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The Report of the University Librarian to the Senate of the University of British Columbia Mar 31, 1984

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 mieport of the university librarian
to the senate
UNIVERSITY OF BRITISH COLUMBIA LIBRARY
1982-83 The Report
of the University Librarian
to the Senate
of the
University of British Columbia
Sixty-eighth Year
1982/83
Vancouver
March 1984 INTRODUCTION
While an annual report is intended primarily as a means of reviewing activities
and developments of the previous year, it can also offer an opportunity to place
before a wider audience some of the issues affecting operations. The introductory
paragraphs of this report touch on questions, old and new, which will demand
attention from everyone concerned with the future of the library services at the
University of British Columbia.
The first of these, affecting all aspects of the Library's operation, is the
question of physical facilities.  When the President's Committee on Library Space
Requirements made its report in 1980, it was expected that existing space for
library collections would be full beyond working capacity by 1988.  That prediction,
which assumed further transfer of collections to non-public storage areas, remains
valid.  Within the present facilities of the Main Library, the only means of
extending the deadline for collections space is to create a limited amount of
additional closed storage on the seventh floor.  Most of the smaller branch libraries
are already out of space for collections; others will be by 1988.
The quality of library space is important as well, for functional and aesthetic
reasons.  Except for the most recently constructed campus branch libraries, most
of U.B.C.'s library space is functionally inadequate, almost incapable of
reorganization, and in certain instances unsafe by current building and fire codes.
The Library Development Proposal submitted in 1981 to the Universities Council
would have provided, over the long term, for extensive reorganization of services
in new space.  Under the present economic conditions, a major redevelopment of
the Library's central facilities appears to be out of the question.  Instead, the task
will be to develop less costly alternatives which provide badly needed space soon
enough without compromising future opportunities for consolidating and
reorganizing services. At a time when an extended period of reduced operating
budgets and technological change demand flexibility in the organization of library
service, the Library faces a series of ad hoc adjustments to cope with a space
problem which will increase operating costs and service deficiencies.
A second major issue is, of course, the effect of reductions in operating
budgets in recent years.  Retrenchment in 1982/83 saw the closure of one small branch library and the virtual elimination of the Library's support to reading rooms.
To meet its retrenchment target the Library was also obliged to give up several
budgeted positions and to sacrifice savings from the operating budget that were
previously used to help offset increases in the cost of supplies and outside services.
The overall result of retrenchment and contractual changes has been a reduction of
13% (excluding grant-funded health science positions) since 1970 in the total staff
hours available to operate the Library.  During that same period, the demands for
library service, both traditional and innovative, have increased and the
responsibilities of the Library have been expanded.
Throughout periods of restraint the Library has protected the collection by
giving it the highest possible priority. The wisdom of this policy can be seen in the
strength of the periodical collections, developed and maintained through years of
lean budgets both as a matter of policy and through the commitment of individuals,
particularly Mr. Roland Lanning, U.B.C.'s outstanding serials bibliographer until
1968. That objective is no less important today.  As the major research library in
the Province, the U.B.C. Library's obligation to maintain strong collections grows
in the face of reductions to other academic library collections in B.C.  It is
expected, quite appropriately, that materials no longer available elsewhere in the
Province will continue to be represented in U.B.C.'s collection.  The collections
constitute a capital investment of unique importance to the Province.  Failure to
acquire books and periodicals as they are published would mean that many
important titles could not be purchased later - most go out of print within a very
short time.  As we learned in the 1960's, subsequent attempts to fill in gaps and to
acquire large retrospective collections are costly, difficult, and only moderately
successful.
In view of the magnitude and possible duration of the present financial crisis,
the maintenance of the Library's unique collections must be considered a
University, not merely a Library, priority.  The last collections budget increase was
in 1981/82 and, although inflation has moderated, it is still a significant factor.
Reduction in duplicate subscriptions funded by the Library budget, some restriction
of book purchases, and favourable European exchange rates have all helped us to
live within a static budget.  Duplicate subscriptions are again being examined, and
all but the most essential will be considered for elimination.  However, if a modest increase in the collections budget is not possible within the next year or two
cancellation of some unique titles will be inevitable.  Any actual reduction in the
budget will, of course, require that this step be taken earlier.  A significant
worsening in exchange rates would have a similar impact.
Reductions to the operating budget can come only from cutting staff or
collections, and as already noted the staff time available to the Library has been
substantially reduced in recent years.  Further reductions in the staff will probably
be required and will have a visible impact on the Library's ability to process books
and journals and to provide services.  Most possibilities for minor adjustments have
been exhausted, and the potential for major reorganization of services for more
economical operation is limited by the Library's physical plant.  A substantial
reduction in operating funds in 1984/85, followed by static or shrinking budgets in
subsequent years, would make it impossible to avoid serious cuts in the Library
collection, to the detriment of research and teaching at U.B.C. and to the great
disadvantage of academic work in the Province as a whole.  There are no
inexpensive solutions to the problem.  The cost of maintaining this provincial
resource increases inexorably with inflation, while no provision exists for offsetting increases to the collections budget.
The past five to ten years have seen important improvements in the provision
of information about collections.  The continued development of automated
systems required for easier access to such information constitutes a third major
issue for the Library in 1984.  Prior to 1978 the only public catalogue of the entire
University Library collection was the one in the concourse of the Main Library.
Since then, a union catalogue representing all materials acquired since 1978 and a
substantial proportion of the older collections has been maintained by computer
and made available on computer-output-microfiche (COM) in all branch libraries
and in many locations outside the University.  As part of the same shift to
automation, information about materials on order, in process, or recently
catalogued is also widely available on a current basis.  Both COM and on-line
access have also been developed for the control of uncatalogued materials,
previously known only to the branch or division in which the materials were held.
Special attention has been given to the provision of information about serial
publications.  Until quite recently, users had to rely on a printed listing, usually out-of-date.  Information about serials received by the Library is now available online, allowing the user to determine quickly if a particular issue has been received
and checked in.
