Open Collections

UBC Publications

UBC Publications

UBC Publications

Report of the University Librarian to the Senate 1974

Item Metadata

Download

Media
libsenrep-1.0115250.pdf
Metadata
JSON: libsenrep-1.0115250.json
JSON-LD: libsenrep-1.0115250-ld.json
RDF/XML (Pretty): libsenrep-1.0115250-rdf.xml
RDF/JSON: libsenrep-1.0115250-rdf.json
Turtle: libsenrep-1.0115250-turtle.txt
N-Triples: libsenrep-1.0115250-rdf-ntriples.txt
Original Record: libsenrep-1.0115250-source.json
Full Text
libsenrep-1.0115250-fulltext.txt
Citation
libsenrep-1.0115250.ris

Full Text

Array USB
::M'rt:''
REPORT
of the  HI
UNIVERSITY
LIBRARIAN
to the SENATE
a  nil
UNIVERSITY OF BRITISH COLUMBIA LIBRARY
Vancouver 1973-74
59th year The Report
of the University Librarian
to the Senate
59th Year
September 1973 to August 1974
Vancouver
December 1974 Cover: Reflections, Sedgewick Library Skylight, by Peter Cardew.
Courtesy of Rhone and Iredale, Architects. TABLE OF CONTENTS
I. Review
II. The Cost of the Library
III. Public Services
1. Branches, Divisions, Subject Collections and Reading Rooms.
2. Computer-Based Services.
IV. Collections
1. Expenditures
2. The Collections
3. Processing and Systems
V.
Buildings
VI.   Personnel
VII.  Conclusion
Appendix A. Library Expenditures
B. Size of Collections - Physical Volumes
C. Growth of Collections
D. Recorded use of Library Resources
E. Reference Statistics
F. Library Organization
G. Library Supported Reading Rooms
H. Senate Library Committee I.   Review.
For the University of British Columbia Library, and for most other
academic libraries in North America, the decade of the sixties was one of
progress.  It now seems that the seventies will be characterized as a
decade of paradox, in which libraries simultaneously wax and wane.
The level of use continues to rise, evidence of an increasing need for
the materials and services libraries offer.  Last year at U.B.C. the
borrowing of materials rose by 8.5% and the provision of reference service
by 10.1%.  But the Library is acquiring less new material and has fewer
staff hours at its disposal.
If collection growth is slowing and staff support diminishing, it is not
the case that the Library's budget is being reduced.  On the contrary, budgets
and expenditures continue to rise impressively, the latter by 8.4% over the
previous year.
The reason for this situation is now familiar to everyone: it is
inflation, a condition which is simply imposed on libraries and all
institutions in the public service, and over which they have no control.
Yet they must contend with it, and attempt to balance user requirements
against resources.  This annual report takes as its point of departure a
study of the financial condition of the Library. Thereafter an account of
the Library's performance and its adjustment in response to its changed and
changing environment will be given. II.  The Cost of the Library.
In 1973/74, the Library spent $5,409,784, an increase of 8.4% over
1972/73.  It is estimated the expenditures will exceed $5,700,000 in the
present year,
In ten years the Library's expenditures have increased 3.8 times.  But
library expenditures at McGill have increased 5.8 times and at Toronto 5,
times, so there is nothing remarkable in that.
Relative to other Canadian institutions, the Library's second place
in terms of collections is reflected in its budget: it is also in second
place in terms of its cost, spending about half as much as Toronto's library
and a few hundred thousand more than Alberta's.  The percentage of the
University's budget allocated to the Library has declined slightly but not
drastically in the past few years, hovering around 7%, close to the average
for Canadian universities.
Viewed in such simple terms, the Library's financial situation would
seem to be typical and satisfactory.  The budget has been growing steadily,
and the amount compares favourably with amounts spent at other institutions.
However, the following tables point up the major problems facing the
Library.
Total Number of Staff Salary Expenditures
1973/71                          3.9355 $2,584,069
1971/72 410^ $2,896,602
1972/73 406^ $3,178,630
1973/74 406 $3,522,626
Net Additions to Collections Collections Expenditures
1970/71                         164,117 $1,214,875
1971/72 146,089 $1,286,401
1972/73 136,626 $1,308,537
1973/74 95,536 $1,348,775 Thus, although the staff has remained at roughly the same strength for
four years, an additional million dollars has been required for salaries.
Over a hundred thousand dollars has been added to the collections budget, but
accessions have plummeted. III. Public Service.
1.  Branches, Divisions, Subject Collections and Reading Rooms.
On the other side of the coin, use and demand continue to increase
annually.  The best available indicators of use of collections and services
are the statistics for lending and reference activity, where respectively
overall increases of 8.5% and 10.1% were recorded.  In seven years loans
have increased by over a million transactions, even though enrollment in
spring and fall terms grew by only 2,881 students in the same period.  Put
another way, student numbers have grown by 16.7%, while loans have soared by
99.8% more loans, which now exceed 2,300,000 per year.  Last year reference
staff replied to over 280,000 questions, nearly 26,000 more than in 1972/73.
Yet another indicator of increased activity is the use made of photocopy
machines, up by 36% in one year to 2,201,549 copies made by or on behalf of
visitors to campus libraries.
Many factors have contributed to the steady rise in the use of the Library:
better and larger collections, changes in teaching methods, computerized borrowing procedures, and more borrowers.  But certainly a prime factor has been
the increased accessibility and service made possible by the creation of branch
libraries.  The balance of activity has been shifting in the direction of the
branches since 1966/67, and if the trend continues they will soon account in
the aggregate for twice as many loans as the Main Library and all its divisions.
They also deal with 12,000 more reference questions, if one leaves out of
consideration questions answered at the general information desk adjacent to
the union catalogue in the Main Library.
Nevertheless, several Main Library divisions experienced significant
increases in activity: the Fine Arts, Government Publications and Microforms,
and Special Collections Divisions hold materials on subjects which are of
growing interest; it is probable that an emphasis on Canadian studies is
contributing to the higher statistics recorded by these divisions.  The Asian
Studies and Map Divisions, perhaps because they are easier to locate and use
in their new quarters in the space vacated by the Sedgewick Library, also
loaned more materials and replied to more queries than ever before. Apparent exceptions to the rising trend are presented by the Main Library
stack collections and the Sedgewick Library.  Since 1971/72, the last academic
year when the Sedgewick Library was within the Main Library building, loans
have decreased in the latter by 12.2% and in the former by 8.7%.  However,
this reduction was planned and expected.  Before the construction of the new
