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The Report of the University Librarian to the Senate of the University of British Columbia Apr 30, 1989

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Array Report of the university librarian
to the senate
THE UNIVERSITY OF BRITISH COLUMBIA LIBRARY
1987-88 The Report
of the University Librarian
to the Senate
of the
University of British Columbia
Seventy-third Year
1987/88
Vancouver
April 1989 Annual Report, 1987-88
In 1987-88 the UBC Library system underwent its first external
review. Preparation for the review began in January, 1988. By
July, the Review Committee had visited UBC and completed its report. The Committee's recommendations were studied at length by
the Library administration during the fall of 1988 and were considered as well by the Senate Library Committee. As the
consultation process has not yet been completed, this report
should not anticipate the disposition of the recommendations. It
is possible, however, to identify issues of particular concern to
the Committee.
The report and recommendations focus largely on measures that
would permit the Library to maintain its ability to support
teaching and research at UBC, while working within realistic expectations for future financial support. Among the difficult
issues examined by the Committee are the following:
* Increasing costs for both traditional and new information
resources
The number of academic journals has grown dramatically in recent years. In addition, the annual increase in the cost of
journals has been significantly greater than increases in
university funding and the Consumer Price Index. According
to median figures for university libraries, libraries as a
whole are spending more, but the unit costs of both serials
and monographs have been going up: serials by approximately
17.2% per title and monographs by approximately 7.8% per
volume from 1985-86 to 1986-87.
At the same time, the introduction and use of developing information technologies such as CD-ROM will require
significant expenditures on both a capital and a continuing
basis.    Information  in electronic  formats will  greatly increase the Library's service capabilities, but bring little
or no likelihood of cost savings.
* Maintaining the purchasing power of the collections budget
The UBC Library has increased the proportion of its total
budget that is spent on collections, reporting collections
expenditures in 1986-87 of 32.81%(1) of its total operating
expenditures, a higher figure than for other Canadian libraries of comparable size. For twenty-six academic library
members of the Canadian Association of Research Libraries,
the average for the five-year period ending in 1986-87 was
29.82%.
In the Committee's view, a large decentralized library like
UBC's is doing well to achieve a figure above 30%. A contributing factor has been the transfer of funds from Library
salaries to the collections budget. Such transfers may have
a largely hidden but increasingly deleterious effect. Consideration should instead be given to treating the
acquisitions budget as entirely separate from all other
elements of the Library's budget. (Some steps have already
been taken to present and consider the acquisitions budget in
this manner.)
* The need for a leading research library to maintain a wide
spectrum of collections
University libraries are attempting to deal with increasing
costs in a variety of ways. Given as first priority the need
to maintain the unique resources required to support research, a number of measures were suggested by the Review
Committee: a written collection policy could assist in
(1) The Committee refers to figures reported to the Canadian
Association of Research Libraries. These include the cost
of binding and vary slightly in definition from figures
reported in Appendix C of this report. reducing overlap among the separate units of the Library system; further cancellations can be made to reduce the number
of duplicate or multiple subscriptions to an absolute
minimum; steps can be taken in future to consolidate and centralize collections in larger branch libraries, further
reducing the need for duplication of titles. Without such
measures, it will be increasingly difficult for the Library
to maintain the necessary range of unique materials and to
acquire sufficient new titles as they appear.
* Need  for  a  formal  mechanism of  communicating  academic
priorities
One of the objectives of a formal collection policy is to
convey information, developed through consultation, about
academic priorities, so that these can be reflected in the
Library's acquisitions programme. It is important to establish a regular means of informing the Library of changes in
priorities as academic and research programmes shift their
emphasis or are discontinued. It is equally important to
have an effective mechanism to anticipate and provide for the
impact on the Library of proposals for new programmes and
research interests.
* Loan policies
Reductions in the number of duplicate subscriptions combined
with increasing numbers of researchers who depend on UBC's
journal collections suggest that the lending of journal issues will have to be restricted in future. Appropriate
physical facilities will be needed first to ensure that sufficient seating is available for increased on-site use of
journals. Security for these areas must also be improved if
journal issues are to be available when needed. It seems
likely that a non-circulating policy for journals at UBC will
require careful consideration and should be implemented, if
adopted, as circumstances permit. * Centralization
There are without doubt additional operating and other costs
arising from the degree to which the UBC Library is
decentralized. For many users, the problem of obtaining materials from several different places makes an extensive
branch system a mixed blessing. As opportunities arise which
permit the consolidation of collections and services, they
will have to be seriously considered. The need to limit the
proliferation of small branch libraries was, in fact, anticipated in the 1980 report of the President's Committee on
Library Space Requirements. While some adjustment has been
made, the lack of space available in the Main Library has
made any significant reorganization difficult to achieve.
* Introduction of new services
The Committee has suggested that service priorities be reviewed to ensure that they are consistent with the
University's recently-drafted mission statement and with projected funding levels. In the next few years, the public
service units must marshal significant resources to implement
new information technologies. This will involve difficult
choices, perhaps requiring the elimination of some existing
services in order to reallocate resources and redeploy staff.
* Role of the Library as a provincial resource
The UBC Library is conscious of its position as the principal
research library in the province and offers an impressive array of services to the community-at-large, as well as to
other publicly and privately funded institutions. Its role
as a provincial resource, however, has never been successfully defined, nor has provincial funding for these services
been provided to date. (The possibility of seeking special
funding for the Library's role in supporting graduate study and research in B.C.'s university system is currently being
considered.)