Other developments have improved access to information and materials held
elsewhere.  The Library holds COM catalogues for other library collections and can
also make enquiries in many instances on-line through its computer terminals.  The
same terminals provide access to a vast array of bibliographic information held in
remote data bases.  More rapid access to materials identified in external sources
has been achieved through the use of electronic mail and through ordering systems
offered by vendors of bibliographic information.  While the magnitude of the
changes that have occurred may not be apparent to the average library patron,
they represent the beginning of a revolution in access to information.
Efforts to continue the development of improved access systems appear to be
at a standstill, at least in British Columbia.  The exciting potential of mounting a
local system to provide cataloguing and other forms of support to the university
and college libraries (the B.C. Library Network) has been abandoned for lack of
funding.  It is doubtful that the University of British Columbia Library can continue
even to participate in the maintenance of a B.C. union catalogue since, without a
B.C.L.N., it is necessary to make continued use of expensive arrangements for
entering and holding records at the UTLAS processing centre in Toronto.  Further
developments must occur with extremely limited operating funds and are likely to
focus on urgent local needs.  Meanwhile, the potential for on-line access to
information has hardly begun to be exploited and the benefits of closer cooperation
in sharing resources will be less easily achieved.
In our concern for the more obvious problems arising from reduced budgets we
must also remain aware of the extent to which the quality of future collections and
information services depends on the effective use of present funding.  Earlier
reports have noted the high standing achieved by the U.B.C. Library among North
American research libraries.  For its collections, staff and services the U.B.C.
Library has, over a period of many years, earned a reputation for excellence which
must be preserved. The immediate problems are clear enough.  Without increased funds to at least
maintain buying power for collections, there will inevitably be a reduction in the
purchase of books and journals that are not held elsewhere in British Columbia;
further reductions in staffing will limit services over the system as a whole and
will lead to larger processing backlogs.  If the level of collecting remains high,
there must also be staff to order, receive and process the materials purchased or
they are of little immediate use to patrons.  Without effective and constantly
improving systems, neither the acquisition of collections nor the process of making
them available for use can proceed efficiently.  Even the task of selecting the best
from the vast array of publications available requires adequate staff support.  And
while our branch system is an effective way of providing access to the Library's
resources, it can function only with a substantial commitment of staff resources.
It is particularly unfortunate that reductions in operating budgets should occur
at a time when our library, like others, is faced with the need both to maintain
traditional collections and services and to prepare for the multitude of changes
arising from developments in communications and information technology.  Our
task will be not merely to preserve the Library's present position as one of
Canada's leading research and teaching resources; we must also find the means to
introduce and use the technology on which future collections access and services
will be based.
REVIEW OF 1982/83
Collections:
The 1982/83 statistics from the Association of Research Libraries show that
the U.B.C. Library collection now ranks thirty-fourth among the 104 member
libraries (thirtieth in 1981/82) and third among Canadian university libraries
(second in 1981/82).  The apparent drop in standing is due entirely to the fact that
the holdings of campus reading rooms are no longer reported as part of the Library
collection.  Since U.B.C. ranked fifteenth (twenty-first in 1981/82) in the number
of volumes added during the year, it is obvious that the Library has not fallen
behind in its development of the collection.  Only one other change is worth noting. U.B.C.'s microform collection, still the largest among Canadian university
libraries, was ranked twelfth in size among A.R.L. libraries in 1982/83 (fifth in
1981/82).  A number of major libraries in the United States reported remarkable
growth in microform holdings in 1982/83.  While no reliable explanation is
available, the dramatic change may result from more complete reporting, made
possible through cooperative efforts to provide detailed cataloguing of large
microform sets, and increased deposit of U.S. government documents in microfiche
format.  U.B.C.'s collection continues to grow, though the increase last year was
partly offset by replacement of the microprint edition of the British Sessional
Papers of the 19th Century.
During another period of retrenchment, in 1981, the Senate Library
Committee proposed that serials expenditures be limited to 60-65% of the total
collections budget for 1981/82, and that the target be reduced to 60% by 1984/85.
Additional funding obtained later that year, largely through a special allocation
made available with the assistance of the Universities Council, resolved that
question by bringing the percentage spent on serials down to 54-55%.
Subsequently, the funds were included as a continuing collections grant, allowing
1982/83 serials costs to be held at roughly the same level as in 1981/82. Other
contributing factors were the elimination of many duplicate subscriptions, and the
very favourable European exchange rates.  In future, the Library will try to keep
serial costs within the 55-60% range.
The statistics reported annually on collections growth (Appendices A and B)
reflect the number of items for which processing has been completed and do not
correspond precisely to the number of items actually purchased during the course
of the year.  Since cataloguing backlogs are always present, the rate of growth may
appear relatively constant when in fact the number of books purchased fluctuates
considerably from year to year.  It may be of interest to note that in 1982/83,
44,960 monograph titles were acquired through our central Acquisitions Division.
(Monographs for Law, Woodward, and the hospital libraries, ordered separately, are
not included in that figure.)  For purposes of comparison, last year's total is
somewhat higher than the corresponding figures for the early to mid-1970's
(1973/74: 41,955 items) but considerably lower than figures for the late 1970's
(1978/79: 56,031 1979/80: 53,531).  While there are many factors which influence the number of books purchased in a given year, the figures suggest that we cannot
be complacent about the number of non-serial items currently being added to the
collection.
Another aspect of the collection which is not adequately revealed in the
statistics is the very significant growth in the collections of non-book materials
which help to support research in the humanities and related areas.
We have been able to complete the purchase on microfilm of the Goldsmith's-
Kress Library of Economic Literature: Resources in the Economic, Social, Business,
and Political History on Modern Industrial Society, Segments I & II. This extensive
collection of 50,000 to 60,000 titles includes the books published before 1850 which
are held in these two very important libraries.
