning
implications which would influence
the Library's development during
the next decade. It identified seven
major initiatives which the Library
intends to accomplish during the
next few years, and which have
formed the basis for the Library's
plans and activities throughout the
reporting year.
1 Enhance client service through
a comprehensive overhaul of
the Library's technological
infrastructure.
♦ identify ongoing funding for
information infrastructure and
technology
♦ begin transition from local
development to purchase of
commercially available library
systems
♦ continue implementation of
Five Year Technology Plan
2 Strengthen our knowledge of
client needs and improve our
performance measures to ensure
that we are meeting those
needs.
3 Continue redesigning services
and staff roles in response to
changing client needs and
expectations.
♦ implement new roles for
librarians which emphasize
instruction, liaison, and
outreach
♦ provide information retrieval
skills and user-friendly
interfaces to facilitate access to
and use of electronic resources
♦ introduce core and enhanced
service levels that prioritize
service to UBC clients
♦ introduce more self-services to
improve speed and convenience
of service
♦ continue improvements to basic
access services
4 Improve client and staff work
space and collections storage
space through the construction
of Phase I of the Walter C.
Koerner Library, through
planning for Phase II of the
Koerner Library, and through
better use of Main Library space
for units not moving at this time.
5 Expand client access to
information by integrating
print, electronic, and remote
resources into collections
planning and development
strategies.
♦ recognize and promote access as
a valid alternative to ownership
♦ complete reorganization of
Interlibrary Loan operations THE UNIVERSITY OF  BRITISH COLUMBIA LIBRARY ANNUAL REPORT
UBC     LIBRARY
♦ integrate electronic resources,
including electronic journals,
into the collections
development process
♦ investigate the potential of
electronic publishing and digital
preservation methods
♦ develop policies which outline
electronic resources and services
which will continue to be
provided at no cost and those
which may be subject to fees, in
keeping with the Library's
vision and values statements,
the University's mission, and
the necessities of the
information marketplace
6 Continue the organizational
restructuring of the Library to
ensure effectiveness, efficiency,
and flexibility.
♦ complete the reorganization of
Cataloguing and other technical
services units
♦ complete the development of an
organizational structure for the
Koerner Library
♦ continue with the development
and implementation of a
flexible management structure
for the UBC Library
♦ continue to ensure the Library
is efficient and cost-effective in
its operations
7 Continue to ensure the
effectiveness of Library
operations through an external
evaluation and review.
♦ internal self-study
♦ external review
In addition, many other tasks
were identified, which will be
completed as part of the Library's
normal day-to-day operations.
Following the next external review,
the Library will begin a new
planning cycle which will take it
beyond 2000 and well along the
road into the 21st Century.
External Review
During the spring of 1995, the
University's Review Committee for
the UBC Library began its work.
The Committee met with
University administrators, faculty,
students, Library staff and
administrators, and other campus
groups to gain a broad
understanding of the Library's
services and operations, and to see
how its services are perceived by the
University community. The
information the Review Committee
has obtained and its report on the
Library will play key roles in the
Library's plans for reorganization
and future services. The
Committee's report, expected to
be completed in the summer of
1995, and the Library's response
to it will be reviewed in next
year's Annual Report. THE UNIVERSITY OF  BRITISH COLUMBIA LIBRARY ANNUAL REPORT
RESTRUCTURING THE
LIBRARY
In December 1994 the Library
started a planning process to
restructure. The challenge is to find
money to upgrade the technological
infrastructure and, at the same time,
to maintain support for traditional
services and collections. Since the
University anticipates static or
diminishing funding for post-
secondary education in the next few
years, the financial pressures are
daunting.
The Library needs $1 million in
continuing funds to support
technological change and
development. This money must be
reallocated from the Library's
existing budget. The Library cannot
undertake this reallocation without
a major reorganization and a
reduction in staff.
To develop the restructuring
plan, the Library Administration
has consulted with the University
Administration, faculty, students,
and Library staff. Since the spring of
1995, the Library has discussed the
options for restructuring with many
campus groups, including the
Senate Library Committee, thirteen
faculty and departmental Library
Advisory Committees, bargaining
unit representatives, the Alma
Mater Society, the Graduate
Student Society, and the President's
Advisory Committee for the
University Library.
A priority of the restructuring
plan is to maintain a balance
between services and collections
that will meet the needs of our
primary users — UBC students,
faculty, and staff. The principal
components of the plan include
clustering of service points,
introducing more self-service
operations, and integrating support
services such as ordering,
cataloguing, and interlibrary loans.
Phase I of the new Koerner
Library will bring about the first
major organizational change.
Koerner will merge staff and services
from the Sedgewick Undergraduate
Library, the Humanities and Social
Sciences Division, the Government
Publications and Microforms
Division, and the Data Library. In
addition, some services and staff
from processing units will be
relocated to Koerner. Detailed
planning for the organizational
structure of the units which will
move to Koerner as well as for those
which will remain in the Main
Library is currently under way.
Several task groups have been
formed to examine other
possibilities for reorganization and
to develop implementation plans.
Services and areas currently under
review are interlibrary loan
operations, the integration of Asian
language processing and public
services staff, levels of cataloguing
for different types of materials, and
acquisitions and fund accounting
procedures. THE UNIVERSITY OF BRITISH COLUMBIA LIBRARY ANNUAL REPORT
XI
STRATEGY: SERVICES
The Electronic Library
Increasingly, information
services are electronically based.
Information continues to migrate
from print to electronic media and
many primary publications are now
available electronically. The shift to
electronic information sources has
broadened the scope of reference
work, increased the number and
complexity of search systems needed
to provide access to information,
and raised the expectations of
Library users.
The UBC Library has focused
on new and more creative ways to
satisfy the growing demands for
information. The shift to electronic
information sources, both local and
remote, has increased the quantity
and scope of information available
to users. It is clear that the Library
must continue to focus on
instructional programs to ensure
that the community is aware of and
knowledgable in the use of these
new resources.
Library Instruction
The Teaching and Learning
Initiative funds continue to
support extensive teaching
programs throughout the Library,
frequently in cooperation with
faculties and student
organizations. The AMS Tutorial
services support NETINFO
instruction. Multimedia
workstations will be installed and
training programs introduced in
the Humanities and Social
Sciences Division as part of a joint
project with the School of Library,
Archival and Information Studies.
Instruction and assistance in
computer-based legal research is a
cooperative project of the Library
and the Faculty of Law. Other
projects include the graduate
advisory service for the electronic
library, teaching research skills for
the electronic library, the fine arts
World Wide Web project, skills
development for electronic text in
classics, and the talking book
narrator project.
A strong instruction program,
closely coordinated with teaching
programs is developing with
emphasis on information literacy
skills. Sophisticated, discipline-
oriented information services
enhance faculty productivity and
the quality of the University's
graduate programs.
UBCLIB, WWW and Netinfo
The Library has added many
new feature to UBCLIB, the
Library's online catalogue. In
addition to information about the
Library's collections, UBCLIB
gives direct access to many
commercial databases and services
and to campus and world-wide
information sources available on
the Internet. The tables of
contents of journals can be
browsed electronically using
ContentsFirst (via FirstSearch),
REVEAL (via UnCpver), and
Current Contents. Databases
located at Simon Fraser University
and at the Research Libraries
Information Network (RLIN) in
California are also available
through UBCLIB.
Development of the UBC
Web site continues with most
Library services supporting a
home page.