* Further development of the online catalogue
The Committee strongly recommended the implementation of an
online catalogue to permit improved access to UBC's large
bibliographic database. A great deal of progress has been
made in the past year towards this objective: a limited number of public terminals have been provided in library
locations; remote online access has been extended to all library card holders; and online access was provided to Simon
Fraser University and the University of Victoria libraries
through special funding from the Ministry of Advanced
Education and Job Training. More recently, online access to
UBC Library holdings has been offered to libraries participating in the B.C. Post-Secondary Interlibrary Loan Network
(NET) and the Federation Information Network (FIN). The online catalogue system has been very well received to date and
current development efforts are being directed towards making
our systems easier to use. There is an urgent need for more
library terminals and for increased computer support. In the
longer term, work to complete the retrospective conversion of
older catalogue records must be expedited. (The Library is
discussing possible joint proposals with the University of
Victoria and Simon Fraser University libraries to obtain resources for further development of online systems and for
retrospective conversion of catalogue records.)
* Need to replace the automated circulation system
The UBC Library was one of the first major libraries to introduce an automated circulation system (1965). The system
has served well through the years but is in dire need of replacement. A new system, using bar-code technology, will
require labelling of most or all of the Library's collections.   (Replacement of the circulation system will be a first priority for funding in the Library's budget proposals
over the next two years.)
* Need for improved management information
The confluence in the last few years of a number of negative
factors (e.g. physical constraints, increased demand for
services, significant cost increases for library materials,
reductions in funding, etc.) has caused many libraries to
shorten their planning horizons and to react to change rather
than plan for it. That shift in emphasis has made it difficult to allocate sufficient resources to the gathering and
synthesis of essential management information. The need for
good information as the basis for future planning has increased, but there is a natural tendency to keep resources
"at the front line", rather than divert them to less visible
- and less easily understood - purposes such as strategic
planning.
* A number of unusual factors contribute to the cost of library
services at UBC
The Library offers services and carries added costs which are
not common to similar research libraries. Some of these are
unavoidable, others will require examination. Among examples
cited are the unusually high degree of external services to
the province, the provision of ID card services to the entire
University, the degree of decentralization (including off-
campus teaching hospital libraries), higher than usual costs
for student workers, and the modification of Library of
Congress classifications to better suit Canadian or professionally oriented collections. Such costs contribute to the
perception that the UBC Library is a relatively expensive
operation.
No attempt has been made here to present the full range of issues
addressed by the Review Committee.  Members of the Senate Library Committee have had an opportunity to comment on the full report
and, after further consultation, the President's office will determine what actions should be taken in response to the recommendations. As noted, action is already being taken in a number of
areas where the need is clear and urgent.
Events of the Last Reporting Year
Use of Services
Use of the Library continued to be heavy in 1987-88. Most of the
traditional indicators of public service activity showed
increases. The number of circulation transactions was very
slightly larger than in 1986/87, up by 241 to 1,890,456. Document delivery between campus libraries and the hospital branches
rose to 40,150 transactions, a 17.2 percent increase. Interlibrary loans showed an increase of 9.7 percent to 32,432. The use
of recordings dropped by 11.5 percent to 283,688. Computer-assisted bibliographic searches were fewer by 2.2 percent at 7,172
searches. Reference questions answered throughout the system
increased by 5.9 percent to 405,209, an average of almost 7,800
for every week of the year. The number of orientation tours and
instructional sessions increased from 618 to 963, while the numbers of participants in these tours and sessions increased from
11,156 to 12,659.
Looking for meaning in statistical variations from one year to
the next is not fruitful, but collectively the figures testify
that the UBC Library is very intensively used, and that is the
best measure of its success and its worth.
Library Spaces
The Library system faces, as it has done for more than a decade,
a serious space problem. During 1987-88 no new space became
available, but progress was made in developing and establishing
the case for a library building on the old bookstore site and
renovating the Main Library. Inclusion of new and renovated
library space as a high priority in the University's emerging 8
development campaign gave reason to hope for space relief in
about five years.
In the meantime, the Main Library building was improved by two
projects. The installation of the fire protection system was
completed in the spring of 1988. The building now has an upgraded alarm system and is sprinklered throughout. During the
summer of 1988 the flat parts of the Library roof were reroofed.
Both these projects led to loss and damage of some library
material through flooding, but all losses were covered by insurance. Following the fire safety improvements the shelving and
collections of the Main Library were completely vacuumed. Another project undertaken by Library staff was the relegation of
some 52,000 volumes from the Main stacks to storage. This move
used up the last of the Library's storage space.
Renovations in the Music Building provided 600 square feet of
badly needed space for the Music Library. A small amount of
shelving and 14 study carrells for graduate students were added.
In the mall space outside the Sedgewick Library entrance Food
Services installed a snack bar. The Sedgewick staff inventoried
one-fifth of the collection, and weeded volumes of superseded,
obsolete and worn-out material from their stacks.
Online Catalogue
Work to extend the benefits of the Library online catalogue was
boosted in December 1987 when the Ministry of Advanced Education
funded a joint proposal by the three B.C. university libraries
with a grant of $250,000. The money was used in four ways: to
upgrade the UBC Library mainframe computer; to provide the Simon
Fraser and Victoria university libraries with two terminals each
for staff access to UBC Library files; to provide remote access
to those files, beginning with UBC faculty; and to install ten
public-access terminals in various Library locations. The Library commitment to and dependence on the online catalogue
continued to grow. It has become the source of first resort for
most catalogue inquiries, and the number of files it contains has
gradually increased. The Biomedical Branch Library at Vancouver
General Hospital completed a project to add all of its holdings
to the UBC Library databases, and it became the first public
service unit to remove its card catalogue from the library's
public area.