The Library has taken out a subscription to another important microfilm
collection, The Eighteenth Century, which will include all significant English
language books published in the 18th century.  The collection will be purchased
slowly over a very long period of time, unless future donations or collections
budget increases allow us to speed up the rate of acquisition.
The annual output of the Canadian Institute for Historical Microreproduction,
a federally-funded project to film all pre-1900 Canadiana, is also being acquired.
The acquisition of this material will greatly increase our holdings of early Canadian
publications and provide insurance against the rapid deterioration of those original
copies that we do have in our collection.
Long term efforts to improve our files of newspapers on microfilm have
continued as well.  While Canadian titles have received closest attention, we have
recently tried to add some key European titles.  Important additions include the
Ottawa Citizen (complete to date), Montreal Gazette (complete to 1932), Winnipeg
Free Press Report on Farming (complete), Frankfurter Zeitung (complete), Journal
des Debats (complete) and Neue Zuercher Zeitung (1780-1872).  During the summer
of 1983, the Library succeeded in obtaining a grant of $50,000 from the Social
Sciences and Humanities Research Council to purchase some additional lengthy
European files. With the support of several external funding agencies we have, in recent years,
been able to build up a significant collection of material on Japanese business
history.  The collection, which we believe is unique in Canada, supports a new area
of interest in the History Department.
Without the external funding provided by SSHRC and other agencies such as
the Vancouver Foundation, the purchase of large, expensive sets of research
material would be extremely difficult.  The contribution that such funding makes
to the continued development of our collection as a resource for research is
gratefully acknowledged.
Services:
Traditional measures of library use are the number of items circulated to
borrowers and the number of reference questions answered. The appendices
provide a breakdown of loans transacted, interlibrary loans in and out, reference
questions by type, and, recently, computer-assisted searches.
In the year under review circulation transactions in the aggregate increased
from 2,181,794 to 2,255,623, up by 3.4 percent over 1981/82.  Most departments of
the Main Library reported increases, and altogether the Main Library's circulation
went up by 8.7 percent.
Until this year, items circulated from reading rooms were counted with those
from branch libraries.  Now that reading rooms are no longer part of the library
system, their data are not reported.  On the other hand, figures appear here for the
first time for the two hospital libraries newly part of the system, Hamber Library
at the Shaughnessy complex and St. Paul's Library.  Most branches reported
increases over the previous year.  The subtotal for branch libraries shows a slight
decline from 1,104,018 loans in 1981/82 to 1,095,835 in 1982/83.  Adjusted to
exclude the reading rooms and the two hospital libraries from both years, branch
circulation would show an increase of 4.4. percent from 1,035,366 to 1,080, 602.
A category reported here for the first time, under the caption "Interbranch
Loans", indicates 24,052 interbranch transactions among the units of the Health
Science Library Network.  The network was established to share the resources of the U.B.C. health science libraries, which are linked by computer terminals and
delivery services.  A network office based in the Woodward Library draws heavily
on the Woodward collections and to a lesser extent on the branches to provide rapid
delivery of hard copy requested at any of the member units.  The headquarters
office also provides a back-up reference service to the branches.
Interlibrary loan activity between the U.B.C. Library system and other
libraries has fallen off considerably over the last four or five years. The number of
loans from U.B.C. reached a peak in 1978/79 at 24,198 transactions, and the figures
have declined every year since then: 1979/80 - 24,042; 1980/81 - 21,245; 1981/82 -
21,097; 1982/83 - 18,600.  The drop in 1982/83 would be greater if we excluded the
1,343 loans made by the Film Library, a recent addition to the Library system.
The decline in the number of outgoing items can be attributed in large part to
a reduction in requests from the post-secondary colleges of British Columbia. The
extent to which this reflects reductions in programs and library budgets is not
clear.  As U.B.C. is the major lender in the province, the decline in loans is
prominent in this Library's statistics.
Interlibrary borrowing on behalf of U.B.C. users was at its highest level in
1979/80 at 8,175 transactions. The figure dropped to 7,168 in 1980/81 and to 6,117
in 1981/82.   1982/83 saw an increase to 7,855, including 762 films.  The reasons for
the rise and fall in demand by U.B.C.'s users are not apparent, but since the rate of
success in obtaining loans from other libraries remains fairly constant, the reasons
would seem to lie outside the Library.
Reference and information activity for the Library as a whole grew by more
than five percent over the previous year, from 322,560 to 339,317 questions of all
types.  The divisions of the Main Library experienced an increase of seven percent,
while the branches as a group had an increase of 3.3 percent. Questions are
categorized as directional, reference or research, depending on their nature and
the time required to answer them. For the entire system, there were increases of
6.5 percent in "reference" questions and 17.2 percent in "research" questions.  The
demand for assistance in finding information remains very high and calls for a
knowledgeable and experienced staff of reference librarians to cover the full range
of subjects taught and researched at U.B.C. 10
Computer-assisted bibliographic searching of remote data bases is an area
which continues to develop and expand.  The total number of searches recorded in
the Library system in 1982/83 was 6,633, up by 69.4 percent over the previous year.
Most of the increase can be attributed to the growing internal use of on-line
searching principally for verification and location of interlibrary loans.  Growth in
this category was a remarkable 91.9 percent.  As on-line searching becomes a more
routine aspect of reference service, continued increases can be expected.  Another
factor in the increase was the inclusion of figures from Hamber and St. Paul's
libraries.  Users of health science libraries are among the most active consumers of
computer-assisted bibliographic searching.  The Woodward Library and the three
hospital libraries account for more than half of the total for the system.
Arts/Sedgewick Computer Terminal Room
In the summer of 1983 a computer terminal room was installed on the lower
floor of the Sedgewick Library.  Some fifteen terminals, provided by the Faculty of
Arts, were thus made available for student use and for classroom exercises.  The
terminals were installed and are maintained by the University Computing Centre.
