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The Report of the University Librarian to the Senate of the University of British Columbia 1976

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Array SFECMl OOLLECTIONS
ANNUAL REPORT OF THE UNIVERSITY LIBRARIAN TO THE SENATE
university of british Columbia
1975-76 The Report
of the University Librarian
to the Senate
of the
University of British Columbia
Sixty-first Year
1975/76
Vancouver,
December 1976 TABLE OF CONTENTS
I.     Introduction 1
Collections 2
Space 5
IV. Services 7
V. The Future: Some Possibilities 11
Appendix A Size of Collections - Physical Volume
B Growth of Collections
C Library Expenditures
D Recorded Use of Library Resources
E Reference Statistics
F Library Organization
G Library Supplemented Reading Rooms
H Senate Library Committee - 1
I.   INTRODUCTION
In last year's sixtieth annual report, certain trends affecting the collections
were delineated.  During the sixty-first year of operation events followed these
trends, with some trying consequences.
The economics of library management are bound up with prevailing local, national
and international economic conditions, where inflation holds sway.  Propelled by
inflation, the costs of the collections programme overtook the budget, forcing a
wrenching mid-year reallocation of resources.  Since the measures which were
taken saved the collections programme, the collections continued to grow at
almost the same rate as in the previous year, but this in turn made the need for
additional physical space more urgent, in a period when capital funds are in
short supply.  At the same time, expenditures on personnel rose sharply, consuming
a higher percentage of the library's total expenditures than ever before.  This
was a further symptom of inflation, reflecting an understandable drive by
University employees to maintain their own economic position.  Yet there are
indications that society and government have concluded that the amounts invested
in post-secondary education should be levelled off if not decreased.
If it is assumed that the inflation factor is a constant in nature if not in degree,
and the trends outlined above are projected, it is easy to perceive a difficult
future for the library, one in which familiar kinds and levels of service are
curtailed, in which the collection falls behind the growth of knowledge and the
University's need for access to this knowledge, in which the collection itself
becomes increasingly inaccesible.  Given certain basic circumstances over which it
has no control, the Library must deal with the future as it unfolds.  This report
gives an account of the year's major developments, and talks of the future and what
might be done to meet it effectively. II.  COLLECTIONS
The  increase in the price of library materials  continues  relentlessly.     Between
1971/72  and 1975/76,  expenditures  on collections rose  from $1,286,401  to
$1,693,169,  an increase of 31.6%.     In those  two years,  the number of physical
volumes  added to the  collections were respectively 146,089  and 97,474,   a decrease
of 33.2%.     Clearly,  the money available  for expenditures did not increase at a
rate  sufficient to offset inflation.     Since  a priority is placed on obtaining
current materials in all  fields  related to teaching and research at U.B.C.,  the
development of retrospective  collections has been slowed, while periodical
subscriptions,  the  costs  of which rose  at a rate higher than for books,   consumed
a greater share of the collections budget each succeeding year.
Although nearly  $1.7 million was  spent on collections  last year,  the Library
entered that fiscal year with a collections budget of $1,440,353.     Behind this
difference of a quarter of a million dollars  lies  the story of one of the
Library's more difficult predicaments.
For a number of years  the Library has  overspent its budget  for collections,
drawing from other areas of the operating budget to do so.     Further,  in order to
maintain the rate of acquisition of current publications,  it gradually increased
the amount of its  outstanding commitments.     In 1975/76,  inflation overtook these
measures with a vengeance.     The  first signs of trouble appeared in May 1975 when
an increase in the wages of student assistants  made  it necessary to reduce  the
collections budget by  $50,000.     By October it was becoming clear,  as  the Library
received increasing numbers of notices of price hikes  for journals  and other
materials,  that the budget of $1.4 million would be spent months before the end
of the  fiscal year,  and that even with a curtailed acquisitions programme,
expenditures would exceed $1.6 million by April.     Thus,   at the beginning of
November,   the flow of orders  for new items was narrowed to a trickle,  and severe
economy measures were imposed on the library system:  virtually no vacant staff
positions were  filled for the duration of the year.
Since periodicals have been consuming a higher proportion of the  collections
budget every year,  they became  the object of a complete  review.     With the
assistance of the  faculty,  the  subscription lists were examined title by title, 3  -
and 1,275 were  cancelled.     These would have  cost over $50,000  in the present fiscal
year.     Although this project was  received and approached with great concern,   it
did have  the beneficial effect of eliminating many non-essential duplicates  and
low-use  titles.     It will be a continuing objective  to keep the costs of periodicals
at no more than 50% of the  collections budget,  a percentage now attained.     In
1975/76  it had reached 54%,  up  from 42% in 1971/72.