In January 1988 the process was begun of adding uncatalogued
government monographs to the online Miscellaneous Materials file,
so that now all materials received by the Government Publications
Division are reachable online throughout the system. A process
of retrospective conversion is going on for pre-1988 holdings.
Film Library's holdings were also added to the Miscellaneous Materials file and are now accessible throughout the University
community.
Photocopiers
The Library replaced its public photocopiers at the end of 1987.
Thirty-one new copiers were installed, each equipped with high-
density magnetic debit-card readers, and 16 of them also equipped
with coin-changers. A machine with enlargement capability was
obtained for Crane Library to meet the special needs of sight-
handicapped users. User reaction to the new equipment, to the
convenience of using copy cards in preference to coins, and to
reduced charges for debit-card copying has been very positive.
Reference Service
For some time libraries have been superimposing modern information services upon their traditional functions. In
addition, information-seeking patterns of students and faculty
have been changing in response to increasing quantities of information and to the availability of new technology. During this
transition period, reference staff throughout the Library are 10
working to assist users to sort out their information options and
to use them effectively.
For reference needs a computer database provides fast and
efficient access to large amounts of information. It also allows
searching for information in ways not available in printed
sources. The benefits available are great; however, searches
generally require mediation of a librarian between the user and
the database. As opportunities or products become available, the
library is encouraging users to do their own searching.
End-user searching of bibliographic databases through information
vendors such as BRS and DIALOG has required that the Library
introduce seminars to assist faculty members and graduate
students to select the system most appropriate to their needs, to
answer questions about why the retrieval does not always match
the user's expectations and to learn to use the systems so that
the results are reliable. The individual seeking to do his own
searching tends to see the Library as the source of expertise
when he experiences problems ranging from the selection and installation of hardware to details of the index structure of
various databases.
Many bibliographic databases are now distributed on CD-ROM. The
hardware costs are significant, the software and database costs
are substantial, and so far one CD-ROM installation will support
only one user at a time. Even with these shortcomings the
technology is attractive because it allows unlimited searching
for a fixed subscription price.
This year CD-ROM MEDLINE was installed in the Woodward Library
and in the three hospital libraries. Users and staff are pleased
with the service and it seems reasonable to expect that the
Library will install other systems within the year. 11
Interlibrary Loans
Interlibrary loan services at UBC utilize the most current
technologies available: online bibliographic verification and ordering, electronic mail and telefacsimile transmission of
requests and materials required urgently. The primary objective
is to minimize the time required to obtain materials from other
collections.
Facsimile transmission is being used for messaging within the
Health Science Library Network, for document delivery to off-campus users, and to a limited extent for obtaining documents for
UBC users. Hospital libraries send requests for materials from
Woodward and other campus libraries via fax; more than 40,000 requests were made last year. The Law Library receives requests
and delivers documents using bookfax to law firms and the B.C.
Courthouse Library Society. For document delivery the additional
costs are covered by charges to the users.
For physical delivery of material to U.S. libraries parcels
sent by courier to Blaine and mailed from there at the U.S
library rate.  The advantages are speed and economy.
The fifth edition of the B.C. Post - Secondary Interlibrary Loan
Manual was issued at the end of the report year.
Preservation
The preservation of collections so that they can be used by
future generations is an important part of the library's responsibilities. In January 1988 Suzanne Dodson, Head of the Government Publications and Microforms Division, was appointed Acting
Part-Time Preservation Librarian and asked to direct the
Library's preservation activities. Mrs. Dodson retains her
divisional headship.
Among other parts of the ongoing campaign to preserve library
materials, signs have been placed at all photocopiers and in
staff areas promoting the proper handling of books; posters, 12
displays, bookmarks, articles, radio interviews, have been
employed to foster careful use of library materials; training
sessions for library staff and student assistants have been
mounted.
During the year a hitherto-unknown type of blemish was discovered
on some reels of microfilm at UBC. Since then the trouble has
been found to exist in libraries in other countries and research
towards a solution is being pursued. It is understood that,
though the blemishing might occur over time in any location, poor
storage conditions such as those in the Main Library hasten the
process.
One aspect of preservation that is beyond control is that
material which is in heavy use will eventually wear out regardless of the care given to it. Librarians are concerned about
parts of the collection that are being subjected to very heavy
use. The material serving the Health Sciences Library Network
constitutes a case in point. Some of it is handled virtually
every day of the year and will in due course wear out. Other
instances are parts of the Main stack collection, and course
books in the Sedgewick Library. In fact they occur throughout
the system.
Review of Collections
The Library is participating in the National Collections
Inventory Project, a program under which research libraries
across North America (and in other countries) are reviewing their
collecting practices. The information obtained from this process
is then submitted according to a standardized form to create a
central computer record of the strengths and weaknesses of our
major research collections. So far at UBC the sections on
psychology, fine arts, religion and philosophy, sociology and
economics, technology, and physical sciences have been completed.
Music, law, medicine, biology, and forestry/agriculture are in
progress. 13
Grants, Gifts and Donations
Gifts in Kind
Gifts to the Special Collections and University Archives Division
included the papers of Howard and Gwen Norman, the Trade Union
Research Bureau records and the November House records. Mrs. M.
Lowry, Mr. D. Lukin Johnston, Dr. L.S. Deane, the late Dr. N.
Colbeck and Mrs. E.C. Cooke donated special books or collections
to the Division during the year.
Donors to the general collections included Dr. H. Abramson, Mr.
B. Campbell, Dr. R.M. Clark, Dr. R.A. Jobe, Dr. H.E. Kasinsky,
Mrs. J. Kessler, Dr. R.V. Mattessich, Mr. I. Mills and Mrs. G.
Warren.