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T\fn iT-rv T-iJ-fin        nmAr* UMin THE UNIVERSITY OF  BRITISH COLUMBIA LIBRARY ANNUAL REPORT
Netinfo
The Library continues to work
with Computing and
Communications to develop and
deliver Netinfo services to students
at UBC. The service provides access
to electronic mail and other
Internet resources for 10 hours per
month to all students. As of March
1995, almost 14,000 students were
registered for the service.
Electronic Journals
An electronic journals pilot
project to make a selection of
electronic journals available via the
Library's Gopher/WWW server was
initiated. The project includes
journals from a variety of subject
areas. Some are available from
remote sites while others are
maintained on a UBC server.
A shared initiative of the
English Department, the Library,
and the Arts Computing Centre has
produced Early Modern Literary
Studies, a refereed journal in
electronic form which will serve
both as a formal arena for scholarly
discussion and as an academic
resource for researchers.
Resource Sharing and
Interlibrary Loans
A Task Group to review the
UBC Library's sharing of resources
has been working since early 1995
to revise the policies, services and
organization of Interlibrary Loans,
to review other Library resource
sharing services, and to review the
relationship of the Library to
external resource sharing groups at
the provincial and national levels.
As serials collections are reduced,
growth in requests for material not
held locally is increasing
significandy. The strategy for
change is to improve the speed of
delivery of materials to the UBC
community, streamline and
introduce end user requesting
processes and reduce the cost of
getting material from remote sites.
Project Pegasus, a pilot project
to test the ease and effectiveness of
having end users place their own
interlibrary loan orders directly with
the Canadian Institute for Scientific
and Technical Information has been
an outstanding success among
faculty and graduate students in the
physical, life and applied sciences.
Orders are generally received within
48 hours and Library staff time
required is significantly reduced.
Electronic Reserves
A pilot project to make reserve
material available electronically is
supporting courses in audiology,
health care and epidemiology,
anatomy and geography.
Dialogue with Users
As part of continuing efforts to
maintain a dialogue with users, the
Library invited undergraduates,
graduate students, and faculty to
participate in 12 focus group
sessions. The resulting report by
consultant Pat Cavill identified
several themes:
♦ the Library is central to
teaching, learning and research.
♦ Library staff are essential in
helping faculty and students
navigate through the rapidly
expanding universe of
information. THE UNIVERSITY OF  BRITISH COLUMBIA LIBRARY ANNUAL REPORT
XI
♦ concern about hours of
opening, lineups at terminals,
access to library materials and
reduction in services.
♦ concern about reductions in
journal subscriptions and the
possibility of user fees for some
services.
The report concludes:
"Participants felt very strongly that
the Library should not be viewed as
a place for making revenue or as a
cost recovery operation, but that it
is provided by the university as an
essential service to everyone on
campus, regardless of discipline."
Scholarly Communication
Scholarly Communication,
Serials and Technology: Problems and
Possibilities, a report by the Senate
Library Committee's Subcommittee
on Serials and Technology was
presented to Senate to encourage
the University to begin the orderly
development of means and
mechanisms to help faculty,
students and the University
community to learn and use new
forms of information transfer. As a
result of the report, University
committees to study information
technology issues have been
established.
Education Library
The new Education Library
opened in February 1995. In
addition to the traditional
collection, the expanded and
improved Library now holds the
ERIC fiche collection and most of
the children's literature collections.
Faculty, students and Library staff
are pleased with the facility.
Koerner Library
The contract for Phase I of the
Walter C. Koerner Library was
awarded to Foundation Building
West Inc. and work began in
December 1994. The anticipated
date of completion is December
1996. The Library will be built in
two stages, starting with the new
section which will occupy the area
behind the present Sedgewick
Library. It will consist of two floors
below ground and five floors above
ground. When the new part of the
building is completed, the
Sedgewick Library will be emptied,
renovated, and combined with the
new structure. The Koerner Library
will integrate staff from the
Circulation Division, the
Humanities and Social Sciences
Division, the Government
Publications and Microforms
Division, the Data Library, and the
Sedgewick Library, as well as some
staff from the processing units in
the Library Processing Centre.
Cooperative Access
The Library's membership in
consortia such as the Electronic
Library Network (ELN) and the
Council of Prairie and Pacific
University Libraries (COPPUL) has
led to reductions in access costs for
a number of databases through
shared purchasing and licensing
agreements. The Life Sciences
Libraries also established reciprocal
resource-sharing agreements with
other medical libraries in the Pacific
Northwest. Sharing of electronic
data through ACCOLEDS (A
COPPUL Consortium of Library
Electronic Data Services) has also
increased through the provision of
shared access to the CANSIM
(Canadian Socio-economic THE UNIVERSITY OF BRITISH COLUMBIA LIBRARY ANNUAL REPORT
UBC     LIBRARY
Information Management) data
stored at UBC by members of
COPPUL.
Goals and Objectives
1 Continue to review services in
view of the Focus Group
Report.
2 Increase liaison activities
throughout the Library's service
units.
3 Improve communications with
the staff and users.
4 Continue to expand and
improve the teaching programs
through the Teaching &
Learning program.
5 Complete the organizational
plan and service model for the
Koerner Library and the Main
Library after completion of
Koerner Phase I.
6 Prepare for the move of
collections and staff to Koerner
Library including tattletaping,
RECON, and identification of
materials to be moved in
consultation with users.
7 Improve interlibrary loan
services and eliminate the
interlibrary loans operating
subsidy.
8 Review the organization and
management of Music, Fine
Arts, Special Collections,
Archives and Map Library to
determine if the portfolio
should be reconfigured. THE UNIVERSITY OF  BRITISH COLUMBIA LIBRARY ANNUAL REPORT
XI
STRATEGY: COLLECTIONS
Collections Management
Although collections have
continued to grow each each year,
changes are occurring as a result of
fiscal restraint and new technology.
This evolution has led to an increase
in the acquisition of electronic/
online materials, greater emphasis
on cooperative collecting with other
institutions (especially in regard to
electronic materials), changes to
procedures for the handling of
donated materials, and closer
cooperation with the faculty in
collection development.
Electronic Materials
The Library is still reaping
benefits from the $1 million
infusion into the collections budget
which was allocated for Netinfo and
electronic materials. Along with the
challenge of using this increased
funding wisely has come the
challenge of keeping up with the
rapid development of electronic
materials. During the first year
(1993/94), purchases were limited
primarily to CD-ROM resources.
This second year (1994/95) has
seen the purchase of more online
services, including online table-of-
contents and alerting services such
as Current Contents, ContentsFirst,
and UnCover Reveal These can be
accessed from the researcher's own
workstation, and include tides not
available in the Library's collection.
Via UnCover, users have the option
of paying for prompt delivery of
specific items via fax. Project
Pegasus, a pilot project in the
science and medical subject areas
begun in March 1995, allows users
to order copies of articles from
periodicals and conference
proceedings from their own
workstations. These materials are
delivered by courier to the Library
within 48 hours, and the Library
covers the cost of those items, which
are not otherwise accessible as part
of the Library's own collection. •
This second year also saw the
third electronic development, that
of networked full-text. IPO, the
full-text of periodicals and
conference proceedings from the
Institute of Electrical and Electronic
Engineers and the Institution of
Electrical Engineers, was made
available in October 1994 and is a
harbinger of future developments.