The facility is usually heavily used.  In the future, the number of terminals can be
increased to about thirty, and a printer can be added in an adjoining room.
Asian Studies Library
During the summer of 1982 the Indic-language books from the Main Library
were transferred to the Asian Studies Library.  This fulfilled one of the objectives
in the development of the Asian Centre, bringing virtually all of the Asian-
language library materials of the University under one roof.  It also served as a
reminder that the shelves of the Asian Studies Library would be full by 1984, as
expected.
Access to Periodicals Study
Access to issues of periodicals has been a long-standing concern of librarians
and library users.  The issue of whether periodicals should circulate has active
champions on both sides.  For some, anything less than freedom to take periodicals 11
to their offices, laboratories, or homes is useless.  Others believe that the value of
the collection is reduced if they are unable to find the issues they need in the
library at all times.  As funds for duplicate subscriptions have been greatly reduced
by rising costs, the question of ensuring access to periodicals appears still more
urgent. To look into the question of ways to improve access to periodicals and
particularly the question of circulation, a committee was established in January,
1983.  The committee planned a survey of availability of periodicals to take place
in November with a final report to be submitted in the spring of 1984.
Loan Regulations and Procedures
In November, 1982, with no dissenting vote, Senate approved a change in the
loan regulations enabling the Library to suspend the borrowing privileges of faculty
members who had not settled outstanding accounts for library fines. The change in
policy was made necessary because a few individuals, fined for returning requested
material late, were not being penalized.  All borrowers must now conform to the
same regulations or else forego borrowing from the Library.
A new system of notifying borrowers about overdue materials was inaugurated
in October, 1982.  It is a pleasure to report that the system is more effective,
easier on both the borrower and the library staff, and less costly than the one it
replaced.  When a person borrows a book, a message can be produced immediately
at the check-out point, listing any books that may be overdue. The printed
message can be retained by the borrower as a reminder.  Once the message has
been delivered, it is dropped from the file. If the message is not picked up within a
month of the due date, a reminder notice is generated automatically and mailed to
the borrower.  The new procedure has substantially reduced the number of notices
mailed to borrowers.
Another change was the simplification of the end-of-term recall process.
Prior to the change, some borrowers waited to be billed for replacement charges
before returning or renewing books after the end of term.  As charges were
cancelled when the material was returned there was no penalty, despite the 12
considerable amount of non-productive work created for library staff.  Now a flat
rate is collected for each invoice processed even though the materials are
subsequently returned.  This change should make it possible for the staff to spend
their working time on more useful work.  It is also expected to improve the
availability of materials for other users and to reduce the number of books that are
lost permanently from the collection.
The Library and Reading Rooms
Anticipating concern about the withdrawal of Library support for reading
rooms, the Library provided those responsible for their operation with a specially
prepared manual entitled Guide to Procedures for Maintaining Reading Rooms.
Intended as a basic description of procedures and useful information, the manual
outlines services available through the U.B.C. Bookstore and the Purchasing
Department as well as those still to be provided by the various Library divisions.
The Library also conducted a survey of reading rooms to determine which  were
intended to continue (all but one) and what were the perceptions about services
needed from the Library (mainly help with cataloguing).  The report of the survey
is being studied to determine what changes might be possible.  These will obviously
have to be considered in the light of further reductions in resources and demands
for other services.
Technical Processing:
The quantity of items ordered, received, and catalogued did not change
substantially in 1982/83.  Some trends affecting the work of the technical
processing divisions are worth noting:
For various reasons, many major suppliers of monographs have reduced their
inventories of titles held in stock.  This is particularly true in the United States,
where financing costs and changes in tax regulations have increased the cost of
maintaining large inventories.  As a result, orders must be placed quickly if titles
are to be obtained from current stock, and long delays are more frequently
encountered, even for fairly recent titles.  Additionally, the tendency for
associations and societies to require prepayment is increasing, further complicating
the ordering process. 13
Cataloguing processes were also affected by the revised reading room policy.
Reading room titles are no longer added to the library catalogue. Instead,
catalogue copy is provided to the reading room when it is available.  The survey of
reading room operations, completed during the summer, indicated that the  full
cataloguing service hitherto provided was badly missed.
More than 69,000 new titles were catalogued in 1982/83.  The high output can
be attributed in part to improved methods of automatic searching for catalogue
information using acquisitions data such as Standard Book Numbers.  Backlogs of
materials awaiting cataloguing fluctuated from 46,000 to 56,000 items, with a
slightly rising trend. This material is, however, listed by author and title and is
available on-demand for patrons through a rush cataloguing procedure which
continues to work well.  The need to reduce backlogs must always be balanced
against the economies of waiting an appropriate length of time for catalogue copy
to be distributed by national libraries. To eliminate the backlog entirely would
require increased staff for original cataloguing.
The operation of the Catalogue Products Division continued as usual last year,
An area of growing concern is the maintenance of the computer-based catalogue.
There have not been funds to use the authority support facility available with the
present system.  Since sufficient staff time to carry out this work manually is no
longer available, there is an increasing inconsistency within the catalogue data
base which is reflected in the microcatalogue.  Full implementation of the
B.C.L.N. system would have provided the means to reduce this problem. The
Library must now explore other solutions if the quality of the catalogue is to be
maintained.
Library Systems Development:
The Phase One implementation project for the British Columbia Library
Network (B.C.L.N.) required a heavy commitment of time from the U.B.C Library
systems staff during the year.  This project marked the end of several years of
study and investigation into the feasibility of a local library computer system that 14
could be made available to all libraries in the Province.  Five libraries participated
in Phase One, using software based on the catalogue system developed for the
Washington Library Network, installed on a University of Victoria IBM 4341
computer by Biblio-Techniques, Inc., of Olympia, Washington.
