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Report of the University Librarian to the Senate Mar 31, 2000

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Array i    I   II K   U  1
84TH   YEAR
REPORT  OF
THE  UNIVERSITY
LIBRARIAN
TO  THE  SENATE
1998/99 CONTENTS
Message from ihe University Librarian I
People 2-5
Learning and Research 6-12
Community and Internationalization 13
Future Directions 14
Appendices 15-23 REPORT OF THE UNIVERSITY LIBRARIAN TO THE SENATE  1998/99
XI
MESSAGE FROM THE
UNIVERSITY LIBRARIAN
The Library's mission is to provide
outstanding access to the universe of
recorded knowledge and information to
UBC students, faculty and staff.
The Library's information resources,
instructional services, and physical facilities
are key to the successful accomplishment of
the goals and initiatives the University has
set out for itself in Trek 2000 and the
Academic Plan. The Library was
represented on the Academic Plan Advisory
Committee, and as the plan began to take
shape it was clear that it would deal with
issues fundamental to the Library, and that
the Library was viewed as an essential
partner in the academic enterprise. If UBC
is to become the best university in Canada,
and one of the finest public universities in
the world, it must have the best possible
resources for learning and research, which
in turn means a first-rate University
Library.
I am grateful for the support for the
Library from the University
Administration, government granting
agencies, and the Library's many friends
and donors. While the additional $500,000
from the University Administration for the
collections budget was appreciated,
unfortunately it did not allow us to do more
than address the price increases of our
current collections. More resources are
needed in order to support current and
emerging programs of learning and research.
I hope that federal government initiatives,
such as the Canada Foundation for
Innovation (CFI), will provide long-term
benefits for academic research libraries
across Canada. Support for the Library's
collections and technology endowments
continues to grow, and the Library's
collections have been enriched by numerous
gifis of rare materials from individual and
corporate donors.
In 1999, the Library embarked on a
strategic planning process to redefine itself in
the context of our changing environment,
including new forms of information, their
use and delivery. This planning process will
involve extensive consultation with our users
and will take place within the context of
Trek 2000 and the University's Academic
Plan. The objective is to ensure that the
Library is well-positioned to meet the
information and knowledge needs of its users
as the University moves into the 21st
century. I look forward to sharing and
discussing this plan with our wide
community of users in the coming year.
Catherine Quinlan
University Librarian XI
REPORT OF THE UNIVERSITY LIBRARIAN TO THE SENATE  1998/99
PEOPLE
The UBC Library recognizes that its
staff— librarians, management &
professional staff, support staff, and
student staff— are its most important
resource in supporting the research and
learning needs of the UBC community.
The Library is committed to attracting
and retaining excellent staff at all levels,
and to providing them with the training
and development they need to fulfil
their responsibilities. It is also
committed to providing for its users the
physical facilities conducive to an
effective learning and study
environment and to maintaining and
upgrading these. Through a series of
faculty and departmental advisory
committees, through periodic surveys,
and through an online feedback system,
the Library listens and responds to the
concerns of its users — the students,
faculty, and staff of UBC.
Library Staff
The knowledge, skills, and service ethic
of the Library's staff continue to be critical
to the Library's success. Staff members are
supported by an active training and
development program as they learn to use
new information technologies, organize and
develop new services, teach students, faculty
and staff, accommodate changing work
responsibilities, and deal with financial
restraint. Although the staff complement
shrank by 1.44% during the reporting
period and a number of positions were
eliminated, the Library was able to post
several vacancies and seek the best
applicants to fill them.
Gisela Mallue, Library Assistant 4,
Science and Engineering Division, was
honored as a 1998 winner of the President's
Service Award for Excellence. The award
fittingly recognizes Gisela's 33 years of
contributions to her Division, the Library,
and the University. Twelve staff members
(Cipriano Ambegia, Woodward Library;
Balbir Aulakh, Cataloguing; Gaylia
Cardona, Woodward Library; Pete Edgar,
Systems; Rowan Hougham, Circulation; Ivy
Lee, Lam Library; Richard Melanson,
Cataloguing; Merry Meredith, Graphics/
Information Services; Caroline Milburn-
Brown, Circulation; Jim Swartz, MacMillan
Library; Jean Tsai, Asian Library; Seta
Yeterian, Humanities & Social Sciences)
were inducted as new members of UBC's
25 Year Club.
Long-service staff members who retired
or took early retirement during the
reporting period (Suzanne Dodson,
Facilities & Preservation; Leah Gordon,
Cataloguing; Matt Hartman, Cataloguing;
Linda Joe, Asian Library; Pat Lysyk,
Hamber Library; Susan Mathew,
Humanities & Social Sciences; Tom
Shorthouse, Law Library; Zorka Srejic,
Cataloguing) were honored at biannual
Library retirement parties. Further details
about staff changes and activities are listed
in Appendix A: Library Staff.
Responding to Users
The Library worked to maintain and
improve dialogue with its user
communities through meetings with
Library Advisory Committees. These
committees represent faculty, graduate
and undergraduate students from all
faculties and schools in the University.
During 1998/99, the committees REPORT OF THE UNIVERSITY LIBRARIAN TO THE SENATE  1998/99
XI
provided useful advice regarding
development of the electronic library and
selection of print journal titles for
cancellation, among other matters. The
Senate Library Committee considered
strategies for addressing the crisis in journal
publishing and the impact of Canadian
copyright law on access to information. The
Arts Faculty Library Advisory Committee
and the Science and Engineering Library
Advisory Committee held a joint meeting to
explore medium and long-term alternatives
to on-site print journal collections. The
committees endorsed the Library's plan to
maintain print collections where digital
alternatives do not exist, and to purchase
digital resources or access to them where
they do exist, particularly in the areas of
science, technology and medicine. The
Faculty of Arts Library Advisory Committee
continued to lobby for additional Library
space for collections and users, and
encouraged faculty to involve librarians in
curriculum development to ensure optimum
use of library collections and improve
students' information literacy.
User activities, needs and satisfaction
were the subject of two surveys conducted
in the Main Library. The Main Library
survey, completed in March 1999, was
designed to study the effect of recent
changes in the building. These changes
included the introduction of a single
entrance, the installation of a computer lab
in the Ridington Room and the closure of
the information desk in the card catalogue
area. The results showed: 87% of the users
of Main Library were students, 4.4% were
faculty and staff and 7.9% were non-UBC
visitors; most of the users were there to
study or use the collection or computer lab;
21% of the visitors wanted assistance during
their visit and 89% of those found the help
they required; only 0.4% of visitors to the
building wanted help using the card
catalogue.
A brief study of activity in the new
Ridington Computer Lab indicated that
most of the people using it in winter session
are undergraduate and unclassified students.
Library research ranked closely with Netinfo
and Web searching as reasons for using the
lab. Private study was one of the three most
important uses, ranking higher than group
study. Almost 50% of the lab users
indicated that they had used the help desk
and 90% of them were satisfied or very
satisfied with the service. The help desk is
staffed with students funded through the
AMS Innovative Projects Fund and AMS
Tutoring Services.
Training and Development for Staff
In its seventh year of programming, the
Library's Staff Training & Development
(ST&D) program supported 297 sessions or
courses for 1,396 participants; 83% of staff
training activities were carried out in-house,
using internal trainers and resources, five
percent were in courses where no fees were
charged and 12% required ST&D funding.