library it was necessary to charge out books from the Sedgewick stacks before
they could be used. Now that collection is readily available, with ample
adjacent study seating.  Further, the new building has drawn users away from
the crowded and overpopulated Main Library, a desirable result.
Among the major branch libraries, the Woodward Library again accounted
for the greatest numerical increase in loans.  Total circulation has nearly
doubled in four years, presumably because of an increased interest and
enrollment in the health and other biological sciences.  A number of smaller
branch libraries have more than equalled Woodward's record, viewed in percentage terms.  Loans at the Crane Library have doubled in three years, at
the Animal Resources Ecology Library and the Wilson Recordings Collection in
just two.
The Crane Library expanded into adjacent areas in the Brock Hall north
wing, and gained some relief from overcrowding caused by growing collections
and number of users.  There are now about three dozen blind and partially-
sighted students on campus in both day and evening courses, and while heavy
use is made of the extensive collection of books in braille, the collection
of 13,700 recordings is assuming more and more importance, since most of these
are specially made to meet individual needs.  Crane continues to be the
largest academic library for the visually handicapped in North America, with
the natural result that other institutions borrow the recordings frequently.
In recognition'of Crane's uniqueness and importance, the Department of Education
has provided a special grant of nearly $90,000 to ensure that its collections
are readily available to other post-secondary institutions in the province.
The departmental reading rooms, of which there are forty-two, were also
more heavily used.  Circulation increased by 13.1%, and the estimated annual
occupancy rate rose from 91,395 to 99,450, or 8.8%.  The reading rooms, taken
in the aggregate, are the equivalent of a major branch library, containing
86,672 volumes and receiving 2,582 subscriptions. The general trend continues upward, an indication that the Library's
usefulness to its community is increasing and, hopefully, that the condition
of teaching and research at this University is thereby enhanced.  But the
Library is more than a University resource.
Throughout its history the Library has been available to persons not
directly associated with the University.  Among the regular extra-mural users
are government employees and research staff, journalists, businesses,
industries, professional groups and members of the public engaged in private
research.  In addition to those thousands of extra-mural borrowers who obtain
library cards, there are unknown numbers of persons who use the Library system
without borrowing.  Because of the general policy of open access, it has been
impossible to estimate the numbers of persons in this category.
This year a first attempt was made to discover, not just for U.B.C. but
also for other libraries in the Lower Mainland, who uses which libraries and
for what purposes.  A limited census of users of the Sedgewick Library was
taken on Sunday, November 18th; 1,478 persons were interviewed between noon
and 7:45 p.m.  Twenty percent of these users were not U.B.C. students.
Eleven percent were students at other universities and colleges, and nearly
two-thirds of these said they visited Sedgewick on most weekends.
The non-students included persons of all ages, members of the public
pursuing some special need which they expected the Library's collections
and services to provide. A more extensive survey of library use was
completed in March 1974.  It showed that the Main and Woodward libraries were
also being used quite heavily by visitors from other campuses and by the
general public.  The Library plans to continue gathering information about
the way in which resources are being used and about the nature of its clientele. 2.  Computer-Based Services.
The previous section has dealt essentially with the traditional lending
and reference services offered by the Library system.  In these beginning
years of their development, computer-based information services warrant
separate attention.  Some of these are centred here, and others are operated
on a national or international basis.  At present they are useful primarily
to graduate students, faculty members, research staff, and professionals
working at a high level of specialization.  The services tend to be invisible
to most users, since they are of potential use to a small number of individuals,
in relation to the total campus population.  The computer-based information
service is not yet an alternative to traditional library service, but a
supplement to it.  And it is not cheap, although it can yield information
which could only be obtained by conventional means at even higher costs.
The most advanced of the services now available at U.B.C. is MEDLINE,
which takes the shape of a computer terminal in the Woodward Library, tied
to a computer in the U.S. wherein is stored a massive file of current information dealing with the health and life sciences literature.  Installed with
the assistance of a grant from the Woodward Foundation, and to be supported
in the near future by the B.C. Medical Centre, the terminal is receiving an
increasing amount of use from a variety of health professionals, with the
amount of use almost evenly divided between on-campus and off-campus users.
The Science Division offers access to the Canadian Institute for
Scientific and Technical Information's (formerly the National Science Library)
CAN/SDI programme, an off-line system for searching data bases in the literature of science and technology. The Institute also inaugurated in 1974 an
on-line system, CAN/OLE, but U.B.C. was unable to participate for financial
reasons
The Data Library, operated jointly by the Library and the Computing
Centre, holds a collection of two hundred and twenty-five data files plus
seventy-seven files and sub-files of Census Canada information.  The real
meaning of this body of data is hard to convey in numerical terms: the three
hundred and eighty tapes needed to contain these files simply hold a massive amount of statistical information pertaining to population, elections,
opinion surveys and other matters amenable to counting.  In the past year the
files were accessed 1,212 times, but even this is not a true indicator of use,
since the individual may simply copy off the portion of the file needed for
another growing data file connected with his research.  Use of the files is
increasing dramatically; in the first month of the next report year,
September 1974, the files were accessed 544 times.
The Library also uses a data base produced by its own acquisition
system to generate lists of books and journals relevant to the specified
interests of faculty members and graduate students, both as groups and as
individuals.  A hundred and thirty-one interest profiles developed by
reference librarians in cooperation with users are now in monthly use.
In the future computers will be more and more commonly used for
searching the literatures of all fields, and by persons with less specialized