Donations
One of the most interesting donations has come from a group of
over 300 people interested in Ireland, Irish history and calligraphy. By pooling individual donations of $60, the group has
raised enough money to buy for the Library a facsimile edition of
the Book of Kells. This beautiful reproduction is being
virtually hand-produced by a specialized publisher in Europe.
UBC's copy will be displayed in Special Collections when it has
been received. The Library is grateful to Mr. John Kelly for his
energy and his commitment of time in organizing the funding for
such an outstanding gift.
Thanks are due to the many alumni and other friends who make
donations to the Library year after year and whose support
enables the purchase of special items from time to time. Mrs.
Faye Collins, Dr. Kaye Lamb, Mr. Samuel Lipson and many others
must be especially acknowledged for their continuing support.
Foundations as well as individuals have supported the Library
regularly over the years. The Law Foundation has been generous
with its support of the UBC Law Library. The purchase of rare
books and manuscripts in Canadian Literature and history has been 14
supported by the Cultural Properties programme of the Ministry of
Communications and by the Ernest Theodore Rogers Fund of the
Vancouver Foundation. Grants from the Social Sciences and
Humanities Research Council have enabled the purchase of
materials in a number of areas since 1980; the latest is to
support collecting by the Fine Arts Library in the Italian
Renaissance period.
The Special Collections and University Archives Division received
grants for a number of projects: from the British Columbia
Heritage Trust for work on fishing and forest products industry
manuscripts; from the National Archives of Canada for the
processing of photograph collections; from the Social Sciences
and Humanities Research Council and the UBC Alumni Association
for the preparation of a Guide to the University Archives and
Special Collections Personal Papers and Private Records; and from
MacMillan Bloedel Limited for the organization of company records
deposited at UBC. The generous support provided has allowed the
Division to continue an extremely active programme of records
organization and publication.
Among the many individual and corporate donors in 1987/88 the
Library especially thanks the class of 1927, Mrs. J. Selby,
MacDonald Dettwiler and Associates, Mrs. J. Tarabulis and Mr.
P.T. Ip.
The Crane Library received special support from a variety of
sources, including the First City Financial Corporation, Mr. J.
MacDonald, Mr. and Mrs. Read, Mr. J.W. Phelps, and the
President's Croquet Championship.
Staff
The net change in the number of Library staff was a reduction of
4.29 FTE (1.12%) in 1987-88. Vacancies were reviewed as they occurred to see whether a replacement was absolutely necessary,
whether the position could be left vacant temporarily, or whether 15
the position could be eliminated to meet retrenchment needs.
When feasible, those positions which had to be refilled to maintain services were filled on a temporary or sessional basis, at a
more junior level, or through reassignment of staff from less essential functions. Funds resulting from positions left vacant
were used to augment the collections budget or to supplement insufficient allocations for supplies and operating expenses.
Turnover resulting from resignation among librarians was higher
than normal, in part due to uncertainty of continuing employment,
to lack of opportunity for promotion and advancement, and to substantially better salaries at other institutions. In addition,
several librarians reached retirement age or retired early.
Anna Leith, the Head of the Woodward Biomedical Library, retired
at the end of June, 1988. Ms Leith joined the staff in 1959,
became Head of the Science Division in 1961, and was appointed
Head of the Woodward Biomedical Library in 1967. For many years,
she also taught a course in medical librarianship for the University's School of Library, Archival, and Information Studies.
Since Ms Leith's retirement, Elsie de Bruijn, Associate Head,
Woodward Biomedical Library, has served as Acting Head of
Woodward.
Laurenda Daniells, University Archivist, also retired at the end
of June 1988, after working for the Library since 1970. Mrs.
Daniells was instrumental in organizing the University Archives
and in building relationships that ensured the collection,
preservation, organization for use of valuable material relating
to the University's history and growth. Her successor is Chris
Hives, a graduate of the UBC Master of Archival Studies
programme.
Another significant retirement was that of Lois Carrier, Head of
the Social Sciences Division from 1966 to 1984. With the amalgamation of the Humanities and the Social Sciences Divisions in
1984, Ms Carrier chose to continue as a reference librarian in 16
the new Division. On her early retirement in June 1988 the position was not refilled and the responsibilities were assigned to
other members of the Division's staff.
The Catalogue Records Division lost another long-service librarian when Betty Misewich decided to take early retirement at the
end of July 1988. Mrs. Misewich worked as a cataloguer for more
than 20 years and was responsible for the cataloguing and classification of science materials. Her position was not refilled for
budgetary reasons and her responsibilities were reassigned to
other librarians in the Division.
Brian Owen, Librarian/Analyst, Systems Division, resigned in
September 1987 to become Manager of Technical Services for the
Fraser Valley Regional Library. He was replaced by Kathy
Scardellato, Serials Librarian, who subsequently resigned as well
to move to Toronto. At the end of the reporting year, the position in the Systems Division had not been refilled.
Laine Ruus, who had headed the Data Library for many years, presiding over its growth and development, left in April 1988 to accept an attractive offer from the University of Toronto Library.
After a lengthy search period, during which Jim Henderson, Reference Librarian, Woodward Library, served as Acting Data
Librarian, Ms Ruus was replaced as Head of UBC's Data Library by
Hilde Colenbrander, who had previously worked as Head of the Research and Development Department of the South African Bibliographic and Information Network.
Judith Phillips resigned as Head of the Marjorie Smith Social
Work Library in July 1988. In order to provide time to the Library to review the operation of the branch and its viability,
she was replaced through the temporary appointment of Beverley
Scott.
The Interlibrary Loans Division lost the services of Isabel Pit-
field through resignation in February 1988.  Mrs. Pitfield had 17
provided management services for the B.C. Post-secondary Interlibrary Loan Network for a number of years on a part-time basis.