These electronic services are
expensive but provide significantly
improved access to the world of
information for the Library's users.
What the additional collections
funding does not cover is the
additional infrastructure which is
necessary, including both the
hardware and software required
within the Library as well as that
needed in the researcher's office, a
not insignificant cost. Nor does this
funding cover the cost of the staff
time required to integrate the
processing of these materials with
regular Library processes, to
publicize the new materials to the
proper user groups, to instruct users
which among the myriad of
materials are most useful for their
research, and to keep up with
current developments regarding
electronic materials.
Cooperation in Collection Building
Despite the extra funding for
growth in the electronic area, it
would not be possible for the THE UNIVERSITY OF BRITISH COLUMBIA LIBRARY ANNUAL REPORT
Library to keep pace with
developments without cooperation
with other institutions. A key player
is the Electronic Library Network
(ELN), a consortium of B.C. post-
secondary institutions, which
among other projects, sponsors the
joint purchase of periodical index
databases which are then available
online to its members. The UBC
Library, along with the other two
largest provincial university
libraries, plays a leading role in
mounting and making these
databases available. Another
consortium of which the Library is a
member, COPPUL, is increasingly
involved in negotiations for
discounts of electronic and other
materials. UBC's Data Library has
been very active in the COPPUL
ACCOLEDS initiative, which
brings together data libraries and
potential data services from all
COPPUL members. ACCOLEDS
negotiated a federated membership
in the ICPSR (Inter-University
Consortium of Political and Social
Research), a major international
data archive, at considerable savings
over individual membership. As the
costs increase for electronic
materials, and they surely will,
libraries will need to find additional
ways to cooperate in negotiations
with publishers and vendors.
Donated Materials and Gifts
Donations for the collection
enrichment endowment have begun
to arrive, thanks to the employment
of a fundraising coordinator. Special
gifts and grants for collections
development during the year
included a $26,000 SSHRC grant
for works by nineteenth century
women authors, a $5,650 gift from
the Ernest Theodore Rogers Fund
for a microfilm set in economic
history, and a 500,000 Yen grant
from the Japan Foundation for
maps in Special Collections. Just at
the time when the Library's need
for sources of outside funding is
growing more acute, the SSHRC
grants are being phased out. During
the final round in the Spring of
1995, the Library applied for a
grant for historic children's
literature.
In 1994/95 the Library spent
more than $300,000 on collections
from funds outside the operating
budget, i.e. trust funds, endowment
funds, funds from faculties, revenue
from fines, grants, and gifts. Fund-
raising to enhance the Library's
ability to acquire materials is
obviously a key area for the Library
and University to strengthen. It is
important to remember, however,
that not all donations of books or
designated-purpose gifts of money
correspond with the research needs
of the Library's users, and that there
are costs associated with the
acquisition and processing of
donated materials. This past year   ;
was the Library's first year without
the position of a gift-and-exchanges
librarian, and the handling of gifts
was integrated into the operations
of individual Library units. Figures
are not readily available, but the
number of gifts received into the
collection has likely been reduced as
bibliographers have focused on
adding only those gift materials
which are most appropriate to the
Library's collection.
Collection Development and Budget
The Library's collections budget
receives an annual increase to cope
with inflation and currency
10 THE UNIVERSITY OF  BRITISH COLUMBIA LIBRARY ANNUAL REPORT
UBC     LIBRARY
fluctuations, and an additional
1.5% for new materials. However,
since the total increase (usually
between 5% and 6%) does not
cover increased costs for books and
serials, annual serials cancellations
have had to take place in recent
years. One positive outcome of this
regular scrutiny of journal titles is
that faculty have become quite
involved in helping the librarians
ensure that collection development
is focused on appropriate areas of
research and teaching at the
University. Such activity is vital, for
the Library can no longer afford to
spend money on materials not
relevant to the curriculum and
research at UBC. Faculty have also
participated in the review of the
written collections policies which
were developed for all subject areas.
In the fall of 1994, the Senate
Curriculum Committee instituted
the requirement that the Library
indicate whether the collection is
adequate (or inadequate) for all new
courses and programs before they
can be approved by Senate. This,
and the evaluations by faculty and
librarians of the Library's collections
and how its emphasis has to change,
have been beneficial, as the Library
wants to make best use of
increasingly limited University
resources. Nevertheless, faculty,
Library advisory committees, and
librarians remain concerned about
the increasing inadequacy of
funding to cover evolving collection
needs.
Preservation
The Preservation Microfilming
Special Projects Program, begun in
1993 at the conclusion of the
Canadian Cooperative Preservation
Project, has continued its work of
protecting scarce and endangered
materials by reformatting them onto
polyester-base silver halide
microfilm. Key projects during the
period September 1994 through
March 1995 included the filming of
the British Columbia Directories for
1930-1939, and for 1940-1948, and
UBC theses and graduating essays
on B. C. history and related
subjects, including regional studies
in science and industry, submitted
between 1920 and 1931. All these
projects are fully cost-recovered
through the sales of copies of these
microfilm sets, and subscribers to
the directories projects have been
attracted from British Columbia,
Alberta, and Washington.
As the fiscal year came to a
close, preparations were far
advanced on the first of a three-part
program to film the provincial and
local directories from the turn of the
century through 1929. Future plans
also include the filming of archival
collections, such as the W. M.
Rossetti Diaries, and Malcolm
Lowry's Shakespeare, and several sets
of high-profile government
publications.
In February 1995 a day-long
seminar and workshop was held by
Program staff. Participants from
libraries, archives and records
centres located in the Lower
Mainland, Victoria and Calgary
were given presentations on the
philosophy and background of
preservation microfilming, relations
with the microfilming service
bureau, the importance of standards
in the production of preservation
microfilm, and other aspects of
microform librarianship. Special
/; THE UNIVERSITY OF  BRITISH  COLUMBIA LIBRARY ANNUAL REPORT
procedures in preparing archival
and manuscript collections for
microfilming were also covered in
detail.
The provision of a satisfactory
storage environment for the
Library's collections is the single
most important thing that can be
done to preserve this valuable
resource. The Library has discussed
mutual needs for appropriate
storage space with the UBC Press,
and has provided this information
to Campus Planning and
Development.
Disaster preparedness supplies
and equipment were purchased and
distributed throughout the Library
system.
Goals and Objectives
Collections
1 To complete the first round of
consultation with faculty about
the written collection policies.
2 To begin mainstreaming
collection procedures relating to
electronic materials.
3 To begin further initiatives for
resource sharing and
cooperative collection
development.
Preservation
1     To continue to produce
preservation microfilm sets to
national standards and to make
them available at reasonable
cost to the local and
international library
communities.
2 To evaluate preservation
microfilming proposals from
Library units.
3 To foster observance of the
standards and procedures of
preservation microfilming in
the wider library and archives
community, and to encourage
cooperative microfilming
projects among government,
academic, public and special
libraries.
4 To continue to promote
awareness of the potential of
preservation microfilming in
collection development—
improving access by
reformatting fragile, rare and
expensive resources onto a
stable and relatively inexpensive
medium.
5 To continue to work toward
acceptable storage for the
Library's collections.
6 To survey acetate microfilm
collection for the presence of
"vinegar syndrome," using AD
(Acid Detecting) Strips
developed by the Image
Permanence Institute at the
Rochester Institute of
Technology.
7 To continue to monitor the
development of digitization
projects for print materials.