needs.  Indeed, access to information about the Library's own collections will
eventually be provided in this way, and terminals will be placed at the direct
disposal of users.  At the present time, however, computer searching is
limited in its applications.  Moreover, it is relatively expensive on a per
search basis.  MEDLINE will cost about $25,000 to operate in 1974/75 and U.B.C.
had to decline to participate in CAN/OLE because annual expenses would
probably be in the same vicinity.  As useful as a service might be, questions
of priority must arise between the needs of a majority of users as opposed to
a minority.  In facing the issue of costs of computer-based services, many
libraries have chosen to regard them as something different and special, and
have adopted a fee-for-service approach, sharing operating costs with individual
users.  In fact, U.B.C. has of necessity used this avenue for introducing the
CAN/SDI system.  Yet it does violate the principle that information through
libraries should be provided at no direct cost to the user.  This is a principle
which libraries should attempt to uphold, for it should make no difference to a
user whether a machine or a human has located the information he sought.  Looked
at another way, it would be equally logical to charge for traditional services,
if one charges for services which are unconventional merely because they are
new.  As the computer is used more frequently in the library context, it should
be assimilated, not isolated.  Besides, there is a hopeful prospect: the
storage and retrieval of information is seemingly the only area in the world of
information which is becoming less rather than more expensive on a unit basis. IV.  Collections.
1.  Expenditures.
In 1973/74, $1,348,775 was spent on the purchase of Library collections,
an increase of about $40,000 over the previous year.  This 3.1% increase did
not come close to matching the inflation rate, with the natural result that
accessions declined markedly.  In the budget year 1974/75 it seemed initially
that worse was yet to come: from the government's grant to the University a
total increase of $25,000 for all purposes except salary increases was allocated
to the Library.  All of this was set aside for collections, and a further drop
in accessions was forecast.  Fortunately the government brought forth a supplementary budget, and this yielded an additional $100,000 for collections which,
it is hoped, will stop the further decline in the rate of acquisition.  For
the first time since 1966/67, the budget for collections and binding stands
at over a million and a half dollars.
However, conditions have changed radically in recent times.  In 1967,
the average cost of a journal published in the U.S. was $8.02.  Now it is
$17.71.  The average price of U.S. hardcover trade and technical books was
$7.99 in 1967 and had risen to $12.20 in 1973.  In about nine months,
according to a study undertaken at the University of Saskatchewan Library,
the average cost of academic books rose 11.8%, from an average price of
$12.56 to $14.04.  Other statistics collected by librarians and publishers
mirror these figures.
Among types of publications, the cost of journals, and especially
academic journals, is rising most swiftly.  In 1966/67, periodical renewals
consumed 7.6% of the acquisitions budget.  This year, it will require 29.9%
to pay for subscriptions.  The subscription list is indeed larger by about
one third, but the cost has more than tripled.  Efforts have been made to
limit the number of subscriptions placed, and to identify and cancel titles
of diminished importance or restricted interest, but costs continue to mount.
Periodical publishers, and especially publishers of academic journals,
are caught in the same web of inflationary circumstances as libraries.  On
the one hand, costs of materials, labour and postage are increasing.  When
these costs are passed on to subscribers, particularly individual subscribers. 10
cancellations result, causing a decline in revenue to the publisher and in
turn a further increase to the subscription price.  Libraries too, the
mainstay of subscription lists, unable to meet rising costs, begin to drop
subscriptions to titles judged to be infrequently used or to those which had
been received in several copies.  Ultimately, many journals may reach the
point where they will be forced to discontinue.  Some have welcomed such an
outcome, maintaining that much that has been published has contributed less
to the advancement of knowledge than to the advancement of careers.  Others
have decried the possibility, seeing journals as the best means of bringing
recent learning to public attention.
The situation of the Academic book is little better.  It is already
necessary to subsidize virtually every work that is issued by a university
press.  Similarly, there is a point at which individual purchasers will
decline to purchase a book, and libraries must also weigh potential frequency
of use against the intrinsic merits of books which they consider for purchase,
University presses can improve their position by issuing works of popular
interest but which are founded on scholarship, yet there are still important
writings for which there can be no extensive readership or market.
One's attitudes toward these developments are probably immaterial: the
economic and technological forces which are at work are going to change the
ways in which information is disseminated and the ways in which publishers
and libraries conventionally operate. Until the process of evolution or
revolution is completed, individual libraries have no choice, if they are to
fulfill their responsibilities, but to seek the means to continue to acquire
and obtain access to whatever selection of the world's literature is needed
to serve their clientele, in an environment where costs seem to be permanently
on the increase. 11
2.  The Collections.
Last year an attempt was made to arrive at a tentative estimate of the
size of the collection of physical volumes, and the figure arrived at was
1,502,746.  During the year more exact measurements were taken, and the
average number of volumes per linear foot for every part of the classification
was calculated.  The results of applying this average to the Library's
holdings are shown in Appendix B.  On the basis of this procedure, a figure
of 1,624,055 volumes is being adopted as the size of the collection, as of
August 31, 1974.  This will have to suffice until an actual count is made, if
ever.
Physical volumes are not the whole story, of course.  In Appendix C,
greatly expanded over previous years, is a list of the collections in all of
their diversity.
Although the University of Alberta's Library has been growing more
quickly than U.B.C.'s in recent years, this University still possesses the
second largest resource of scholarly materials in Canada.  Measured in U.S.
terms it is somewhat less impressive, ranking thirty-eighth among eighty-two
major private and state universities.
As to its rate of growth, with the addition of 96,536 physical volumes
it placed twenty-ninth on the same list.  Referring again to 1966/67,