The evaluation of the system features, including benchmark and cost data,
demonstrated the system to be competitive with present services and attractive
for the improvements it offered. For continued operation, however, the system
required assurance of a minimal level of usage and a long term financial
commitment.  Since the prospect of budget reductions made it impossible to obtain
the necessary commitments from participating libraries, the B.C.L.N. project has
been discontinued.
B.C.L.N. would have provided a support system to meet future as well as
current needs.  In particular, it would have permitted the implementation of an online public catalogue.  U.B.C.'s substantial investment in time and money in this
project since its inception many years ago was made in support of a cooperative
approach to obtaining improved library services and resource sharing.  These goals
remain valid but must now be considered at each institution in the context of
reduced funding.
While completion of the B.C.L.N. project affected the time available on the
part of Systems staff for other work, some progress was made in moving towards
the implementation of on-line systems and the extension of batch systems.  As
noted elsewhere, an electronic message system for library overdues and recalls was
introduced.  The present circulation system was also extended to include the
hospital libraries in the Health Science Library Network.  Improvements to the
serial system included the implementation of on-line checking in of journal issues
and new support for the binding of serials.
The use of on-line systems offers great advantages to the Library, but still
suffers from one serious limitation: slow response time.  While this represents an
inconvenience to all users of the on-line systems, the cumulative effect on staff
time in processing thousands of transactions daily is substantial enough to make
additional on-line applications impractical.  In spite of efforts by the Library and 15
the Computing Centre to improve response time for library applications, the
problem persists.  There are more users during peak times than the resources can
support with reasonable performance.  One solution would be to have a larger,
faster central computer; another would be to have an additional computer
primarily for library applications.  In the meantime, slow response time has
required examination of existing on-line library usage of the computer and
curtailment of further implementation of on-line systems.
During the year, a review of systems projects was completed and a priority list
for future systems work was developed, based on consultation with all parts of the
Library system.  A key requirement in the coming year will be  providing systems
that improve operational efficiency.
Personnel:
Changes and Appointments
A number of librarians undertook new assignments during this year. The
expansion of services to the teaching hospitals required a reallocation of
administrative responsibility for Library public services.  Bill Watson was named
Assistant University Librarian for Public Services (Central Libraries), with
responsibility for the Main and Sedgewick libraries, and Heather Keate was
appointed Assistant University Librarian for Public Services (Branch Libraries).
Elsie de Bruijn moved to the Woodward Biomedical Library as Associate Head, and
was replaced as Head of the Marjorie Smith (Social Work) Library by Judith Frye.
Nick Omelusik, previously Head of the Reading Rooms Division, become Head of
the Catalogue Products Division.  During the absence of Ann Yandle on study
leave, Joan Selby served as Acting Head of Special Collections.  Laurenda Daniells,
University Archivist, assumed responsibility for the Data Library while the Head,
Laine Ruus, was on leave.  Margaret Price transferred to a reference position in
the Woodward Library, having previously worked in the Retrospective Conversion
Unit in the Catalogue Records Division. Joe Jones also left Catalogue Records to
become a reference librarian in the Humanities Division. 16
New appointments in 1982/83 included Lore Brongers, who returned to the
MacMillan Library as a half-time reference librarian; Janice Kreider as Science
Bibliographer; Jo-Anne Naslund as reference librarian in the Curriculum
Laboratory; and Brenda Peterson as a catalogue librarian in the Catalogue Records
Division.
Retirements
Stephen Johnson retired at the end of June, 1983, having worked in various
Library departments for twenty-six years.  After working in Acquisitions,
Cataloguing and Serials divisions, he became Head of Serials in 1965 and was in
charge of that division throughout the period of very rapid growth in the serials
collections.  In 1972, he became Research Bibliographer, a position he held until his
retirement.
Maria Horvath, employed in the Library for twenty-two years, almost entirely
in the Humanities Division, retired at the end of the reporting year.  She was
responsible for the subject areas of east European languages and literatures,
German language, literature and history, Italian language, medieval history and
Christian sects.  She compiled an extensive and important bibliography of the
Doukhobors and is now working on a comparable bibliography of the Hutterites.
Helen Goetz joined the Library staff in 1965 and retired at the end of March,
1983.  For most of that time she was in charge of the mendery and, except for
brief periods when she had an assistant, she was single-handedly responsible for all
of the bookmending carried out within the Library.
Ardelle Henderson retired at the end of December, 1982. She had joined the
Library in 1971, working for several years as a keyboard operator. She became a
member of the Humanities Division in 1979. 17
Senate Library Committee:
The Senate Library Committee met twice during the year, in the fall and in
the spring.  In addition, a special tour of the Library was arranged for members of
the Committee, focusing on the extent of technological change in the provision of
services and in the processing of library collections.  The Committee gave its
approval to the issuing of "gold card" privileges to members of the Wesbrook
Society, to several minor adjustments in loan policies and procedures, and to the
allocation of collections budgets for 1983/84.  At its April meeting, the Committee
initiated steps to revive consideration of the 1981 Library Development Proposal,
on which a definite response had still not been received.  The Committee also
reviewed the situation of reading rooms following the change in Senate policy and
elimination of the Library's Reading Rooms Division. Appendix A
SIZE OF COLLECTION- PHYSICAL VOLUMES
Main Library
March 31/8t      Additions
Deletions        March 31/83
Asian Studies Library
Biomedical Branch Library
(V.G.H.)