It is  gratifying to report that for the  fiscal year 1976/77,   the University
Administration raised the  collections budget to $1,855,087,   an increase of 9.6%
over last year's expenditures,  and of 28.8% over last year's budget.     This,
coupled with the  reductions in expenditures on periodicals,  should enable  the
Library to maintain the collections programme without facing a crisis  again this
year.     At the same time,  the  figure  for year-end commitments has been reduced to
an acceptable  level,   from $434,235 on April 1,  1975,   down to  $245,282 on April 1,
1976.     What is ensured for the immediate  future is that new materials  relevant to
the University's  requirements  can be obtained,  and that the  collection will remain
current in terms of advancing knowledge.    What is not ensured is  that the Library
can meet any new demands  arising out of extensions  to the  curriculum or research
programmes,  or that the Library can continue the development of the  retrospective
collections on  the scale established in the  late nineteen sixties.
By the end of the  fiscal year,  the  collection of physical volumes had reached
1,764,163,   and by the end of the  academic year had exceeded 1,800,000.     In addition,
as shown in Appendix B,  the  collection contains some 2,300,000  government documents,
films,   filmstrips,  video tapes,  slides,  transparencies*  pictures,  microforms,  maps,
recordings  and data tapes.     In those  terms  the  collection now consists of over four
million items,   and remains  the second largest in Canada.
Among the year's  accessions were  three distinguished collections.     Dr.   and Mrs.
Stanley Arkley,   long-time  friends of the University and regular donors  to the
Library,  gave  their thousand-volume  collection of early children's  literature  to
the Library,  and then capped the  gift by establishing a special  fund of $10,000  for
its  future support.     Mrs.  N.M.  Yakovleff donated a collection of several hundred
pre-revolutionary Russian books,  some of them so rare as  to be unique  copies  in
North America.     It was with sadness  that the Library received the third collection:
that of the late Mr.  H.R.  MacMillan,  whose benefactions  throughout his  lifetime and whose  unprecedented gift of  $3,000,000 in February 1965 enabled the  Library to
acquire in the space of a  few years  the research  collections it needed to
support the expanding University.     These were his own books,  numbering nearly
five  thousand.     Mr.   MacMillan was  a committed and consistent reader;   the  size
and scope of his personal collection indicated clearly the  range of his own
interests  and intellect.
Other  friends of the Library,  such as Lester McLennan of California,  Mrs.  Agnes
C.   Lamb of Galiano Island,  and Mrs.  Eva G.  Ham of Saskatchewan,  to mention only
a few individuals,  contributed thousands of useful and important items.     Such
persons have played and continue to play an important role  in enriching the
collections  in ways  it would be impossible  for the Library to duplicate. -  5  -
III.   SPACE
One of the ironies of the Library's present situation is that while the University
has  shown its  concern for the' development of the  collections,  and while steady
growth is  assured for the present,  space  to house these  collections is  in
increasingly short supply and programmes aimed at relieving the situation have
been delayed or stopped.
At the very beginning of the academic year,  on September 2nd,  the Board of
Governors approved a site  for a new Library Processing Building, west of the
Woodward Biomedical Library.     This ended years of uncertainty during which some
location acceptable to the Library,  the University and the students was  sought.
Work proceeded immediately on plans  for the building but before  construction
could begin,   the  Universities  Council of B.C.  suspended all  capital  funding.
Thus  the project was halted once  again.     This had serious  implications  for library
staff members,  working in a low-ceiling area designed for book storage,   and for
the expansion of the collection in the Main Library, where shelves in many areas
have  surpassed working capacity.
Another building on which work has been stopped is  the Asian Studies Centre.    When
it is completed,   the Asian Studies Library will be transferred to it from the Main
Library.     In the meantime,  part of its  collection is  in storage,  while  its
available collection occupies shelves in the crowded Main stacks.
Also affected by the University Council's  freeze was the extension to the Scarfe
Building, which was  to include  an expanded library and resource  centre  for the
Faculty of Education.     The present Curriculum Laboratory is becoming increasingly
cramped,   collections expanding regularly into seating areas:  in 1970  there were
250 study spaces,  there  are now 125.     in 1970/71 the  Faculty enrolled 3818 students,
this year,  as of September 1976,   there were 4343.     Until a new library is available
students and faculty will be obliged to seek study space elsewhere,   and visit other
libraries  to locate  the materials  they need.
No relief was or is in sight for many other library branches,  like the MacMillan
Library,  the Music Library and the Mathematics Library,  where space  is  running out. In this situation, the only immediate recourse was to create a new storage area.
For this purpose, the space recently vacated by the Anthropology Museum in the
basement of the Main Library has been equipped with double-tiered warehouse
shelving, to provide space for about 120,000 volumes.  Nearly half this space was
immediately consumed by the return of volumes withdrawn from the Main Library
stacks in 1971, which had been stored in the basement of the Woodward Library.
Access to these volumes was thereby made more efficient, and storage space was
created in the Woodward Library for the overflow from that collection and from
other branches.  The selection of further Main Library materials for storage is
under way, with an emphasis on long runs of journals.  The intention is to fill
the area completely, extending the shelf life of the Main Library by about two
years.  This would be enough time to permit the completion of the Library Processing Centre, if work commenced soon; this building would free one stack level for
further expansion of the Main Library collection.