when the budget for acquisitions was comparable, it is revealing that in
that year U.B.C. was fifty-sixth in terms of its size and twenty-third in
terms of accessions, showing that although rapid progress  was made in the
intervening years in relation to other research libraries, the rate of
progress has declined. 12
3.  Processing and Systems.
A sharp decline in accessions should naturally have resulted in lower
production figures from the processing divisions.  The unit concerned with
verifying orders before they are placed dealt with 111,776 requisitions,
down from 1972/73's 124,179.  Titles catalogued dropped from 59,481 to 54,321.
However, card set production increased from 83,827 to 90,782, and cards filed
from 2,279,073 to 2,457,350.  This seeming inconsistency is explained by the
fact that a backlog in card production and filing, deriving from the swift
growth of the collections in the late sixties, was finally eliminated.  In
general, work loads in the processing divisions are diminished, and staff
positions have been transferred to the public service sector where, as has
been shown, demands are mounting.
The Systems Division has a general responsibility for the automation
of procedures throughout the library system.  At the housekeeping level, the
computer assists the library in maintaining massive files of constantly
changing records, and in making those records more widely accessible.  But
although costs of computer processing are declining, inflation is increasing
the cost of displaying the records.  Print-out is becoming prohibitively
expensive, given the fact that library records are both large and regularly
updated.  Unfortunately, the costs of on-line systems for the library,
which would eliminate print-out, are also prohibitive, even if all the
software and hardware problems could be solved.  Computer terminals are not
yet ready for the public and the public, by and large, is not yet ready for
computer terminals.
A compromise solution with which the library is experimenting is
computer output microform, or COM.  The acquisition file is being produced
on COM, and is available in the Main Library union catalogue area, along
with a copy of the conventional print-out. User comparisons of the two media
indicate acceptance with reservations: although the COM records are more
complete and easier to read than the dim carbons of the print-out, access
time is slightly slower, possibly because of unfamiliarity.  But economics
is so firmly on the side of COM that it is clear that it will play an
increasingly significant role in the creation and dissemination of library
records, including those now found in card catalogues. 13
V.   Buildings.
Since libraries by their nature must grow and change, the provision and
alteration of space is a constant.  In the past decade the rate of growth and
change has accelerated, as a function of the so-called information explosion
on the one hand and the increase in student numbers on the other, with the
result that virtually every university in North America has constructed one
or more major library buildings since 1960.  These days construction starts
are fewer in number, not because there is not a continuing need for additional
space, but because in this area too rising costs are placing buildings beyond
the reach of institutions, or delaying their completion.  Although some library
construction is under way at U.B.C., it seems clear that problems lie ahead.
It had been hoped that the new Law Library, as part of the building for
the Faculty of Law, would be completed in time for the 1974 fall classes, but
a construction strike made this impossible.  It now appears that the Library,
which will be one of the first portions of the building to be finished, will
not be ready until the new year, and that a disruptive move of collections
must take place during term.  But once this is over, the Law Library will be
favourably situated in a structure which will offer excellent facilities for
use by students and faculty members and provide space for growth to at least
the end of the next decade.
Construction of the Asian Studies Centre, future home of the Asian
Studies Library, began early in 1974.  By the end of the summer, following
the shut-down caused by the strike, the foundation was almost complete, and
it was anticipated that the shell of the structure would be finished by
March, 1975. Unfortunately, further progress may be delayed.  Inflation has
driven up the price of the completed building, and the funds collected from
donors are no longer sufficient to the need.  A fund drive is continuing, and
if it is successful the Asian Studies Library could be relocated in late 1975
or in 1976.
The need to provide more and better space for the processing divisions
of the Library, scattered through the Main Library but concentrated on the
seventh level of the stacks, has been acute for some time.  Improved working 14
conditions are essential for the staff, and the space they occupy is needed
for the purpose for which it was designed, essentially the storage of
collections.  Approval for the construction of a Processing Building was
given in the spring of 1973.  By the beginning of the academic year 1973/74
programming and space estimating had been completed, and an architect had been
appointed. A number of constraints emerged to complicate the matter of siting
the structure.  In the first place, the funds available for the project were
not sufficient to complete the necessary amount of space, which meant that
some processing departments would be left in the Main Library.  This, and the
close relationship that exists between processing departments and the public
service departments in the Main Library, made a site adjacent to the Main
Library essential.  Further investigation determined, first, that the existing
budget would not permit the construction of even an incomplete building on any
of the available sites, and second, that all but one of the sites were
impossible for a variety of reasons ranging from environmental damage to
requirements of fire and safety codes.  The sole choice was a site south of
Brock Hall, which was endorsed by the President's Advisory Committee on
Siting of Permanent Academic Buildings, and work is now proceeding on plans
for a two-story, partially sunken structure with an unfinished area in the
basement for future development.  If funds are available, for estimates on
the building have doubled since it was first authorized, construction could
begin in the late spring of 1975.
For many years the Library and the Faculty of Education have sought the
construction of a building in which could be brought together the contents
of the present overcrowded Curriculum Laboratory and the education collections
in the Main Library, and where they might be placed in conjunction with the
Faculty's educational media departments.  In March the Senate Committee on
Academic Building Needs moved .this hope into the realm of possibility by
giving a first priority to the construction of 60,000 net square feet to meet
Faculty of Education needs, including an education resource centre.  Given a
shortage of capital funds, it is uncertain when such a building could be
