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Report of the University Librarian to the Senate Nov 30, 2000

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Array I    Ii  i        1    I  II   K   \  K   \
85TH   YEAR
REPORT  OF
THE   UNIVERSITY
LIBRARIAN
TO  THE   SENATE
1999/2000 CONTENTS
Message from the University librarian 1
People 2-5
Learning and Research d-12
Community and Internationalization 13-14
Future Directions 15
Appendices 17-24 REPORT OF THE UNIVERSITY LIBRARIAN TO THE SENATE  1999/2000
XI
MESSAGE FROM THE UNIVERSITY LIBRARIAN
The University is committed to the discovery,
expression, preservation, and dissemination of
knowledge and the enhancement of
understanding. The Library is an active and
integral partner with students, faculty and staff
in these endeavours. Its staff develops, organizes,
and manages the infrastructure, services, and
access to knowledge, ideas and information that
are critical in a University dedicated to
distinctive learning outstanding teaching and
leading-edge research. The Library serves and
collaborates with a large and diverse community:
first, the students, faculty and staff of UBC, and
as resources permit, individuals and institutions
through British Columbia, Canada and the rest
of the world.
This mission statement reflects some of
the work of this year's strategic planning
process, which will guide the Library and its
staff through the first decade of the 21st
century. Throughout this process and the
development of the Library's Strategic Plan
(available at www.library.ubc.ca/home/
planning.html), it has been heartening to hear
the support the Library enjoys both within
and outside the University community, and
exciting to anticipate the opportunities
inherent in the continuing advances in
information technology. At the same time, a
number of challenges became clear.
Recruitment and retention of staff are of
primary importance, as we experience the first
of many retirements of experienced librarians
and support staff. Space for users and
collections is at a crisis point. With the
University's increased success in attracting
research funding, the Library must strive to
maintain, develop, preserve and provide access
to excellent research collections in an ever-
increasing variety of disciplines and formats.
The Library has continued to expand
access to online resources and services during
the past year, assisted by the University's
allocation of $1 million on a recurring basis to
the Library's acquisitions budget. The primary
purpose of this $1 million was to assist the
Library in its move from the traditional
acquisitions-based, on-site resource model of
collections development for all disciplines to
one that emphasizes access for specific
disciplines (primarily science, technology and
medicine). This funding, in addition to the
greater balance between monograph and serial
expenditures that was achieved as a result of
the 1998/99 $830,000 serial cancellations,
allowed us to support the campus' learning
and research activities more thoroughly this
year. As prices continue to rise and demands
for new resources continue to grow, there will
need to be further increases to the funds
available for acquisitions. Developing a
strategy to achieve support for this and other
Library services is a critical part of the Library's
Strategic Plan.
This year we had the very great honour of
receiving from Dr. Wallace B. Chung, his wife
Dr. Madeline H. Chung and their family a
unique and extensive collection of rare books,
manuscripts and artifacts. The Chung
collection is valued in the millions of dollars,
and is priceless in terms of its contribution to
the history of the Pacific Northwest, the Asian
experience in North America and the
Canadian Pacific Railway. The particular
significance of this gift was acknowledged by
the Canadian Cultural Property Export and
Review Board who designated the collection
"a national treasure". Gifts such as this, and
the others listed m Appendix Eof this report,
play a critical role in making the Library a rich
resource for the students, scholars and
researchers of today and tomorrow.
Catherine Quinlan
University Librarian REPORT OF THE UNIVERSITY LIBRARIAN TO THE SENATE  1999/2000
PEOPLE
The UBC Library recognizes that its staff
— librarians, management & professional staff,
support staff and student staff— are its most
important resource in supporting the research
and learning needs of the UBC community.
The Library is committed to attracting and
retaining excellent staff at all levels, and to
providing them with the training and
development they need to fulfil their
responsibilities. It is also committed to
providing for its users the physical facilities
conducive to an effective learning and study
environment and to maintaining and
upgrading these. Through a series of faculty
and departmental advisory committees,
through periodic surveys, and through an
online feedback system, the Library listens and
responds to the concerns of its users — the
students, faculty and staff of UBC.
User Survey and Focus Groups
As part of this year's strategic planning
initiative, the Library undertook the first
comprehensive survey of its users since
1991. The process established repeatable
research methods and benchmarks, so that
trend data can be developed over future
years. Return rates exceeded expectations for
the mail survey, conducted in November
1999. This data was supplemented with
qualitative focus group research in
February 2000.
The main objectives of the survey were:
to obtain a snapshot description of current
users and their uses of the Library; to
identify perceived gaps in information
resources; to determine interest in learning
about finding information and the methods
preferred for learning; to measure
satisfaction with the quality of service
received; and to determine user priorities for
improvements and additions to information
resources, services and facilities. Survey
results indicate that users anticipate
increases in their use of books, journals,
electronic journals, electronic reference
materials and computer workstations.
Although users predicted that their use of
electronic resources will continue to grow,
their responses also indicated this will not
take the pressure off Library buildings in the
foreseeable future. Reasons for continued
reliance on in-person visits to the Library
are to receive assistance from Library staff,
to use the print collections and borrow
materials, to use the computer workstations
in the Library to access resources and to use
study space.
The focus group results confirmed the
findings of the survey and identified several
recurring themes regarding current use of
Library resources and services and possible
directions for the future. One main theme
emerged regarding the perception of the
Library: it is perceived as the best or one of
the best university libraries in Canada.
Full reports of the results of the user
survey and focus groups as well as other
supporting documents are available at
www.library.ubc.ca/home/planning.html.
Library Staff
The user survey and focus groups
confirmed that Library staff are heavily
relied upon and appreciated for their
knowledge and expertise. Staff input into
the Library's Strategic Plan was sought
throughout the process, in the development
of environmental scans, the SWOT (strengths,
weaknesses, opportunities, threats) analysis and
regular review and feedback sessions
throughout the year-long process.
Particular attention was paid this year to
improving staff communication. As a result REPORT OF THE UNIVERSITY LIBRARIAN TO THE SENATE  1999/2000
XI
of a staff survey, the staff Bulletin newsletter,
which had ceased publication for a short
time, was reinstated in print form on a
quarterly basis. The University Librarian
continued to hold regular drop-in sessions
throughout the year for staff to meet with
her on an informal basis and discuss topics
of their choice, and she delivered her annual
report at two sessions open to all staff in
November 1999.
Eight staff members were inducted as
new members of UBC's 25 Year Club:
Maureen Adams, Lam Library; Russ Anton,
Cataloguing; Darlene Bailey, St. Paul's
Hospital Library; Winnie Ng, Cataloguing;
Gary Phillips, Circulation; Pontip Placzek,
Education Library; Sara Vergis, Woodward
Library; Gladys Wong, Cataloguing. One
librarian, George Brandak, Special
Collections & University Archives, was
inducted as a new member of the Quarter
Century Club.
Long-service staff members who retired
or took early retirement during the
reporting period were honoured at biannual
Library retirement parties. Together, these
staff represent 360 years of service: Young-ju
Ahn, Asian Library; Jana Beran,
Cataloguing; Manda Bose, Asian Library;
Erik de Bruijn, Human Resources & Staff
Development; Wila Busza, Circulation/
Document Lending; Jennifer Forbes,
Humanities & Social Sciences; Josie Lazar,
Administration; Oleg Litwinow,
Cataloguing; Anthony Ma, Cataloguing;
Gisela Mallue, Science & Engineering; Ann
Rowley, Cataloguing; Jean Tsai, Asian
Library; Yim Tse, Asian Library; and Elsie
Wollaston, Woodward Library.