Storage is a good solution for material that is seldom used.  Unfortunately,
materials now destined for storage do not all fall into that category.  Thus, in
addition to creating a frustrating delay in access for users, extra operating
costs are incurred in changing library records and in retrieving materials.  The
usefulness of the library for browsing is also reduced.  However, at the present
time there is no alternative to increased storage.
Storage facilities can not contend with another problem confronting the Library:
the growth of the card catalogue. Although a combination of a staff strike, a
postal strike and a financial crisis brought about an ebb and flow of materials
through the Processing Divisions, the number of catalogue cards produced and filed
declined only slightly: from 1,467,650 in 1974/75 to 1,428,400 last year.  Nearly
half a million of these cards were filed in the Main Library's union catalogue,
which, with the addition of fifteen cabinets, has reached the limits of expansion
within the confines of the Main Concourse.  It is obvious that the card catalogue
can not go on growing forever, and that other means must be found to provide
information concerning the holdings of the library system. 7 -
IV.  SERVICES
A superficial examination of the statistics of library activity, as reflected in
the lending of materials and in responses to questions, gives the impression that
the use of the library is levelling off if not in fact declining.  Loans dropped
by about 3%, the number of reference questions increased by a fraction of a
percent.  However, analysis of the statistics suggests not only reasons for the
apparent change but also the possibility that use of libraries is continuing to
increase.
To begin with, there was a strike of the supporting staff late in 1975, during
which the lending of materials declined by about 16% in comparison with the same
month in 1974; there was a similar decrease in reference questions by about 4%.
A second factor affecting the number of loans was the introduction in January,
for a trial period of one year, of new loan regulations which provided all users
with an opportunity to borrow infrequently used materials for extended periods.
This resulted in the renewal of fewer items, holding down the statistics for the
period from January through August.
The use of materials within library premises is not usually measured because it
is almost immeasurable.  However, in the Sedgewick Library samples of in-house
use taken in November 1973 and November 1975 indicated that the proportion of
materials used but not borrowed had increased, to the point where it can be said
that for each book taken out, one is used in the Library.  Thus Sedgewick Library
total use would be in the order of three quarters of a million items per year.
Whether other libraries achieve the same ratio would undoubtedly be partly a
function of the availability of seating, but nevertheless it is obvious that total
loans in excess of two and a quarter million are only part of the story.
The significant decline of 36% in loans of materials to other libraries requires
explanation.  On February 1st an interlibrary lending fee of $8.00 per item was
introduced.  U.B.C. thus became the second library in Canada to take this step,
the first being the University of Toronto; among university libraries in Canada,
these two are the heaviest net lenders, which is to say that they lend to other
libraries in total more than they borrow from other libraries in total. -   8  -
Introduction of the fee,  which became  an immediate object of protest by other
libraries  accustomed to borrowing from U.B.C, was made necessary by the Library's
own financial difficulties,  together with  the  fact that the number of requests
received had been rising:  over 18%  in the previous year.     Based on net loans  in the
calendar year 1975,  U.B.C.'s  support of the needs of other libraries,   in terms of
direct costs,  exceeded $100,000.     This had to be weighed against the Library's
increasing inability to maintain its  collections and services  to its primary
clientele.     It is  regrettable  that other institutions  should be hindered in their
access  to U.B.C.'s  collections, but the  fee may be a temporary necessity,  until
federal and provincial  governments  recognize  that major university collections  in
Canada are serving as national and regional resources,  and make  arrangements  to
compensate such libraries  for their interlibrary lending activity.
However,   interlibrary  loan accounts  for only a small proportion of the use made of
U.B.C.   collections by persons with no U.B.C.   affiliation:   direct use by such persons
is  much more significant.     Earlier surveys have established that about 16% of
individuals  to be  found in U.B.C.'s  libraries  are neither U.B.C.  students nor
faculty.     Since most of these persons would not have borrowing privileges,  their
use of the  collection would be  internal,   and unmeasured;  but if,  as  suggested
earlier,   for each item borrowed one is  used in the  library,  based on last year's
total circulation,  16% of users  could account for the  use of some  360,000  items.
Accurate measurement would probably reveal a much higher figure,   since most of our
visiting clientele  are seeking library materials,  rather than study space,   and are
unable  to borrow the materials  they  find in our collections.
A survey  conducted from October 23rd to 29th revealed that off-campus visitors were
also heavy users of the library's  reference services.     In that period,   reference
librarians  responded to  8,307 questions:  reflecting the earlier finding about the
number of visitors  almost exactly,   16.7%  of the questions were posed by persons
without U.B.C.   affiliation.     However,  it was  also learned,  through measuring the
duration of reference  service  rendered,  that the visitors  consumed 25.4% of
available  reference staff time,  presumably because  they were  less  familiar with
the  library.     The value of that time,  expressed on an annual basis, would be  about
$275,000.     The visitors  fell into the  following categories: -   9  -
Students 39%
General 32.6%
Business  & Industry 10.8%
Health  Science   & Hospital 9.4%
Government 8.2%
These  findings  support the  contention that U.B.C.   Library is  de  facto a community
resource,   although  it has  neither the mandate nor the special  funding to serve  as
such.     It is  natural  that Canada's second largest library, with strong collections
in professional as well  as  academic  fields,   should attract extra-mural users.     With
appropriate   funding and other  forms  of support,   more  could be  done   for the
community,  and to increase  access  to the  Library's  resources.