started or finished, but at least work can begin on conceptualization,
programming and design. 15
Almost half of this decade has elapsed, and 1980 is no longer so far away,
especially considering the lead time needed to bring new buildings into
existence. Given that the Library's collections are growing, that the academic
programme seems always to expand and never to contract, and that it now appears
that student populations are increasing again, it is essential that the Library
look ahead at least to that date, if not beyond it.
The brute fact is that among the Library's branches, only the recently
completed or yet to be completed Woodward, Sedgewick, Law, Education and Asian
Studies Libraries will be able to contain their collections beyond 1980.  By
or before that date all other branches, including the Main Library, will have
reached capacity.  As far as student seating needs, the Library's ability to
meet them will depend on student numbers and on the shape of academic
programmes, particularly those for part-time students.
The Main Library remains a major centre of activity, despite the success
of new branches, and its physical limitations continue to pose problems for
users and staff alike. Efforts are made to interpret its architectural
complexities to succeeding generations of students, and explanations regarding
the virtual impossibility of providing better air conditions are regularly
given.  The building does not provide enough high-ceiling public access area
for all of the service departments, which means that users must ferret out in
remote low-ceiling areas such important resources as government publications
and microforms.  The situation will be slightly ameliorated as some Library
departments are moved out to new buildings, and rearrangements are made
within the old building, but until some revolutionary change is possible, the
University must content itself with the prospect of constant renovation and
adaptation, in an unsatisfactory building, and the costs and inconveniences
entailed in these.
In attempting to resolve the difficulties which it faces in providing
space for users, collections and services the Library will continue to
work closely with faculties, departments, Senate Committees, students and the
campus planning authorities.  However, it will take much more than cooperation
to stave off a succession of crises which will occur before 1980 arrives. 16
VI.  Personnel.
The Library's four hundred and six staff members include ninety-nine
librarians and three hundred and seven library assistants, clerks, technicians,
programmers, keypunch operators and stack attendants.  As pointed out in an
earlier chapter, the personnel establishment is not growing, but is in fact
slightly diminished in size, although service loads are increasing.
The amount paid for salaries is increasing, and at a faster rate than
other parts of the budget, as can be seen from Appendix A.  Nevertheless,
members of the supporting staff, confronted by an abruptly higher cost of
living, did not feel that their wages were keeping pace, and for this and
other reasons contributed to the organization of the Association of University
and College Employees Local no. 1.  As the academic year drew to a close, the
new union and the University moved closer to agreement on a contract which
provided a significant increase to salary scales, an extension to vacations
and a reduction in hours of work, as well as other provisions and benefits.
The effect of this on the Library's budget will be clear by the end of the
next academic year, but it is obvious that the line for salaries will show a
much higher figure than ever before, and an exceptional percentage increase
over this year.  At the same time, changes to vacations and hours of work
will have the effect of reducing the Library's establishment by about twenty
full time positions.  In effect, the three hundred and seven supporting staff
positions will be equal to about two hundred and eighty-seven positions
roughly the size of the staff in 1966/67.
Librarians, with their faculty colleagues, also expressed their concern
over their worsening economic position by participating in discussions within
the Faculty Association regarding the possibilities of collective bargaining.
Whatever the outcome of these continuing discussions, it seems clear that
future salary settlements will contribute significantly to higher operating
costs for the Library.
These developments, as necessary as they are for the welfare of the
staff, raise a forbidding question: if the university's revenues can not meet
the bill, what of library services and collections? As has been shown, the
Library is already hard pressed, with more users and more use than ever before,
and with fewer staff hours and new materials to meet demands. 17
VII. Conclusion.
In the light of what the foregoing pages reveal it is difficult to be
optimistic about the state or future of the Library. The issue is squarely
one of costs versus expectations.  If the costs are not met, the expectations
will not die, but they will not be adequately satisfied.  This is much to be
regretted, for in this Library the University and the province possess a great
and essential resource, one which should be expanding in the range of its
offerings rather than contracting.
Of one thing the University can rest assured: that the Library staff
members, as is their tradition, will meet any challenges the future presents
with their characteristic devotion to the needs of the Library's users and
to the objectives of the University. APPENDIX A
LIBRARY EXPENDITURES
Fiscal Years, April-March
Salaries & Wages
Books & Periodicals
Binding
Supplies, Equipment
1971/72
2,896,602
1,286,401
151,501
346,378
1972/73
3,178,630
1,308,537
154,593
350,455
1973/74
3,522,626
1,348,775
165,081
373,302
4,680,882    4,992,215   5,409,784
1974/75*
3,695,289
1,502,313
157,396
366,767
5,721,765
*Estimated Expenditures APPENDIX B
SIZE OF COLLECTIONS - PHYSICAL VOLUMES
August 31,
1973
Growth
August 31,
1974
Main Library
General Stacks
Asian Studies Division
Fine Arts Division
Humanities & Social Sciences Ref.
Science Ref.
Special Collections
SUBTOTAL
Branch Libraries & Reading Rooms
Animal Resource Ecology Library
Crane Library
Curriculum Laboratory
Law Library
MacMillan Library
Medical Branch Library
Mathematics Library
Music Library
Reading Rooms
Sedgewick Library
Social Work Library
Woodward Library
SUBTOTAL
Storage
TOTAL
675,805
38,281
714,086
51,114
5,730
56,844
50,611
4,316
54,927
31,530
1,982
33,512
12,184
725
12,909
39,113
2,099
41,212
860,357
53,133
913,490
12,082
525
12,607
4,393
666
5,059
25,901
3,872
29,773
86,518
4,527
91,045
28,263
1,909
30,172
21,485
1,131
22,616
15,611
670
16,281
19,132
1,766
20,898
79,830
5,901
85,731
126,041
8,558
134,599
8,445
667
9,112
185,180
7,858
193,038
612,881
38,050
650,931
65,304
-5,670
59,634
1,538,542
85,513
1,624,055
Includes Reserve Book Collection and some minor Main Library collections. Volumes - Catalogued
1
,483,442
95,219
Documents - Uncatalogued
315,148
35,315
Films, Filmstrips & Video
Tapes
2,518
88
Slides & Transparencies
4,177
1,065
Pictures & Posters
38,395
24,417
Microfilm (reels)
36,198
2,029
Microcard (cards)
111,680
	