Catalogue Records Division
Crane Library
Curriculum Laboratory
Data Library
Fine Arts Division
Government Publications
Division
Hamber Library (C/G/S.H.)B
Humanities & Social
Sciences Reference
Law Library
MacMillan Library
Main Stacks
Map Division
Marjorie Smith Library
Mathematics Library
Music Library
St. Paul's Library (S.P.H.)B
Science Reference
Sedgewick Library
Special Collections Division
Storage Collections
Woodward Library
TOTAL
129,775
34,312 A
164,087
25,030
1,384
1
26,413
5,080
165
3
5,242
7,363
202
62
7,503
69,482
6,986
688
75,7Z0
249
32
5
276
89,824
4,960
94,784
1,848
278
6,794
26
2,100
6,794
49,447
1,919
93
51,273
123,381
2,909
75
126,215
39,725
2,414
82 c
42,057
887,458
34,279
26
,512 A
895,225
7,058
341
10
7,389
14,975
779
33
15,721
23,728
1,079
14
24,793
36,067
2,591
4,113
62
38,596
4,113
15,968
514
26
16,456
176,112
6,062
4
,909
177,265
55,404
1,256
9
56,651
153,384
56 C
153,440
259,198
10,884
!*1
270 037
2,170,556
124,309
32,
,655
2,262,210
Notes:     A. Includes 25,497 volumes in Indie languages transferred from the Main Stacks
to the Asian Studies Library.
B. The Library assumed responsibility for the Hamber Library at the Children's/
Grace/Shaughnessy Hospitals and for the St. Paul's Hospital Library.
C. Includes 56 volumes transferred from MacMillan Library to Storage. Appendix B
GROWTH OF COLLECTIONS
March 31, 1982
Net Growth
March 31, 1983
Volumes - Catalogued
2,170,556
91,654
2,262,210
Documents - Uncatalogued
605,059
26,913
631,972
Microfilm (reels)
68,849
7,174
76,023
Microcards (cards)
111,680
111,680
Microprint (sheets)
1,112,750
-117,250*
995,500
Microfiche (sheets)
1,346,002
158,517
1,504,519
Aperture Cards
2,589
2,589
Films
86
1,375
1,461
Filmloops
15
15
Filmstrips
3,453
248
3,701
Video Tapes
483
188
671
Slides
16,101
710
16,811
Slide/Tape Shows
2
2
Transparencies
1,710
100
1,810
Photographs
22,709
600
23,309
Pictures
69,798
593
70,391
Posters
2,978
2,978
Maps
132,756
20,552
153,308
Manuscripts"1"
1434.4    m
174.4    m
1608.8    m
Sound Recordings
123,979
14,190
138,169
Computer Tapes
428
17
445
Air Photos
72
72
The decrease is due to the replacement of the British Sessional Papers of the 19th
Century with a microfiche version.
Thickness of files in meters. Appendix C
LIBRARY EXPENDITURES
Fiscal Years, April /March
Salaries &
Year
Wages
Collections
Binding
Other
Totals
1973/74
3,522,626
(65.11)
1,348,775
(24.93)
165,081       1
[3.05)
373,302
(6.90)
5,409,784
1974/75
4,263,647
(67.44)
1,502,317
(23.76)
127,480
[2.01)
428,391
(6.77)
6,321,835
1975/76
5,344,412
(69.78)
1,741,021
(22.73)
144,266      1
[1.88)
428,696
(5.59)
7,658,395
1976/77
5,755,893
(66.79)
1,954,121
(22.67)
154,043      1
[1.78)
752,810
(8.73)
8,616,867
1977/78
6,303,582
(66.54)
2,473,368
(26.11)
177,253
[1.87)
518,360
(5.47)
9,472,563
1978/79
6,515,980
(62.65)
2,722,613
(26.18)
184,223       1
[1.77)
976,638
(9.39)
10,399,454
1979/80
7,227,991
(65.16)
2,872,972
(25.90)
195,527      1
[1.76)
795,386
(7.17)
11,091,876
1980/81
8,074,711
(62.62)
3,311,221
(25.68)
234,778
[1.82)
1,272,232
(9.85)
12,892,942
1981/82
8,901,978
(64.11)
3,781,209
(27.23)
174,402
[1.26)
1,027,039
(7.40)
13,884,628
* 1982/83
9,464,458
(63.75)
3,894,288
(26.23)
171,609      <
[1.16)
1,315,521
(8.86)
14,845,876
+1982/83
9,812,519
(63.17)
4,149,070
(26.71)
171,609      1
11.10)
1,400,549
(9.02)
15,533,747
*Figures on this line include a total of $188,375 in non-recurring expenditures on hospital libraries.
They are comparable with reported figures for previous years.
+These totals include for the first time all grant-funded operating expenditures in the hospital libraries.