The major focus of this year's ST&D
program was to support training at the
orientation and foundation levels of the
employment cycle, including: an overview
of the Library's organization and services;
introduction to the physical work
environment; basic skills in ergonomic and
safety procedures; foundation skills in
library and Internet literacy; knowledge of
the key principles of employee relations. To
achieve these goals, the Library's
community of trainers expanded its
repertoire with a variety of new programs.
Principles of selection interviewing,
handling grievances and other employee
relations practices were covered in two
sessions, with over 20 supervisory librarians
in attendance each time. Two abbreviated REPORT OF THE UNIVERSITY LIBRARIAN TO THE SENATE  1998/99
UBC     LIBRARY
Easy Excel programs attracted 32
participants.
A revised orientation plan for new staff
was developed and will be tested and
implemented in the coming year. It includes
a printed package of orientation materials, a
checklist of orientation tasks for supervisors
and access to a set of Web-based orientation
documents with links to other information
sources. In addition, the program formalizes
the following events: attendance at the
UBC-wide orientation session, presented by
the Human Resources Department; a
meeting with the University Librarian; a
virtual tour with Information Services staff;
a revived open house event, hosted by
branch libraries.
Technology-related training branched
out to include many cross-unit groups in
various distributed library functions. These
seminars included 14 Netcat sessions for 88
participants, three Information Services
sessions on specialized information resources
for 66 participants and four Information
Services sessions on Web-based information
resources for 83 public service staff. The
latter marked the beginning of a regular
seminar series titled ER: Electronic Resources
on the UBC Library Web. Other cross-unit
training included a customized Collections
Accounting School, an introduction to the
Library's new book fund accounting system,
for 51 staff members.
A workshop incentive grant from the
Canadian Association of College and
University Libraries provided the seed
money to edit and script the video
Ergonomic Case Studies. This video was
paired with a structured seminar script,
designed and delivered by the Ergonomics
Trainers Group.
This year's ST&D program continued
to support the diverse needs of the Library's
staff from basic to specialist levels. The
recruitment and hiring of new staff
members provided the incentive to channel
considerable time and energy into their
orientation. Programs were revised to help
new staff members feel welcome, to provide
additional cross-unit training for staff in
distributed functions and to update core
skills training for all staff.
Health, Safety and Security
During 1998/99, the Library had five
accidents reported to the Workers'
Compensation Board, all of which resulted
from overexertion or tripping. As part of a
concerted effort to enhance its Health and
Safety staff orientation, the Library
developed and delivered three staff training
modules in multiple sessions: Library Health
and Safety Orientation, Ergonomics for All
and Emergency Preparedness. Staff attendance
was required for all modules.
Security in the Main Library continued
to be a major concern in 1998/99. A
security audit of the Main Library was
begun, and a report is due early in 1999/00.
Facilities and Space
The most significant project of 1998/99
was the renovation of room 502 of the Main
Library, now named the Suzanne Cates
Dodson and Earl D. Dodson Reading
Room in honour of two great friends and
generous benefactors to the UBC Library.
Mrs. Dodson had a 36-year career with the
Library, retiring as Facilities and
Preservation Manager in 1999. Together,
the Dodsons generously supported and
made possible a variety of Library projects.
In recognition of the Dodson's great
support for the Library, the room was
restored to recapture its original appearance, REPORT OF THE UNIVERSITY LIBRARIAN TO THE SENATE  1998/99
XI
dating back to the opening of Main Library
in 1925. All beams, sills, and baseboards
were revarnished and the ornamental crests
were regilded. One of the most striking
visual effects was the hand stenciling of the
tile pattern along the top of the wall, which
copies the pattern on the south wall of the
Main concourse. The restoration has
resulted in increased demand for usage of
the room and renewed appreciation for this
heritage building.
A number of other projects were
completed during 1998/99. The public area
in the Science and Engineering Division,
Main Library, was enhanced with the
removal of the turnstiles and counter, which
had become redundant once the single
entrance to the building was completed. In
addition, some new study tables and chairs
were purchased. These small changes have
greatly improved the appearance of the
study area and have resulted in increased
student usage.
The University Librarian relocated from
the seventh floor of Koerner Library to the
old administrative office suite in the Main
Library. The Koerner seventh floor north
office was in turn occupied by the
Collections Accounting and Budget staff
previously located in the Library Processing
Centre. The end result was a consolidation
of the Library's financial services staff on a
single floor of one building.
Electrical upgrades were completed in
rooms 103 and 213 of the Library
Processing Centre. These upgrades were
required in order to accommodate
additional Library servers and networking
infrastructure. Additional shelving was
added to the Library Processing Centre and
Education Library.
Two other small projects were begun,
but not finished in 1998/99: addition of a
staff office in the Education Library and the
long-awaited Asian Library renovation. The
Asian Library project will result in nine staff
members moving from the Library
Processing Centre to the Asian Library.
In addition, the groundwork was
completed for several projects that should be
concluded in the next fiscal year. These
include new security gates for the
Mathematics and Law Libraries, as well as a
major renovation to room 501 of the Main
Library. zz
REPORT OF THE UNIVERSITY LIBRARIAN TO THE SENATE  1998/99
LEARNING AND RESEARCH
The UBC Library is committed to
supporting the learning needs of
undergraduate students and the research
needs of graduate students and faculty.
It does so through the acquisition,
provision, and preservation of
information resources locally, both in
print and electronic form, and through
access to information resources beyond
the campus. It provides individual,
group, and Web-based instruction and
training to enable its users to make the
best possible use of the universe of
information that is available. In
addition, the Library provides the
infrastructure and technology to support
and deliver information resources, it
provides bibliographic access to and
information about them through its
online catalogue and other indexes, and
it manages the physical flow of resources
to and from Library users, whether on
campus or at a distance.
Teaching and Training for Users
Information literacy is implicit in the
learning principles, goals and strategies of
UBC's Trek 2000. "Research-based inquiry
and problem solving" require that students
understand how information is organized,
recognize when it is needed, access it
effectively and think critically about its
intellectual content, accuracy and validity.
These skills have become increasingly
important as the number and complexity of
information resources has grown. The
Library continued to address student needs
for these skills in 1998/99, through the
development and presentation of a variety of
teaching programs.
Information Connections was introduced
to consolidate the teaching endeavours of
each branch and division into a highly
visible program of instruction, and to
provide students with the information
literacy skills they need in their studies at
UBC, in their careers and throughout their
lives. The program, funded in part by the
Teaching and Learning Enhancement Fund
(TLEF), provided workshops on
information resources and technologies
open to all students, as well as classes within
regular courses. Classes were available in all
subject areas and were offered by librarians
throughout the Library system. In addition,
two new teaching programs were developed
with funding provided by TLEF: Electronic
Full Text. What Exists, How to Find It and How to
Use It and Online Education: Information Sources
and Services fir Learners at a Distance.
The Library continued to collaborate
with other University units to support
learning. Computers Don't Byte, a program
of basic computer skills, was coordinated by
the Library, the Faculty of Arts, the First
Year Coordinator and the Women Students'
Office. A program of instruction in Library
databases and Internet searching for faculty
and teaching assistants was offered in
collaboration with the Centre for Teaching
and Academic Growth.