Microprint (sheets)
760,500
65,750
Microfiche (cards)
584,770
10,871
Maps
89,524
4,918
Manuscripts
3
,100 ft.**
250 ft.**
Recordings
35,899
9,478
APPENDIX C
GROWTH OF COLLECTIONS
March 31  Net Additions  Withdrawals March 31
1973       1973/74        1973/74 1974
2,983 1,578,661*
  350,463
  2,606
  5,242
  62,812
38,227
  111,680
  826,250
  595,641
  94,443
  3,350 ft.
45,367
* See Appendix B
** Thickness of Files APPENDIX D
GENERAL CIRCULATION
RECORDED USE OF LIBRARY RESOURCES
September 1973 - August 1974
1970/71    1971/72     1972/73
Main Library
General Stack Collection
Reserve Circulation
Extension Library
Asian Studies Division
Fine Arts Division
Government Publications
Map Collections
Special Collections
SUB-TOTAL
Branch Libraries
& Reading Rooms
Animal Resource Ecology
Crane Library
Curriculum Laboratory
Law Library
MacMillan Library
Marjorie Smith Library
Mathematics Library
Medical Branch Library, VGH
Music Library
Reading Rooms
Sedgewick Library
Woodward Biomedical
SUB-TOTAL
1,997
22,341
215,327
122,055
28,303
18,420
18,459
26,677
19,687
52,749
491,241
122,644
3,066
25,117
229,448
125,493
29,517
16,270
20,763
29,881
20,606
72,063
474,981
139,716
1,138,900   1,186,921
4,202
29,361
222,392
122,813
33,304
13,807
21,965
27,483
20,679
66,700
446,860
175,106
1,184,672
1973/74   % Increase/
Decrease ovei
1972/73
524,142
542,687
498,656
483,699
-
2.9%
35,839
37,148
37,603
35,383
-
5.9%
5,710
6,061
5,355
5,317
-
0.7%
7,452
9,076
10,704
13,691
+
27.9%
49,841
59,160
62,749
74,145
+
18.1%
88,756
94,083
103,491
130,491
+
26.0%
8,184
7,939
8,353
9,320
+
11.5%
15,357
12,580
12,681
20,068
+
58.2%
735,281
768,734
739,592
772,114
+
4.4%
6,598
43,085
239,365
135,054
39,323
11,900
22,976
27,606
26,473
75,447
433,681
204,380
1,265,888
+ 57.0%
+ 46.7%
+ 7.6%
+ 9.9%
+ 18.0%
- 13.8%
+ 4.6%
+ 0.4%
+ 28.0%
+ 13.1%
- 2.9%
+ 16.7%
+ 6.9%
RECORDINGS
Wilson Recordings Collection 108,834
Music Library Record. Coll.    34,259
SUB-TOTAL
143,093
122,219
35,452
157,671
173,718
34,880
208,598
247,146   + 42.2%
33,906    -  2.8%
281,052
+ 34.7% APPENDIX D Continued
INTERLIBRARY LOANS
To Other Libraries
1970/71
1971/72
1972/73
1973/74
% Increase/
Decrease over
1972/73
Original Materials
General
3,652
4,518
5,027
5,582
+
11.0%
To BCMLS*
1,245
1,321
1,341
1,415
+
5.5%
TO SFU**
1,200
1,354
1,270
1,396
+
9.9%
To U. Victoria**
191
241
267
299
+
12.0%
To BCIT**
22
52
62
106
+
71.6%
6,310
7,486
7,967
8,798
+
10.4%
Photocopies
General
6,139
6,722
6,923
6,991
+
1.0%
To SFU**
4,231
5,862
5,228
4,227
-
19.1%
To U. Victoria**
1,144
1,137
865
1,020
+
17.9%
To BCIT**
148
211
314
335
+
6.7%
To Colleges**
-
-
-
181
To Bamfield**
-
-
-
27
11,662
13,932
13,330
12,781
-
4.1%
Total Interlibrary Lending
17,972
21,418
21,297
21,579
+
1.3%
From Other Libraries
Original Materials
General
From BCMLS
Photocopies
Total Interlibrary Borrowing   5,026
2,037
2,457
4,090
2,613
-
36.1%
290
412
434
473
+
9.0%
2,699
2,901
3,847
3,241
-
15.8%
5,770
8,371
6,327    -  24.4%
GRAND TOTAL
2,040,272  2,140,514
2,162,530   2,346,960   (+ 184,430)
Overall % increase= + 8.5%
* B.C. Medical Library Service.
** Loaned via special SFU Unit. APPENDIX E
REFERENCE STATISTICS
(September, 1973 - August, 1974)
Directional Reference Research Percentage
Questions  Questions Questions Total Increase/Decrease*
Main Library
Asian Studies
Fine Arts
Government Publications
Humanities
Information Desk
Map Collection
Science
Social Sciences
Special Collections
(1972/73)
1,269
2,969
947
5,185
5,887
7,818
1,406
15,111
753
26,178
789
27,720
2,246
8,328
554
11,128
13,615
58,065
-
71,680
88
3,749
60