Further details about staff changes
and activities are listed in Appendix A:
Library Staff.
Training and Development for Staff
Staff training and development continue
to be integral to the operation of each branch
and division of the Library. New staff are
introduced to the University and to the
Library through a formal orientation program,
and ongoing training is arranged by each
supervisor. In addition to this individual
training, staff participated in a total of 247
formal sessions or courses this year. As well,
participation in conferences continued to be
encouraged through funding from the staff
training and development budget, the
administrative travel budget and a fund
administered by the UBC Librarians'
Association. A review of these funding
mechanisms was begun this year, and a more
consolidated approach to professional
development funding will be instituted in the
coming year.
In-house training sessions accounted for
over 90 per cent of the formal staff training,
and covered four main topics: customer
services, information resources and services,
health and safety, and information
technology. Individual sessions included
such topics as referral skills, telephone
courtesy, specific electronic databases, Web
page creation, XML, electronic journals,
electronic books, disaster and emergency
preparedness, fire safety, general health and
safety, personal security, ergonomics, staff
Windows NT training, cataloguing,
circulation, interlibrary loan, document
delivery, media services, cost information
for serials subscriptions and account
statements. The program on employee
relations, Drawing the Line, was brought in-
house and presented by the University's
Human Resources advisors and CUPE 2950
president to supervisory library assistants.
Human Resources' Organizational and
Training Development office provided free
courses on such topics as Breaking Down
Racism, Disability Awareness, and Selection
Interviewing. REPORT OF THE UNIVERSITY LIBRARIAN TO THE SENATE  1999/2000
Staff were encouraged to take advantage
of opportunities for learning elsewhere on
campus and off-campus. They participated
in a variety of courses in Human Resources'
Organizational Training and Development
office's MOST program, in Continuing
Studies' Computers and Technology
program and in the Centre for Teaching
and Academic Growth programs.
Opportunities within the Lower Mainland
included the Serials Cataloguing
Co-operative Training Program, the Art
Libraries conference and the Medical
Library Association/Canadian Health
Libraries Association conference and
workshops. Innumerable one-of-a-kind
learning activities at professional
conferences outside the Lower Mainland
included topics such as archives, numeric
data, distance learning, electronic texts,
instructional design, systems development
and Web design.
Advisory Committees
The Library continues to meet with its
Faculty Library Advisory Committees to
ensure an ongoing exchange of ideas
between the Library and its users. A joint
meeting of the Chairs of the Faculty Library
Advisory Committees recommended that
the University increase and fully index the
annual Library collection budget and make
Library space the primary objective of the
next capital campaign. The Faculty of Arts
Library Advisory Committee and the
Library worked together to organize a one-
day symposium, eLibrary@ubc: Research and
Learning through Technology, to raise
awareness on campus of the opportunities
and issues presented by new information
technologies and the place of the Library in
this changing research and learning
environment (see www.library ubc.ca/home/
elibrary.html).
The President's Advisory Council on
the University Library (PACUL) advises on
the development of the Library and its role
in supporting the mission of UBC, provides
advice on how to maintain the Library's
collections, and supports its commitment to
technological advancement and innovation.
Several new members were recruited to
PACUL this year: Betty Bengston, Earl
Dodson, Bill Gibson, Robert McNaughton,
Indira Samarasekera, Michael Smith, and
Richard Taylor. These new members joined
continuing members Wallace Chung, Ted
Dodds, Haig deB Farris (Chair), Shenoor
Jadavji, Robert Sharman King, Michael
Koerner, Carole Moore and Peter Ward.
Health, Safety and Security
The Library has made a concerted effort
to enhance its health and safety orientation
in recent years, and it continued to be a
priority this year. In addition to the three
sessions that are mandatory for all staff
(general health and safety, emergency
preparedness, ergonomics), sessions on fire
safety and personal security were held.
There were 25 classes in total, with 709
participants. Plans were put in place to
repeat sessions each quarter as new staff
members are hired. As well, a new student
health and safety presentation and a supervisor
health and safety workshop were developed.
Several security-related initiatives were
undertaken this year. A security audit report
of the Main Library was completed in June
1999, resulting in changes such as the
addition of a CCTV surveillance system in
Special Collections & University Archives.
Several branches and divisions were re-
keyed, including Special Collections &
University Archives, MacMillan Library
and Asian Library. A new Y2K compliant
door access system was implemented in
Koerner Library. REPORT OF THE UNIVERSITY LIBRARIAN TO THE SENATE  1999/2000
XI
Library Facilities and Space
The need for improvements to Library
space for users and collections continues to
be a major concern, and several activities
were undertaken to move this issue forward
this year. A case statement for a University
Learning Centre and enhanced Library
space was developed in July 1999, in
preparation for the next University capital
campaign. This case statement emphasized
the need for learning space and facilities that
provide good environmental conditions,
facilitate the installation and use of new
technology and provide for collection access
and preservation. A small working
committee co-chaired by the University
Librarian and Catherine Alkenbrack
(Manager, Space Planning) was formed to
identify and review Library space needs and
prepare a report for the Vice-President
Academic. As well, the University Librarian
and Dr. Herbert Rosengarten (Chair, Senate
Library Committee) made a presentation to
the March 2000 Senate meeting about the
Library's space needs. At that meeting, Dr.
Herbert Rosengarten proposed the
following motion: "That, in recognition of
the crisis facing the University Library,
Senate urges the University Administration
to give special consideration to the
renovation and upgrading of the Library's
current facilities and to make the
construction of new facilities a major
priority in the next fundraising campaign."
The motion passed unanimously.
A number of projects to upgrade
existing facilities were completed during the
past year. The most significant was the
completion of the Asian Library renovation,
which involved creating 13 new work areas
for both librarians and support staff, as well
as upgrading the public area on the lower
level. Approximately 1,600 feet of compact
shelving was added to the Asian Library. In
addition, small amounts of shelving were
added to Education, MacMillan,
Mathematics, Asian, and Woodward
Libraries. Some planning was completed for
future compact storage projects in Law,
Main, Koerner, and Woodward Libraries.
New security gates were installed in
Mathematics, Law, and Woodward
Libraries. Circulation desks in Mathematics,
Law, and Woodward Libraries were altered
to accommodate new equipment and
improve ergonomic conditions.
A major renovation was begun in
Main Library's Room 501, in preparation
for the exhibition and display of the
Chung Collection. The renovation
involved re-locating five staff members to
other locations in Main and Koerner
Libraries, removing all interior partitions,
re-varnishing all beams, sills, and
baseboards, re-gilding the ornamental
crests and hand-stencilling a tile pattern
along the top of the wall. The opening of
the Chung Collection is planned for the
Spring of 2001. REPORT OF THE UNIVERSITY LIBRARIAN TO THE SENATE  1999/2000
LEARNING AND RESEARCH
The Library is committed to supporting
the learning and research needs of
undergraduate students, graduate students,
faculty and staff. It does so through the
acquisition, provision and preservation of
information resources locally, in print,
electronic and other formats, and through
access to information resources beyond the
campus. It provides instruction and training
(e.g. individual, group, Web-based) to help
students develop the information-seeking and
critical thinking skills required to succeed in
their studies and as members of a knowledge-
intensive society. It works with faculty,
students and staff to find, develop and
effectively use the information resources they
require for the creation and transmission of
knowledge. In addition, the Library provides
the infrastructure and technology to support
and deliver information resources, it provides
bibliographic access to and information about
them through its online catalogue and other
indexes, and it manages the physical flow of
resources to and from Library users, whether
on campus or at a distance.
