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Twentieth Report of the Library Committee to the Senate Oct 31, 1949

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 CLASSN..
SERIES„
THE LIBRAE C*^».
The University of British Columbia
THE  UNIVERSITY CF BRITISH COLUMBIA
TWENTIETH       REPORT
of the
LIBRARY COMMITTEE
/
to
THE  SENATE
Covering the Period
September, 194$ - August, 1949
October, 1949 THE UNIVERSITY OF BRITISH COLUMBIA
Vancouver, Canada
President N. A. M. MacKenzie, C.M.G., M.M., LL.M., LL.D., K.C.,
Chairman of the Senate,
The University of British Columbia
Dear Sir:
As Chairman of the Library Committee I have the
honour to submit, for the consideration of Senate, the
Twentieth Report of the Librarian of the University, covering
the period from September 1, 194$, to August 31, 1949.
All of which is respectfully submitted.
Ian McTaggart Cowan
Chairman
September 30, 1949. REPORT OF THE LIBRARIAN
Dr. I. McT. Cowan,
Chairman, Library Committee,
The University of British Columbia.
Dear Dr. Cowan:
I have the honour to submit the Twentieth Report of
the Librarian of the University covering the period from
September 1, 194$, to August 31, 1949.  This report is admittedly
sketchy, and it can hardly be otherwise since the writer's
knowledge of the Library is limited and the reports submitted
from the divisions of the Library are briefer than is desirable.
Perhaps the best way for me to present an account of the year's
activities is to make certain comments on the state of the Library
in general and then to give particular attention to the work of
the several operating units.
In Dr. Lamb's last annual report as the Librarian he
wrote, "By 1944 I had also become convinced that the Library of
the University of British Columbia was destined to become the
most important research collection in the Canadian West... a view
that recent events have amply justified".  I quite agree with
Dr. Lamb's concept of the future role of this Library, for we
have here the minimum requirements needed to achieve this end.
The book collection appears to be well selected, the building is
well planned and spacious, the staff in the main is competent
and energetic, and the Library is organized to serve the university community in an effective manner.
A few comments on each requirement are in order.
The new north wing which has given the Library "breathing room"
must have been the dominant influence in the thinking of the staff 2
during the year under review.  The moving of the collections and
the various divisions into new quarters was accomplished not
without difficulty, but the results probably are as good if not
better than had been anticipated.  At this writing there are
certain flaws in the construction that need to be remedied; but
we have reason to consider ourselves among the fortunate as far
as space is concerned.
The collections appear to be in good condition, but the
inventory concluded in June revealed that about 1500 volumes were
missing.  This figure is high, but it is difficult to see how it
can be substantially reduced without restricting access to the
stacks and this is a step which should not be taken except as a
last resort.
Most of the members of the staff of the Library are both
capable and loyal, and much of the credit for the successful
development of the Library belongs to them.  The salaries of the
staff in this Library are low, and the number of recent resignations
and present vacancies in professional positions is reason for
concern. At this distance from the library schools in the east,
it is difficult to see how we can recruit the type of personnel we
need unless we can offer qualified persons opportunities which are
more attractive than those found here now.
The Acquisitions Division of this Library is little more
than a year old, but in its new quarters and with its effective
organization it seems to be doing a commendable job of acquiring
publications (other than periodical) for this Library.  During the
past year much of the attention of Mr. Samuel Rothstein, who is in
charge of our acquisitions work, was given to devising and improving procedures, and he now has readily available detailed
information about his outstanding orders and the expenditures made
under the several departmental allocations.  In addition to
handling purchases, the Acquisitions Division receives gifts to the
Library: and during the past year this Library acquired from both
sources 12,001 volumes as compared with 9,62$ in the previous jsar.
A special feature of acquisitions work in the past year was the
expenditure of special funds for Clinical Psychology and for
materials useful in the Ph.D. programs of the Biology, Physics, and
Zoology Departments.