There was also an increase in the number of retirements this year
among the Library's support staff. Berching Ho, Library Assistant 4, Catalogue Records Division, Simon Yeung, Library Assistant 3, Curriculum Laboratory, and Walter Marsh, Clerk 2
(audiobook narrator), retired during the reporting year.
Several librarians were appointed to fill vacant positions, to
replace librarians taking on other temporary assignments, and to
fill grant-funded and special project positions. In March 1988
Tomoko Hermsmeier was appointed half-time as Japanese Language
Cataloguing Librarian and half-time in the Asian Library in a
position established through special funding in support of
Pacific Rim studies.
Carole Wisdom, who had previously worked for the Library, was appointed in March 1988 on a one-year specified term basis as Curriculum and Audiovisual Material Cataloguer. Angela Schiwy was
appointed in July 1988 as grant-funded Project Archivist in the
Special Collections Division to organize the MacMillan Bloedel
papers. Funding for her appointment was provided through an
agreement with MacMillan Bloedel Ltd.
Lynn Redenbach was appointed as a temporary Reference Librarian
in the Government Publications and Microforms Division in May
1988. Her appointment provided release time to Suzanne Dodson,
Head of the Division, to enable her to undertake additional responsibilities as the Library's Preservation Librarian and to
permit Connie Fitzpatrick, half-time Reference Librarian in Government Publications, to be seconded on a contractual basis to
Statistics Canada.
Jocelyn Godolphin, formerly of the Information and Orientation
Division, was appointed as Head of the Humanities and Social Sciences Division in September 1987. Ms Godolphin was replaced by
Brenda Peterson, who transferred from Catalogue Records to the 18
Information and Orientation Division. Elizabeth Caskey served as
Acting Head of the Humanities and Social Sciences Division from
January 1 to May 31, 1988 while Ms Godolphin was on maternity
leave.
Kat McGrath was appointed in August 1987 to replace Kathy
Scardellato as Serials Librarian. The appointments of Ron
Simmer, Patent Service Librarian, Terry Horner, Catalogue Librarian, and Marjorie Nelles, half-time Reference Librarian,
MacMillan Library, were extended for an additional year.
The probationary appointments of Martha Whitehead, Reference Librarian, Sedgewick Library, and Ann Rowley, Catalogue Librarian,
Catalogue Records Division, were reviewed and both were granted
confirmed appointments.
Recruiting continued during the year for four half-time positions
for Reference Librarians with competency in Asian languages
(Japanese, Korean, Indonesian, Indie languages). Only the
Japanese language position was filled during the reporting year,
as no qualified applicants were found for the others. Since further delay would not be acceptable, a new classification of Bibliographic Associate was established, and the positions were re-
advertised on that basis. (The positions were subsequently
filled early in 1989.)
Reference Publications
A Bookman's Catalogue: the Norman Colbeck Collection of
Nineteenth-Century and Edwardian Poetry and Belles Lettres in the
Special Collections Division by Norman Colbeck, edited by
Tirthankar Bose, was published in two volumes by the UBC Press in
1987.
The following bibliographies and guides were published by
the Library in 1988:
Canadian Politics: a Selective Bibliography to 1988 by
Laponce, in a microfiche edition.   An online bibliography 19
12,000 citations to books, parts of books, articles and conference papers on politics and public policy in Canada.
A Guide to the University of British Columbia Archives and
Special Collections Personal Papers and Private Records by Chris
Hives and Laurenda Daniells.
A Guide to Fishing. Forestry and Mining Records in the
Special Collections Division by Chris Hives and George Brandak.
Theses on British Columbia History and Related Subjects by
Frances Woodward, in a microfiche edition.
Thanks...
Dr. Jonathan Wisenthal stepped down at the end of June after four
years as Chairman of the Senate Library Committee. His work on
behalf of the Library and his concern for the future of library
collections and services at UBC are very deeply appreciated.
In Memoriam...
One of the Library's greatest benefactors, Dr. Norman Colbeck,
died on September 23, 1988 at the age of eighty-five.  He will be
greatly missed by his friends in the Library and elsewhere at the
University. Appendix A
SIZE OF COLLECTIONS - PHYSICAL VOLUMES
Margh 31/87      Additions     Deletions
Relegated      March 31/88
to Storage
Asian Studies Library 198,375
Biomedical Branch Library (VGH)      31,556
Catalogue Records Division 5,567
Crane Library 6,887
Curric Laboratory 101,199
Data Library 499
Fine Arts Library 113,810
Government Publications Division 3,632
Hamber Library (CGSH) 10,182
Humanities & Social Sciences 61,290
Reference
Law Library 144,943
MacMillan Library 58,787
Main Library 969,973
Map Library 8,617
Marjorie Smith Library 18,476
Mathematics Library 29,069
Music Library 50,327
St. Paul's Library (SPH) 7,549
Science Reference 24,712
Sedgewick Library 195,290
Special Collections Division 66,678
Woodward 318.368
SUBTOTAL 2,425,786
Storage Collections 213.653
TOTAL 2,639,439
10,227
1,210
54
532
5,219
61
6,558
713
562
3,188
5,871
2,500
29,472
270
974
1,116
3,209
569
2,147
5,832
3,026
2J24
92,434
 17
-1
-8
-12
-2,861
-39
-49
-49
-295
-435
-27
-565
-10
-100
-2
-18
-8
-24
-7,478
_£21
-12,304
-500
-42
-51,694
-52,236
+52,236
92,451     -12,304
208,601
32,758
5,621
7,407
103,557
521
119,819
4,296
10,744
64,183
150,379
61,218
947,186
8,877
19,350
30,183
53,518
8,110
26,835
193,644
69,704
327.169
2,453,680
265.906
2,719,586 Appendix B
GROWTH OF COLLECTIONS
March 31. 1987
Net Growth
March 31. 1988
Volumes - Catalogued
2,639,439
80,147
2,719,586
Documents - Uncatalogued
684,557
28,787
713,344
Microfilm (reels)
88,546
1,214
89,760
Microcards (cards)
111,680
-
111,680
Microprint (sheets)
1,087,670
-
1,087,670
Microfiche (sheets)
2,204,580
118,533
2,323,113
Aperture Cards
2,589
-
2,589
Films
1,641
-137
1,504
Filmloops
8
-
8
Filmstrips
2,624
34
2,658
Slides
17,798
154
18,028
Slide/Tape Shows
108
6
114
Transparencies
1,281
1
1,291
Video Tapes
1,830
400
2,230
Videodiscs
1
-
1
Photographs
26,174
70*
22,001
Pictures
74,960
157
75,117
Maps
172,857
3,321
176,178
Manuscripts**
2,185 m
144 m
2,330  m
Sound Recordings
163,512
4,587
168,099
Computer Tapes
570
73
643
Microcomputer Discs
139
52
191
Air Photos
755
359
1,114
This represents the number of accessions, which can range from one to several thousand photographs.