The i-files, a joint annual publication of
ITServices and the Library, introduced new
UBC students to computing and Internet
resources available on campus. Computing at
UBC: Top 12 Questions, a publication
reflecting the Library's involvement with the
Student Information Technology Access
Committee (SITAC), answered questions
about email, dial-in time, usemames and
other practical computing details. REPORT OF THE UNIVERSITY LIBRARIAN TO THE SENATE  1998/99
XI
The Library provided instruction for
almost 20,000 students, faculty and staff in
2,200 sessions; 17% attended sessions in the
humanities and social sciences, 12% in
science and engineering, 26% in education
and 20% in the life sciences. In addition
there were 4,757 hits on the Library's Web
tutorial page.
Teaching labs in Koerner, Main and
Woodward Libraries were used to capacity.
Students hired with funding from the AMS
Innovative Projects Fund and AMS
Tutoring Services continued to assist
students with use of workstations in the
Ridington Computer Lab and the
Woodward Teaching Lab.
Web-based Learning and Access
A redesign of the Library's Web site was
launched on September 1, 1998. The
redesign task group was composed of
librarians representing various user groups,
as well as technical and design staff. It
considered user feedback received since the
UBC Library Web was launched as the
Library's main interface to online resources
in the spring of 1997, and sought direct
input from students and faculty through
several focus group sessions.
The redesign resulted in several
significant improvements to the accessibility
and maintenance of information resources
and services. The multiplicity of local
system interfaces was reduced to a single
Web interface that appears as the
introductory screen for computers in the
Library as well as the Library's main Web
page. Information related to the Library's
hundreds of online information resources
was moved to a Web-mediated database
system, which allows the information and
access pages for each resource to be
generated dynamically, which in turn
greatly improved the consistency, flexibility
and ease of maintenance of these Web
pages. A similar system was designed to
facilitate the efficient development of
subject guides, which were consolidated
under a single link on the Library's main
Web page. These subject guides are
developed by reference librarians to give
students a starting point both with the
structured databases available on the UBC
Library Web and the less structured
resources of the Internet as a whole.
Early in 1999, the Library's
proliferating collection of electronic journals
(ejournals) was made available through a
new search page on the Library's Web site.
While ejournal subscriptions continued to
be accessible through the Library catalogue,
this additional Web access point became
necessary for a number of reasons. It raised
the profile of these valuable resources, which
would otherwise have remained unknown to
many researchers. It provided a single search
point for titles available through several
separate full text article indexes or through
trial subscriptions. It provided the
equivalent of the unbound journal shelves in
the Library, where users can browse to see
what is available in their field or look for a
particular title. As well, the database system
underlying the search page provided a
flexible method of maintaining information
about these rapidly changing resources.
The list of ejournals grew from Project
Muse, JSTOR, and a few individual titles to
over 2,500 titles by the end of March.
Usage increased as the list grew, with titles
in medicine and chemistry being
particularly popular. Full text journal
articles were also accessible through a
number of databases, such as Medline,
Canadian Business and Current Affairs,
Canadian Periodical Index, ABI/Inform, and
Academic Search FullTEXT Elite. REPORT OF THE UNIVERSITY LIBRARIAN TO THE SENATE  1998/9!
The Library's Web site continued to be
one of the Library's primary means of
communicating with users. A "What's New'
page was introduced in 1998/99, to alert
users to new resources and to events and
issues related to information access. There
was heavy use of the "Contact Library"
service on the main page, for technical
questions related to accessing resources, for
research questions, and for comments or
questions on Library services.
The Library continued to provide
hardware, software and help for student
access to online University services. Free
access to email, newsgroups and other
Internet services continued to be available
for students through Netinfo, offered cooperatively by ITServices and the Library.
Computers for Netinfo were provided in
Koerner, Main and Woodward Libraries,
and help was provided in those locations by
students hired with funding from the AMS
Innovative Projects Fund and AMS
Tutoring Services. Student Services' online
Student Service Centre was also accessible
from workstations in the Library.
Information Resources and Collections
The Library received an additional
$500,000 for the collections budget, but
due to the low value of the Canadian dollar,
especially in the fall when the large invoices
for periodical subscriptions were paid, the
Library had to tap one-time funds from the
Stablization Fund in order to meet expenses.
There were no funds for new initiatives, and
the amount of money spent on monographs
was below the average of the previous four
years. The few new online databases that
were purchased were funded by endowment
income, cancellations of other serials, or, in
the case of Web of Science, Library fines
revenue.
The Library undertook an extensive
review of its existing periodical subscriptions
in order to reorient the budget away from
periodicals, whose subscription costs
increase at much higher rates than those of
monographs or electronic resources, and
towards monographs and electronic
resources. This review resulted in the largest
cancellation ever undertaken, in terms of
dollar amounts: 850 titles worth $830,000
in 1999 costs. The cancellations were
concentrated in the sciences because
electronic means of access to periodical
articles is more feasible in those subjects.
Document delivery of periodical articles
from the Canada Institute for Scientific and
Technical Information (CISTI), via the
Library's Pegasus service, grew during the
year to an average of 1,000 documents per
month compared to just over 600 per
month during the previous year.
Cooperation with other institutions
enables the Library to stretch its own
resources and achieve results it could not
accomplish alone. It is an active supporter of
the Association of Research Libraries'
Scholarly Publishing and Academic
Resources Coalition (SPARC) and
subscribed to several of the new electronic
publications that SPARC introduced. The
Library continued to participate in the
Electronic Library Network (ELN) and the
Council of Prairie and Pacific University
Libraries (COPPUL) endeavours. Only one
new resource, Academic Search FullTEXT
Elite, was purchased cooperatively, through
ELN, with funding from the Collections
Enrichment Endowment Fund. The
Library's long-standing membership in the
Shastri Indo-Canadian Institute resulted in
the addition of many books and periodicals
in English and Indie languages.
Many gifts-in-kind, as well as gifts of
funds, aided in enriching the collection. A
new endowment began this year with a
$1-million donation from the Sutherland REPORT OF THE UNIVERSITY LIBRARIAN TO THE SENATE  1998/99
XI
Foundation to the Rodger Stanton
Memorial Library Fund. This fund helped
launch several medical databases and two
sets of full text medical journals. Maria
Klawe, Vice-President Student and
Academic Services, provided an additional
$180,000 to the Collections Enrichment
Endowment Fund for matching purposes.
An annotated copy of Malcolm Lowry's
Ultramarine was purchased for Special
Collections thanks to the enthusiastic
support of Sherrill Grace, Head of the
Department of English, Bernie Bressler,
Vice-President Research, and Barry
McBride, Vice-President Academic and
Provost. Numerous other University units
donated funds towards the purchase of
library materials in their subject areas:
Centre for Korean Research — nearly
$23,000 for Korean books and periodicals;
Medicine — $15,000 for medical books;
Education — $14,000 for education
periodicals and spoken English materials;
the 1998 graduating class — $6,000 for
books and periodicals; English — $6,000
for Malcolm Lowry manuscripts; Electrical
Engineering — $5,000 towards IEL;
Mathematics — $4,600 for SLAM
membership; ITServices — $3,700 for one-
half the cost of CNI membership; Arts —
$3,500 for one-half the cost of ICPSR
membership; Metals and Materials
Engineering — $2,000 towards Metadex.