It should be noted that there are already in existence  some programmes which have
improved access.     Through  the Federated Information Network,  or FIN,  a project of
the Greater Vancouver Library Federation,  U.B.C.   Library is provided with  funds  to
offset the  costs of lending materials  to all branches of all public libraries   in
the Lower Mainland.     Several  government departments  in Victoria have also been able
to use FIN to expedite  their borrowing from U.B.C.     The Department of Education
has provided the Crane Library with  funds  to enable it to send its materials  to
universities,   colleges  and schools  throughout the province.
At the  same  time,  one  important service was  obliged to  shift  from a  free  to  a cost-
recovery basis.     This was MEDLINE,   the on-line health-  and life-sciences  information
system, which had been made  available  to all  doctors  in the province with  the
assistance  of the  B.C.   Medical Centre.     With the demise of that organization,   the
Library was  forced to draw up a scale of fees which has had the natural result of
reducing the  amount of off-campus  use,   to the  detriment of health  services.
Remarkable  demand for the  use  of MEDLINE by  ths  U.B.C.   community,   together with
availability of similar data bases  in science and the  social sciences,   suggest that
the  Library should anticipate heavy use of computerized bibliographic services  in
the   future.     Since  costs  are  substantial,   some  degree  of cost-recovery  from U.B.C.
users  as well as  from non-U.B.C.   users may be  necessary if adequate access  to these
important services  is  to be assured.
But off-campus  users were  not the only ones   to experience  a  curtailment of service.
The  Library's schedule has been trimmed,   and libraries now close earlier than 10
before; in addition, the overtime expense of operating libraries on statutory
holidays has forced their closure on such days.  Another traditional library service,
campus delivery of library materials by truck to faculty members, has been
terminated because of a budget reduction in the Department of Physical Plant. 11
V.   THE FUTURE: SOME POSSIBILITIES
As stated in the introduction to this report, the Library is in the grip of an
economic vise; independently, it can do little to change the conditions which are
gradually eroding its capacity to maintain collections and services at desirable
and established levels.  It is probable that only through cooperative action and
extra-institutional assistance will it be able to continue to meet the needs of
its primary clientele: the students and faculty of the University.
Given the prevailing budget situation, it was extraordinary that the University
was able to provide a budget supplement sufficient to maintain the rate of
accessions in the present fiscal year.  There is no guarantee that it will be able
to meet an almost assured continuing challenge from that demon, inflation.  If the
accession rate falls, if fewer books can be acquired, if more periodical titles
must be cancelled, the need for cooperative collection development, and for the
sharing of resources among libraries, becomes more urgent. Even if one were to
assume that budget supplements would be adequate to offset inflation in the near
future, there is no assurance that other libraries, and particularly those at
other universities and at colleges, will be so fortunate; already dependent on
U.B.C.'s collections, the extent of their dependence would increase.
Experience supports the contention that the collection at U.B.C. serves as a
resource at both the provincial and national level.  Thus it can be argued that
provincial and federal governments should have an interest in the welfare of
libraries like this one, and should be asked to provide funds for the maintenance
of resource collections, within the framework of a general plan which acknowledges
existing strengths and areas of specialization.
To sustain resource collections is one thing: to provide access to them is another.
To have been forced to introduce an interlibrary loan fee is to have set back the
development of inter-institutional sharing and the rationalization of collections
development among libraries.  But the hard fact is that the costs of interlibrary
lending are substantial, and that larger libraries at universities are increasingly
unable to meet them.  Again, it should be acknowledged by the provincial and
federal governments that they have a role to play in facilitating the sharing of
collections on the one hand, and on the other of ensuring the most efficient use
of public funds committed to the purchase of library materials. -   12
Effective sharing of collections is  also dependent on knowing what there is  to
share.     Although  the holdings of some of the province's  larger libraries  are
recorded in the National Union Catalogue in Ottawa,   for the most part,  each
library in British Columbia only knows  its own holdings.     There  is  a definite
need for a provincial union  catalogue,  and this  in fact has been acknowledged by
the  government;  the  creation of such a catalogue has been an objective of the
B.C.   Library Development Commission  for several years.     As yet the  financial means
for bringing that catalogue  into existence have not been made available.     However,
the methodology  for creating a computer-based union catalogue is well understood.
The creation of such a catalogue impinges on the maintenance of U.B.C.'s own
catalogues  at other libraries.     In roughest outline,   there would be  a common pool
of machine-readable catalogue  records;   these  records  could be  drawn upon to create
records  for individual libraries, whether they were in card,  book,  or microfiche
format;   and in the process of making these  individual records,  a union  file would
be  developed as  a by-product.     There  are in existence  systems which would allow
British Columbia libraries  to accomplish  this.     What is needed is  a supra-library
organization to exploit these systems,  one which would have  the resources  in terms
of man- and computer-power to adapt and apply  these  systems  in the provincial
context.