Teaching and Reference Service
Each Library branch continued to
develop teaching programs tailored to their
user groups, and these were presented for
the second year as the Information
Connections program. This program was
funded in part by the University's Teaching
and Learning Enhancement Fund. The
Information Connections brochure lists
numerous drop-in workshops on a variety of
topics, and it serves to raise faculty
awareness of opportunities for including this
instruction in their courses. The Library
continues to seek opportunities to integrate
information skills instruction into the
curriculum. In order to reach most
incoming students, librarians developed an
information literacy module for the first
year University Writing course, in
collaboration with the English Department.
Ninety-eight sections attended a class in a
Library computer lab, reaching almost
3,000 first year students. Other examples of
such formal integration can be found in
several subject areas, most notably biology,
medicine and education.
The Library collaborated with several
other groups on campus to support
University teaching programs. Librarians
facilitated several workshops for faculty and
graduate students through the Centre for
Teaching and Academic Growth. Human
Resources' orientation and AfOST'programs
included Library presentations on information
resources. Training sessions on Web
searching were provided to UBC alumni at
the annual Alumni Day event and upon the
request of the Alumni Association. A
librarian developed a workshop and trained
student leaders to deliver it in AMS
Orientations' program for new students.
The Library invited AMS Tutoring Services
to use space in the Ridington Student
Computer Lab in Main Library for their
evening tutoring sessions, and collaborated
with them to provide training on the
Netinfo email service at the beginning of
Winter session. In addition, an AMS
Innovative Projects Fund grant to the Library
was used to staff the Ridington help desk.
Web-based Learning and Access
The Library has developed online
tutorials for its teaching programs for several
years, but this year saw the Library's first use
of WebCT, the online course tool originally
developed at UBC. The Library chose
WebCT as the platform for online tutorials
for University Writing and for Medical/
Dental Informatics because it allows
tracking of student progress and is widely REPORT OF THE UNIVERSITY LIBRARIAN TO THE SENATE  1999/2000
zz
used on campus. These projects provided an
opportunity to establish Library modules
that can be adapted for other courses in
coming years.
The Faculty of Applied Science,
Student Services, ITServices and the Library
submitted a joint 2000/01 Teaching and
Learning Enhancement Fund proposal to
develop a student portal that will bring
together information from a variety of
campus providers. The proposal was
funded, and implementation of the first
stage of the MyUBC portal is planned for
Fall 2000. The Library also began
development of a basic digitization facility
and electronic course reserve system to
support online access to some course
materials, and began a proof-of-concept
project to pass information from this system
to the portal.
The Library's Web site continues to
grow both in content and significance.
Faculty, students, staff and other users rely
increasingly on the Web site as their starting
point for accessing the Library's resources
and services at any time of the day or night,
whether on campus, at home or elsewhere.
The site continues to point users to
materials in the Library's print collection,
but the significant change has been the
increase in the amount of full text available
online. The underlying database system
used to generate dynamic Web pages for
these new resources continues to be a very
effective way to ensure consistency and
accuracy across the site.
Increased use of the Library's Web-
based catalogue resulted in computer
response time and reliability problems this
year, and these were actively addressed. In
May 1999, the computer that hosted the
catalogue was replaced with a larger, faster
machine. At the same time, in-house
development began on a replacement for the
Web-based catalogue software, to address
the reliability problems and high priority
functionality issues. Final programming and
testing was completed by late 1999, and
implementation of the new software is
planned for Spring 2000.
Several improvements were introduced
for remote online access, especially for the
three major teaching hospital sites located
off-campus. A system beyond the existing
proxy server arrangement was developed to
authorize access to locally mounted
databases and services. This system
addressed some of the difficulties faced by
users on networks behind firewalls. In
addition, some database licenses were
extended to include non-UBC users at the
major teaching hospital sites, through an
agreement with three members of the
Council of University Teaching Hospitals
(St. Paul's Hospital/Providence Health
Care, Vancouver General Hospital and
Children's and Women's Health Centre).
Information Resources and Collections
The Library continued its move from
the acquisitions-based, on-site resource
model of collections development for all
disciplines to one that emphasizes online
access for specific disciplines. The major
purchase of the year in this regard was a
subscription to Elsevier's ScienceDirect
service. In addition to providing access to
the online equivalent of the 467 Elsevier
printed journal subscriptions already
available at the Library, users gained full text
electronic access to over 630 additional
Elsevier titles. Another subscription, with
Academic Press, provided access to a smaller
but just as significant set of 174 electronic
journals. In both subscriptions, the titles
range over many subject areas. The Library
also purchased online access to Science, the
key weekly journal in all areas of science,
and the usage of it has been the highest of REPORT OF THE UNIVERSITY LIBRARIAN TO THE SENATE  1999/2000
all the Library's electronic journals.
Numerous new online databases were also
purchased, the most notable being INSPEC
(for physics, computer science, and electrical
engineering), one of the first major
databases acquired by the Library that
features linking to the full text of journals at
selected publishers' Web sites.
The University's allocation of an
additional $1 million to the base of the
acquisitions budget, a 9.7 per cent increase,
helped the Library to make these advances
in electronic resources and at the same time
continue to develop the print collection for
disciplines that still rely on it as their
primary source of information. Over $2.7
million was spent on monographs,
$300,000 more than the previous year and
more than in any previous year, not taking
inflation into account. Another reason for
this improvement was lower net serial costs
due to the previous year's serials
cancellations and the strength of the
Canadian dollar in Fall 1999.
Improvements were sought for
monograph purchasing, a time consuming
task for many bibliographers across the
Library. This year nearly 40 per cent of the
monograph funds was expended by means
of approval plans, improving procedures for
both bibliographers and processing staff.
The Library continued its project of
consolidating the ordering of monographs
with fewer vendors, with the goal of
obtaining beneficial terms and utilizing the
funds efficiently. The average cost of books
obtained by the Library ranged from $37 for
Asian-language books to $144 for books in
science and applied science subjects.
In addition to its acquisitions budget,
the Library has access to funds generated by
three endowments of $1 million or more:
the Collections Enrichment Endowment
Fund, the Rodger Stanton Memorial
Library Fund (funded by the Sutherland
Foundation), and the Burwell Endowment
(for anthropology and sociology). Other
sources of funds include smaller
endowments, trust funds, and donations by
various faculties and departments for
specific materials. The total expended from
outside the Library's acquisitions budget
was nearly $750,000.
Numerous gifts-in-kind were received
this year, most notably the remarkable
collection donated by Dr. Wallace B.
Chung, his wife Dr. Madeline H. Chung
and their family. This unique collection of
rare books, manuscripts and artifacts is one
of the most extraordinary and extensive of
its kind in North America. It weaves
together three broad, interrelated themes:
the Western approach to the Pacific
Northwest of North America, in particular
British Columbia; the Asian experience in
North America, particularly in British
Columbia; and the history of the Canadian
Pacific Railway Company. In total, the
Chung collection comprises more than
20,000 items, ranging from ships' logs and
tableware, to posters, pamphlets and
personal diaries. In November 1999 the
Canadian Cultural Property Export Review
Board granted a special Certificate of
Recognition to the Chung family, an
honour bestowed only upon collections of
exceptional value. For further information
on gifts-in-kind, please refer to Appendix E:
Donor and Gift Recognition.