12 THE UNIVERSITY OF BRITISH COLUMBIA LIBRARY ANNUAL REPORT
XI
STRATEGY: ACCESS
Circulation
Circulation activity increased
approximately 32% overall in the
Library system during the reporting
year reflecting changes in Library
loans policy and the resulting
increase in availability of high-use
materials. In addition self-service
renewal activity continues to grow
in volume, and has become an
exceedingly popular service.
Circulation patterns in
Appendix D reflect a number of
changes. Circulation activity in the
Asian Library increased by 62,000
transactions or 210% over two years
with the introduction of an
automated circulation system.
Transfer of collections from Main
Library to the Education Library
and the Lam Library served to
increase circulation in the branch
libraries and moderate growth in
the Main Library. The use of
materials within Library buildings,
which is not recorded by the
circulation system, continues to
increase. Studies planned for the
coming year will help to assess this
use of the collection.
Technical Services
Improved Access to New Materials
The Books to Branches (B2B)
program, inaugurated in January
1994, was fully integrated into
Technical Services workflows
during 1994/95. The uncatalogued
backlog waiting for catalogue copy
or original cataloguing is stored in
public areas for the most part where
it is available for circulation. The
Catalogue Division has worked out
recall procedures for the books with
relevant Public Services areas. Now
that the catalogue backlog is no
longer stored in the Library
Processing Centre basement, the
space is available for storage.
Compact shelving has been installed
in this area and low use material,
primarily from the Main Stacks, is
being transferred to this area, the
Library's latest storage location.
Conversion of Card Catalogue
Records
One of the Library's long-
running projects is a step closer to
completion. The retrospective
conversion (RECON) project,
which is converting pre-1978 card
catalogue records into electronic
form, has received $168,000 in onetime funding from the provincial
government, thanks to a joint
proposal for SFU, UBC and UVic
made in January 1995. The other
universities received a total of
$132,000.
The Library plans to use this
funding to employ student
assistants for RECON duties and to
acquire workstations for RECON
staff. These student assistants will
supplement the time already
allocated to RECON work by
Library staff in the Catalogue
Division, the Music Library, the
Fine Arts Library and Special
Collections & University Archives.
The priority will be to enter brief
bibliographic records and up-to-
date holding information into the
Library's online catalogue. The
objective is to finish conversion of
records for those materials most
likely to move to the new Koerner
Library, as this needs to be
completed prior to the Koerner
move-in date of December 1996.
13 zz
THE UNIVERSITY OF BRITISH COLUMBIA LIBRARY ANNUAL REPORT
Asian Library Cataloguing
The Asian Library is making
good progress in cataloguing the
rare books in the P'u-pan
Collection, through its participation
in the RLG International Union
Catalog of Chinese Rare Books
Project. The project began in 1991
and now has more than 5600
records in the RLIN database,
representing the holdings of 11
North American collections and 5
libraries in China. The Asian
Library has contributed over 500
records to the database and is
striving to enter the remaining 300
rare titles within the next 12
months. The project pays the
Library US$5.00 for each record
contributed to cover necessary
expenses.
Goals and Objectives
Circulation
1     Introduce self-service holds and
self-service check out in the
Library.
Technical Services
1 To complete the internal
reorganization of the Catalogue
Division to improve workflow.
2 To upgrade equipment,
including the provision of
ergonomic furniture for each
staff member.
3 To develop a Library policy on
the level of cataloguing given to
items acquired for the
collection.
Serial Vendor Change
A review of the Library's
arrangements for North American
journal acquisition in 1994 and a
subsequent evaluation of proposals
from several serials agents led to the
replacement of Faxon Canada by
Canebsco. At the same time, the
Library began phasing out use of
U.S. Post Office boxes for journal
subscriptions, as increasing taxes,
service fees, and handling costs no
longer made the use of these
economical. As records already had
to be modified to implement the
change in agent, it was efficient to
make the subscription address
changes at the same time.
Monitoring these changes will
require a certain amount of time
over the next year.
4 To streamline processing
workflows by making use of the
capabilities of the Library's new
automated system, by
implementing the to-be-
developed level of cataloguing
policy, and by considering
processing options offered by
the Library's book and journal
vendors.
5 To continue with the
integration of technical
processing and public services
staff where effective.
6 To continue with ongoing
projects such as RECON and
the installation of theft-
detection strips in the Main
Library collection.
14 THE UNIVERSITY OF  BRITISH COLUMBIA LIBRARY ANNUAL REPORT
XI
STRATEGY: PLACE
Automation and Technology
Work commenced on two
major technology initiatives: to
commence the transition from local
development to purchase of
commercially available systems,
especially for support of library
processing work; and to secure
ongoing funding and budget
flexibility for technology and the
information infrastructure. This was
also the year when it became very
apparent that the UBC Library was
entering an era of multiple online
systems.
The UBC Library prepared and
issued a Request for Proposal (RFP)
for automated library systems and
services; reviewed seven responses
and selected three shortlisted
vendors; held two-day on-site
presentations from each of the
shortlisted vendors; and completed
a final review and evaluation. In the
coming year, the Library expects to
complete negotiations with the
most suitable vendor and
commence conversion and
implementation work.
A target of $ 1 million was
identified for the ongoing
technology and information
infrastructure budget. A multi-year
campaign has been initiated to
reallocate existing budget resources
and raise new funding.
UBCLIB, the Library's online
catalogue continued to expand and
improve. In July 1994, a new
version of the menu interface was
implemented. Many new databases
and services, especially remote ones,
were incorporated directly into the
standard menu screens. A highly
requested function, self-service
holds, was also introduced. New
databases and services included: The
B.C. Outlook database, a union
catalogue of the holdings of most
B.C. public, college, and other post-
secondary institutions; Books in
Print database; OCLC FirstSearch.
Activity on other locally
supported online systems increased
dramatically. All seven subsets of the
Current Contents database were
made available on the Ovid system
(previously known as PlusNet 2).
IPO, a special version of the UMI
Powerpages system with the full-text
reports and conference papers of
IEE/IEEE was implemented. This
was done as a cooperative project
with the Faculty of Applied Science
and the Department of Computer
Science.
The UBC Library also received
Innovation Funding to acquire and
implement the Silverplatter ERL
system to provide network access to
databases previously available only
on standalone CD-ROM
workstations at various Library
locations. In its initial
implementation later this year, the
system will provide access to at least
nine databases.
World Wide Web activity was
evident in all parts of the Library.
Most branches and divisions had
projects underway to create and
provide online information via the
Web. The Library also acquired a
separate computer to act as a Web
server and a prototype Web gateway
to the local UBCLIB system was
also created. The latter was used to
demonstrate the feasibility of
i UBCLIB
15 THE UNIVERSITY OF BRITISH  COLUMBIA LIBRARY ANNUAL REPORT
making locally loaded electronic
journals available via the Web.
Library Space and Equipment
Koerner Library
In the Fall of 1994 the Walter
C. Koerner Library (Central
Library-Phase I) was sent out to
tender. The lowest bid had been
substantially over the project
budget, and the architects, together
with the low bidding contractor,
were asked to develop a list of
potential savings which would bring
the project within the budget but
which would not drastically revise
the programme or the architectural
quality of the project.
This goal was achieved, and on
November 29, 1994 Campus
Planning and Development
announced that the contract had
been awarded to Foundation
Building West Inc., and that site
work would commence on
December 1, 1994. The date of
anticipated completion of the work
is December 1996.