At U.B.C,   catalogue  records would no longer be available  in card form.     The
existing card catalogue would of course  remain, but it would be  closed off,   and
new accessions would be  listed on computer output microfiche,  or COM,  a medium
already  familiar to library patrons  and one which has been readily accepted.
The  complete  record of the Library's  new accessions would for the  first time be
available  in all branches of the system,  and if desired in reading rooms  and
departmental offices.     Retrospective  conversion of the old catalogue would be
undertaken,  to provide  initially at least an abbreviated bibliographical record
on COM, with the  ultimate objective being a catalogue which is  completely
machine-readable  and accessible on-line by remote  terminal.     It is obvious  that
such  an undertaking should not be performed in isolation, but in cooperation
with other libraries,  so as to avoid duplication of effort.     But if a province-
wide  catalogue  support system is not introduced,  U.B.C.   Library must take steps
independently to convert its  catalogue  to machine-readable  form,  and to work
toward the development of an integrated bibliographical record in support of all
its  automated systems. 13 -
Certainly a machine-readable catalogue, whether made available on COM or through
a terminal, solves the attendant problem of the physical space consumed by catalogues.  But neither computer technology nor microphotography are able yet to be
of great assistance in dealing with that other fundamental and vexing problem:
where to store library materials as the collections outgrow building capacities.
Over the past dozen years the creation of branch libraries has enabled the library
to absorb a tripling in size of the number of physical volumes.  Other branch
libraries have been advocated.  It is clear that in the future the Main Library
must be replaced or totally renovated.  But at this point it is also clear that
neither more branch libraries nor a new central library will be forthcoming; the
buildings in prospect, namely the Processing Building and the Asian Studies Centre,
will alleviate the problem of growth only for the span of a few years.  It is
obvious that a storage facility lies in the future of this library, and ultimately
of all libraries in the province, since there must be limits to growth.  Such a
storage facility would be another natural project for a supra-library organization:
a warehouse to contain infrequently used materials from all libraries, the contents
of which could be made known through the machine-based union catalogue, and thus
made available as a resource for all libraries and their users.
In the area of public services, U.B.C Library has much to offer the community,
and surveys show that the community is taking advantage of present offerings.
Unfortunately, it may not be possible to maintain the level of services now
available, even for U.B.C students and faculty.  As in the case of MEDLINE, cost-
recovery programmes may be necessary, involving such things as higher extra-mural
fees and the development of contracts for the provision of special types of
service to particular groups.
In summary, the danger exists that as the University's ability to maintain the
existing library system, let alone expand it, is curtailed, retrenchment could
seriously affect the Library's ability to serve U.B.C.'s students and faculty.  As
part of such retrenchment, the Library could become isolated within the community
of libraries in the province and in Canada, as it attempted to deal with its first
priorities at the expense of extra-mural service and interlibrary cooperation.
What is called for in this situation is the increased participation of provincial
and federal governments in the creation of library networks which, through the use
of computer-based records and improved communications systems, through support for
the interlibrary sharing process, and through support for resource collections,
would make the most effective use of the totality of libraries.  U.B.C. Library - 14 -
would be a central component in any combination of provincial and national networks, and is ready to participate, whether in planning or implementation.  In the
meantime, with the resources at its disposal, the library will continue, as it has
for over sixty years, to serve the University's students and faculty as well as it
possibly can. Appendix A
SIZE OF COLLECTIONS - PHYSICAL VOLUMES
March 31, 1975  Additions  Withdrawals  March 31, 1976
Main Library
General Stacks
Asian Studies
Fine Arts
Humanities & Social
Sciences Reference
S cience Re ference
Special Collections
SUBTOTAL
Branches and Reading Rooms
Animal Resource Ecology
Crane  Library
Curriculum Laboratory
Law Library
MacMillan Library
Biomedical Branch
Mathematics Library
Music Library
3
Reading Rooms
Sedgewick Library
Social Work Library
Woodward Library
SUBTOTAL
TOTAL
Withdrawals
Net Growth
Storage
GRAND TOTAL
736,729
37,309
61,577
9,458
58,013
4,858
34,902
2,252
13,340
706
42,511
1,561
947,072
56,144
663,654
1,610,726
59,634
1,670,360
41,330
97,474
11,600
12,409
16
15
1
12,446
2,825
15,271
761,029
71,035
62,866
37,138
14,031
44,071
990,770
12,824
393
5
13,212
5,583
645
3
6,225
31,491
4,888
1,007
35,372
94,604
5,118
9
99,713
31,439
2,354
67
33,726
23,342
1,148
45
24,445
16,894
900
3
17,791
22,285
2,133
24
24,394
88,043
6,952
538
94,457
127,892
8,602
1,004
135,490
9,745
720
110
10,355
199,612
7,377
10
206,979
702,159
1,692,929
82,203
71,234^
1,764,163 Appendix A (continued)
Notes:
General Stacks  includes  the  Reserve Book Collection and some minor Main Library
collections.