The Library continued to co-operate
with other institutions in developing its
collections. With the BC Electronic Library
Network, the Library acquired online access
to the Canadian Almanac and Directory,
Canadian NewsDisc, and the years 1887 to
1966 ofPsycInfo. With the Council of
Prairie and Pacific University Libraries, the
Library acquired online access to Investext.
To access Academic Press electronic
journals, the Library joined the Ontario
Academic and Research Libraries group REPORT OF THE UNIVERSITY LIBRARIAN TO THE SENATE  1999/2000
XI
based at the University of Toronto. The
Library subscribed to most of the titles
initiated via the Association of Research
Libraries' Scholarly Publishing and
Academic Resources Coalition. Other
collaborative initiatives were begun this
year with the Canada Foundation for
Innovation-funded Canadian National
Site Licensing Project, and the Pacific Rim
Digital Library Alliance.
The position of Assistant University
Librarian for Collections was reinstated in
November 1999, in recognition of the
significance of the Library's collections
portfolio. Janice Kreider, formerly
Collections Coordinator, accepted this
position. Other reorganization of the
Library's structure for bibliography and
collections support began in 1999/00,
prompted by early retirements in the
Library and the growing prominence of
electronic resources. The goals of the
restructuring are to centralize more of the
workflow and to mainstream many of the
procedures needed to support the acquisition
of and access to electronic resources.
University Archives
Special grant funding received from
campus sources and external granting
agencies allowed the Archives to undertake
two important projects this year. The first
project was Phase II of the retrospective
indexing of the student paper, The
Ubyssey. Funds for this year provided for
the creation and input of over 10,000 new
entries in the University Publication
Index. As a result of this project, there is
now a comprehensive, online index to The
Ubyssey for the period 1917-1953. The
second project allowed the Archives to
process a backlog of archival records from
the President's Office.
The Archives partnered with the
Ceremonies Office to add complete
honorary degree citations to the existing list
of honorary degree recipients which had
been available as part of the Archives'
University history Web page (see
www.library.ubc.ca/spcoll/ubc_arch/
facts.html). This information is important
because it provides not only a
comprehensive list of all of UBC's honorary
degree recipients but also illustrates clearly
the reasons for which these honours were
bestowed.
The Archives worked very closely with
students from the Master of Archival
Studies program. One student participated
in a summer internship while several others
completed professional experience projects
in the Archives.
Throughout the year, Archives' staff
continued to develop and enhance Web-
based resources to disseminate information
about archival holdings. The Archives has
now published detailed, online finding aids
to over 95% of its collections. The
Archives' growing digitized historical
photograph collection, consisting of over
23,000 images, continues to be extremely
popular. As well, there were a number of
enhancements to the historical resources
Web page, where researchers can find a
wealth of information about the historical
development of the University.
Preservation
The Library's program of preservation
microfilming was reduced in 1999, due to
decreases in grant funding and markets
for microfilmed materials, the funding
mechanisms that had sustained the
program since its inception in 1990. The
emphasis of the program has turned
toward the preservation of the REPORT OF THE UNIVERSITY LIBRARIAN TO THE SENATE  1999/2000
University's and the Library's own special
materials. Microfilming projects this year
included recent years of The Ubyssey and
UBC Reports, completing the final phase
of MacMillan Library documents, UBC
Law Newsletter, UBC theses on BC
history and related subjects, The South
China Cultural Review, 1993-98, and the
third part of the Malcolm Lowry archive.
Fee-for-service or marketable projects
included UBC Faculty of Education
major papers, British Columbia
Directories, 1955-60, and The New
Canadian, a Japanese-Canadian
newspaper that ran from 1938 to 1948.
The Library does not have an organized
program of digitization, but efforts began
this year in cooperation with the Pacific
Rim Digital Library Alliance (PRDLA) to
identify items in our collections for
digitization, as part of PRDLA's Pacific
Explorations Project.
The Library's mendery continues to
repair books which need more prompt
repair than could be obtained via
commercial binders and it performs various
kinds of repairs of other books, rare and
not-so-rare. Mendery staff also train
circulation assistants who perform minor
book repairs in Library branches.
The Library continued its efforts to
facilitate access to materials not held at
UBC. Pegasus, the user-initiated document
delivery service from the Canada Institute
for Scientific and Technical Information
was improved and made more accessible
with the introduction of a Web interface.
Approximately 20,000 documents were
delivered to UBC students, faculty and staff,
primarily in science, technology and
medicine. This represents an increase of 35
per cent over the preceding year. Increased
access to full text journal articles online may
begin to reduce this extraordinary rate of
growth. Staff-mediated interlibrary loans,
obtaining materials for UBC users from
libraries worldwide, also increased by 15 per
cent over the previous year.
Development continued on the Epixtech
Resource Sharing System supporting
interlibrary loan services from UBC. The
new system experienced implementation
difficulties, but also automated many
processes formerly performed by staff and
enabled new methods of user notification.
Last year the Library delivered
approximately 33,000 documents, primarily
to other post-secondary libraries in the
province, but also within specialized subject
networks such as the Association of
Canadian Medical Colleges.
Collection Use and Access to Materials
At Other Libraries
Circulation activity increased eight
per cent from 3.3 million transactions in
1998/99 to 3.5 million transactions in
1999/00. Given that journals in the
Library do not circulate and there has
been a significant increase in the amount
of full text available online through
Library subscriptions, these numbers
represent only a portion of the use of the
Library's collections.
Technology Infrastructure
The migration of the Library's 800
computer workstations to the NT operating
system, a major project begun last year, was
completed this year with the migration of
400 staff and specialized workstations. The
project included upgrading many older
workstations, providing memory or other
upgrades to the remaining ones, testing and
implementing the most recent versions of
software, and migrating data. Systems staff
provided NT orientation and basic training
w REPORT OF THE UNIVERSITY LIBRARIAN TO THE SENATE  1999/2000
XI
sessions for all Library staff, as well as
individual help.
The NT migration resulted in many
benefits. It provides a more secure, robust
environment for the Library's workstations
and allows Systems staff to make much
better use of the network to operate and
maintain equipment and upgrade software.
It enables the Library to provide more
recent and powerful software for users and
staff, and more efficient use and sharing of
printers and data amongst workstations. It
also supported the introduction of new
services and systems such as a facility
allowing a CD-ROM database to be
accessed from any Library workstation via
the Library's Web site.
The Library's central computing
equipment continued to expand, with over
25 servers supporting a variety of local
systems and operating environments. The
Library's original computer for the DRA
system was replaced with a faster and more
powerful one, resulting in improved
response time on the Web catalogue and
other DRA applications. Through the BC
Electronic Library Network (ELN), a third
server was added to the two already in place
for ELN-licensed Silverplatter databases
hosted by the UBC Library.
The Library's communications network
grew significantly with the addition or
activation of computer ports at many
locations. The main connection between the
off-campus St. Paul's Hospital Library and
the campus network was upgraded from a
TI connection to a lOmbps link. Many of
the Library's locations have now utilized all
readily available ports and new ports will
require major infrastructure upgrades or the
investigation of communications
technologies such as wireless.
A new online teaching lab, named
E-Space, was opened in Koerner Library in
Fall 1999. It was equipped as a small group
teaching space with nine Sun Ray workstations
using the latest Internet appliance technology.
This new facility was made possible by a
donation from Haig deB and Mary Farris.
Haig Farris is Chair of the President's Advisory
Council on the University Library, and a longtime supporter of information technology
endeavours at the Library.