The materials received in the Acquisitions Division have
gone forward promptly to the Catalogue Division where they have been
described without undue delay.  The problems confronted by
Miss Dorothy Jefferd and her cataloguing assistants are likely to
increase greatly in the near future.  Both Mr. and Mrs. McCloy,
professional members of the Catalogue Division, will leave for
Ottawa shortly, and they will be difficult to replace since there is
a dearth of qualified cataloguers. Moreover, the type of publications which we are now acquiring, Slavic materials form an excellent,
example, require special skills.  The University has entered into
fields such as law and medicine, and in each there is an extensive
literature which is often difficult for cataloguers to handle
without special subject knowledge.  Fortunately, this Library uses
the Library of Congress classification and it is possible for
members of our Catalogue Division to utilize with little change th'-
subject headings and other decisions made by members of the
cataloguing staff of the Library in Washington.  If Miss Jefferd
and her assistants had been obliged to describe, classify, and 4
determine the subject approach of the 12,000 volumes acquired
during the twelve months under review, these materials simply
would not now be accessible to the users of this Library.
The daily work of a Circulation Division is usually
reflected in statistics of materials charged out to library users.
Statistics can be most easily computed at loan desks, and it is in
this service of a library that they best reveal the work load.
A monthly tabulation of the circulation statistics of this Library
is given in the appendices, but the annual totals are as follows:
Loan Desk,108,191; Reserve Book Room, 130,941; Periodicals Room,
13,2$i; Reference Room, 8,7$$; and Fine Arts Room, 3,4$$—a total
of 264,6$9 items serviced during the year.  The total of the
previous year was 219,535.  The increase in circulation, despite
the reduction in student body, probably is the result of the better facilities of the Library, and this statement seems to be
particularly true since there was a substantial increase in the
number of books serviced in the Reserve Book Room.  It appears
likely that the demands on this room will increase even more in
the next few years as the book stock becomes larger and more and
more volumes can be placed on reserve.  The present Reserve Book
Room is a great improvement on the facilities formerly available,
but some of the volumes on reserve should be obtainable from book
shelves along the walls of the reading room.  Students in lower
division classes probably will always have to secure their books
for required readings from a service desk or from behind turnstiles, but the members of upper division classes ought to be able
to examine materials put on reserve free from the restrictions
necessarily imposed on the members of very large classes.  For 5
instance, there seems little likelihood of improving the service of
reserve books to the large numbers of students in first year
psychology, but it should be possible for students in "Contemporary
Philosophy" or "l$th Century Literature" to have free access to the
materials placed on reserve for such courses.  If such an arrangement resulted in the loss of more volumes, the situation probably
could be remedied by providing the supervisory staff with a view of
the exit from the room.
During the.past twelve months the Reference Division
suffered from the inconvenience of moving that afflicted other units
in the Library, but it is now established in commodious quarters in
the Ridington Reference Room.  Here, as in other parts of the building, certain things could be done which would improve the working
conditions (there is need for acoustical tile in the ceiling of the
workroom behind the reference desk), but by and large the room provides ample space for readers, books, and staff.  The publications
available along the walls of this room are those which are most
useful in locating materials on many subjects, and in most cases
the results of careful selection are apparent.  Certain materials,
such as government publications, which are serviced by members of
the Reference Division are shelved behind the scenes. Miss Anne M.
Smith, Head of the Reference Division and her assistants give a
great deal of time to the not inconsiderable task of checking in a
generous selection of the product of the official presses in a great
many countries.  In addition, the Reference Division undertakes.to
provide attractive and significant exhibits in three display cases
in the building, and fifty-two such displays were prepared during
the past year.  In a library of this size it would be unwise to 6
attempt to collect extensively in all fields in which the University is interested, and the Reference Division attempts to compen-
sate for the limitations of the collection by borrowing pertinent
materials from other libraries.  Six hundred and sixteen volumes
were obtained in this manner during the past year, and 2$9 were
loaned to other libraries.• As the research activities of the University expand, this inter-library loan work will increase even
though the Library collections become much larger than they are at
present. A special feature of the work of members of the Reference
Division staff has been to instruct students in the use of the
Library.  During the past year Miss Isabel McDonald spoke before a
group in Social Work, Miss Doreen Fraser undertook to introduce
students in Architecture to the Library, and Miss Smith gave lectures before students in Pharmacy, Physics, Mining Engineering, and
Forestry.  The Library, with its rooms in the new north wing, has
admirable facilities for work of this kind, and it is contemplated
that more will be done in this direction in the future. The opportunity to become acquainted with the facilities of a research
library is one of the advantages enjoyed by students at this University, and an effort will be made to develop relationships with
teaching departments which will result in many more students becoming acquainted with the work of the Library above and beyond that
of handing out books in response to specific requests.
