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The University of British Columbia Calendar Aug 30, 1946

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PUBLICATIONS OF THE UNIVERSITY OF  BRITISH  COLUMBIA
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CALENDAR
THIRTY-SECOND SESSION
1946-1947
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Vol. 32
VANCOUVER,   BRITISH  COLUMBIA
1946
General Series
No. 1 NOTICE OF IMPORTANT CHANGES
REGISTRATION AND PAYMENT OF FEES
Attention is drawn to the new regulations.
TIME TABLES
Schedules showing hours and rooms for lectures and laboratories will be
available during the registration period beginning September 12th.
FACULTY OF LAW
Regulations affecting Law Students and an outline of courses will be
found in the section devoted to the Faculty of Law.
NEW COURSES
Numerous additional courses are provided in various departments.
RENUMBERING OF COURSES
All courses in the Faculty of Arts and Science, the Faculty of Applied
Science, and the Faculty of Agriculture have been renumbered.   Old numbers are set in square brackets after the new in the departmental outlines.
SCHOLARSHIPS AND BURSARIES
Numerous additional scholarships and bursaries will be found in the '
introductory pages of the Calendar.
THE DOMINION-PROVINCIAL YOUTH TRAINING
BURSARIES AND PROVINCIAL LOAN FUND
It is the desire of the Dominion and Provincial Governments that no
student of ability shall through lack of funds be denied the opportunity to
continue his or her education beyond the level of the secondary school.
A sum of money has been set aside to aid University students who can
offer proof of scholastic ability and financial need. This assistance is
available to regular students in any year and any faculty. Students will
receive 60 per cent, of the total assistance as a bursary and 40 per cent, as a
loan. The loan is repayable commencing one year after the applicant
enters gainful employment, and will not bear interest until that time.
Application forms may be obtained from the Department of Education,
Technical Education Branch, Victoria, B. C., and must be returned by
August 15th, 1946. W$t UnfoersWp
OF
prittsSf) Columbia
CALENDAR
THIRTY-SECOND SESSION
1946-1947
VANCOUVER,   BRITISH   COLUMBIA
1946  CONTENTS Page
Academic Year  „  S
Visitor     7
Chancellor    ■  7
President     7
The Board of Governors  7
The Senate  7
Convocation   9
Officers and Staff  9
Historical  Sketch    20
The Constitution of the University  22
Location and Buildings  23
General Information   28
Admission to the University  34
Registration  and  Attendance  36
Fees   39
Medals, Scholarships, Prizes, Bursaries, and Loans  44
Faculty of Arts and Science
Regulations in Reference to Courses:
Courses Leading to the Degree of B.A.    89
Course Leading to the Degree of B.Com  105
Course Leading to the Degree of B.H.E  107
Course Leading to the Degree of B.Ed.  109
Course Leading to a Bachelor's Degree in Pharmacy  110
Courses Leading to the Degree of M.A.  Ill
Teacher Training Course  120
Courses Leading to the Degrees of B.S.W. and M.S.W.  122
Pre-Medical Courses   124
Examinations and Advancement  125
Courses of Instruction:
Department of Bacteriology and Preventive Medicine  127
"   Biology and Botany   130
"  Chemistry   137
" "   Classics   144
" "   Commerce   149
" "  Economics, Political Science, and Sociology  152
"  Education     159
"   English  164
"   French     169
" "   Geology and Geography   172
"   German   181
" "   History   183
"   Home Economics   190
"   Mathematics     195
" "   Philosophy and Psychology   199
"   Physics     205
"   Social Work   211
" "   Spanish   214
"  Zoology  216
Faculty op Applied Science
Foreword  225
Admission  226
Regulations in Reference to Courses  227
General Outline of Courses -  229
Courses in
Agricultural Engineering    232
Chemical  Engineering     233
Civil  Engineering  234
Electrical Engineering   235
Forestry and Forest Engineering  235
Geological Engineering  -  239
Mechanical Engineering   240 Page
Metallurgical  Engineering   241
Mining Engineering   242
Engineering Physics  .'  243
Nursing and  Health   -  244
Courses Leading to the Degree of M.A.Sc  250
Examinations  and  Advancement  252
Courses of Instruction:
Department of Biology and Botany  255
"   Chemistry   256
" "  Civil Engineering   258
"  Commerce      264
"  English    264
"   Forestry    265
" "   Geology and Geography   270
"  Mathematics  271
" "   Mechanical and Electrical Engineering  273
" "  Mining and Metallurgy   279