Bibliographic Control, Cataloguing
and Ordering
Technical Services staff kept pace with
the normal processing of ordering, receiving
and cataloguing during 1999/00. This is an
indication that the stress of the previous
years' change to an integrated library system
has past and that staff are skilled at using the
new processing systems. Project work of
various types continued during the year.
Acquisitions staff worked with fund
managers to clear outdated orders, to free
more funds for ordering material and
prepare for automated claiming. Serial staff
continued to work on serial clean-up of
bound holding records; this work is now 75
per cent done. Serial order unit staff
completed the work resulting from the first
major serial cancellation project since the
move to the new integrated library system.
Cataloguing staff continued to clear
cataloguing backlogs stored in branches.
Approximately 10,000 titles were catalogued
from these backlogs during this year,
reducing this arrearage to approximately
24,000 titles as of April 2000. Three
branches account for the majority of this
backlog: Asian Library at 8,200; Koerner
Library at 8,300; Main Library at 7,300.
The goal is to catalogue the Koerner and
Main backlogs during the next year while
maintaining relative currency in cataloguing
new incoming material. REPORT OF THE UNIVERSITY LIBRARIAN TO THE SENATE  1999/2000
The first phase of the retrospective
conversion of the card catalogue (recon)
continued. As of March 2000, the status
report for this project is: 1,029 drawers
done (64 per cent); 58 drawers in process
(three per cent); 520 drawers not done
(33 per cent). 'First phase' means that at
least a basic bibliographic record and all
Library holdings are recorded in the
online catalogue.
The first phase of the binding backlog
clearance began at the end of this year. The
Library reallocated $20,000 additional
dollars on a one-time basis to reduce
binding backlogs. This allocation resulted in
clearing the Science & Engineering serial
binding backlog, some catch-up binding in
Law and Music Libraries and a start at
clearing the Life Science Libraries serial
binding backlog. The Library intends to
continue one-time funding as possible to
clear branch binding backlogs.
The letters of agreement negotiated
with the Library's top vendors were up for
renegotiation at the end of this fiscal year.
Agreement has been reached on the
majority, with improvement of terms once
again on some. Blackwell Information
Services (BIS), one of the Library's major
periodical vendors, sold its periodical
business late in 1999/00, and the Library
sought better terms on the BIS list and
received them. The order unit in Library
Processing Centre will be recoding order
records to reflect the new vendor during the
next year.
Asian specialists in the Library
Processing Centre were relocated to the
Asian Library during December 1999 to
complete the process of unifying the
Library's Asian specialists on one site.
12 REPORT OF THE UNIVERSITY LIBRARIAN TO THE SENATE  1999/2000
COMMUNITY AND
INTERNATIONALIZATION
The UBC Library is firmly committed to
cooperating with other academic libraries and
institutions, government and industry in order
to support learning and research and to further
the transfer and preservation of knowledge. As
a community resource, it plays a key role in the
intellectual, social, cultural and economic
growth of the Vancouver region and British
Columbia. It is now part of a network of
information resources that extends around the
world, and which strengthens British
Columbia's and Canada's links to the
international community.
Cooperation with Other Libraries
The Library has cooperative agreements
with many academic libraries, all of which
depend upon each other to meet the
growing information needs of their
communities. The Library continues to
support libraries throughout British
Columbia and Canada through its
interlibrary lending program, and at the
same time depends on libraries throughout
North America and abroad for access to
materials not available locally. The Library
enjoys preferential pricing for documents
received from the Canada Institute for
Scientific and Technical Information as a
result of its membership in the Council of
Prairie and Pacific University Libraries.
The Canadian Association of Research
Libraries, of which UBC is a member,
applied for and received funding from the
Canada Foundation for Innovation to
develop the Canadian National Site
Licensing Project, which will improve
access to electronic information for
scholars and researchers at the 64
institutions across Canada who are
participating in this project.
In 1999, the Academic Vice-Presidents
of the six universities of the province
expressed interest in investigating the
possibilities of greater collaboration between
their university libraries. Funds were made
available and a consultant was hired to
review past collaboration and current
initiatives and issues, and to make
recommendations for the future. The project
was under way by the end of 1999/00, and a
report will be issued by Summer 2000.
The Library is an active member of the
Pacific Rim Digital Library Alliance
(PRDLA), a consortium of academic
libraries on the west coast of North America
and the Pacific Rim. The Library will be
participating in PRDLA's Pacific
Explorations Project, by identifying relevant
materials for digitization in Special
Collections & University Archives, and in
its Multilingual Gateway Project to
provide a common Web gateway to
PRDLA library catalogues.
Community Access to Collections
The Library's collections are open to all
visitors, and materials such as those in
Special Collections & University Archives
are used by scholars from around the world.
The Library also endeavours to make its
online resources as accessible as possible,
within the bounds of vendor license
agreements. Although many of the Library's
online resources are obtained through
license agreements that restrict remote
access to UBC students, faculty and staff,
most of these agreements permit anyone
to use the resource within the Library.
This year, remote access to a select list of
the Library's online resources was gained
for the non-UBC staff of three UBC
affiliated teaching hospitals, through
negotiations with the Council of
University Teaching Hospitals. fa^^^^rf
REPORT OF THE UNIVERSITY LIBRARIAN TO THE SENATE  1999/2000
Community borrower cards are
available for a fee, and at no charge for
Hampton, Acadia Park and University
Apartments residents and visiting scholars.
In September 1999, a one-year trial
agreement was reached with the UBC
Alumni Association to provide community
borrower cards at no charge to Alumni
participating in the Alumni A-card program.
Community Discussion and Awareness
The Library has a leadership role on
campus, and in the wider community, in the
discussion of issues related to the sharing and
preservation of knowledge. Dr. Colin Steele,
University Librarian at the Australian National
University, was invited to deliver the Library
Lecture on October 18, 1999, tided Darwin's
Radio: Trends in Scholarly Communication.
The Faculty of Arts Library Advisory
Committee and the Library worked together
to organize a one-day symposium,
eLibrary@ubc: Research and Learning through
Technology, to raise awareness on campus of
the opportunities and issues presented by new
information technologies and the place of the
Library in this changing research and learning
environment. The George Woodcock Lecture
organized by the Library, the Program in
Canadian Studies and the Department of
English, was delivered September 29, 1999 by
Dr. Juliet McMaster of the University of
Alberta, and titled What Daisy Knew: The
Child Writer as Voyeur.
Keeping up with the variety of
information resources and services available
today is a significant challenge, and the Library
needs to consider how it can most effectively
communicate with users about new resources,
services and opportunities. This year, the
University Librarian asked UBC Public Affairs
to assist with a communications review, and
recommendations will be reviewed in the
coming year.
14 REPORT OF THE UNIVERSITY LIBRARIAN TO THE SENATE  1999/2000
XI
FUTURE DIRECTIONS
The University has embarked on the
course of becoming the best university in
Canada and one of the world's finest public
universities. As the 'heart' of the University,
the Library is central to the University's vision
for the new millennium.
The Academic Plan endorsed by Senate
on February 23, 2000, like Trek 2000, is
focused on supporting innovative learning-
centred academic programs and outstanding
research. In his introduction to the Plan, the
Vice-President Academic and Provost
stated, "Recognizing that the quality and
breadth of its research and scholarly activity
distinguishes UBC, the Plan stresses the
need to recruit and retain the strongest
scholars and researchers, and provide
them with the infrastructure that will
allow them to thrive." An outstanding
research library is one of the critical
elements of that infrastructure.