The 70 accessions this year represent about 60,000 photographs.
**  Thickness of files in meters. Appendix C
LIBRARY OPERATING EXPENDITURES
Fiscal Years. April/March
Year
Salaries &
Wages
1985/86
9,589,910
(63.85)
1986/87
9,584,602
(61.20)
1987/88
10,090,808
(63.55)
Collections
4,266,642 (28.41)
4,853,225 (30.99)
4,768,876    (30.03)
Binding
202,553 (1.35)
198,148 (1.27)
208,202 (1.31)
Other
959,160 (6.39)
1,025,395 (6.55)
810,840 (5.11)
Totals
15,018,265
15,661,370
15,878,726
(1) Expenditures from grant and trust funds are not included; in 1987/88 they amounted to $290,328 for collections.
(2) Cost recoveries of $246,159 are not reflected in this appendix. Appendix D
RECORDED USE OF LIBRARY RESOURCES
Years ending June 30
GENERAL CIRCULATION
Main Library
General Stacks
Reserves
Extension
Fine Arts
Government Publications
Map
Special Collections
SUBTOTAL
Branch Libraries
Asian
Biomedical Branch
Crane
Curriculum Laboratory
Film
Hamber
Law
MacMillan
Marjorie Smith
Mathematics
Music
St. Paul's
Sedgewick
Woodward
SUBTOTAL
Use of Recordings
Wilson
Music
SUBTOTAL
Document Delivery
Health Sciences Network
INTERLIBRARY LOANS
To Other Libraries
From Other Libraries
TOTAL INTERLIBRARY LOANS
GRAND TOTAL (General Circulation
& Interlibrary Loans)
% Increase/
1985/86
1986/87
1987/88
Decrease vs,
1986/87
514,315
520,708
511,522
25,716
23,188
26,965
9,168
10,251
10,202
95,481
86,449
92,075
120,768
124,574
132,347
11,132
10,957
11,379
21,143
18,827
18,609
797,723
794,954
803,099
+1.02
19,667
19,245
20,013
34,784
30,470
29,681
1,958
1,875
3,108
162,012
161,164
147,107
2,032
2,013
3,492
34,659
34,600
35,496
117,198
117,888
112,750
62,584
55,957
55,167
27,081
30,617
28,752
22,637
24,515
24,884
53,424
53,075
53,185
20,852
20,641
21,747
304,699
288,827
294,175
248,721
254,374
257,800
,112,308
1,095,261
1,087,357
- 0.72
257,240
267,276
230,380
53,610
53,320
53,308
310,850
320,596
283,688
-11.51
36,532
34,261
40,150
+17.19
17,589
19,035
21,149
+11.11
9,842
10,519
11,283
+ 7.26
27,431
29,554
32,432
+ 9.74
2,284,844
2,274,626
2,246,726
1.23 Appendix E
INTERLIBRARY LOANS
Years ending June 30
1985/86
To Other Libraries
Original Materials
General
1,486
Federation Information Network
969
B.C. Medical Library Service
3,662
Cancer Control Agency of B.C.
-
B.C. Post-Secondary Library Network
2,504
Bamfield Marine Station
25
SUBTOTAL
8,646
Films
895
Photocopies
General
2,312
Federation Information Network
592
B.C. Medical Library Service
713
B.C. Post-Secondary Library Network
4,329
Bamfield Marine Station
102
SUBTOTAL
8.04?
TOTAL INTERLIBRARY LENDING
17,589
From Other Libraries
Original Materials
General
2,496
B.C. Medical Library Service
394
Cancer Control Agency of B.C.