This Library takes pride in the strength of its periodical files, and a great deal of the credit for this must be given to
Mr, Roland Lanning who has an extraordinary knowledge of scholarly
serial publications.  At the moment there is reason for concern in
this field because of the large binding arrearage. An attempt was 7
made to relieve this situation by establishing a bindery in the
Library, but the present output is small in relation to the volume
of work to be done.  During the past year 1,$49 volumes were bound
in this building, and 952 were bound for the Library by the Art
Bookbinder in Vancouver.  This concern has handled binding for the
University for some years, but its service is slow and attention
should be given to augmenting the staff of the Library bindery and
making an attempt to increase its production.  It seems reasonable
to believe that if the staff of the Library bindery were increased
from its present two to four, its output would be trebled.  The increased production would result from a more effective division of
labor which could be achieved with a larger number of workers.  A
larger Library bindery appears to be a necessity, since the other
local facilities have proven incapable of taking care of our needs.
The alternative of not binding periodicals is one which should not
be seriously considered in a library which endeavors to serve research students.  It hardly needs to be pointed out that if the
issues of a periodical are not bound as soon as the volume is complete, one or more of them will probably be lost shortly thereafter.
For some time the budget for periodicals has been fixed at $6,500
\
a year.  This amount has been adequate in the past few years only
because of the difficulty of securing issues from Europe.  Now that
these are again forthcoming, it Is app-arent that an additional
amount.will have to be made available for periodicals unless the
University is prepared to discontinue some of its subscriptions.
The "births" in this field will probably continue to exceed the
"deaths" for a long time to come, and so long as the University is
broadening the field of its interest our subscription list will 8
continue to enlarge.
The Extension Library, headed by Miss Edith Stewart,
operates administratively as a unit of this Library but gives attention to groups not part of the regular academic community.  During
the past year the Extension Library circulated 10,740 volumes as
compared with 7,177 in the preceding year and 5,255 plays as compared with 3,444 in 1947-4$,  The potential demands which could be
made upon the Extension Library must be almost limitless, and care
must be exercised to see that our willingness to send books to
readers is not abused by persons who have access to other adequate
library facilities.  The demands made upon the Extension Library for
certain titles have been so great that it is often impossible to
supply a particular book for a number of months.  The entrance of
the University into correspondence and extra-mural courses will
make new demands on the Extension Library, and attention has been
given to see how Miss Stewart and her staff can best serve this new
group of off-the-campus readers.  These persons will differ from
other readers whom the Extension Library has served in that they
will be paying directly for service and the Extension Library will
be expected to render it promptly.  Several members of the University Library staff have met with Dr. Shrum and his assistants to
determine how best to answer the requirements of these new groups,
and the conclusions agreed upon should result in more rapid service
to users of the Extension Library.  One requirement for the rapid
service of volumes of assigned readings which are supplied by mail
is that the number of titles to be shipped be comparatively small,
and the instructors who will direct two of the scheduled correspondence courses have agreed to limit their titles for readings to 9
a number which the Extension Library should be able to handle
without difficulty.  Henceforth the Extension Library will keep a
stock of books which are in constant demand and. will turn over to
the University Library works which circulate infrequently.  In the
past regular students in the University have utilized the Extension
Library as a source for books which could not be found on the
shelves of the main Library, but this will not continue since Miss
Stewart and her assistant do not have the time necessary to serve
readers both on and off the campus.  In an effort to disassociate
the volumes in the Extension Library from those in the main collection, the cards representing works in the former will be withdrawn
from the public catalogue.  This will not result in any appreciable
lessening of the stock of books available to readers on the campus,
because most of the volumes in the Extension Library are duplicates
of those in the main collection.