Construction is proceeding on
schedule. The contract specified
that the Sedgewick Library would
remain open, and the staff there
have coped very well with the
construction which is going on
around them. The contractors have
developed a good working
relationship with Library staff
members involved in Koerner
planning, and most problems to
date have been minor and have been
settled to the satisfaction of both
sides.
While the building is under
construction, Library staff have
been working toward the division of
the humanities and social sciences
collections, in anticipation of the
move into the new library in the
winter of 1996.
Storage
The Library's need for storage is
acute and continues to grow, and
the environmental conditions for
such storage are specialized. For
example, between July 1994 to June
1995, 14,389 volumes of newly-
catalogued books were added to the
Asian Library. In addition, over
8,000 volumes of uncatalogued
books were moved there from the
Library Processing Centre when the
Books to Branches project was
implemented. To accommodate
these books, 15,000 volumes of
catalogued books were moved to
LPC for storage. More materials
will have to be placed in remote
storage unless additional storage
space is found either in the Asian
Library or the Asian Centre. The
feasibility of installing compact
shelving in the public areas of the
Asian Library is being explored,
although the cost may prove
prohibitive, and an appeal has been
made to the University
Administration for space in the
Asian Centre.
Campus Planning and
Development has been engaged in a
study of storage requirements for
the University, and the Library is
participating in this study.
Additional compact shelving was
installed in Room 21 of the Library
Processing Centre. This work was
completed in April, 1995. Room
105 of the Main Library (the Old
Bindery) which had long been used
as a store room, was cleared and
shelving was installed. A new ramp
16 THE UNIVERSITY OF  BRITISH COLUMBIA LIBRARY ANNUAL REPORT
XI
leading into the room was built.
Maintenance and Repairs
Campus Planning and
Development has agreed to replace
the northwest elevator in the Main
Library. The work is scheduled to
take place some time early in 1996.
Plant Operations agreed to replace
the ageing air conditioning plant for
the vault in the Special Collections
and University Archives Division.
This work was scheduled to take
place in the autumn of 1995. The
Library Processing Centre has
experienced severe climate control
problems over the reporting period,
and the Library, together with Plant
Operations, has been working on
solutions.
Emergencies
Emergency supplies, such as
mops and buckets, plastic sheeting,
newsprint, trouble lights, etc., were
purchased and distributed to all
Library locations, to enable staff to
deal with building emergencies,
such as broken water pipes.
Goals and Objectives
Automation and Technology
1 To complete negotiations with
the most suitable vendor for a
new library system to support
acquisitions/accounting,
cataloguing, circulation, public
access catalogue, and serials
management; and commence
data preparation and system
implementation.
2 To continue with reallocation
and fund raising for the new
information and technology
infrastructure budget.
3 To continue with the addition
of new workstations, and the
replacement of old equipment,
for both staff and public use.
4 To prepare for the systems and
infrastructure support required
for the new Koerner Library.
5 To implement self-checkout
workstations at five major
locations.
6 To continue to develop the
systems resources that will
address the increasingly
complex and varied
requirements of client-based
software for multiple online
systems now supported at the
UBC Library.
Space
1 To continue to work on the
construction of the Walter C.
Koerner Library.
2 To install additional compact
shelving wherever possible in
the Library system.
3 To work with Campus
Planning and Development to
achieve the type and quantity of
storage space the Library needs
to alleviate our severe space
shortage.
4 To develop a Master Space Plan
for the University Library. h   ■ ^     ri|
THE UNIVERSITY OF BRITISH COLUMBIA LIBRARY ANNUAL REPORT
STRATEGY: PEOPLE
Staff
The UBC Library and its staff
have been involved in a period of
continuing change during the past
few years. The challenges of
meeting the ever-increasing pace of
innovation in information
technology, planning for new
services and buildings, restructuring
of existing services and the
organization, and dealing with
UBC's financial restraints have led
to a re-evaluation of priorities and
services. It is a tribute to the
Library's professional and support
staff that they have continued to
provide both responsive and well-
appreciated services to the Library's
many clients and to maintain the
processing services and infrastructure
facilities upon which information and
reference service depend.
Training and Development
The Library has completed
three years of staff training and
development (STD) programs,
implementing the comprehensive
plan developed in 1992. In this
third year of programming, the
Library supported 240 sessions or
courses for 1,100 participants.
Computer Skills and Managerial
and Other Skills Training Program
(MOST) courses continued to be
supported. Where appropriate,
these and other courses were
customized for in-house delivery or
lab training. Special emphasis was
placed on training and development
that would help staff to adapt to
changing roles and career paths.
These included such diverse topics
as leadership development,
interpersonal effectiveness,
teaching/training roles, human
resource management, and
information technology
management. More individualized
training was provided to 69 staff
members in such specialties as
electronic texts, Gopher, resource
sharing, Pacific Rim resources,
Freedom of Information legislation,
copyright, preservation, media
librarianship, and many more. New
training methods were added to the
repertoire: videoconference, online
electronic workshops, model
simulations for decision making.
The terms of reference of the Staff
Training and Development
Committee were revised and new
committee members were recruited
for a two year term.
Safety and Security
New safety and security policies
were developed for the Library,
dealing with the exclusion of
animals from Library buildings,
rollerblading and skateboarding
within Library buildings, and with
the proper loading and use of book
trucks. The Facilities and
Preservation Manager (F&PM)
organized personal security training
sessions for Library staff and served
on the Selection Committee for the
University's Personal Security
Coordinator. The F&PM also
served as chair of the University's
annual Health and Safety Awareness
Week which took place at the end
of October 1994.
A traffic plan put into effect in
the summer of 1994 by Campus
Planning and Development had put
the Security Bus stop at the rear of
the Main Library, an unpopular
move for users of the bus, as the
location was poorly lit and without
shelter. The Library lobbied to have
18 THE UNIVERSITY OF BRITISH COLUMBIA LIBRARY ANNUAL REPORT
XL
bus stop moved back to the front of
the Main Library. After a series of
meetings with Campus Planning
and Development, Parking and Security
Services, the Alma Mater Society,
etc., the University agreed to return
the bus stop to its former location.
The retrieval of keys from
individuals who have left the
Library continues to be difficult
under current University procedures.
To improve security, a thorough
review was made of outstanding keys
and of access codes in an effort to
retrieve or cancel all those held by
people no longer employed in the
Main Library building.
Staff Complement
The Library's staff establishment
totalled 342.84 full-time equivalent
(FTE) positions, including 87.75
librarians, 8.17 management &
professional (M&P) staff, and 246.92
support staff, at the end of the
reporting period. This includes 14.8
cost-recovery or grant-funded
positions, and compares to a total of
344.16 (including 12.59 cost-recovery
or grant-funded positions) at the end
of the previous reporting year.
General purpose operating fund
(GPOF) positions decreased from
331.57 positions to 328.04, a
reduction of 1.06 percent while cost-
recovery and grant-funded positions
increased by 17.55 percent. The latter
now represent 4.31 percent of the
Library's staff complement.
However, the actual working staff
complement was considerably less
than establishment figure listed above.