The Library's Strategic Plan, to be
published in Fall 2000, will set forth the
vision, mission and values of the Library in
the context of Trek 2000 and the Academic
Plan. In addition, it will include some key
strategies for the next three years to ensure
that the Library continues to enhance its
support for learning and research at UBC
and beyond. An Implementation Plan
detailing how these strategies will be
achieved will be developed over the next
twelve months.
The vision of the future that emerged
from this year's user survey and focus
groups was very encouraging, and helped
define the direction for the Library. Users
indicated that they believe that university
libraries will continue to participate in the
preservation of cultural heritage and act as
the conduit to a vast array of resources for
learning, teaching and research. Of this
university in particular, users indicated that
the Library's role is central in serving the
information needs of a diverse academic
community of students, faculty and staff.
The depth and breadth of the
community served by the Library will
increase substantially over the next year.
UBC has been extraordinarily successful in
the second round of competition for
funding through the Canada Foundation
for Innovation, securing over $68 million in
funding. UBC has also been successful in
the Canada Research Chairs program and
will receive 160 positions over the next
five years.
This success will have a direct effect on
the Library. As UBC's success grows, so do
the demands on the Library for more
information resources and the staff to help
researchers use these resources effectively.
The University's support in funding the
Library, an important element of research
infrastructure, will be crucial to the
Library's ability to meet the new demands
and expectations that accompany the new
programs and researchers coming to UBC.
People, Learning and Research,
Community and Internationalization are the
foundations of the Library's Strategic Plan.
Guided by this Plan, the Library will
develop its resources, its staff and its
contributions to the community. The
Library's vision statement upholds and
expands upon this theme: the UBC Library
will be a provincial, national and
international leader in the development,
provision and delivery of outstanding
information resources and services that are
essential to learning, research and the
creation of knowledge at UBC and beyond.
15 REPORT OF THE UNIVERSITY LIBRARIAN TO THE SENATE  1999/2000
UBC     LIBRARY
16 REPORT OF THE UNIVERSITY LIBRARIAN TO THE SENATE  1999/2000
APPENDICES CONTENTS
A Library Staff 18
B Library Statistical Summary 19
C Growth of Collections 20
D Library Expenditures 21
E Donor and Gift Recognition 22-23
F Grant Funding 24
XI
UBC     LIBRARY REPORT OF THE UNIVERSITY LIBRARIAN TO THE SENATE  1999/2000
Appendix A
LIBRARY STAFF
The Library's staff complement (including GPOF and non-
GPOF budget positions) now totals 302.37 full-time equivalent
(FTE) positions, including 75.33 librarians, 15 management &
professional (M&P) staff and 212.04 support staff. This
compares to a total of 307.61 FTE positions in 1999, and
represents a net decrease of 1.7 per cent. The effect on GPOF
budget positions was a decrease of 5.24 FTE to 282.24 from
287.48 FTE. Non-GPOF budget positions (cost-recovery or
grant-funded) remained at 20.13 FTE. Such positions now
represent 6.7 per cent of the Library's staff complement. In
addition, the Library's student assistant and temporary hourly
staff complement totalled 53.36 FTE positions. Of these, 3.93
FTE were funded by cost recoveries or from grants.
Long-service staff members who retired or took early retirement
during the reporting period included: Young-ju Ahn, M&P,
Asian Library; Jana Beran, LA 4, Catalogue Division; Manda
Bose, M&P, Asian Library; Erik de Bruijn, Assistant University
Librarian, Human Resources & Staff Development; Wila Busza,
LA 4, Circulation Division/Document Lending; Jennifer Forbes,
Bibliographer, Humanities & Social Sciences Division; Josie
Lazar, Administrative Clerk, Administration; Oleg Litwinow,
Catalogue Librarian, Catalogue Division; Anthony Ma,
Catalogue Librarian, Catalogue Division; Gisela Mallue, LA 4,
Science & Engineering Division; Ann Rowley, Catalogue
Librarian, Catalogue Division; Jean Tsai, LA 4, Asian Library;
Yim Tse, Reference Librarian, Asian Library; Elsie Wollaston,
Reference Librarian, Woodward Library.
New appointments, extensions of appointments, or changes in
appointment included: Norman Amor, extended as Preservation
Microfilming and CIP Cataloguing Librarian, in July 1999, partially
from funding provided by the National Library; Darrell Bailie,
appointed as Manager, Facilities, Security and Health and Safety, in
April 1999; Doug Brigham, appointed as Librarian/Analyst, Systems,
in May 1999; Danielle Bugeaud, appointed as Catalogue Librarian
(.5FTE), Catalogue Division, in March 2000; Ann Doyle, extended
as Acting Head, Xwi7xwa Library, in August 1999; Patrick Dunn,
extended as Acting Head, Resource Sharing Services, in October
1999; Tracy Havlin, appointed as an hourly librarian in Woodward
Library, in October 1999; Janice Kreider, appointed Assistant
University Librarian for Collections on a continuing basis, in
September 1999; Simon Neame, extended as an hourly librarian in
the Science & Engineering Division, in April 1999; Bonnie
Stableford, Head, Science & Engineering Division, assumed
responsibility for management of the Main Library's Circulation
service, in November 1999; Isabel Pitfield, extended as part-time
Coordinator, Vancouver Bibliography Project in Special Collections
& University Archives, in January 2000; Lynne Redenbach, extended
as Circulation Extension Librarian, in September 1999; Sally Taylor,
extended as term Reference Librarian in the Woodward Biomedical
Library, in June 1999; Rudy Traichel, appointed as Technical
Services and Catalogue Librarian, Catalogue Division, in August
1999; Anna Wilkinson, appointed as term Reference Librarian in
Special Collections & Archives and Fine Arts Library, in November
1999; Eleanor Yuen, appointed as Head, Asian Library, in April
1999. Hilde Colenbrander was granted study leave for the period
September 1999 to August 2000.
18 REPORT  OF  THE UNIVERSITY LIBRARIAN TO  THE  SENATE   1999/2000
UBC     LIBRARY
Appendix B
LIBRARY STATISTICAL SUMMARY
collections 1999/00
Total Volumes1 3,941,433
Volumes Added, Net 94,918
Total Titles Catalogued 60,755
Current Subscriptions 25,966
Number of monographs purchased2 40,165
1 Includes net volumes added.
2 Order division only - excludes Asian, Government Publications, Law, Map & Life Sciences.
SERVICES
Total Recorded Use of Library Resources 3,679,207
Document Delivery-Copies (Internal)3 45,620
Document Delivery-Books (Internal)3 2,300
Interlibrary Loan-Loaned/Copies3 41,960
Interlibrary Loan-Borrowed/Copies3 32,560
Instruction Classes/Orientation 1,962
Number of Participants 21,457
Total Questions Answered 402,276
Research Questions 28,978
Reference Questions 201,288
Directional Questions 172,010
3 Included in Total Recorded Use of Library Resources.
STAFF (FTE)