The Foundation for Advanced Information
and Research Library Program funded by
Fujitsu donated books on Japan valued at
263,000 Yen, the Japan Foundation
donated 300,000 Yen for additional maps
for Special Collections' historical Japanese
map collection, the Ernest Theodore Rogers
1939 Fund donated $7,500 to purchase
more years of 19th century New York Times
on microfilm, and the Rodger Stanton
Memorial Fund donated $22,000 for
gynaecology and obstetrics books for the St.
Paul's Hospital Library. Notable gifts-in-
kind included the Blanche Howard papers,
books for Fine Arts and Special Collections
from William Messenger, additions to the
folk song collection from Phil Thomas, the
archive of film and production records for
Spilsbury's Coast from Alan Twigg, six years
of the dissident newspaper, South China
Cultural Review, Arden Shakespeare on CD-
ROM (39 volumes of plays and poems with
commentary and variant notes) from Ray
Siemens, Siku Quanshu (a set of over 150
CD-ROMs of 3,460 books and manuscripts
pertaining to 5,000 years of Chinese
civilization) from the family of Dr. Michael
J. A. Walker and Mrs. Chao Woo Shui-
Chee, and a collection of 500 books
published from the mid 18th century to the
1980s relating to history, travel, and
exploration of China, the Middle East, and
the Malaysian archipelago from Vernon and
Dana Mullen.
Archival Resources
During 1998/99, the University
Archives continued to expand its presence
on the Internet, to promote awareness of,
and access to, its archival holdings. Detailed
online finding aids are available for
approximately 90% of the Archives'
collections. In addition, significant
information on the University's history was
added to the Library's Web site, and
digitized photographs and descriptive
records were added to the historical
photograph database.
The Archives was able to augment its
existing resources through various
partnerships. The Ceremonies Office
provided funding that helped attract a
Canadian Council of Archives grant to
process and describe several thousand
digitized photographs. In addition, a
commitment of funds from the Ubyssey
Publishing Society and the President's
Office was obtained to attract grants for
specific projects (see Appendix F: Grant REPORT OF THE UNIVERSITY LIBRARIAN TO THE SENATE  1998/99
BC     LIBRARY
Funding). The Archives provided Master of
Archival Studies students with opportunities
to gain practical experience, and benefited
from their contributions in a variety of
projects.
Archives staff developed a number of
virtual displays for the Web. Of particular
note was a graphical presentation included
as part of the ceremony to mark the formal
opening of the Leon and Thea Koerner
University Centre in March 1999.
Preservation
The Library began participating in a
new preservation initiative, along with nine
other North American libraries and the
American Society for Testing and Materials
(ASTM), to study the effects of aging on
various types of printing and writing papers
over a period of 100 years. A set of special
papers from ASTM has been placed in the
vault in Special Collections, where
environmental conditions are being
monitored. Samples of the papers will be
sent to laboratories for testing at intervals of
several years.
The Library's preservation microfilming
program continued this past year, producing
47 reels of microfilm including: more of the
Malcolm Lowry collection, the Alice
Ravenhill Collection (papers of a noted
educator and champion of native studies in
British Columbia), 32 years of The Peak
(Simon Fraser University's student
newspaper), six more years of the British
Columbia Directories, and 27 years of the
BC Department of Vital Statistics Special
Reports. Two microfiche projects were
undertaken: a portion of the MacMillan
vertical files (BC Land/Food/Forests
Historical Documents) and the annual set
of M.Ed. Major Papers. A grant was
received from the Canadian Council of
Archives to assist with the filming of the
Lowry collection. Some projects are funded
by sales to other institutions, while others
are funded by the Library's own acquisitions
funds.
The Library's in-house Mendery
continued to repair reference books and
other books as needed. In addition to her
ongoing work, the Mendery Assistant
restored three 18th century books:
Archaeologia (Miscellaneous Tracts) and
Bibliographia Britannica, both from the
Koerner Library, and Musikalien-Leih
Institut Robert Streiber from the Music
Library.
With the retirement of Suzanne
Dodson, Facilities and Preservation
Manager, after 36 years with the Library,
preservation became the responsibility of the
Coordinator of Collections as of April 1,
1999.
Use of UBC Library Materials
During 1998/99, 3.3 million items
circulated from the Library's collection,
down about two percent from the preceding
year. Circulation of materials from Koerner
Library increased about 11% while
substantial reductions occurred in other
parts of the Library. The increase in Koerner
may be explained in part by the normal
increase in use experienced in new Library
facilities, while the reduction, particularly in
the sciences, technology and medicine
libraries, may be explained by the increasing
amounts of full text information available
electronically.
In keeping with Trek 2000, the Library
entered into agreements to provide
community borrower services to residents of
Hampton Place, University Apartments and
Acadia Park. These agreements, to be REPORT OF THE UNIVERSITY LIBRARIAN TO THE SENATE  1998/99
XI
reviewed annually, ensure that the costs of
these services will be covered from the
Hampton Place Services Levy and the UBC
Infrastructure Services Levy.
The Library began to consider a new
service model to bring together functions
involved in the delivery of physical items to
users, including circulation, course reserve,
document delivery, interlibrary loans and
delivery of materials to students at a
distance. Considerations focused on
reorganizing services in Main and Koerner
Libraries and coordinating and supporting
these services across the Library.
Implementation of the recommended
reorganization will begin in 1999/00.
Access to Materials at Other Libraries
The Library is committed to the rapid
delivery to our users of materials from other
libraries' collections and remote sources. In
1998/99, efforts focused on expanding and
improving document delivery services,
monitoring and improving access to CISTI
materials through the Pegasus service, and
implementing a new Resource Sharing
System. The Library acquired 30,267 items
from other sources, an increase of 26% over
the previous year. This clearly indicated
movement from a model of purchasing
information "just in case" it is needed to an
access or "just in time" model of
information delivery. Directions for the
future include increasing the speed of
delivery for all types of materials and
delivery to the user's workstation for
materials available electronically.
Technology Infrastructure
Data conversion cleanup on the DRA
system, in conjunction with the almost-
complete decommissioning of the local
UBCLIB system, was a major focus during
the past year. Over 40 specific data cleanup
projects were identified and largely
completed in 1998. The most significant
one was a concerted effort to correct,
consolidate, and standardize holdings
information for the Library's numerous
serial publications. The DRA system also
became the new home for a number of
locally maintained files of bibliographies,
UBC reading room holdings, and archival
collections. These files had previously
resided on the local UBCLIB system. DRA's
Electronic Data Interchange (EDI) software,
for loading machine-readable invoices from
some of the Library's major suppliers, was
implemented. The Library was a beta test
site for this module and was one of the first
DRA sites to implement it successfully.
Another major initiative during the past
year was the implementation of a new
system to support interlibrary loan and
document delivery services. A hybrid
solution consisting of Ameritech's Resource
Sharing System (RSS) software, Simon
Fraser University Library's GODOT
software, plus extensive programming work
to provide a DRA and local Web interface,
was developed and implemented in
September 1998. The new system was not
without growing pains and considerable
effort was expended during its first six
months of operation to address a number of
hardware and other problems. In early
1999, the Library was engaged in beta
testing Ameritech's next release of the RSS
software with the expectation it would
address some of the difficulties encountered
initially.
A new print facility for public use was
also implemented in fall 1998. It is capable REPORT OF THE UNIVERSITY LIBRARIAN TO THE SENATE  1998/99
of supporting Web and image-based
documents and utilizes the Library's existing
copycard technology. This new system
replaced the older UBCLIB print/download
facility that was unable to handle many of
the more complex print requirements. The
Library beta tested the NT version of this
software and was one of the first sites to
implement it.