As of the writing of this report, 19.67
FTE GPOF positions have been left
vacant for financial reasons in
addition to another 5 FTE positions
which are blocked by early
termination agreements. Many of
these positions will be used in the
1995/96 fiscal year to fund negotiated
staff salary increases, to supplement
allocations for technology, supplies,
equipment, and other operating
expenses, and to fund new services. So
far, the Library has been able to deal
with fiscal restraint through normal
attrition, early retirement, and an
increased use of cost-recovery and
grant-funded staff, it has not yet had
to resort to layoffs.
Goals and Objectives
Training and Development
1 In consultation with the STD
Committee, review and revise STD
policy based on experiences with the
STD plan in first three years.
2 Plan and implement programs
for STD at all levels to assist
them in managing
organizational and personal
change and transition.
3 Plan and implement training
programs to assist staff in
learning the Library's new
automated system (in
cooperation with Library
Systems and Public Service/
Technical Service Heads).
Safety and Security
1 To continue to address the
general safety and security
concerns of the Library's staff.
2 To improve security and safety in
the Main Library through
improvement of the alarm system.
19 THE UNIVERSITY OF  BRITISH COLUMBIA LIBRARY ANNUAL REPORT
STRATEGY: PARTNER
Development and Community
Support
Thanks to a combination of
private sector donations and
matching funds from both the
provincial government and the
President's Fund, the Library raised
over $416,000 during 1994/95.
Specific fundraising efforts included
the Walter C. Koerner Library
Leave Your Mark Campaign, the
Faculty and Staff Campaign, Gifts-
In-Kind, and Friends of the Library.
The Koerner Library Leave
Your Mark Campaign, which raised
$164,415 during the 1994/95
campaign, will continue into 1995/
96. For contributions ranging from
$250 to $5,000, donors' names will
be inscribed on a book plate inside
a new volume being added to the
Koerner Library collection ($250), a
book stack ($500), a skylight roof
panel ($1,000), or the granite
foundation blocks ($2,500 and
$5,000).
The Library has also established
two endowments with targets of $ 1
million each. Gifts made to these
endowments are eligible for
matching funds from the Hampton
Place Endowment. The Library
Collection Endowment will enable
the Library to continue to build its
rich and unique collection. The
Technology Endowment will help
the Library keep pace with
technological developments. This
endowment is off to an excellent
start with an initial gift of $50,000
from Mr. Haig Farris.
The Library also has a Friends
of the Library organization. The
Friends of the Library welcome
everyone interested in the continued
excellence of the UBC Library. If
you would like to become a
member, please call the
Development Officer at 822-5071.
Donations
The UBC Library gratefully
acknowledges those alumni, parents,
faculty, staff, corporations,
organizations, and friends who
contribute to the Library. The
Library wishes to take this
opportunity to give special
recognition to those supporters who
contributed donations or gifts of
$1,000 or more during the year
under review. The Library also
gratefully acknowledges the support
of the many donors who have
provided donations or gifts-in-kind
of less than $1,000.
The Crane Library Memorial
Donations Fund
Mr. & Mrs. William R. Read
The Friends of the HSS Book Fund
Vancouver Foundation
The Friends of Macmillan Library Fund
Dr. Joseph &
Mrs. Joyce Gardner
The Friends of the Library Fund
Dr. & Mrs. Cyril Bryner
Mrs. Anne M. Kaplan
The Dr. Stanley Z. Pech Book Fund
Mrs. Vera Pech
The Walter Gage Memorial Fund
in support of Crane Library
Mr. John A. MacDonald
20 THE UNIVERSITY OF  BRITISH  COLUMBIA LIBRARY ANNUAL REPORT
XI
Walter C. Koerner Library Fund
Brascan Ltd.
Commonwealth Holding Co. Ltd.
RBC Dominion Securities
Pemberton
Shell Canada Ltd.
Trident Enrichment Society
Miss Elsa Alsgard
Dr. C. Jane Banfield
Mr. John & Mrs. Cheryl Banfield
Dr. Walter & Mrs. L. M. Barss
Dr. William H. Barton
Mrs. Birgit Freybe Bateman
Estate of Irene M. Bourassa
Dr. David Brabyn
Miss Joanne V. Brown
Miss Jean A. K. Campbell
Mr. Chung Cheung
Mrs. Elizabeth Clark
Dr. Stanley Coren
Mr. Charles A. Davis
Dr. E. M. Derworiz
Mr. Gene W. Faryna
Mr. & Mrs. A. B. Gellatly
Estate of Elizabeth Wilson Grant
Ms. Janis Hamilton
Mr. H. Meng Heah
Mrs. Mona Iwabu
Dr. Herbert William Kee
Dr. Daniel S. Y. Lee
Mr. John A. MacDonald
Mrs. Mary C. Martin
Dr. & Mrs. Robert C. Miller, Jr.
Mr. Paul R. Moritz
Dr. Abdul M. Mousa
Ms. D. Marie North
Mr. John E. O'Donnell
Mr. Mark T. Olsen
Mr. James Orr
Mr. Noel A. S. Owens
Dr. Ruth J. Patrick
Ms. Marion Pearson
Dr. Leslie R Peterson, QC, OBE
Dr. Man-Chiu Poon
Mr. James G. Reddon
Mr. Donald Rogers
Mrs. Sheila &
Mr. Robert Ross, QC
Dr. Robert S. Rothwell
Miss D. E. Ryder
Dr. John E. R Stainer
Mr. Lynn & Mrs. Florence Sully
Dr. Delfa Syeklocha
Dr. Geraldine M. Ty
Matching Gifts
The Library appreciates the
support of corporations and
organizations who match the gifts of
their employees to the UBC
Library.
Arthur Andersen & Co
Chevron Canada Ltd.
Chevron Canada Resources Ltd.
ICI Canada Inc.
Lafarge Canada Inc.
Metropolitan Life Insurance Co.
Mobil Oil Canada Ltd.
Prudential Foundation
Seagram Company Ltd.
Spar Areospace Ltd.
Suncor Inc.
Upper Skeena Counselling &
Legal Assistance Society
Planned Giving
Planned giving through estate
and tax planning by alumni and
friends continues to assist the
development of the Library. The
Library gratefully acknowledges the
generosity of such donors.
Catherine Macintosh
Gifts-in-Kind
Gifts-in-kind enrich and
enhance the research collections of
the UBC Library. The Special
Collections and University Archives
Division received a number of
notable gifts during the year,
including the personal papers of
humorist Eric P. Nicol and some of
the literary manuscripts and
21 zz
THE UNIVERSITY OF BRITISH  COLUMBIA LIBRARY ANNUAL REPORT
correspondence of science-fiction
writer Spider Robinson.
The Stanley Deane Collection,
a significant collection of some 297
maps and seven books and atlases
from the 16th to 19th centuries,
was donated by collector Dr. L.
Stanley Deane. This collection,
which includes many fine examples
of the work of a number of the most
important pre-1900 cartographers
and map publishers, documents the
growth of geographical knowledge,
cartographic art, and technical skills
in western society. The collection
complements other cartographic
collections in the Special
Collections and University Archives
Division which provide valuable
resources for the study of the history
of geography and cartography as
well as the history of printing.
The Asian Library received a
number of valuable collections. The
State Education Commission of
China provided 698 volumes of
scholarly works published in China
in recent years. This multi-
disciplinary collection will benefit
faculty, students and researchers
from many faculties and academic
departments as it covers all aspects
of Chinese Studies, including
History, Literature, Politics,
Economics, Education and Art. The
Korean Foundation provided 200
volumes of Korean books in the
subject areas of Sociology, History,
Literature, Language and Politics;
the Daewoo Foundation provided
200 volumes of Korean books in the
Humanities and Social Sciences;
and 50 volumes of Korean books in
the areas of Sociology, History,
Religion and Culture were donated
by the Academy of Korean Studies.