Librarians 75.33
Professional (M&P) 15.00
Support Staff 212.04
Subtotal4 302.37
Student5 53.36
Total FTE All Staff 355.73
4 Includes 20.13 FTE cost-recovery or grant-funded positions.
5 Includes 3.93 cost-recovery or grant-funded positions.
EXPENDITURES
Collections
Salaries & Wages
Binding
Other Operating Expenditures
Total Gross Expenditures
Cost Recoveries
Total Net Expenditures
%
11,666,649
41.73
13,870,137
49.60
164,438
0.59
2,259,511
8.08
27,960,735
2,021,382
25,939,353
19 REPORT  OF  THE  UNIVERSITY LIBRARIAN  TO  THE  SENATE   1999/2000
UBC     LIBRARY
Appendix C
GROWTH OF COLLECTIONS
MARCH 31,1999
Air Photos
1,045
Aperture Cards
2,589
Archives (metres)
3,194
Electronic Databases
Locally mounted Bibliographical Databases
37
Remote access Bibliographical Databases
36
Remote access Bibliographical Databases (free)            108
CD-ROM
75
Locally mounted Full Text Databases
51
Remote access Full Text Databases
18
Remote access Full Text Databases (free)
14
Remote access Ejournals1
2,888
Locally mounted Numeric Databases
833
TOTAL Electronic Databases
3,938
Films/Motion Pictures
967
Filmstrips
2,584
Flash Cards
908
Government Publications (unbound)
807,848
Maps
202,503
Microcomputer Discs
1,560
Microfiche (Sheets)
3,465,097
Microfilms (Reels)
115,564
Microprint/Microcards
1,199,350
Photographs
332,118
Pictures
67,398
Realia/Games/Models
5
Slides
31,983
Slide/Tape Shows
112
Sound Recordings-Cassettes
6,717
Sound Recordings-CDs
16,109
Sound Recordings-LPs
52,608
Subscriptions2
24,791
Transparencies (Sets)
1,594
Videodiscs
12
Videotapes
8,012
Volumes-Catalogued
3,846,515
NET GROWTH       MARCH 31, 2000
0
1,045
0
2,589
106
3,300
6
43
0
36
0
108
-8
67
10
61
36
54
0
14
1,812
4,700
0
833
1,978
5,916
0
967
2
2,586
0
908
6,459
814,307
888
203,391
182
1,742
62,845
3,527,942
1,392
116,956
0
1,199,350
14,139
346,257
0
67,398
0
5
0
31,983
0
112
324
7,041
1,012
17,121
11
52,619
1,175
25,966
0
1,594
0
12
736
8,748
94,918
3,941,433
1 There were 2,102 full text ejournals mounted as part of Academic Search Elite and ABI Inform which were not part
of the 1998/99 base totals. These have now been incorporated.
2 Includes print and electronic periodical subscriptions, standing orders and monographic series.
20 REPORT OF THE UNIVERSITY LIBRARIAN TO THE SENATE  1999/2000
XI
Appendix D
LIBRARY EXPENDITURES
LIBRARY OPERATING EXPENDITURES
SALARIES
GROSS
YEAR
& WAGES
%
COLLECTIONS
%
BINDING
%
OTHER
%
EXPENDITURE
1994/95
13,663,492
55.89
8,389,284
34.32
210,068
0.86
2,183,458
8.93
24,446,302
1995/96
13,758,042
53.33
8,978,367
34.80
194,749
0.75
2,866,274
11.11
25,797,432
1996/97
13,878,493
51.16
9,159,355
33.77
196,649
0.73
3,891,052
14.34
27,125,549
1997/98
13,999,426
52.68
9,769,644
36.77
162,650
0.61
2,641,540
9.94
26,573,260
1998/99
13,945,766
50.71
10,569,120
38.43
203,093
0.74
2,782,233
10.12
27,500,212
1999/00
13,870,137
49.60
11,666,649
41.73
164,438
0.59
2,259,511
8.08
27,960,735
♦ As in previous years, only expenditures from the Library's own GPOF budget are included in the above. Excluded are:
Faculty of Commerce expenditures in support of the David Lam Library.
Expenditures for library materials by other campus units, for example for departmental reading rooms.
Expenditures from library grant and trust funds.
Collections expenditures from library grant and trust funds amounted to $289,877 in 1999/00.
♦ "Other" expenditures include non-recurring equipment acquisitions which vary considerably from year to year.
♦ The Library's GPOF expenditures for 1999/00 were 8.1% of the University GPOF expenditures.
SOURCES OF LIBRARY OPERATING FUNDS
GPOF BUDGET
FEES FOR SERVICE
FEES FOR SERVICE
LIBRARY FINES
TOTAL
YEAR
AMOUNT
%
INTERNAL
%
EXTERNAL
%
AMOUNT
%
FUNDING
1994/95
23,286,079
93.15
130,992
0.52
1,202,963
4.81
377,781
1.51
24,997,815
1995/96
24,610,477
92.66
195,157
0.73
1,289,958
4.86
465,660
1.75
26,561,252
1996/97
26,072,323
92.98
155,138
0.55
1,405,976
5.01
407,880
1.46
28,041,317
1997/98
24,825,940
93.81
83,138
0.32
1,304,806
4.93
249,987
0.94
26,463,871
1998/99
25,526,451
92.91
138,007
0.50
1,398,876
5.09
413,005
1.50
27,476,339
1999/00
26,123,163
92.81
159,317
0.57
1,431,005
5.08
431,060
1.53
28,144,545
21 REPORT OF THE UNIVERSITY LIBRARIAN TO THE SENATE  1999/2000
Appendix E
DONOR AND GIFT RECOGNITION
DONATIONS
Once again, alumni, friends, parents of students, faculty, staff,
foundations, corporations and organizations continued and
increased their support of the Library. Gifts ranged from the very
specific - for example, funds to purchase collected back issues of the
New York Times, an important research resource - to the very
general, such as unrestricted gifts to the Friends of the Library Fund.
All gifts shared and conveyed the philanthropic spirit of donors
wishing to support students, scholars and community users of the
Library.
Overall in 1999/00, the Library received more than 2,200
donations, with a combined value of $6,045,547. This represents an
increase of 282 per cent in support for the Library over the previous
year. Donations came in the forms of cash, gifts-in-kind (e.g. books,
maps), and pledged support, which may be received over a period of
years.
One gift - The Wallace B. and Madeline H. Chung Collection -
clearly led the way, not only for the year, but also in the history of
collections donated to the Library. This gift stands as the single most
valuable donation (in financial terms) ever made to the Library.
Valued in the millions of dollars, the collection's worth as a unique
cultural and research resource is essentially priceless. Dr. Wallace B.
Chung, former head of UBC's Department of Vascular Surgery,
spent decades collecting books and ephemera relating to three
interconnected themes: the Chinese experience in North America,
especially Canada; the history of the Canadian Pacific Railway; and
the history of British Columbia and Canada. Among the highlights
of the collection is a 14-foot ship's model of the Empress of Asia,
lovingly recrafted by Dr. Chung over more than 4,000 hours. In
total, the collection comprises more than 20,000 items, ranging
from ships' logs and tableware, to posters, pamphlets and personal
diaries. In November 1999 the Canadian Cultural Property Export
Review Board granted a Special Certificate of Recognition to the
Chung family, an honour only bestowed upon collections considered
to be of exceptional value.
In addition to the collection, Drs. Wallace and Madeline Chung and
family donated funds to assist in preparing a space in Main Library
for the exhibition of artefacts and other elements of the collection.
Room 501 - soon to be renamed The Wallace B. and Madeline H.
Chung Collection and Reading Room - has been restored to recapture
its original appearance, dating back to the building's opening in
1925. The room is now a complement to Room 502 - similarly
restored last year and named The Suzanne Cates Dodson and Earl D.
Dodson Reading Room, in honour of these long-time friends and
benefactors of the Library.
Other highlights of 1999/00 include a generous gift from Dr. Ken
Spencer, which helped to push the Library Technology Endowment
Fund past $1 million, on the way to a goal of $1.5 million. Overall,
the Technology Endowment received $231,226 in support this past
year. The Technology Endowment funds technology and services to
enhance our capacity as a 'library without walls,' through delivery
of resources and services online to students, faculty, staff and
community users wherever they are located.