One of the memorable events of the year under review was
the American Library Association Conference held in the Library
from August 21 to 25, More than 750 librarians came to Vancouver
to attend this, the first of se.ven regional American Library Association meetings to be held this year, and most of the delegates
were housed, fed, and otherwise accommodated on the campus.
Meetings of the Conference were held in University buildings, and
the staff of this Library and other University officials worked
hard to make the Conference a success.  The tables and chairs ordinarily in the Ridington Reference Room and the Reserve Book Room
were removed and the first served as space for exhibits and the
second as a lounge.  To make certain that the provisions necessary
for exhibitors' booths wculd not be injurious to the books on the 10
shelves and to our new shelving, sheets of plywood were placed
along the walls and the partitions for the booths, were built at
right angles to the protective sheets.  This precautionary measure
required considerable planning on the part of Mr. Rothstein, who
was the Library's representative on the Conference Exhibits Committee, and a large amount of work on the part of the University Office
of Buildings and Grounds.  Certain members of the University staff
outside of the Library, particularly Mr. Robert J. Boroughs, deserve
special commendation for their work for the Conference.  In holding
this large gathering of librarians on the campus, the University
won many friends, and in retrospect it can be said that it certainly was a job worth doing.
It is customary in reports such as this to make certain
acknowledgments.  It is a pleasure for me to recognize the assistance given to the Library by yourself and other members of the
Library Committee: Dr. Brink, Professor Cooke, Professor Kennedy,
Professor Larsen, and Dr. Murdoch.  Since August, 194$, there have
been three heads of the Library of the University of British Columbia.  Dr. W. Kaye Lamb, Librarian since 1940, left at the end of
the last calendar year to become Dominion Archivist, and Miss Anne
Smith served as Acting Librarian for the first six months of this
year.  It would be difficult, if not impossible, to give Miss Smith
the credit she deserves for her valuable work for this institution.
The third in succession is, of course, myself. My predecessors
established here the basis for an outstanding university library,
and it is my hope that we shall be able to realize at least a few of
our potentialities.
Respectfully submitted,
Leslie W. Dunlap
Librarian 11
APPENDIX A
CIRCULATION STATISTICS Sept. 194$ - August 1949
Sept.
194$
Oct.
194$
Nov.
194$
Dec.
194$
Jan.
1949
Feb.
1949
Mar.
1949
Apr.
1949
May
1949
June
1949
July
1949
Aug.
1949
Tota]
Loan Desk
4,3$4
14,500
17,121
5,752
16,018
15,990
16,255
6,222
1,370
2,050
4,675
3,854
108,]
Reserve Book
Room
1,129
14,090
22,449
11,160
14,289
17,337
22,41$
17,469
"*
222
6,099
4,279
130,9
Periodicals
Room
—
1,042
2,049
374
2,198
3,507
2,506
690
62
43
396
414
13,2
Reference
Room
"~
1,034
2,001
374
1,476
1,347
1,460
531
_
121
269
175
8,7
Fine Arts
Rood
—
*.
«
•mm
599
939
1,301
376
.
_
273
3,k
TOTALS
5,513
30,666
43,620
17,660
34,580 39,120
43,940
25,288
1,432
2,436
11,712
8,722
264,6 APPENDIX B
LIBRARY STAFF. "Sept., 194$ - Aug
., 194
9
nted
Resig
ADMINISTRATION
Appoi
ned
Lamb, W. Kaye
Librarian
July,
1940 -
Dec. ,
194$
Dunlap, Leslie W.
Librarian
July,
1949 -
Fugler, Ethel
Secretary
June,
1947 -
REFERENCE
Smith, Anne M.    Head of the Division
Sept.