~
SUBTOTAL
2,890
Films
828
Photocopies
6.U4
1986/87
1,551
784
4,423
2,949
 m
9,787
823
2,480
206
192
5,362
_M1
2,806
371
TOTAL INTERLIBRARY BORROWING
9,842
1987/88
% Increase/
Decrease vs,
1986/87
1,785
+15.1
875
+11.6
3,857
-12.8
1,829
-
3,039
+ 3.1
26
-67.5
11,411
779
+16.6
5.3
2,529
+ 2.0
156
-24.3
90
-53.1
6,105
+13.9
79
-57.3
8.959
+ 6.3
21,149
+11 -I
3,015
+ 7.4
311
-16.2
39
-
3,365
+ 5.9
560
-16.4
7,358
+10.3
11,283
+ 7.3 Appendix F
HEALTH SCIENCES LIBRARY NETWORK
July 1987 - June 1988
Interbranch Loans
To Other Branches
Original
Material
Photocooies
Total
% Increase
vs. 1986/87
Woodward
6,272
26,190
32,462
Biomedical Branch
727
2,590
3,317
Hamber
477
734
1,211
St. Paul's
424
284
708
Other U.B.C. Libraries
1,446
1,006
2,452
TOTAL
9,346
30,804
40,150
(1986/87)
(8,371)
(25,890)
(34,261)
From Other Branches
Woodward
688
1,518
2,206
Biomedical Branch
3,400
8,554
11,954
Hamber
3,124
11,729
14,853
St. Paul's
1,438
6,791
8,229
Other U.B.C. Libraries
696
2,212
2,908
TOTAL
9,346
30,804
40,150
(1986/87)
(8,371)
(25,890)
(34,261)
+17.19% Appendix G
REFERENCE & INFORMATION QUESTIONS ANSWERED
July 1987 - June 1988
Main Library
Fine Arts
Government Publications
Humanities & Social Sciences
Information Desk
Map
Science Division
Special Collections
SUBTOTAL
(1986/87)
Directional
Questions
12,530
1,147
1,309
9,647
476
593
4,843
30,545
(31,038)
Reference
Questions
8,375
28,622
30,733
46,973
4,206
6,840
8,229
133,978
(134,517)
Research
Questions
1,711
1,008
1,197
56
466
2,393
6,831
(6,793)
Total
Questions
22,616
30,777
33,239
56,620
4,738
7,899
15,465
171,354
(172,348)
% Increase/
Decrease vs.
1986/87
- 0.58%
Branch Libraries
Asian Studies
Biomedical Branch
Crane
Curriculum Laboratory
Extension
Film
Hamber
Health Sciences Network
Law
MacMillan
Marjorie Smith
Mathematics
Music
St. Paul's
Sedgewick
Woodward
SUBTOTAL
(1986/87)
GRAND TOTAL
(1986/87)
1,377
5,498
259
7,134
2,276
18,918
1,101
22,295
1,403
1,785
748
3,936
7,659
15,436
1,447
24,542
10
180
190
1,024
7,251
357
8,632
7,252
9,059
4,396
20,707
1,611
121
1,732
6,465
7,625
3,679
17,769
2,320
7,868
871
11,059
1,480
2,307
367
4,154
1,626
1,223
393
3,242
2,844
10,146
141
13,131
5,765
20,478
774
27,017
7,394
18,806
198
26,398
7,337
29,222
5,358
41,917
56,222
157,243
20,390
233,855
(53,470)
(138,542)
(18,443)
(210,455)
86,767
291,221
27,221
405,209
(84,508)
(273,059)
(25,236)
(382,803)
+11.12%
+ 5.85% 1
No. of
Division Searches
Biomedical
Branch 759
Curriculum
Laboratory 77
Hamber 963
Humanities &
Social Sciences      499
Law 94
MacMillan 373
St. Paul's 566
Science 1,489
Woodward 2.352
TOTAL 7.172
1986/87 (7,330)
Appendix H
COMPUTER-ASSISTED BIBLIOGRAPHIC SEARCHES
July 1987 - Juny 1988
2
Student
Searches
133
6
47
61
Hi
369
(338)
3
UBC
Searches
587
13
573
71
26
58
400
93
833
2.6J4
(2,386)
Non-UBC
Searches
22
5
4
3
38
_48_
126
(99)
Reference
166
55
390
273
57
264
163
306
988
IMl
(2,727)
6
I.L.L
991*
370**
LMi
(1,780)
Data Bases
Searched
1,931
99
2,261
685
1,001
604
1,427
1,643
5,391
15.042
(15,203)
SDI
Reports
166
6
618
169
1.189
2.148
(2,171)
1. Number of searches: a total of the figures in columns 2 to 6.
2. Student specials: limited searches provided to UBC students at a flat fee.
3. UBC searches: for UBC members, excluding student specials.
4. Non-UBC searches: full costs, including staff time, are charged for searches on behalf of persons not
associated with the University.  These searches tend to be complex and often involve the use of several
data files.
5. Reference searches are usually brief inquiries for information not readily accessible in print.
6. ILL verification is a search for the purpose of determining the existence and location of documents and
ordering them on-line as interlibrary loans.
*   The total for Science includes all ILL verification for the Library system except Woodward
and the hospital libraries
** The Woodward total includes ILL verification for Woodward and the 3 hospital libraries.
7. A single reference search may involve the use of more than one data base.  Staff time for a reference
search may vary depending on the number and combination of data bases used.
8. Selective Dissemination of Information reports: the number of monthly updates distributed to clients.
Current awareness (SDI) profiles are included in columns 1 to 5 only when they are initially established
or subsequently revised. Appendix I
ORIENTATION TOURS & INSTRUCTIONAL SESSIONS
Julv 1987 -
June 1988
UBC students, faculty, staff
Community grouos
Main Library
^
Fine Arts
6
44
22
289
11               70
Government Publications
-
14
132
5              55
Humanities & Social Sciences
-
44
857
1              20
Information & Orientation
129
979
18
262
1              10
Map Collection
-
21
264
6              79
Science
5
73
4
105
Special Collections
15
72
11
122
5              53
SUBTOTAL
155
1,168
134
2,031
29            287
(1986/87)
(92)
(1,047)
(156)
(2,158)
(50)         (569)
Branch Libraries
Asian Studies
4
52
183            570
Biomedical Branch
26
73
Crane
4
25
2
25
11              85
Curriculum Laboratory
34
458
78
2,189
2              29
Hamber
16
83
2
20
3              16
Law
18
359
24
1,029
13            342
MacMillan
9
76
5
84
Marjorie Smith
1
12
11
122
Mathematics
1
2
3                7
Music
16
199
St. Paul's
14
115
Sedgewick
116
2,281
Woodward
7
145
39
695
3              80
SUBTOTAL
132
1,432
295
6,612
218         1,129
(1986/87)
(258)
(3,518)
(130)
(2,825)
(230)      (1,039)
GRAND TOTAL
287
2,600
429
8,643
247         1,416
(1986/87)
(350)
(4,565)
(286)
(4,983)
(280)      (1,608)
*   Estimated number of participants Appendix J
LIBRARY ORGANIZATION
1987/88
ADMINISTRATION
Mclnnes, Douglas N.