Alumni and other Friends of the Library also continued to support
the Collections Enrichment Endowment Fund (Phase II). Gifts
totalling $82,510 put the endowment above $1.2 million, heading
to a $2 million goal. The endowment generates annual income to
support acquisition of electronic resources and databases, scholarly
journals, and books covering the range of academic disciplines.
GIFTS-IN-KIND
Gifts-in-kind play an important role in enhancing the Library's
collections by increasing the depth and breadth of our research
resources and contributing to our uniqueness as an institution.
Significant gifts-in-kind received in 1999/00 include:
♦ The Thomas Crosby and Emma Douse Crosby Fonds,
1862-1927, donated by Mrs. Helen L. Hager, comprising
the correspondence of Rev. Thomas Crosby and his wife,
Emma, as well as manuscripts, documents and photographs
kept by the family for over a century, providing significant
information on Protestant missionary work and the lives of
missionaries and the First Nations people in the Port
Simpson area of the North Pacific Coast;
♦ Dr. Max Cynader's continuing subscription to the journal
Brain Research, which includes subscriptions to four allied
research journals; these subscriptions are expensive and
would not otherwise be available at the Library;
♦ Prof. Ron Jobe's ongoing tradition of donating extensive
volumes to build the Ronald Jobe Children's Literature
Collection;
♦ Prof. Paul Lin's gift of the Pai Na Pen Erh Shih Ssu Shih
(The Twenty-Four Dynastic Histories), an 820-volume set
originally presented to him by the late Chinese Premier
Zhou Enlai, and a rich and authoritative source for the
study of Chinese history;
♦ Mrs. Elizabeth Black's donation of the personal papers of
her late husband, internationally acclaimed artist, Sam
Black;
♦ Prof. Philip Thomas's additions to the collection of folk
songs he previously donated to Special Collections.
The Library is grateful to all of the generous individuals and
organizations who contributed financial support and gifts-in-kind
during 1999/00. These Friends of the Library significantly enrich
our information resources, and thus they enrich the learning
opportunities and experiences of our students, faculty, staff and
community users.
22 REPORT OF THE UNIVERSITY LIBRARIAN TO THE SENATE  1999/2000
XI
Appendix E
DONOR AND GIFT RECOGNITION
FRIENDS OF THE LIBRARY 1999/2000
The following donors generously contributed gifts between
April 1, 1999 and March 31, 2000.
PRESIDENT'S CIRCLE
($250,000 and above)
Dr. Wallace B. Chung & Dr. Madeline H. Chung and Family
CHANCELLOR'S CIRCLE
($25,000 to $249,999)
Mrs. Helen L. Hager
Dr. Kenneth Spencer
We have made every effort to ensure the accuracy of
this list of donations received between April 1,1999
and March 31, 2000. Please direct any inquiries to
the Library Development Officer at (604) 822-8926.
LIBRARIAN'S CIRCLE AND WESBROOK SOCIETY
($1,000 to $24,999)
Anonymous
Mr. Ian Edward Ashdown
Dr. Charles B. Bailey
Mrs. Elizabeth M. Black
Boag Foundation Limited
Mr. W. Thomas Brown, MBE
Dr. Max Cynader
Mr. & Mrs. Charles A. Davis
Mr. J. Erik de Bruijn
Ms. Mary C. Dvorak
Estate of Mary Millicent Fallis
Dr. Margery Fee
Mr. G. Philip Fisher
Dr. Joseph A. F. Gardner, CM & Mrs. Joyce Gardner
Ms. Nina Halpern
Mr. Robert M. Hamilton
Mrs. Elizabeth Hawkins
Dr. Ken Haycock
Dr. Leonidas E. Hill
Mrs. Sandra L. M. Hodgins
Mr. & Mrs. Joseph Jetter
Dr. Ron Jobe
Mrs. Lynn Kis
Dr. Paul T. K. Lin, CM
Mr. Robert Mann
Mr. Stewart M. Marshall
Mr. Marcus Nairns
Dr. William H. New
Mr. Noel A. S. Owens
Mrs. Vera Pech
Mrs. R Elaine Polglase
Dr. Patrick A. Powell
Estate of David W. Ridington
Dr. Robert S. Rothwell
Dr. Gunther F. Schrack
Mr. Amil Shah
Dr. O. F. G. Sitwell
Dr. H. Colin Slim
Dr. Avrum Soudack
Dr. John E. R Stainer
Mr. Basil F. Stuart-Stubbs
Mrs. Jennie A. Tarabulus
Estate of Angela Thacker
Mr. & Mrs. Philip J. Thomas
Treehouse North Productions
Mr. Tom Tronsgard
Vancouver Foundation
Vancouver Historical Society
Mr. Bryce Waters
Mr. E. Wallace Whiteside
23 REPORT OF THE UNIVERSITY LIBRARIAN TO THE SENATE  1999/2000
UBC     LIBRARY
Appendix F
GRANT FUNDING
With increasing costs in all budgetary sectors, grants play an increasingly important role in funding services and projects that would otherwise
be beyond the Library's means. They have been particularly helpful in meeting the tremendous demand for library instruction in new
technology, which involves both staff resources and equipment. Benefits from successful applications during 1999/00 include:
B.C. MINISTRY OF EMPLOYMENT AND INVESTMENT.
$105,900 for continued support of the PATSCAN service.
B.C. MINISTRY OF EMPLOYMENT AND INVESTMENT.
NETWORKS OF CENTRES OF EXCELLENCE, INFORMATION
INFRASTRUCTURE.
$16,000 to support reference assistance in the life sciences.
BOAG FOUNDATION.
$2,500 for the Dave Barrett Papers project.
CANADIAN COUNCIL OF ARCHIVES.
$4,911 for the Control of Holdings program- President's Office
Records project.
$3,470 for the Lowry Collection microfilming project phase 3.
DEPT. OF CANADIAN HERITAGE.
YOUNG CANADA WORKS IN HERITAGE INSTITUTIONS.
$6,523 for the Ubyssey indexing project.
NATIONAL LIBRARY OF CANADA.
$58,000 in continued support for the Cataloguing-in-Publication
program.
RODGER STANTON MEMORIAL TRUST FUND.
$5,770 for books on surgery, gynaecology and obstetrics.
UNIVERSITY OF B.C.
ACADEMIC EQUIPMENT FUND.
$129,000 for expansion of the digital library.
UNIVERSITY OF B.C. ALMA MATER SOCIETY.
INNOVATIVE PROJECTS FUND.
$5,000 for the Mapping Data on the Web project.
UNIVERSITY OF B.C.
CAMPUS PLANNING AND DEVELOPMENT.
$5,507 toward replacing the Woodward Library security gates to
improve access for disabled patrons.
UNIVERSITY OF B.C. MINOR CAPITAL FUND.
$80,000 to upgrade electrical and communication service support
in the Main Library.
UNIVERSITY OF B.C. TEACHING AND LEARNING ENHANCEMENT FUND.
$50,000 for the Information Connections program.
VANCOUVER HISTORICAL SOCIETY.
$4,300 for the Vancouver Bibliography project.
24 Edited by
Martha Whitehead
Design & Production by
l'B(   I ibrary Graphics
Published by
The University tit British Columbia Library
1956 Main Mall
Vancouver, BC Vol  l/l
www.library.ubc.ca
November 2000 \

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