In 1998/99, the Library had over 800
workstations in use. The migration of all of
these workstations to an NT operating
system environment was a major systems
project this year. At the same time, many
older workstations were replaced. Almost all
of these workstations are connected to the
Library's network and elsewhere by 32 local
area networks distributed across campus and
off-campus at teaching hospital sites. The
Library operates over 20 central computers
or servers using a variety of operating
systems (Unix, NT, Novell, VMS) and
supporting major local systems such as
DRA, the Library's Web site, Silverplatter,
Ovid, CABI, RSS, and various general
system facilities. Two new computer
machine rooms were established in 1998/99
to house the growing number of local
servers.
In early 1999, Systems obtained
approval to proceed with the filling of a
vacant Programmer/Analyst position and to
convert a temporary Librarian/Analyst
position to a permanent one. These
additional resources will provide much
needed relief and support in operating and
maintaining the Library's online systems
and services.
Bibliographic Control, Cataloguing,
and Ordering
Technical Services staff improved their
skill level working on the DRA system, and
a major clean-up of serial holding records
progressed during the year. Staff in Koerner
and Systems organized the project, with
contributions from all Library order units
(Koerner, Law and Life Sciences) as well as
additional help from other branches. The
project will continue for some time. It
began with a focus on bringing the holdings
of each location together on a single holding
record and organizing the items within each
holding record. This part of the project is
approximately half done. The challenge is to
maintain the original focus and complete
the clean-up of the Library's serial holdings.
Business arrangements with some of the
Library's major collections vendors were
improved and formalized. Selected
collections and order staff, under the
leadership of the University Librarian, met
with five of the top Library material
vendors. The meetings resulted in
significantly improved discounts for book
purchases and reduced service charges for
periodical subscriptions. The Library
continues to seek and implement
improvements in methods of ordering
collection materials.
The heating/ventilation/air-
conditioning (HVAC) system in the Library
Processing Centre had a major failure in
June 1998 which resulted in flooding of
new materials on the first floor and of older
materials in three of the storage areas in the
basement. Several thousand books were
water damaged. Those books which could
be restored were returned to the Library by
the end of March 1999. Materials which
had to be replaced will continue to arrive
past year-end.
Work continued on the initiative to
relocate the LPC Asian specialists to the
Asian Library. Staff will be relocated once
space in the Asian Library is renovated. REPORT OF THE UNIVERSITY LIBRARIAN TO THE SENATE  1998/99
COMMUNITY AND
INTERNATIONALIZATION
The UBC Library is firmly
committed to cooperating with other
academic libraries and institutions,
government agencies, and industries in
order to support learning and research
and to further the transfer and
preservation of knowledge. As a
community resource, it plays a key role
in the intellectual, social, cultural, and
economic growth of the Vancouver
region and the province of British
Columbia. It is now part of a network
of information resources that extends
around the world, and which
strengthens British Columbia's and
Canada's links to the international
community.
No academic library, even the largest
and most comprehensive, can provide all the
information resources its users may need.
Regional, national, and international
programs and consortia supplement the
Library's own resources by providing access
to important research materials for UBC
students, faculty and staff. In turn, the
Library provides access to its own
specialized resources to an international
community of scholars.
The Library serves the reading needs of
the campus residential community, and
more and more community users
throughout British Columbia now turn to
UBC Library for their information needs.
At times, the impact of this community use
on the Library's resources and staff can be
substantial, and has the potential of
degrading the ability of the Library to fulfil
its primary mission — to support the
information needs of UBC students, faculty,
and staff.
The Library enjoys considerable direct
support from the campus and wider
community. This support has taken the
form of new Library buildings, new facilities
to improve the learning and research
environment, and the donation of
specialized and unique materials. The
generosity of the Library's many friends and
donors and the support received from
granting agencies and government are
gratefully acknowledged in Appendix E:
Donor and Gift Recognition, and Appendix F.Grant Funding. Without such continuing
generosity and support, the Library would
be a much poorer resource for all of its
users.
13 REPORT OF THE UNIVERSITY LIBRARIAN TO THE SENATE  1998/99
UBC    LIBRARY
FUTURE DIRECTIONS
The University has embarked on the
course of becoming the best university in
Canada and one of the world's finest
public universities. As the "heart" of the
University, the Library is central to the
implementation of the University's
vision for the new millennium.
Trek 2000 is focused on supporting
innovative learning-centered academic
programs and outstanding research. This
support will require convenient access to as
wide a range of important scholarly
materials as possible, in all applicable
formats, concentrating on materials that are
likely to be of long-term or permanent value
for research and learning. Coupled with
this, the Library must provide timely and
cost-effective access to and delivery of
scholarly resources available elsewhere.
More and more, the Library's
collections budget will be stretched by a
combination of escalating prices and
growing demand for resources. As the use of
information technology expands, there will
be an increasing need for user training and
instruction. The Library will be losing many
staff through retirements in the coming
years, and they must be replaced to ensure
that the Library can continue to spend its
materials budget wisely and train students
and faculty to operate in an increasingly
disintermediated information environment.
The recruitment of skilled and expert
librarians and staff will be vital to the future
success of the Library and the University.
Such staff must have access to state-of-the-
art equipment and a technological
infrastructure that supports learning and
research.
The Library serves as the principal
campus repository of human knowledge and
memory in traditional formats. The
Library's irreplaceable print collections,
valued in the hundreds of millions of
dollars, are not likely to be digitized in the
foreseeable future, if ever. They require
storage in environmental conditions that
will ensure their preservation for generations
of researchers yet to come. Such storage
facilities must also allow for use of the
collection, for the Library serves as a major
laboratory for faculty and students in many
disciplines, and its environment must be
conducive to learning and research.
Collections, staff, technology, facilities —
all of these form the foundation blocks for a
world-class academic research library and a
world-class research university. A vigorous
UBC Library is key to providing the
University's students, faculty, and staff with
the best possible information resources and
environment for research and learning, and
is critical to the University's success in
attracting top faculty and graduate students.
The efforts of Library staff need continuing
support from the University and the
community to ensure that the Library
thrives in the 21st century.
14 REPORT OF THE UNIVERSITY LIBRARIAN TO THE SENATE 1998/99
APPENDICES CONTENTS
A Library Staff 17
B Library Statistical Summary 18
C Growth of Collections 19
D Library Expenditures 20
E Donor and Gift Recognition 21-22
F Grant Funding 23
XI
UBC     LIBRARY
15 REPORT OF THE UNIVERSITY LIBRARIAN TO THE SENATE  1998/99
UBC     LIBRARY
16 REPORT OF THE UNIVERSITY LIBRARIAN TO THE SENATE  1998/99
Appendix A
LIBRARY STAFF
The Library's staff complement (including GPOF and non-GPOF
budget positions) now totals 307.61 full-time equivalent (FTE)
positions, including 79.23 librarians, 14.0 management &
professional (M&P) staff, and 214.38 support staff. This compares
to a total of 312.11 FTE positions in 1998, and represents a net
decrease of 1.44%. The effecr on GPOF budget positions was
slightly higher, as these decreased from 291.86 FTE to 287.48 FTE,
a reduction of 1.5 %. Non-GPOF budget positions (cost recovery
or grant-funded) decreased from 20.25 FTE to 20.13 FTE, a
reduction of 0.59%. Such positions now represent 6.54% of the
Library's staff complement. In addition, the Library's student
assistant and temporary hourly staff complement totalled 52.66
FTE positions. Of these, 5.52 FTE were funded by cost recoveries
or from grants.