,1930 -
Rendell, Mary
First Assistant
March
,1947 -
Fraser, Doreen
Senior Librarian
July,
1947 -
MacKenzie, Margaret
Senior Librarian
July,
194$ -
McDonald, Isabel
Junior Librarian
Aug.,
1947 -
O'Rourke, Joan
Junior Librarian
July,
194$ -
Abernethy, Isabel
Junior Librarian
July,
1947 -
June,
1949
Kristjanson, Lily
Library Assistant
Sept.
1947 -
June,
1949
Martinson, Muriel
Library Assistant
Sept.
,1947 -
May,
1949
Coates, Mrs, Patricia
Library Assistant
Sept.
,1947 -
May,
1949
Wilson, Mrs. Mary
Clerk
July,
1944 -
Asson, Ruth
Clerk
Oct.,
1947 -
April
, 1949
CATALOGUE
Jefferd, Dorothy M.  Head
of the Division
Jan.,
1915 -
McCloy, Mrs. Doreen
First Assistant
Sept.
,1939 -
McCloy, T. R.
Senior Librarian
May,
1947 -
Henderson, Mary E. P.
Junior Librarian
July,
1944 -
Aug.,
1949
, Higman, Mrs. Elizabeth
Library Assistant
Oct.,
1947 -
June,
1949
Hodgkinson, Elizabeth
Clerk
Mar.,
1946 -
Oct.,
194$
Zacharias, Mrs. Frances
Clerk
Dec.,
1947 -
Cumming, Mrs. Lillian
Clerk
Aug.,
1947 -
Price, Mrs. Marguerite
Clerk
Nov.,
194$ -
Feb. ,
1949
Boving, Denise
Clerk
Nov. ,
194$ -
South, Mrs. Joan
Clerk
Jan.,
1949 -
Aug. ,
1949
CIRCULATION
Lanning, Mabel M.  Head
of the Division
April
, 1930
Mercer, Eleanor
First Assistant
Oct.,
193$ -
Howieson, Margaret
Junior Librarian
Oct.,
1945 -
Hunter, Mrs. Rella
Library Assistant
Dec.,
1947 -
Crook, Lois
Library Assistant
July,
1947 -
Sept.
, 194$
Campbell, Mary
Library Assistant
Dec.,
194$ -
April
, 1949
Rolfe, Dorothy
Clerk
Sept.
, 1944
Arnott, Mrs. Violet
Clerk
March
, 1946 ■
- July
, 1949
Neale, Robert
Stackroom attendant
Sept.
, 1945
Chapman, Mrs. Patricia
Clerk
Sept.
, 194$ •
- May,
1949
North, Mrs. Kathleen
Clerk
July,
194$ -
May,
1949
Thomson, Mrs. Elizabeth
Clerk
Sept.
, 194$ •
- May,
1949
Olson, Mrs. Joyce
Page
Sept.
, 194$ •
- Mar.
, 1949 13
ACQUISITIONS
Rothstein, Samuel
Aylen, Dorothea
Rowley, Mrs. Shirley
Grigg, Naomi
Bryce, Mrs. Frances
Hearsey, Evelyn
Forsythe, Mrs. Yvonne
PERIODICALS
Head of the Division
Junior Librarian
Library Assistant
Library Assistant
Clerk
Clerk
Clerk
Sept., 1947 -
Jan., 1946 -
Jan., 1947 - May, 1949
June, 194$ -
Sept., 194$ - July, 1949
Jan., 1923 -
July, 194$ -
Lanning, Roland J.   Head of the Division
Fraser, Mrs, Helen
Cundill, Mrs. Pauline
Donald, Sheila
Brooks, H. W.
Dunsmuir, William
Pulfer, Mrs. Hazel
EXTENSION LIBRARY
Stewart, Edith
Cameron, Mrs. Pearl
Junior Librarian
Clerk
Clerk
Bookbinder
Bookbinder
Bindery worker
Senior Librarian
Clerk
April, 1929 -
June, 1947 -
Aug., 1947 -
Jan., 1947 - March, 1949
Oct., 194$ -
Feb., 1949 - May, 1949
Oct., 194$ -
July, 194$ -
Jan., 194$ - April, 1949

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