The Library expresses its thanks
to the following donors for gifts to
the book collections of various
Library units.
Academy of Korean Studies
Daewoo Foundation
Korean Foundation
State Education Commission
of China
Vancouver Foundation
Dr. David F. Aberle
Dr. Ivan Avakumovic
Dr. Michael H. Bullock
Mrs. Margaret E. Burke
Dr. Max &
Mrs. Moira Cynader
Dr. L. Stanley Deane
Dr. Ronald A. Jobe
Dr. Robert W. Kennedy
Mr. Eric P. Nicol
Mr. Spider Robinson
Mr. Philip &
Mrs. Hilda Thomas
Dr. James V Whittaker
Miss Frances M. Woodward
Special Purpose Gifts
The Japan Foundation
provided $6,000 for the purchase
of another 22 volumes of Gokaido
Bunken Nobe-Ezu (scaled
pictorial strip maps of the five
major highways in Old Japan),
which is published in 103
volumes. This is the second
donation the Japan Foundation
has provided to assist with the
purchase of this valuable set.
The Library also expresses its
thanks to the Science Council of
B.C. for its donation to the
Library's PATSCAN service to
promote the development of
inventions which contribute to the
solution of environmental
problems.
22 THE UNIVERSITY OF  BRITISH  COLUMBIA LIBRARY ANNUAL REPORT
Every effort has been made to
ensure accuracy of this listing of
donations and gifts received
between September 1, 1994 and
March 31, 1995. Please notify
Library Development of any errors
or omissions.
UBC     LIBRARY
23 THE UNIVERSITY OF  BRITISH COLUMBIA LIBRARY ANNUAL REPORT
STRATEGY: FUNDING
Salaries & Wages
For the first time in eight years
expenditures on salaries and wages
for Library staff appeared to decline
in real dollars as well as continuing
their steady downward trend as a
percentage of the Library's total
expenditures. This was largely the
result of freezing budgeted positions
as they became vacant in order to
fund actual and anticipated salary
increases for the remaining staff.
The University's budget guidelines
now require that these increases, as
well as salary scale steps and
reclassifications, be covered from
within existing budgets. Both of the
Library's major employee
bargaining units, CUPE local 2950
and the UBC Faculty Association,
were still in negotiations at the close
of 1994/95, and their settlements
would be retroactive to April 1994
and July 1994 respectively. In fact
the salaries expenditures incurred
for 1994/95 did not actually decline
in real dollars, once the retroactive
pay settlements were taken into
consideration, but their proportion
of the Library's total spending
continued to slip downward.
This trend is expected to
continue and even accelerate over
the next several years. A major
Library restructuring initiative
began in 1994/95 when the
decision was taken to reallocate $1
million in continuing funding from
the salaries budget to support the
Library's technological
infrastructure. Specifically, the
reallocation is to establish a
permanent budget for replacement
and upgrading of the computing
and telecommunications equipment
on a five-year cycle, eliminating the
need to rely on unpredictable "soft
money" for this purpose each year.
The reallocation will take place over
several years beginning in 1995/96.
It is intended to continue utilizing
budgeted positions as they become
vacant in the normal course of
events, in order to avoid layoffs if at
all possible.
Collections
Spending on collections
continued to increase, both in real
dollars and in its percentage of the
Library's budget (34.3%) and the
University budget (6.4%). The
second installment of University
funding for the Electronic Library
amounted to $350,000. The
Collections Formula increase
provided another $452,717, an
increase of 5.7%^ with 1.5%
designated for new material, 2.4%
to offset unfavourable foreign
exchange fluctuations, and 1.8% to
mitigate the effects of inflation.
Actual inflation for serials
subscriptions amounted to 14.2%
in 1994/95. $475,000 worth of
serials subscriptions were cancelled
in order to continue other
subscriptions and allow for some
new titles to be purchased.
Supplies, Services & Equipment
Because of the need to
reallocate salary savings to cover
salary increases, less "soft money"
was available for ergonomic
furniture and equipment purchases
than usual. Spending in these areas
was down by over $200,000 from
that in 1993/94. The cost of
supplies and services continued to
rise, especially in the growth areas of
computing and telecommunications.
As with salaries, any increases had to
24 THE UNIVERSITY OF  BRITISH COLUMBIA LIBRARY ANNUAL REPORT
XI
be covered from within the existing
budget.
Cost recoveries
Of necessity the Library has
come to rely on additional income
generated from sales of products
and services to support and expand
those services which lend themselves
to cost recovery. Such cost
recoveries from sources external to
the Library's operating budget, plus
Library fines, amounted to $1.7
million in 1994/95, a 22% increase
over 1993/94. They permitted
expansion of the Library's fleet of
public use photocopiers by 11
machines, supported a substantially
increased volume of patent-
searching services, and reflected
increased use of the UBC Library
collection by other libraries and
extra-mural borrowers. Fine
revenues covered their own
processing costs and contributed to
the Collections budget.
During 1995/96 the Library
and other units on campus with
significant cost recoveries will be
setting up special "non-core"
accounts and budgets to segregate
the operations supported through
cost recoveries from those
supported by the General Purpose
Operating Fund, in accordance
with the University's new budget
policy.
Grant Funding
Grants are playing an
increasingly important role in
funding services and projects that
would otherwise be beyond the
Library's means. Benefits from
successful applications over the past
year include:
B.C. Government Innovation Fund
$142,500 to develop networked
access to CD-ROM databases.
B.C. Ministry of Advanced Education,
Training and Technology.
Networks of Centres of Excellence
Information Infrastructure
$10,000 to support electronic
library services to the health
sciences.
B.C. Ministry of Employment
and Investment
$65,900 for continued support
of the PATSCAN service.
B.C. Ministry of Skills, Training
and Labour
$168,060 to support electronic
access to libraries through further
retrospective conversion of the
UBC Library card catalogue.
Canadian Council of Archives
$3,000 for an academic
internship in the Special
Collections & University
Archives Division for a student
in the School of Library, Archival
and Information Studies.
$2,795 for the Nitrate Negative
Identification and Treatment
Project in the Special
Collections & University
Archives Division.
Law Foundation of B.C.
In response to a request from
the UBC Law Faculty, $6,424
for an ARIEL workstation for
the Law Library.
National Library of Canada
$52,913 for continued support
of the Cataloguing in
Publication Program.
25 -..-^-
THE UNIVERSITY OF  BRITISH COLUMBIA LIBRARY ANNUAL REPORT
National Library of Canada. Adaptive
Technology for Libraries Program 94/95
$6,548 for a scanner
workstation with voice output
and screen enlargement, and a
closed circuit magnifying TV
for the Crane Library.
Social Sciences and Humanities
Research Council of Canada
$26,000 to develop the
collection of materials relating
to 19th century women authors
of Great Britain and Ireland.
University of B.C. Disabled Employee
Assistance Fund
$3,575 to fund 50% of the cost
of a photocopy station in the
Main Library for users in
wheelchairs.
University of B.C. Minor Capital Fund
$95,000 for compact shelving
in the Library Processing
Centre.
University of B.C. President's
University Croquet Tournament
$2,000 in support of the Crane
Library.