de Bruijn, Erik
Jeffreys, Anthony
Keate, Heather
MacDonald, Robin
Watson, William
University Librarian
Assistant Univ. Librarian for
Administrative Services
Assistant Univ. Librarian for Collections
Assistant Univ. Librarian for Public Services
- Branch Libraries
Assistant Univ. Librarian for Technical Processes
and Systems
Assistant Univ. Librarian for Public Services
- Central Libraries
ACQUISITIONS DIVISION
Davidson, Joyce
Head
ASIAN LIBRARY
Joe, Linda
Head
BIOMEDICAL BRANCH LIBRARY (V.G.H.l
Freeman, George
Head
CATALOGUE RECORDS DIVISION
Turner, Ann
Head
CATALOGUE PRODUCTS DIVISION
Omelusik, Nick
Head
CIRCULATION DIVISION
Banham, Mary
Head Appendix J
(continued)
COLLECTIONS DIVISION
Elliston, Graham
Forbes, Jennifer
Hallonquist, P. Lynne
Karpinski, Leszek
Kreider, Janice
Mcintosh, Jack
Bibliographer - Serials
Bibliographer - English Language
Bibliographer - Life Sciences
Bibliographer - European Languages
Bibliographer - Science
Bibliographer - Slavonic Studies
CRANE LIBRARY
Thiele, Paul
CURRICULUM LABORATORY
Hurt, Howard
DATA LIBRARY
Ruus, Laine
/'
Henderson, Jim
Colenbrander, Hilde
FINE ARTS LIBRARY
Burndorfer, Hans
GIFTS & EXCHANGE DIVISION
Elliston, Graham
Head
Head
Head (to April 30, 1988)
Acting Head (May 1 to August 1, 1988)
Head (from August 2, 1988)
Head
Head
GOVERNMENT PUBLICATIONS & MICROFORMS DIVISION
Dodson, Suzanne Head
HAMPER MSKARY (Children's/Grace/Shaughnessy Hospitals)
Nelson, Ann Head Appendix J
(continued)
HEALTH SCIENCES LIBRARY NETWORK SERVICES
Price, Jane Co-ordinator
HUMANITIES & SOCIAL SCIENCES DIVISION
Godolphin, Jocelyn
Caskey, Elizabeth
INTERLIBRARY LOAN DIVISION
Friesen, Margaret
LAW LIBRARY
Shorthouse, Tom
MACMILLAN LIBRARY
Brongers, Lore
MAP LIBRARY
Wilson, Maureen
MARJORIE SMITH LIBRARY
Christensen, Pia
Phillips, Judith
Scott, Beverley
MUSIC LIBRARY
Burndorfer, Hans
Head (on leave January 1 to May 31, 1988)
Acting Head (January 1 to May 31, 1988)
INFORMATION & ORIENTATION DIVISION
Stevens, Julie Head
Head
a
Head
Head
Head
Acting Head (to April 30, 1988)
Head (May 1 to July 4, 1988)
Acting Head (from August 2, 1988)
Head
.ev ST. PAUL'S HOSPITAL LIBRARY
Saint, Barbara
Appendix J
(continued)
Head
SCIENCE DIVISION & MATHEMATICS LIBRARY
Brongers, Rein Head
SEDGEWICK LIBRARY
Sandilands, Joan
SERIALS PMSIQN
Baldwin, Nadine
SPECIAL COLLECTIONS DIVISION
Yandle, Anne
Daniells, Laurenda
Hives, Chris
Forbes, Chuck
SYSTEMS DEVELOPMENT DIVISION
Dennis, Donald
Dobbin, Geraldine
WILSON RECORDINGS COLLECTION
Kaye, Douglas
WOODWARD LIBRARY
Leith, Anna
de Bruijn, Elsie
Cole, John
Head
Head
Head
University Archivist (to June 30, 1988)
University Archivist (from July 4, 1988)
Curator, Colbeck Collection
Systems Analyst and Head
Systems & Information Science Librarian
Head
Head (to June 30, 1988)
Associate Head (to August 14, 1988)
Acting Head (from July 1, 1988)
Acting Associate Head (from August 15, 1988) Appendix K
SENATE LIBRARY COMMITTEE
1987/88
Dean P.T. Burns
Mr. B. Dumka
Dr. S.E. Grace
Dr. S.C. Lindstrom
Dean P.A. Lusztig
Dean R.C. Miller, Jr.
Prof. A.B. Piternick
Mr. J. Ringwald
Dr. G.G.E. Scudder
Dean P. Suedfeld
Mr. J. Williamson
Dr. J.L. Wisenthal (Chairman)
Ms N.E. Woo
EX-OFFICIO
Chancellor L.R. Peterson
President D.W. Strangway
Vice President K.D. Srivastava
Mr. A.C. McMillan
Mr. D.N. Mclnnes

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