2
Indie language materials numbering 11,600 volumes were  removed from the Main
Stacks  and consigned to limited-access  storage.    They are meant eventually to
be housed in the Asian Centre.
3
Data Library holdings  are included with Reading Rooms. Appendix B
GROWTH OF COLLECTIONS
Volumes - Catalogued
1,670,360
97,474
Documents -  Uncatalogued
417,070
17,577
Films,  Filmstrips  & Video
Tapes         2,70 3
86
Slides  & Transparencies
8,172
1,623
Pictures  & Posters
64,280
2,618
Microfilm   (reels)
42,687
2,854
Mlcrocard   (cards)
111,680
-
Microprint   (sheets)
858,000
27,000
Microfiche   (sheets)
600,186
10,279
Maps
105,733
4,212
Manus crip ts *
3,500  l.f.
67  l.f.
Recordings
58,476
1,359
Magnetic Tapes
150
15
Air Photos
—
70
March 31, 1975  Additions  Withdrawals  March 31, 1976
3,671
1,764,163
434,647
2,789
9,795
66,898
45,541
111,680
885,000
610,465
109,945
3,617 l.f.
59,835
165
70
♦Thickness of files in linear feet Appendix C
LIBRARY EXPENDITURES
Fiscal Years,  April-March
Salaries  & Wages
Books  & Periodicals
Binding
Supplies,  Equipment
1973/74
3,522,626
1,348,775
165,081
373,302
1974/75
4,263,647
1,502,317
127,480
428,391
1975/76
5,344,412
1,741,021
144,266
428,696
Estimated
1976/77
6,132,604
1,855,087
164,044
507,177
5,409,784 6,321,835 7,658,395 8,658,912 Appendix D
GENERAL CIRCULATION
RECORDED USE OF LIBRARY RESOURCES
September 1975 - August 1976
1972/73
Main Library
General Stack Collection 498,656
Reserve Circulation 37,603
Extension Library 5,355
Asian Studies Division 10,704
Fine Arts Division 62,749
Government Publications 103,491
Map Collections 8,353
Special Collections 12,681
SUBTOTAL
739,592
% Increase/
Decrease over
1973/74
1974/75
1975/76
1974/75
483,699
465,534
427,094
- 8.3%
35,383
31,656
19,657
-37.9%
5,317
3,831
4,356
+13.7%
13,691
18,586
17,943
- 3.5%
74,145
81,097
88,359
+ 9.0%
130,491
148,960
149,975
+ 0.7%
9,320
7,650
9,928
+29.8%
20,068
19,571
19,051
- 2.7%
772,114
776,885
736,363
- 5.2%
Branch Libraries &
Reading Rooms
Animal Resource Ecology
4,202
6,598
9,651
8,447
—J.2 * 5%
Crane Library
29,361
43,085
48,626
31,293
-35.6%
Curriculum Laboratory
222,392
239,365
249,054
225,261
- 9.6%
Law Library
122,813
135,054
124,169
142,628
+14.9%
MacMillan Library
33,304
39,323
41,860
41,193
- 1.6%
Marjorie Smith Library
13,807
11,900
12,969
12,603
- 2.8%
Mathematics Library
21,965
22,976
18,972
19,251
+ 1.5%
Medical Branch Library
27,483
27,606
26,947
27,469
+ 1.9%
(V.G.H.)
Music Library
20,679
26,473
27,468
33,624
+22.4%
Reading Rooms
66,700
75,447
75,195
83,907
+11.6%
Sedgewick Library
446,860
433,681
396,286
377,882
- 4.6%
Woodward Biomedical
175,106
204,380
189,408
195,110
+ 3.0%
SUBTOTAL           1
,184,672
1,265,888
1,220,605
1,198,668
- 1.8%
Recordings
Wilson Recordings
Collection
173,718
247,146
255,498
261,278
+ 2*3%
Music Library
Record Collection
34,880
33,906
37,920
38,976
+ 2.8%
SUBTOTAL
208,598
281,052
293,418
300,254
+ 2.3% Appendix D (Continued)
INTERLIBRARY LOANS
To Other Libraries
1972/73
1973/74
1974/75
1975/76
General
From BCMLS
- Photocopies
TOTAL INTERLIBRARY
BORROWING
GRAND TOTAL -
(General Circulation
& Interlibrary Loans)
*  Federated Information Network (Greater Vancouver Libraries)
** B.C. Medical Library Services
*** Loaned via special Simon Fraser University unit
% Increase/
Decrease Over
1974/75
- Original Materials
General
5,027
5,582
7,362
3,078
- 58.2%
To FIN libraries*
-
-
(9 mos.)
1,314
+ 91.8%
To BCMLS**
1,341
1,415
1,997
2,298
+ 15.1%
To SFU***
1,270
1,396
1,645
987
- 40.0%
To U. Victoria***
267
299
314
364
+ 15.9%
To BCIT***
62
106
89
53
- 40.4%
SUBTOTAL
7,967
8,798
12,092
8,094
- 33.1%
- Photocopies
General
6,923
6,991
8,142
3,591
- 55.9%
To FIN libraries*
-
-
,183
(9 mos.)