Percentages of annual expenditures are shown in parentheses. Appendix D
RECORDED USE OF LIBRARY RESOURCES
Years ending June 30
GENERAL CIRCULATION
Main Library
General Stacks
Reserves
Extension
Fine Arts
Government Publications
Maps
Special Collections
SUBTOTAL
Branch Libraries
Asian Studies
Crane
Curriculum Laboratory
Ecology
Film Library
Hamber
Law
MacMillan
Marjorie Smith
Mathematics
Medical Branch
Music
Reading Rooms
St. Paul's
Sedgewick
Woodward
SUBTOTAL
Use of Recordings
Wilson
Music
SUBTOTAL
Document Delivery
Health Sciences Network
INTERLIBRARY LOANS
To Other Libraries
From Other Libraries
TOTAL INTERLIBRARY LOANS
GRAND TOTAL (General Circulation
& Interlibrary Loans)
1980/81
1981/82
425,038
412,969
24,076
31,398
6,400
6,174
105,765
102,833
124,477
103,798
10,648
9,719
17,088
18,317
713,492
685,208
19,539
20,998
38,615
38,492
177,453
174,292
8,600
10,442
123,732
117,722
45,302
46,608
18,135
19,553
19,026
19,657
36,633
39,170
45,814
47,437
72,333
68,652
305,933
303,385
184,590
197,610
1,095,765
1,104,018
331,284
313,648
51,686
51,706
382,970
365,354
21,245
7,168
28,413
2,220,640
21,097
6,117
27,214
2,181,794
% Increase
Decrease vs,
1982/83
1981/82
457,543
+
10.8
29,777
-
5.2
7,560
+
22.5
108,701
+
5.7
109,806
+
5.8
9,209
-
5.3
22,118
+
20.8
744,714
+
8.68
22,670
+
8.0
45,052
+
17.0
170,112
-
2.4
1,370
13,863
119,684
+
1.7
58,418
+
25.3
20,510
+
4.9
20,001
+
1.8
31,928
-
18.5
51,470
+
8.5
11,752
318,762
+
5.0
210,243
+
6.4
1,095,835
—
0.74
311,618
0.7
52,958
+
2.4
364,576
0.2
24,052
18,600
7,855
26,455
2,255,632
11.8
28.4
2.8
3.3 Appendix E
INTERLIBRARY LOANS
Years ending June 30
To Other Libraries
- Original Materials
General
Federated Information Network
BC Medical Library Service
BC Post-Secondary Library Network
Bamfield Marine Station
SUBTOTAL
- Films
- Photocopies
General
Federated Information Network
BC Medical Library Service
BC Post-Secondary Library Network
Bamfield Marine Station
SUBTOTAL
TOTAL INTERLIBRARY LENDING
1980/81
1981/82
1,707
1982/83
1,722
% Increase/
Decrease vs
1981/82
1,962
+  0.9
1,269
1,298
1,222
-  5.8
4,118
5,000
3,465
- 30.7
2,676
2,260
2,303
+   1.9
9
15
27
+ 80.0
10,034   10,280
8,739
1,343
15.0
1,908
2,079
1,975
-  5.0
679
742
1,040
92
5,344
+ 40.2
8,535
7,867
- 32.1
89
129
10,817
21,097
67
- 48.1
11,211
8,518
- 21.3
21,245
18,600
- 11.8
From Other Libraries
-   Original Materials
General
2,256
1,988
2,273
+ 14.3
BC Medical Library Service
793
3,049
556
2,544
553
-  0.5
SUBTOTAL
2,826
+ 11.1
-   Films
	
	
762
——
-   Photocopies
4,119
7,168
3,573
6,117
4,267
+ 19.4
TOTAL INTERLIBRARY BORROWING
7,855
+ 28.4 Appendix F
HEALTH SCIENCES LIBRARY NETWORK
July 1982 - June 1983
Interbranch Loans
To Other Branches
Original
Material
Photocopies
Total
Woodward
3,669
15,675
19,344
Medical Branch
832
2,169
3,001
Hamber
115
132
247
St. Paul's
57
64
121
Other U.B.C. Libraries
757
582
1,339
SUBTOTAL
5,430
18,622
24,052
From Other Branches
Woodward
457
1,126
1,583
Medical Branch
1,718
4,612
6,330
Hamber
1,661
7,111
8,772
St. Paul's
989
3,939
4,928
Other U.B.C. Libraries
605
1,834
2,439
SUBTOTAL
5,430
18,622
24,052 REFERENCE
Appendix G
& INFORMATION QUESTIONS ANSWERED
July 1982
- June 1983
Directional
Questions
Reference
Questions
Research
Questions
TOTAL
% Increase/
Decrease vs
1981/82
Main Library
Fine Arts
17,850
19,823
1,880
39,553
Government Publications
861
23,955
1,036
25,852
Humanities
1,652
9,198
793
11,643
Information Desk
10,179
49,020
59,199
Map Collection
357
3,597
81
4,035
Science Division
404
6,972
832
8,208
Social Sciences
543
15,429
975
16,947
Special Collections
4,501
5,035
1,096
10,632
SUBTOTAL
(1981/82)
36,347
(34,524  )
133,029
(123,395
6,693
(6,660  )
176,069
(164,579
+ 7.0%
)
Branch Libraries
Asian Studies
1,993
3,438
3,044
8,475
Crane
1,832
1,441
426
3,699
Curriculum Laboratory
10,789
14,435
188
25,412
Hamber Library
3,294
2,920
730
6,944
Health Sciences Network
	
	
193
193
Law Library
2,480
4,130
1,383
7,993
MacMillan Library
1,672
6,994
306
8,972
Marjorie Smith
1,965
2,607
355
4,927
Mathematics Library
1,322
1,184
379
2,885
Medical Branch (V.G.H.)
2,276
7,721
606
10,603
Music Library
2,272
9,992
505
12,769
St. Paul's
3,019
5,721
1,170
9,910
Sedgewick Library
7,935
15,192
109
23,236
Woodward Library
7,727
25,430
4,073
37,230
SUBTOTAL
(1981/82)
48,576
(50,962  )
101,205
(96,478  )
13,467
(10,541   )
163,248
(157,981
+ 3.3%
)
GRAND TOTAL
(1981/82)
84,923
(85,486  )
234,234
(219,873  )
20,160
(17,201
339,317
(322,560
+ 5.2%
) Appendix H
COMPUTER-ASSISTED BIBLIOGRAPHIC SEARCHES
July 1982 -
June 1983
Division
1
No. of
Searches
2
Student
Searches
3
UBC
Searches
4
Non-UBC
Searches
5
Reference <5c
Verification
6
Data Bases
Searched
7
SDI
Reports
Biomedical Branch
379
—
230
1
148
700
15
Hamber
489
—
197
—
292
847
144
Humanities
7
—
2
—
5
8
2
Law
52
8
18
11
15
424
—
MacMillan
202
26
16
6
154
244
—
St. Paul's
376
—
162
—
214
694
16
Science
2,704
25
135
36
2,508
2,837
—
Social Sciences
244
91
85
16
52
287
—
Woodward Library
2,180
42
599
27
1,512
3,678
876
TOTALS
6,633
192
1,444
97
4,900
9,720
1,053
(1981/82)
(3,916)
(245)
(1,018)
(100)
(2,553)
(6,489)
(900)
1. Number of searches: a total of the figures in columns 2 to 5.
2. Student specials: limited searches provided to UBC students at a flat fee.  MEDLINE searches,
normally inexpensive, are excluded from the special rate.