"   Nursing and Health   283
"   Physics     285
"   Zoology   286
Faculty op Agriculture
General Information   289
Regulations in Reference to Courses:
For the B.S.A. Degree   290
The Occupational Course, Short Courses, Extension Courses  291
Courses Leading to the Degree of M.S.A  293
Teacher Training Course   295
Examinations and Advancement   295
Courses of Instruction:
Department of Agricultural Economics  297
"  Agronomy    _  299
"  Animal Husbandry  301
"  Dairying  303
"   Farm  Mechanics  305
"   Horticulture    -  305
"  Poultry Husbandry   308
"  English 311
Genetics     311
Faculty op Law
General Information   317
Courses of Instruction  319
Double Courses  825
Endowments and Donations   328
Summary of Students in Attendance, Session 1945-46.  334
Degrees Conferred, 1945   336
Medals, Scholarships, and Prizes Awarded, 1945  346
University Summer Session  352
Department of University Extension  355
University Service Training Corps  358
Government Training Provisions  for Discharged Men  360
Student Organization  363
Alumni Association   367
Summer Session Students' Association  368
Inter-University Exchange of Undergraduates  369
Affiliated Colleges:
Victoria College   369
Union College of British Columbia _ _ 371
The Anglican Theological College of British Columbia  371 August
9th Friday \
10th Saturday     /
15th Thursday
15th Thursday
15th Thursday
ACADEMIC YEAR
1946
Supplemental examinations—Second Year Nursing.
Last day for submission of applications for supplemental examinations.
Last day for submission of applications for admission to Second Year Nursing.
Last day for submission of applications for burs-
September
1st Sunday
2nd Monday
3rd Tuesday to   )
10th Tuesday )
12th Thursday
18th Wednesday
20th Friday
19th Thursday, 9 a.n
to 4 p.m.
20th Friday, 9 a.m. to
4 p.m.
23rd Monday
October
1st Tuesday
4th Friday
7th Monday
9th Wednesday
llth Friday
14th Monday
15th Tuesday
23rd Wednesday
30th Wednesday
December
4th Wednesday
6th Friday
9th Monday
18th Wednesday
21st Saturday
25th Wednesday
ACADEMIC YEAR begins.
Labour  Day.   University  closed August 31st to
September 2nd inclusive.
Supplemental examinations.
Registration in person for Winter Session begins.
Last day for registration and payment of First
Term fees of all First and Second Year students.
(See August 15th, above.)
Last day for registration and payment of First
Term fees of all other undergraduates except
students in Extra-Sessional Classes and Directed
Reading Courses.
t
Programme for students registering for the first
time.  Session begins for new students.
Lectures begin at 8:30 a.m.
Last day for handing in graduation essays and
theses (Autumn Congregation).
Meeting of the Faculty Council. (Subsequent
meetings to be held at the call of the President.)
Last day for change in students' courses.
Meeting of the Faculty of Arts and Science.
Meeting of the Faculty of Agriculture.
Meeting of the Faculty of Law.
Thanksgiving Day.   University closed.
Last day for registration and payment of fees
of graduate students and of students in Extra-
Sessional Classes and Directed Reading Courses.
Meeting of the Senate.
Congregation.
Meeting of the Faculty of Arts and Science.
Meeting of the Faculty of Agriculture.
Meeting of the Faculty of Law.
Meeting of the Senate.
First Term ends.
Christmas Day.   University closed December 24th
to 26th inclusive. The University of British Columbia
January
1st Wednesday
6th Monday
15th Wednesday
1947
New Year's Day. University closed December
31st to January 2nd inclusive.
Second Term begins.
Last day for payment of Second Term fees. Payment of second instalment of scholarship money.
February
5th Wednesday
7th Friday
10th Monday
19th Wednesday
Meeting of the Faculty of Arts and Science.
Meeting of the Faculty of Agriculture.
Meeting of the Faculty of Law.
Meeting of the Senate.
Ajpril
4th Friday
17th Thursday
17th Thursday
19th Saturday
May
2nd Friday
2nd Friday
3rd Saturday
10th Saturday
12th Monday
12th Monday    '
13th Tuesday
15th Thursday
15th Thursday
24th Saturday
Good Friday.   University closed April 4th to 7th
inclusive.
Last day of lectures.
Last day for handing in graduation essays and
theses.
Sessional examinations.
Last day for handing in applications for scholarships.
Field work in Applied Science begins immediately
at the close of the examinations.
Meeting of the Faculty of Agriculture.
Meeting of the Faculty of Arts and Science.
Meeting of the Faculty of Law.
Meeting of the Senate.
Congregation.
Meeting of Convocation.