3,897
549
8,181
853
9,583
878
15,060
1,135
17,073
636
7,159
620
8,415
25,921
137,507
6,364
169,792
(25,480)
(121,350)
(5,938) (152,768)
+ 11.1%
Branch Libraries
Animal Resource Ecology
Crane Library
Curriculum Laboratory
Law Library
MacMillan Library
Marjorie Smith Library
Mathematics Library
Medical Branch Library (VGH)
Music Library
Sedgewick Library
Woodward Library
(1972/73)
GRAND TOTALS
767
2,095
469
3,331
3,585
2,627
408
6,620
2,324
4,723
245
7,292
1,928
2,276
1,462
5,666
1,050
5,849
414
7,313
269
1,635
284
2,188
1,353
1,026
214
2,593
353
4,752
348
5,453
2,811
8,917
1,014
12,742
8,837
15,553
387
24,777
5,614
25,480
1,174
32,268
28,891
74,933
6,419
110,243
(27,495)
(68,869)
(5,138) (101,502)
54,812
212,440
12,783
280,035
(52,975)
(190,219)
(11,076)(254,270)
+ 8.6%
+10.1% ADMINISTRATION
APPENDIX F
LIBRARY ORGANIZATION
S tuart-S tubbs, Bas i1
Bell, Inglis F.
Hamilton, Robert M.
Mclnnes, Douglas N.
MacDonald, Robin
Watson, William J.
de Bruijn, Erik
ACQUISITIONS
Harrington, Walter
ASIAN STUDIES
Ng, Tung King
BIBLIOGRAPHY
Mcintosh, Jack
Elliston, Graham
Mercer, Eleanor
Shields, Dorothy
Jeffreys, Anthony
Johnson, Stephen
University Librarian
Associate Librarian
Assistant Librarian - Collections
Assistant Librarian - Public Services
Coordinator of Technical Processes and
Systems
Assistant Librarian - Physical Planning
and Development
Administrative Services Librarian
Head Librarian
Head Librarian
Bibliographer - Science
Bibliographer - Serials
Bibliographer - English language
Bibliographer - European languages
Bibliographer - Life Sciences
Research Bibliographer
BINDERY
Fryer, Percy
CATALOGUE DIVISION
Elrod, J. McRee
Original Cataloguing
Bailey, Freda
Catalogue Preparations
Little, Margaret
Searching/LC Cataloguing
Foreman
Head Librarian
Head
Head
Chisholm, Virginia
Acting Head APPENDIX F Continued
CIRCULATION
Butterfield, Rita
CRANE LIBRARY
Thiele, Paul
DATA LIBRARY
Ruus, Laine
FINE ARTS DIVISION
Dwyer, Melva
ANIMAL RESOURCE ECOLOGY LIBRARY
Nelson, Ann
MACMILLAN LIBRARY
Macaree, Mary
GIFTS & EXCHANGE
Elliston, Graham
GOVERNMENT PUBLICATIONS
D ods on, S uzann e
HUMANITIES
Gallup, Jennifer
INFORMATION & ORIENTATION
Chew, Luther
INTERLIBRARY LOAN
Friesen, Margaret
LAW LIBRARY
Shorthouse, Thomas
MAP DIVISION
Wilson, Maureen
MARJORIE SMITH LIBRARY
Head Librarian
Head
Head
Head Librarian
Head Librarian
Head Librarian
Head Librarian
Head Librarian
Acting Head
Head Librarian
Head Librarian
Head Librarian
Head Librarian
de Bruijn, Elsie
Head Librarian APPENDIX F Continued ...
MUSIC LIBRARY
Burndorfer, Hans
READING ROOMS
Omelusik, Nicholas
RECORD COLLECTION
Head Librarian
Head Librarian
Kaye, Douglas Head
SCIENCE DIVISION & MATHEMATICS LIBRARY
Brongers, Rein
SEDGEWICK LIBRARY
Erickson, Ture
SERIALS DIVISION
Turner, Ann
SOCIAL SCIENCES DIVISION
Carrier, Lois
SPECIAL COLLECTIONS DIVISION
Yandle, Anne
SYSTEMS DEVELOPMENT
Dennis, Donald
Dobbin, Geraldine
WOODWARD LIBRARY
Leith, Anna
BIOMEDICAL BRANCH LIBRARY
F re eman, George
COLBECK ROOM
Head Librarian
Head Librarian
Head Librarian
Head Librarian
Head Librarian
Systems Analyst
Systems & Information Science
Librarian
Head Librarian
Head Librarian
Selby, Joan
Curator APPENDIX G
LIBRARY SUPPORTED
READING ROOMS
AS OF AUGUST, 1974.
Academic Planning
Adult Education
Agricultural Economics
Anthropology-S ociology
Applied Science
Architecture
Asian Studies
Audiology
Chemical Engineering
Chemistry
Classics
Commerce
Comparative Literature
Computing Centre
Creative Writing
Main Mall North
Administration Bldg.
President's House
6401 N.W. Marine Dr.
Ponderosa Annex D
Room 105
Hut M22, Room 23