3. UBC searches: for UBC members, excluding student specials.
4. Non-UBC searches: full costs, including staff time, are charged for searches on behalf of persons not
associated with the University. These searches tend to be complex and often involve the use of
several data files.
5. Library staff searches are usually for the purpose of verifying the existence and location of
documents and ordering them on-line as interlibrary loans.
6. A single reference search may involve the use of more than one data base. Staff time for a
reference search may vary depending on the number and combination of data bases used.
7. SDI reports: the number of monthly updates distributed to clients. Current awareness (SDI)
profiles are included in columns 1 to 5 only when they are initially established or
subsequently revised. Appendix I
LIBRARY ORGANIZATION
1982/83
ADMINISTRATION
Mclnnes, Douglas N.
de Bruijn, Erik
Jeffreys, Anthony
MacDonald, Robin
Watson, William J.
Keate, Heather
University Librarian
Assistant Univ. Librarian for Administrative Services
Assistant Univ. Librarian for Collections
Assistant Univ. Librarian for Technical Processes
and Systems
Assistant Univ. Librarian for Physical Planning and
Development (to Sept 14,
1982)
Assistant Univ. Librarian for Public Services-Central
Libraries (from Sept 15,
1982)
Interim Planning Coordinator, Health Sciences
Library Services (to Nov 30, 1982)
Assistant Univ. Librarian for Public Services -
Branch Libraries  (from Dec, 1982)
ACQUISITIONS
Davidson, Joyce
Head
ASIAN STUDIES
Ng, Tung King
Head
BIBLIOGRAPHY
Elliston, Graham
Forbes, Jennifer
Hallonquist, P. Lynne
Johnson, Stephen
Kreider, Janice
Mcintosh, Jack
Shields, Dorothy
Bibliographer - Serials
Bibliographer - English Language
Bibliographer - Life Sciences
Research Bibliographer (to June 30, 1983)
Bibliographer - Science (from Oct 18, 1982)
Bibliographer - Slavonic Studies
Bibliographer - European Languages Appendix I
(continued)
BIOMEDICAL BRANCH LIBRARY (V.G.H.)
Freeman, George Head
CATALOGUE RECORDS
Turner, Ann
Bailey, Freda
Head
Deputy Head <5c Bibliographic Control Librarian
CATALOGUE PRODUCTS
Omelusik, Nick
Head
CIRCULATION
Butterfield, Rita
Head
CRANE LIBRARY
Thiele, Paul
Head
CURRICULUM LABORATORY
Hurt, Howard
Head
DATA LIBRARY
Ruus, Laine
Laurenda Daniells
Head (Leave of Absence (April 1, 1982 - March 31,
1983)
Acting Head (June 1, 1982 - March 31, 1983)
FINE ARTS
Dwyer, Melva
Head
GIFTS & EXCHANGE
Elliston, Graham
Head
GOVERNMENT PUBLICATIONS <5c MICROFORMS
Dodson, Suzanne
Head
HAMBER LIBRARY (Children's/Grace/Shaughnessy Hospitals)
Nelson, Ann Head Appendix I
(continued)
HEALTH SCIENCES LIBRARY NETWORK SERVICES
Price, Jane
Co-ordinator
HUMANITIES
Forbes, Charles
Head
INFORMATION & ORIENTATION
Sandilands, Joan
Head
INTERLIBRARY LOAN
Frieseh, Margaret
Head
LAW LIBRARY
Shorthouse, Tom
Head
MACMILLAN LIBRARY
Macaree, Mary
Head
MAP DIVISION
Wilson, Maureen
Head
MARJORIE SMITH LIBRARY
de Bruijn, Elsie
Frye, Judith
Head (to Jan 31, 1983)
Head (from March 1, 1983)
MUSIC LIBRARY
Burndorfer, Hans
Head
ST. PAUL'S HOSPITAL LIBRARY
Saint, Barbara
Head
SCIENCE DIVISION & MATHEMATICS LIBRARY
Brongers, Rein
Head Appendix I
(continued)
SEDGEWICK LIBRARY
Erickson, Ture
Head
SERIALS DIVISION
Baldwin, Nadine
Head
SOCIAL SCIENCES DIVISION
Carrier, Lois
Head
SPECIAL COLLECTIONS DIVISION
Yandle, Anne
Selby, Joan
Head (Study Leave July 1, 1982 - June 30, 1983)
Curator, Colbeck Collection
Acting Head (July 1, 1982 - June 30, 1983)
SYSTEMS DEVELOPMENT
Dennis, Donald
Dobbin, Geraldine
Systems Analyst
Systems & Information Science Librarian
WILSON RECORDINGS/COLLECTION
Kaye, Douglas
Head
WOODWARD LIBRARY
Leith, Anna
de Bruijn, Elsie
Head
Associate Head (from Feb 1, 1983) Appendix J
SENATE LIBRARY COMMITTEE
1982/83
Mrs. M.F. Bishop
Dr. K.O.L. Burridge
Dr. D.J. Campbell
Mr. R.D. Diebolt
Mr. K.D. Freeman
Mrs. P. Jones
Dean P.A. Larkin (Chairman)
Mrs. A. Piternick
Miss R. Robinson
Dr. G.G.E. Scudder
Mr. G.M. Shepard
Dr. J.G. Silver
Dr. CE. Slonecker
Dr. J. Wisenthal
EX-OFFICIO
Chancellor J.V. Clyne
President D. Kenny
Mr. K.G. Young
Mr. D. Mclnnes
Terms of Reference
(a) To advise and assist the Librarian in:
(i) formulating a policy for the development of resources for
instruction and research;
(ii) advising on the allocation of book funds to the fields of
instruction and research;
(iii) developing a general program of library service for all the
interests of the University; and
(iv) keeping himself informed about the library needs of instructional
and research staffs, and keeping the academic community informed
about the Library.
(b) To report to Senate on matters of policy under discussion by the Committee.

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