Long-service staff members who retired or took early retirement
during the reporting period included: Suzanne Dodson, Facilities &
Preservation Manager, June 1998; Leah Gordon, LA 5, Cataloguing
Division, March 1999; Matt Hartman, Catalogue Librarian,
Cataloguing Division, December 1998; Linda Joe, Head, Asian
Library, December 1998; Pat Lysyk, Reference Librarian, Hamber
Library, June 1998; Susan Mathew, Reference Librarian,
Humanities & Social Sciences Division, June 1998; Tom
Shorthouse, Head, Law Library, June 1998; Zorka Srejic, LA 4,
Cataloguing Division, March 1999.
Hilde Colenbrander was appointed part-time Acting Head, Science
& Engineering Division, during this period, and was also granted a
one-year reduced term appointment. Donna Curtis, Reference
Librarian, Woodward Biomedical Library, resigned in October
1998 to take a position at Indiana State University. Dan Heino,
Reference Librarian, Woodward Biomedical Library, was granted a
permanent 80% reduced term appointment. Theresa Iverson,
Reference Librarian, Special Collections & University Archives
Division/Fine Arts Library was granted a one-year reduced term
appointment. Miseli Jeon, Korean Language Reference Librarian,
Asian Library, resigned in February 1999 to pursue full-time
graduate studies at UBC. Bonnie Stableford, Head, Science &
Engineering Division, was granted study leave for the period
September 1998 to August 1999.
The following librarians were granted confirmed appointments:
Kathryn Hornby, Reference Librarian, Woodward Biomedical
Library; Joy Kirchner, Reference Librarian, Science & Engineering
Division; Sandra Wilkins, Head, Law Library (upon initial
appointment).
New appointments, extensions of appointments, or changes in
appointment included: Young Ju Ahn, appointed as Korean
Language Bibliographic Associate, Asian Library, in February
1999; Norman Amor, extended as Preservation Microfilming and
CIP Cataloguing Librarian, in October 1998, partially from
funding provided by the National Library; Tim Atkinson,
appointed as Head, Education Library, in May 1999; Darrell
Bailie, appointed as Acting Head, Education Library, in May 1998;
Nadine Baldwin, appointed Assistant University Librarian for
Technical Services on a continuing basis, in May 1998; Charlotte
Beck, appointed as Resource Sharing & Processing Librarian, Life
Sciences Libraries, in February 1999; Doug Brigham, appointed as
a term Librarian/Analyst, in the Systems Division, in May 1998;
Lee Ann Bryant, appointed for another two-year term as Head,
MacMillan Library, in January 1999; Danielle Bugeaud, appointed
as an hourly Catalogue Librarian, in the Cataloguing Division, in
August 1998; Ann Doyle, extended as Acting Head, Xwi7xwa
Library, in August 1998; Patrick Dunn, extended as Acting Head,
Resource Sharing Services for another year, in October 1998;
Margaret Friesen, joindy appointed for one year as Staff Training
& Development Coordinator in the Library, and Coordinator of
Continuing Education & Development in the School of Library,
Archival and Information Studies, in October 1998; Dean
Giustini, appointed as Reference Librarian, Biomedical Branch
Library, in June 1998; Linda Joe, post-retirement extension as
Head, Asian Library for the period January-March 1999; Janice
Kreider, appointed Coordinator of Collections on a continuing
basis in February 1999; Mary Luebbe, Reference Librarian,
Humanities & Social Sciences Division, assumed responsibility for
data services; Simon Neame, appointed as an hourly librarian in
the Science & Engineering Division, in September 1998; Isabel
Pitfield, appointed as part-time Coordinator, Vancouver
Bibliography Project in Special Collections & University Archives,
in January 1999, from funding provided by the Vancouver
Historical Society; Cathy Rayment, appointed as Reference
Librarian, Hamber Library, in September 1998; Lynne Redenbach,
extended as Circulation Librarian, in September 1998; Marie-
Helene Robitaille, appointed as an hourly librarian in Special
Collections & University Archives, from Canadian Council of
Archives funding; Sally Taylor, extended as term Reference
Librarian in the Woodward Biomedical Library, in July 1998,
partially funded from NCE grant funds; Sandra Wilkins,
appointed as Head, Law Library, in August 1998; Sandra Wong,
appointed an an hourly Librarian, Science & Engineering Division,
in June 1998.
17 zz
REPORT OF THE UNIVERSITY LIBRARIAN TO THE SENATE  1998/99
Appendix B
LIBRARY STATISTICAL SUMMARY
COLLECTIONS
Total Volumes1
Volumes Added, Net
Total Titles Catalogued
Current Subscriptions
Number of Monographs Purchased
1998/99
3,846,515
102,143
64,845
24,791
39.1552
1 Includes net volumes added.
2 Excludes Asian, Government Publications, Law, Map, and Life Sciences Libraries.
SERVICES 1998/99
Total Recorded Use of Library Resources 3,283,605
Internal Document Delivery - Copies3 38,181
Internal Document Delivery - Books3 1,666
Interlibrary Loan — Loaned/Copied3 38,395
Interlibrary Loan — Borrowed/Copied3 30,264
Instruction Classes/Orientations 2,194
Number of Participants 19,395
Total Questions Answered 433,767
Research Questions 29,758
Reference Questions 209,313
Directional Question 194,696
3 Included in Total Recorded Use of Library Resources.
STAFF (FTE) 1998/99
Librarians 79.23
Professional (M&P) 14.00
Support Staff 214.38
Subtotal4 307.61
Student5 52.66
Total FTE All Staff 360.27
4 Includes 20.13 cost-recovery or grant funded positions.
5 Includes 5.52 cost-recovery or grant funded positions.
EXPENDITURES 1998/99
Collections 10,569,120
Salaries & Wages 13,945,766
Binding 203,093
Other Operating Expenditures 2,782,233
Total Gross Expenditures 27,500,212
Cost Recoveries (1,949,888)
Total Net Expenditures 25,550,324
38.43%
50.71%
0.74%
10.12%
18 REPORT OF THE UNIVERSITY LIBRARIAN TO THE SENATE  1998/99
Appendix C
GROWTH OF COLLECTIONS
Air Photos
Aperture Cards
Archives (Metres)
Electronic Databases
Locally mounted bibliographic databases
Remote access bibliographic databases
CD-ROM
Locally mounted full text databases
Remotely mounted full text databases (ejournals)1
Locally mounted numeric databases
Total Electronic Databases
Films
Filmstrips
Flash Cards
Government Publications (Unbound)
Maps
Microcomputer Discs
Microfiche (Sheets)
Microfilms (Reels)
Microprint/Microcards
Motion Pictures
Photographs
Pictures
Realia/Games/Models
Slides
Slide/Tape Shows
Sound Recordings-Cassettes
Sound Recordings-CDs
Sound Recordings-LPs
Subscriptions2
Transparencies (Sets)