Victoria Day.   University closed.
June
King's Birthday.   University closed.
July
1st Tuesday
7th Monday
August
15th Friday
22nd Friday
29th Friday
29th Friday
31st Sunda\
Dominion Day. University closed.
Summer Session begins.
Last day for submission of applications for supplemental examinations.
Summer Session ends.
Meeting of the Faculty of Arts and Science.
Meeting of the Senate.
ACADEMIC YEAR ends. THE UNIVERSITY OF BRITISH COLUMBIA
VISITOR
Cot. The Hon. W. C. Woodward, Lieutenant-Governor of
British Columbia.
CHANCELLOR
The Hon. Ehic W. Hamber, C.M.G., B.A., LL.D.
PRESIDENT
Norman A. M. MacKenzie, C.M.G., M.M. and Bar, B.A., LL.B., LL.M., LL.D.,
D.C.L., K.C., F.R.S.C.
BOARD OF GOVERNORS
(a) Ex-officio:
The Hon. Eric W. Hamber, C.M.G., B.A., LL.D. (Chairman).
Norman A. M. MacKenzie, C.M.G., M.M. and Bar, K.C, B.A., LL.B.,
LL.M., LL.D., D.C.L., F.R.S.C.
(b) Elected by Senate:
Arthur E. Lord, B.A., Vancouver.
Kenneth P. Caple, M.S.A., Vancouver.
Terms expire 1947.
Austin B. Shinbein, O.B.E., M.B., F.A.C.S., Vancouver. .
Term expires 1949.
(c) Appointed by the Lieutenant-Governor in Council:
William George Motrin, Vancouver,.  Term expires 1949.
Edward H. Barton, Chilliwack.   Term expires 1949.
The   Hon.  Mr.  Justice  Denis  Murphy,  B.A.,  LL.D.,  Vancouver.
Term expires 1948.
Joseph Badenoch Clearihue, M.C, M.A., B.C.L., K.C, Victoria.
Term expires 1948.
R. H. Neelands, Vancouver.   Term expires 1947.
George T. Cunningham, Vancouver.   Term expires 1947.
SENATE
(a) The Chancellor, The Hon. Eric W. Hamber, C.M.G., B.A., LL.D.
The President (Chairman), Norman A. M. MacKenzie, C.M.G., M.M. and
Bar, K.C, B.A., LL.B., LL.M., LL.D., D.C.L., F.R.S.C.
(b) Dean  of  the  Faculty  of  Agriculture,  F.   M.  Clement,   B.S.A.,  M.A.
Dean of the Faculty of Applied Science, John Norison Finlatson, M.Sc.,
LL.D., M.E.I.C., M.Am.Soc.C.E.
Dean  of the  Faculty of Arts and  Science, Daniel  Buchanan,  M.A.,
Ph.D., LL.D., F.R.S.C
Dean of the Faculty of Law:
George Frederick Curtis, LL.B., B.A., B.C.L. The University of Beitish Columbia
Representatives of the Faculty of Agriculture:
J. C. Berry, M.S.A., Ph.D.; G. H. Harris, B.S.A., M.S., Ph.D.  Terms
expire 1948.
Representatives of the Faculty of Applied Science:
F. A.   Forward,   B.A.Sc,  M.C.I.M.,   Mem.A.I.M.E.,   M.Aust.I.M.M.;
H. J. MacLeod, O.B.E.,  B.Sc,  M.Sc, A.M.,  PhJ5.,  Mem.A.I.E.E,
M.E.I.C, Mem.I.R.E.   Terms expire 1948.
Representatives of the Faculty of Arts and Science:
Walter H. Gage, M.A., O. J. Todd, A.B., Ph.D., F.R.S.C.    Terms expire
1948.
Representative of the Faculty of Law:
Frederick Read, LL.B.   Term expires 1948.
(c) Appointed by the Lieutenant-Governor in Council:
H. N. MacCorkindale, B.A., Vancouver.   Term expires 1949.
Francis J. Burd, C.B.E., Vancouver.  Term expires 1949.
John W. Spencer, Victoria.   Term expires 1949.
(d) The   Principal   of   the   Provincial  Normal   School,   Vancouver,   A.   R.
Lord, B.A.
The Principal of the Provincial Normal School, Victoria, H. O. English,
B.A., B.S.A.
(e) Representative  of the  High  School  Principals  and Assistants, W.  R.
McDougall, B.A., North Vancouver.   Term expires 1947.
(f) Representatives of Affiliated Colleges:
Victoria College, Victoria, John M. Ewing, B.A, D.Paed. Term expires 1948. ^^
Union College of British Columbia, Vancouver (Theological), Rev.