571
+212.0%
To SFU***
5,228
4,227
2,951
2,446
- 17.1%
To u. Victoria***
865
1,020
1,492
1,245
- 16.6%
To BCIT***
314
335
269
178
- 33.8%
To Colleges***
-
181
416
142
- 65.9%
To Bamfield***
-
27
30
90
+200.0%
SUBTOTAL
13,330
12,781
13,483
8,263
- 38.7%
TOTAL INTERLIBRARY
LENDING
21,297
21,579
25,575
16,357
- 36.0%
From Other Libraries
- Original Materials
4,090
2,613
2,657
2,020
- 24.0%
434
473
919
1,164
+ 26.7%
3,847
3,241
3,801
2,661
- 30.0%
8,371
6,327
7,377
5,845
- 20.8%
2,162,530
2,346,960
2,323,860
2
,257,487
(-66,373)
s)
Overall
%
decrease =
=  -  2.9% Appendix   E
REFERENCE  STATISTICS
September, 1975 - August, 1976
Directional
Questions
Reference
Questions
Research
Questions
Total
Percentage
Increase/Decrease
Main Library
Asian Studies
1,897
3,545
830
6,272
Fine Arts
7,515
9,800
1,250
18,565
Government Publications
337
29,511
813
30,661
Humanities
2,104
8,960
594
11,658
Information Desk
12,810
59,550
-
72,360
Map Collection
234
3,198
162
3,594
Science
799
7,170
747
8,716
Social Sciences
666
15,133
839
16,638
Special Collections
1,315
7,532
200
9,047
27,677
144,399
5,435
177,511 .
+ 0.6%
(1974/75)(27,060)
(143,739)
(5,626)
(176,425)
Branch Libraries
Animal Resource Ecology
1,587
2,624
159
4,370
Crane Library
3,490
3,661
679
7,830
Curriculum Laboratory
4,434
8,136
222
12,792
Law Library
3,052
2,624
1,721
7,397
MacMillan Library
1,754
5,083
230
7,067
Marjorie Smith Library
247
1,661
164
2,072
Mathematics Library
907
1,258
165
2,330
Medical Branch Library
(V.G.H.)
1,744
6,545
448
8,737
Music Library
2,870
7,129
838
10,837
Sedgewick Library
11,620
16,168
450
28,238
Woodward Library
6,844
23,318
4,679*
34,841
38,549
78,207
9,755
126,511
- 0.3%
(.1974/75) (39,850
C80,520)
(6,472)
(126,938)
GRAND TOTALS
66,220
221,966
15,170
304,022**
+ 0.2%
(1974/75)(66,910)
(224,259)
(12,194)
(303,363)
* Includes 3850 MEDLINE questions.
**38,304 questions in Reading Rooms
not included in totals. Appendix F
LIBRARY ORGANIZATION
ADMINISTRATION
Stuart-Stubbs, Basil
Bell, Inglis F.
Hamilton, Robert M.
Mclnnes, Douglas N.
MacDonald, Robin
Watson, William J.
de Bruijn, Erik
ACQUISITIONS
Harrington, Walter
ASIAN STUDIES
Ng, Tung King
BIBLIOGRAPHY
Elliston, Graham
Jeffreys, Anthony
Johnson, Stephen
Mcintosh, Jack
Mercer, Eleanor
Palsson, Gerald
Shields, Dorothy
BINDERY
Fryer, Percy
CATALOGUE DIVISION
Elrod, J. McRee
Original Cataloguing
Bailey, Freda
Catalogue Preparations
Baldwin, Nadine
Searching/LC Cataloguing
Balshaw, Mavis
University Librarian
Associate Librarian
Assistant Librarian - Collections
Assistant Librarian - Public Services
Coordinator of Technical Processes
and Systems
Assistant Librarian - Physical Planning
and Development
Administrative Services Librarian
Head Librarian
Head Librarian
Bibliographer - Serials
Bibliographer - Life Sciences
Research Bibliographer
Bibliographer - Slavonic Studies
Bibliographer - English Language
Bibliographer - Science
Bibliographer - European Languages
Foreman
Head Librarian
Head
Head
Head Appendix F   (Continued)
-   2
CIRCULATION
Butterfield, Rita
CRANE LIBRARY
Thiele, Paul
CURRICULUM LABORATORY
Hurt, Howard
DATA LIBRARY
Ruus, Laine
FINE ARTS DIVISION
Dwyer, Melva
ANIMAL RESOURCE ECOLOGY LIBRARY
Nelson, Ann
MACMILLAN LIBRARY
Macaree, Mary
GIFTS & EXCHANGE
Elliston, Graham
GOVERNMENT PUBLICATIONS
Dods on, S uzanne
HUMANITIES
Forbes, Charles
INFORMATION & ORIENTATION
Sandilands, Joan
INTERLIBRARY LOAN
Friesen, Margaret
LAW LIBRARY
Head Librarian
Head
Head
Head
Head Librarian
Head Librarian
Head Librarian
Head Librarian
Head Librarian
Head Librarian
Head Librarian
Head Librarian
Shorthouse, Tom
Head Librarian Appendix F (Continued)
3 -
MAP DIVISION
Wilson, Maureen
MARJORIE SMITH LIBRARY
de Bruijn, Elsie
MUSIC LIBRARY
Burndorfer, Hans
READING ROOMS
Omelusik, Nicholas