University of B.C. Teaching &
Learning Enhancement Fund
$19,133 for continuation and
expansion of the Electronic
Resources Teaching Program.
$7,807 for the Library Gopher
Project.
$17,603 for the Crane Library's
Multi-Media Talking Book
Project which permitted the
recording of The Enjoyment of
Music, 6th ed. (1990) by Joseph
Machlis and Kristine Forney.
Goals and Objectives
1 To begin implementation of the
Library's decision to reallocate
$1 million from the salary
budget to technology.
2 To develop financing plans for
the acquisition of the new
Library system.
3 To continue revising the
Library's accounts and budget
allocations as required to reflect
changes arising from
restructuring initiatives
associated with the reallocation
to technology and the move to
the new Walter C. Koerner
Library in 1996/97.
4 To work with the University's
Office of Budget and Planning
and the Dept. of Financial
Services to set up non-core
operating accounts for the
Library's major cost recoveries.
5 To continue implementation of
cost recovery and cost reduction
strategies to eliminate the
GPOF subsidy of interlibrary
loans by 1995/96.
6 To continue working toward
the objective of restoring the
Library to its former position as
one of the top 20 research
libraries in North America.
7 To continue training Library
managers to use and interpret
financial data.
26 THE  UNIVERSITY OF  BRITISH  COLUMBIA LIBRARY ANNUAL REPORT
APPENDICES CONTENTS
A   Library Statistical Summary 29
B   Growth of Collections 30
C   Library Operating Expenditures 31
D   Retrospective Conversion (RECON) 32
UBC     LIBRARY
27 THE UNIVERSITY OF BRITISH COLUMBIA LIBRARY ANNUAL REPORT
28 THE UNIVERSITY OF  BRITISH COLUMBIA LIBRARY ANNUAL REPORT
XI
Appendix A
LIBRARY STATISTICAL SUMMARY
April 1, 1994 - March 31, 1995
COLLECTIONS
Total Volumes1
Volumes Added, Net
Total Titles Catalogued
Current Subscriptions2
Number of monographs purchased
'Includes net volumes added
includes 17,486 paid subscriptions and 5,555 received as gifts or exchanges
SERVICES
Total Use of Library Resources
Document Delivery (Health Sci. Network)3
Interlibrary Loan - Loaned3
Interlibrary Loan - Borrowed3
Instruction Classes/Orientation Sessions
Number of Participants
Library Tours (Faculty Sc Students)
Number of Participants
Library Tours (Community Groups)
Number of Participants
Total Questions Answered
Research Questions
Reference Questions
Directional Questions
'Included in Total Use of Library Resources
1994/95
3,467,184
112,809
68,095
23,041
54,805
1994/95
3,720,490
39,008
52,473
18,535
938
10,395
211
2,159
196
925
402,091
36,581
258,642
106,868
STAFF (FTE)
Librarians
Professional (M&P)
Staff
Student
Total FTE4
1994/95
87.50
8.17
246.92
52.90
395.49
includes 14.8 cost-recovery or grant funded positions
EXPENDITURES
Collections
Salaries & Wages
Binding
Other Operating Expenditures
Total Gross Expenditures
Cost recoveries
Total Net Expenditures
1994/95
$8,389,284
34.32%
$13,663,492
55.89%
$210,068
0.86%
$2,183,458
8.93%
$24,446,302
($1,711,736)
$22,734,566
29 XI
UBC     LIBRARY
THE UNIVERSITY OF  BRITISH  COLUMBIA LIBRARY ANNUAL REPORT
Appendix B
GROWTH OF COLLECTIONS
Air Photos
Aperture Cards
CD-ROM Discs
Data Bases On Line
Documents-Uncatalogued
Films
Filmstrips
Large Print & Braille Volumes
Magnetic Tapes
Manuscriprs (merres)1
Maps .
Microcards (cards)
Microcomputer Discs
Microfiche (sheets)
Microfilms (reels)
Microprint (sheets)
Photographs
Picrures
Serial Subscriptions2
Slides (sets)
Slide/Tape Shows
Sound Recordings
Transparencies (sets)
Video Tapes
Videodiscs
Volumes-Catalogued
1 Thickness of files in metres.
2 Includes periodical subscriptions, monographic series and sets.
MARCH 31, 1994
NET GROWTH
MARCH 31, 1995
1,045
0
1,045
2,589
0
2,589
576
401
977
27
14
41
813,099
10,203
823,302
919
1
920
2,854
0
2,854
9,104
17
9,121
905
(5)
900
2,909
63
2,972
193,769
2,348
196,117
111,680
0
111,680
999
60
1,059
2,943,901
91,806
3,035,707
104,710
1,368
106,078
1,087,670
0
1,087,670
325,793
300
326,093
66,198
370
66,568
24,440
(1,399)
23,041
31,974
100
32,074
112
0
112
125,946
2,423
128,369
1,482
0
1,482
5,221
598
5,819
12
0
12
3,354,375
112,809
3,467,184
30 XI
UBC     LIBRARY
THE UNIVERSITY OF  BRITISH  COLUMBIA LIBRARY ANNUAL REPORT
Appendix C
LIBRARY OPERATING EXPENDITURES
FISCAL YEARS APRIL/MARCH
GROSS COST NET
YEAR SALARIES & WAGES COLLECTIONS BINDING OTHER        EXPENDITURES     RECOVERIES EXPENDITURES
1990/91 12,706,989 (61.64) 5,898,405 (28.61) 244,422 (1.19) 1,765,675 (8.56) 20,615,491 944,463 19,671,028
1991/92 12,730,853 (61.13) 6,111,422 (29.34) 267,970 (1.29) 1,716,095 (8.24) 20,826,340 1,019,300 19,807,040
1992/93 13,502,655 (58.45) 6,735,336 (29.16) 258,481 (1.12) 2,604,148(11.27) 23,100,620 1,296,117 21,804,503
1993/94 13,726,868 (57.80) 7,541,116 (31.76) 235,432 (0.99) 2,244,024 (9.45) 23,747,440 1,404,708 22,342,732
1994/95 13,663,492 (55.89) 8,389,284 (34.32) 210,068 (0.86) 2,183,458 (8.93) 24,446,302 1,711,736 22,734,566
♦ As in previous years, only expenditures from the Library's own GPOF budget are included in the above. Excluded are:
Faculty of Commerce expenditures in support of the David Lam Library.
Expenditures for library materials by other campus units, for example for departmental reading rooms.
Expenditures from library grant and trust funds.
Collections expenditures from library grant and trust funds in 1994/95 amounted to $187,774.
♦ Percentage figures in parentheses relate to total spending independent of Cost Recoveries. For 1994/95 Cost Recoveries were:
Internal $130,992
External $ 1,202,963
Fines $377,781
♦ Collections expenditures for years prior to 1992/93 are shown net of fines revenues, as published in the Reports for those years.
Gross fine revenues in those years were:        1990/91 $92,923
1991/92 $136,252
♦ "Other" expenditures include non-recurring equipment acquisitions which vary considerably from year to year.
♦ The Library's GPOF expenditures for 1994/95 were 6.42% of the University's GPOF expenditures.
31  Edited by
Erik de Bruijn
Design & Production by
UBC Library Graphics
Published by
The University of British Columbia Library
1956 Main Mali
Vancouver, BC V6T 1Z1
Internet home page:http//:unixg.ubc.ca:7001/
April 1996 

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