Civil Engr. Bldg.
Room 305
F. Lasserre Bldg
Room 9B (Basement)
Buchanan Bldg.
Room 2208
James Mather Bldg.
Fairview Place
Chem. Engr. Bldg.
Room 310
Chemistry Bldg.
Room 261
Buchanan Bldg.
Room 2218
Henry Angus Bldg.
Room 6 (Basement)
Buchanan Bldg.
Room 227
Civil Engr. Bldg.
Room 238
Brock Hall
South Wing
Room 204
Economics-History
Electrical
Engineering
English
French
Geography
Geology
Geophysics
Hispanic-Italian
Home Economics
Institute of
Industrial Relations
Library School
Buchanan Tower
Room 1097
Elect. Engr. Bldg.
Room 428
(Enter Room 434)
Buchanan Tower
Room 697
Buchanan Tower
Room 897
Geography Bldg.
Room 140
Geological Sciences
Bldg. - Room 208
Geophysics Bldg.
2nd Floor, South
Buchanan Bldg.
Room 2220
Home Ec. Bldg.
Room 112
Auditorium Annex 100
Linguistics
Mechanical
Engineering
Metallurgy
Microbiology
Library North Wing
8th Floor
Buchanan Bldg.
Room 227
Mech. Engr. Bldg.
Room 200A
Metallurgy Bldg.
Room 319
Wesbrook Bldg.
Room 300 APPENDIX G Continued
Mineral Engineering
Pharmacology
Pharmacy
Philosophy
Physics
Physiology
Political Science
Psychiatry
Psychology
Rehabilitation
Medicine
Slavonic Studies
Theatre
Min. Engr. Bldg.
Room 201
Medical Sciences Bldg.
Block C, Room 221
Cunningham Bldg.
Room 160
Buchanan Bldg.
Room 3270
Hennings Bldg.
Room 311
Medical Sciences Bldg.
Block A, Room 201
Buchanan Bldg.
Room 1220
Health Sciences Centre
2255 Wesbrook Road
Henry Angus Bldg.
Room 203
Hut MSI
Room 20
Buchanan Bldg.
Room 2251
Frederick Wood Theatre
Room 211 APPENDIX H
Senate Library Committee
1973/74
Mr. W.M. Armstrong
Dr. D.G. Brown
Dr. W.C. Gibson
Mr. A. Hilliker
Dr. F.A. Kaempffer
Dr. J.M. Kennedy
Dr. R.V. Kubicek
Dr. S. Lipson
Mr. R.F. Osborne
Dr. M.F. McGregor (Chairman)
Mr. J.M. Munsie
Mrs. A. Piternick
Mr. J.M. Schoening
Dr. K.S. Stockholder
Dr. C. Swoveland
Dr. M. Uprichard
Chancellor N. Nemetz
President W Gage    EX_0FFICI0
Mr. J.E.A. Parnall
Mr. B. Stuart-Stubbs
Terms of Reference:
(a) To advise and assist the Librarian in:
(i)  formulating a policy for the development of resources for
instruction and research;
(ii)  advising on the allocation of book funds to the fields of
instruction and research;
(iii)  developing a general program of library service for all
the interests of the University; and
(iv)  keeping himself informed about the library needs of
instructional and research staffs, and keeping the
academic community informed about the library;
(b) To report to Senate on matters of policy under discussion by
the Committee.

Cite

Citation Scheme:

        

Citations by CSL (citeproc-js)

Usage Statistics

Share

Embed

Customize your widget with the following options, then copy and paste the code below into the HTML of your page to embed this item in your website.
                        
                            <div id="ubcOpenCollectionsWidgetDisplay">
                            <script id="ubcOpenCollectionsWidget"
                            src="{[{embed.src}]}"
                            data-item="{[{embed.item}]}"
                            data-collection="{[{embed.collection}]}"
                            data-metadata="{[{embed.showMetadata}]}"
                            data-width="{[{embed.width}]}"
                            async >
                            </script>
                            </div>
                        
                    
IIIF logo Our image viewer uses the IIIF 2.0 standard. To load this item in other compatible viewers, use this url:
http://iiif.library.ubc.ca/presentation/cdm.libsenrep.1-0115250/manifest

Comment

Related Items