RECORD COLLECTION
Kaye, Douglas
Head Librarian
Head Librarian
Head Librarian
Head Librarian
Head
SCIENCE DIVISION & MATHEMATICS LIBRARY
Brongers, Rein
SEDGEWICK LIBRARY
Erickson, Ture
SERIALS DIVISION
Turner, Ann
SOCIAL SCIENCES DIVISION
Carrier, Lois
SPECIAL COLLECTIONS DIVISION
Yandle, Anne
Selby, Joan
SYSTEMS DEVELOPMENT
Dennis, Donald
Dobbin, Ge raldi ne
WOODWARD LIBRARY
Leith, Anna
BIOMEDICAL BRANCH LIBRARY
Freeman, George
Head Librarian
Head Librarian
Head Librarian
Head Librarian
Head Librarian
Curator, Colbeck Collection
Systems Analyst
Systems & Information Science Librarian
Head Librarian
Head Librarian Appendix G
LIBRARY  SUPPORTED READING ROOMS
AS  OF AUGUST,   1976
Adult
Education
Room 20
5760 Toronto Road
Agricultural    Ponderosa Annex D
Economics       Room 105
Anthropology-   Hut M22
Sociology       Room 23
Applied Science/ Civil & Mech. Eng.
Mechanical Eng. Building, Room 2050
Architecture    F. Lasserre Bldg.
Room 9B (Basement)
Asian Studies   Buchanan Building
Room 2208
Audiology
Chemis try
James Mather Bldg.
Fairview Pi., Room 205
Chemical        Chem. Engineering
Engineering     Bldg., Room 310
Chemistry Building
Room 261
Electrical    Elect. Engr. Bldg.
Engineering   Rm. 428 (Enter by Rm. 434)
English
French
Buchanan Tower
Room 697
Buchanan Tower
Room 897
Geography     Geography Building
Room 140
Geology       Geological Sciences
Building, Room 208
Geophysics    Geophysics Building
2nd Floor, South
Hispanic-     Buchanan Building
Italian       Room 2220
Home Home Economics Bldg.
Economics     Room 112
Institute of  Auditorium Annex 100
Industrial Relations
Classics
Commerce
Buchanan Building
Room 2218
Henry Angus Bldg.
Room 307
Institutional Main Mall N. Admin. Bldg.
Analysis & Planning
Library       Library North Wing
School        8th Floor
Comparative     Buchanan Building
Literature      Room 227
Linguistics   Buchanan Building
Room 227
Computing
Centre
Creative
Writing
Economics-
History
Civil Engineering
Bldg., Room 238
Brock Hall, South
Wing, Room 204
Buchanan Tower
Room 1097
Metallurgy    Metallurgy Building
Room 319
Microbiology  Wesbrook Building
Room 300
Mineral       Mineral Engineering
Engineering   Building, Room 201 Appendix G (continued)
Pharmacology
Pharmacy
Philosophy
Medical Sciences Building
Block C, Room 221
Cunningham Building
Room 160
Buchanan Building
Room 3270
Physics        Hennings Building
Room 311
Physiology      Medical Sciences Building
Block A, Room 201
Political       Buchanan Building
Science        Room 1220
Psychiatry      Rm. 22, Health Sciences Centre
2255 Wesbrook Road
Psychology
Henry Angus Building
Room 203
Rehabilitation
Medicine
Hut B2
Room 26-27
Slavonic
Studies
Buchanan Building
Room 2251
Theatre
Frederick Wood Theatre
Room 211 Appendix H
SENATE LIBRARY COMMITTEE
1975/76
Dr. CS. Belshaw
Mr. W.H. Black
Dr. E.M. Fulton
Dr. M.CL. Gerry
Dr. W.C Gibson
Dr. R. Gosse
Dr. R.F. Kelly
Dr. P.A. Larkin
Mr. S.L. Lipson
Rev. J.P. Martin
Dr. M.F. McGregor (Chairman)
Mr. J.F. McWilliams
Mrs. A. Piternick
Dr. M. Shaw
Dr. J.L. Wisenthal
EX-OFFICIO
Chancellor D. Miller
President D. Kenny
Mr. J.E.A. Parnall
Mr. B. Stuart-Stubbs
Terms of Reference:
(a) To advise and assist the Librarian in:
(i)  formulating a policy for the development of resources for
instruction and research;
(ii)  advising on the allocation of book funds to the fields of
instruction and research;
(iii)  developing a general program of library service for all the
interests of the University; and
(iv)  keeping himself informed about the library needs of
instructional and research staffs, and keeping the
academic community informed about the library.
(b) To report to Senate on matters of policy under discussion by the
Committee.

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