Videodiscs
Videotapes
Volumes-Catalogued
u
UBC     LIBRARY
MARCH 31, 1998
NET GROWTH
MARCH 31, 1999
1,045
0
1,045
2,589
0
2,589
3,169
25
3,194
35
2
37
37
-1
36
81
-6
75
46
5
51
310
483
793
811
22
833
1,320
505
1,825
927
39
966
2,854
0
2,854
908
0
908
819,887
-12,039
807,848
201,040
1,453
202,503
1,358
202
1,560
3,394,371
70,726
3,465,097
113,671
1,893
115,564
1,199,350
0
1,199,350
1
0
1
332,048
70
332,118
67,298
100
67,398
2
3
5
31,983
0
31,983
112
0
112
6,424
293
6,717
15,748
361
16,109
52,319
289
52,608
24,748
43
24,791
1,594
0
1,594
12
0
12
7,418
594
8,012
3,744,372
102,143
3,846,515
1 There are 2,102 additional full text ejournals mounted as part oi Academic Search FullTEXTand ABI/Inform.
2 Includes periodical subscriptions, standing orders, and monographic series.
19 REPORT OF THE UNIVERSITY LIBRARIAN TO THE SENATE  1998/99
Appendix D
LIBRARY EXPENDITURES
LIBRARY OPERATING EXPENDITURES
SALARIES
GROSS
YEAR
& WAGES
%
COLLECTIONS
%
BINDING
%
OTHER
%
EXPENDITURE
1993/94
13,726,868
57.80%
7,541,116
31.76%
235,432
0.99%
2,244,024
9.45%
23,747,440
1994/95
13,663,492
55.89%
8,389,284
34.32%
210,068
0.86%
2,183,458
8.93%
24,446,302
1995/96
13,758,042
53.33%
8,978,367
34.80%
194,749
0.75%
2,866,274
11.11%
25,797,432
1996/97
13,878,493
51.16%
9,159,355
33.77%
196,649
0.73%
3,891,052
14.34%
27,125,549
1997/98
13,999,426
52.68%
9,769,644
36.77%
162,650
0.61%
2,641,540
9.94%
26,573,260
1998/99
13,945,766
50.71%
10,569,120
38.43%
203,093
0.74%
2,782,233
10.12%
27,500,212
♦ As in previous years, only expenditures from the Library's own GPOF budget are included in the above. Excluded are:
Faculty of Commerce expenditures in support of the David Lam Library.
Expenditures for library materials by other campus units, for example for departmental reading rooms.
Expenditures from library grant and trust funds.
Collections expenditures from library grant and trust funds amounted to $418,169 in 1998/99.
♦ "Other" expenditures include non-recurring equipment acquisitions which vary considerably from year to year.
♦ The Library's GPOF expenditures for 1998/99 were 7.93% of the University GPOF expenditures.
SOURCES OF LIBRARY OPERATING FUNDS
GPOF CORE BUDGET
YEAR
AMOUNT
%
1993/94
22,371,900
94.09%
1994/95
23,286,079
93.15%
1995/96
24,610,477
92.66%
1996/97
26,072,323
92.98%
1997/98
24,825,940
93.81%
1998/99
25,526,451
92.91%
FEES FOR SERVICE
FEES FOR SERVICE
LIBRARY FINES
TOTAL
INTERNAL
%
EXTERNAL
%
AMOUNT
%
FUNDING
167,929
0.71%
1,043,032
4.39%
193,747
0.81%
23,776,608
130,992
0.52%
1,202,963
4.81%
377,781
1.51%
24,997,815
195,157
0.73%
1,289,958
4.86%
465,660
1.75%
26,561,252
155,138
0.55%
1,405,976
5.01%
407,880
1.46%
28,041,317
83,138
0.32%
1,304,806
4.93%
249,987
0.94%
26,463,871
138,007
0.50%
1,398,876
5.09%
413,005
1.50%
27,476,339
20 REPORT OF THE UNIVERSITY LIBRARIAN TO THE SENATE  1998/99
XI
Appendix E
DONOR AND GIFT RECOGNITION
DONATIONS
The generous tradition of alumni, friends, parents of students,
faculty, staff, foundations, corporations and organizations
supporting the Library continued and increased in 1998/99. From
targeted gifts focusing on specific interests of donors, to
unrestricted gifts benefiting all users of the Library, there was
significant growth in philanthropic support from the previous year.
Overall in 1998/99, the Library received more than 2,000
donations, totalling $1,584,250. This represents a 25% increase in
support for the Library from 1997/98. Donations came in the
forms of cash, in-kind gifts (e.g. books, maps), and pledged
support, which may be received over a period of years.
Among the year's highlights, one gift led the way: a $1-million
donation from the Sutherland Foundation to the Life Sciences
Libraries. The gift established a $950,000 endowment, The Rodger
Stanton Memorial Library Fund, and provided $50,000 in
immediate funding for acquisitions. Based at the St. Paul's Hospital
Library of the Life Sciences Libraries, the Rodger Stanton
Memorial Library comprises a range of health information
resources. Thanks to the generous support of the Sutherland
Foundation, the endowment will provide ongoing funds for
supporting information resources every year. In particular, the
endowment provides funds to expand the Library's electronic
resources, including online access to medical databases and full text
publications. This is a very significant enhancement of resources
available to benefit students, researchers, scholars and health
professionals.
Our development program continues with two strong priorities:
The Library Collections Enrichment Fund (Phase II), and the
Library Technology Endowment. The Collections Fund initiative,
having achieved the goal of establishing a $1-million endowment in
1998, continued to receive strong support from alumni, friends,
and organizations — so much so that Phase II was established with
a "stretch" goal of $2 million. The endowment generates annual
income to support acquisition of electronic resources and databases,
scholarly journals, and books covering the range of academic
disciplines. The President's Fund, following a contribution of
$500,000 toward the original goal, pledged an additional $180,000
in matching funds to create further momentum toward the Phase II
goal. In 1998/99, this initiative received $109,526 in gifts; fund-
raising will continue in 1999/2000.
The Technology Endowment funds technology and services to
enhance the Library's capacity as a "library without walls," through
delivery of resources and services to users wherever they are located,
via online computer access. The President's Fund has pledged
$500,000 in matching funds toward the goal of establishing a $1.5-
million endowment. In 1998/99, this initiative received $51,666 in
gifts; fundraising will continue in 1999/00.
GIFTS-IN-KIND
Gifts-in-kind play an important role in enhancing the Library's
collections by increasing the depth and breadth of our research
resources and contributing to our uniqueness. Significant gifts-in-
kind received in 1998/99 include:
♦ Dr. Max Cynader's subscription to the journal Brain
Research, which includes subscriptions to four allied
research journals; these subscriptions are expensive and
would not otherwise be available at the UBC Library
♦ a set of 175 CD-ROMs entided Siku Quanshu, providing
significant literature in Chinese history and culture, from the
family of Dr. Michael J A. Walker and his mother-in-law,
Mrs. Chao Woo Shui Chee, in memory of Chow Sing Kai
♦ the manuscripts and correspondence of Canadian author
Blanche Howard
♦ a rare Japanese map from an anonymous donor, adding to
the Library's significant holdings in this area
♦ from Prof. Philip Thomas, additions to the collection of
folk songs he previously donated
♦ Alan Twigg's collection of books, manuscripts,
correspondence, photographs and other materials relating
to George Woodcock, to supplement the Library's archive
of materials about this important Canadian author.
Local organizations and foundations continued to support Library
initiatives. The Vancouver Foundation, on behalf of a local family
foundation, contributed $7,500 to the Humanities & Social
Sciences Division for acquisition oi New York Times archives from
the 19th century, an important addition to the division's research
resources. The Vancouver Historical Society continued its support
for the Vancouver Bibliography Project, bringing the total to more
than $40,000. The Ubyssey Student Newspaper Society provided
$3,000 in funding for the Library to produce an archive of the
newspaper.
This past year also featured University recognition of a couple who
are great friends and long-time benefactors of the Library — Earl
and Suzanne Dodson. Mrs. Dodson retired as Facilities and
Preservation Manager in 1999, following a 36-year career with the
Library. Together, the Dodsons generously supported and made
possible a variety of Library projects, including numerous gifts for
restoration and upgrading of Library facilities, a particular interest
of the couple. In recognition of their great support, one of the two
large reading rooms on the fifth floor of Main Library was restored
to recapture its original appearance, dating back to the building's
opening in 1925. At a ceremony on April 29, 1999, President
Martha Piper officially named this room "The Suzanne Cates
Dodson and Earl D. Dodson Reading Room".
21 REPORT OF THE UNIVERSITY LIBRARIAN TO THE SENATE  1998/99
Appendix E
DONOR AND GIFT RECOGNITION
The Library is grateful to all of the generous individuals and organizations who contributed financial support and gifts-in-kind during
1998/99. These Friends of the Library significantly enrich the Library's information resources, and, more importantly, they enrich the
learning opportunities and experiences of UBC students, faculty, staff and community users.
FRIENDS OF THE LIBRARY 1998/99
The following donors conrributed gifts between April 1, 1998 and March 31, 1999.
PRESIDENT'S CIRCLE
($250,000 and above)
The Surherland Foundation
CHANCELLOR'S CIRCLE
($25,000 to $249,999)
Anonymous
LIBRARIAN'S CIRCLE AND WESBROOK SOCIETY
($1,000 to $24,999)
Anonymous
Prof, and Mrs. Philip Akrigg
Prof. Ivan Avakumovic
Mr. W. Thomas Brown, MBE
Ms. Bev Buchanan
Mr. Ron Burke
Ms. Diana Cooper
Dr. Max Cynader
Mr. and Mrs. Charles A. Davis
Ms. Mary C. Dvorak
Mr. Wilfred M. Evans
Prof. Daniel Fraser
Prof. Joseph Gardner, CM
and Mrs. Joyce Gardner
Miss Letitia Hay
Prof. Ken Haycock
Prof. Ivan Head, OCQC
Dr. Leonidas Hill
Mrs. Blanche Howard
Ms. Beth Jankola
Mr. and Mrs. Joseph Jetter
Prof. Ronald A. Jobe
Mr. Derek R. Lukin Johnston
Mr. John Koerner
Dr. and Mrs. Gerald Korn
Mrs. Anne Lind
Major Stuart A. Maitland
Mr. Stewart M. Marshall
Mr. Vernon Mullen
Dr. Peter N. Nemetz
Nordic House Ltd.
Mr. Noel A.S. Owens
Otis Canada Incorporated
Mrs. Vera Pech
Dr. Stephen Petrina
Dr. Man-Chiu Poon
Dr. Patrick A. Powell
Mr. Spider Robinson
Dr. Robert S. Rothwell
Mr. Michael J. Ruffatto
Mr. Ray Siemens
Dr. John E.R. Stainer
Dr. Wendy K. Sutton
Mrs. Mary Lee Taylor
Dr. Carlo Testa
Prof, and Mrs. Philip J. Thomas
Mr. Alan R. Twigg
Ubyssey Publications Society
Prof. Charles S. Ungerleider
The Vancouver Foundation
The Vancouver Historical Society
Dr. Michael J.A. Walker and family,
and Mrs. Chao Woo Shui Chee,
in memory of Chow Sing Kai
Mr. Bryce Waters
Ms. Ingeborg Woodcock
Miss Frances M. Woodward
22 REPORT OF THE UNIVERSITY LIBRARIAN TO THE SENATE  1998/99
zz
Appendix F
GRANT FUNDING
Grants continue to play a vital role in funding services and projects that would otherwise be beyond the Library's resources. They have been
especially useful in meeting the growing demand for library instruction related to information technology, providing funding for both staff
and equipment to access new sources of information. Results from successful applications during 1998/99 include:
BC MINISTRY OF ADVANCED EDUCATION, TRAINING & TECHNOLOGY.
$105,900 for continued support of the PATSCAN service.
BC MINISTRY OF ADVANCED EDUCATION, TRAINING & TECHNOLOGY.
NETWORKS OF CENTRES OF EXCELLENCE,
INFORMATION INFRASTRUCTURE.
$16,000 to support reference assistance in the life sciences.
CANADIAN ASSOCIATION OF COLLEGE AND UNIVERSITY LIBRARIES.
$400 Workshop Grant to complete an in-house Ergonomics for All
staff training video.
CANADIAN COUNCIL OF ARCHIVES. PRESERVATION MANAGEMENT
COST SHARED COOPERATIVE ASSISTANCE PROGRAM.
$1,735 for Part 2 of the Lowry Collection Microfilming Project.
CANADIAN COUNCIL OF ARCHIVES.
YOUNG CANADA WORKS IN HERITAGE INSTITUTIONS.
$6,395 for the Berger Fonds Project, supplemented by a $3,000
donation from Mr. Berger.
HUMAN RESOURCES DEVELOPMENT CANADA.
SUMMER CAREER PLACEMENTS.
$1,785 for student employment on Library Systems projects.
NATIONAL ARCHIVES OF CANADA.
$6,880 for the UBC Ceremonies Office Photographic Description
Project, supplemented by a $2,000 contribution from the University
Relarions and Ceremonies Office.
NATIONAL LIBRARY OF CANADA.
$58,000 in continued support for the Catalogumg-in-Publication program.
UNIVERSITY OF BC ACADEMIC EQUIPMENT FUND.
$100,000 for computer workstations.
UNIVERSITY OF BC ALMA MATER SOCIETY.
INNOVATIVE PROJECTS FUND.
$23,517 for the Ridington Computer Lab Help Desk.
$9,000 for printing facilities in the Woodward Library Teaching Lab.
$3,100 for continuation of the Study Night on the Web project.
UNIVERSITY OF BC FACULTY OF MEDICINE.
$24,400 to upgrade the Biomedical Branch Library.
UNIVERSITY OF BC GRADUATING CLASS OF 1998.
$3,000 for the Library book fund.
$3,000 for the Library periodicals fund.
UNIVERSITY OF BC MINOR CAPITAL FUND.
$100,000 for renovations to the Asian Library.
UNIVERSITY OF BC PHYSICAL ACCESS COORDINATOR,
CAMPUS PLANNING AND DEVELOPMENT.
$3,500 for wheelchair accessible security gate equipment in the
Law Library.
UNIVERSITY OF BC TEACHING AND LEARNING ENHANCEMENT FUND.
$49,950 for the Informatics Training Series.
$20,250 for the Electronic Full Text project.
$16,240 for the Online Education project.
Every effort has been made to ensure accuracy of this listing of donations, gifts, and grants received between April 1, 1998 - March 31, 1999.
Questions or inquiries should be directed to Ron Burke, Library Development Officer, at 822-8926.
23 REPORT OF THE UNIVERSITY LIBRARIAN TO THE SENATE  1998/99
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