J. G. Brown, M.A, D.D.   Term expires 1948.
The Anglican Theological College of British Columbia, Vancouver,
Rev. H. R. Trumpoub, M.A, B.D, D.D. Term expires 1948.
(g) Elected by Convocation:
Sherwood Lett, C.B.E, D.S.O, M.C, E.D, B.A, Vancouver.
H. T. Logan, M.C, M.A, Duncan.
G. G. Sedgewick, B.A, Ph.D., Vancouver.
Miss M. Dorothy Mawdsley, B.A, M.A, Ph.D., Vancouver.
A. E. D. Graueb, B.A, Ph.D, Vancouver.
A. E. Lord, B.A, Vancouver.
Mrs. Sally Murphy Creighton, B.A, M.A, Vancouver.
Walter N. Sage, M.A, Ph.D, F.R.Hist.S, F.R.S.C, Vancouver.
Frank A. Turnbull, B.A, M.D, Vancouver.
H. V. Warren, B.A, B.A.Sc, B.Sc, D.Phil, Assoc.Inst.M.M, F.G.S.A,
Vancouver.
Kenneth P. Caple, M.S.A, Vancouver.
J. F. Walker, B.A.Sc, Ph.D, F.R.S.C, F.G.S.A, Victoria.
Austin B. Schinbein, O.B.E, M.B, F.A.C.S, Vancouver.
C A. H. Wright, M.Sc, Ph.D, Trail.
Mrs. Kenneth M. Beckett, B.A, B.L.Sc, Vancouver.
Terms expire 1948.
(h) Representative of the British Columbia Teachers' Federation:
Miss Florence S. Mulloy, B.A, Vancouver.  Term expires 1946. Officers and  Staff
CONVOCATION
The Hon. Eric W. Hamber, C.M.G., B.A, LL.D, Chancellor of the University
of British Columbia, Chairman.
F. D. Bolton, B.A, B.A.Sc, Secretary.
OFFICERS AND STAFF
Norman A. M. MacKenzie, CM.G, M.M. and Bar, K.C, B.A, LL.B. (Dal-
housie), LL.M. (Harvard), LL.D. (Mount Allison, New Brunswick, Toronto), D.C.L. (Whitman), F.R.S.C, President.
Daniel Buchanan, M.A. (McMaster), Ph.D. (Chicago), LL.D. (McMaster),
F.R.S.C, Dean of the Faculty of Arts and Science.
John Norison Finxayson, M.Sc. (McGill), LL.D. (Manitoba), M.E.I.C,
M.Am.Soc.C.E, Dean of the Faculty of Applied Science.
F. M. Clement, B.S.A. (Toronto), M.A. (Wisconsin), Dean of the Faculty of
Agriculture.
George Frederick Curtis, LL.B. (Sask), B.A, B.C.L. (Oxon.), Dean of the
Faculty of Law.
Miss M. Dorothy Mawdsley, B.A. (McGill), M.A. (Brit. Col.), Ph.D. (Chicago), Dean of Women.
Walter H. Gage, M.A. (Brit. Col.), Assistant to the Dean, Faculty of Arts
and Science.
Maxwell A. Cameron, M.A. (Brit. Col.), Ph.D. (Toronto), Director of the
Summer Session.
Charles B. Wood, B.A. (Toronto), A.M. (Columbia), Registrar.
Miss M. L. Kievell, B.A. (Brit Col.), Assistant Registrar.
Angus MacLucas, Bursar.
William Kaye Lamb, M.A. (Brit Col.), Ph.D. (London), Librarian.
Miss M. W. Johnston, B.A. (Brit. Col.), Secretary to the President.
John D. Lee, Superintendent of Buildings and Grounds.
FACULTY COUNCIL
The President  (Chairman): Norman A. M. MacKenzie, CM.G, M.M. and
Bar, K.C, B.A, LL.B, LL.M, LL.D, D.C.L, F.R.S.C
Dean of the Faculty of Arts and Science, Daniel Buchanan, M.A., Ph.D.,
LL.D, F.R.S.C
Dean of the Faculty of Applied Science, John Norison Finlayson, M.Sc,
LL.D,  M.E.I.C,  M.Am.SocCE.
Dean of the Faculty of Law, George Frederick Curtis, LL.B, B.A, B.C.L.
Dean of the Faculty of Agriculture, F. M. Clement, B.S.A, M.A.
Representatives of the Faculties: J. C Berry, M.S.A, Ph.D.; Miss M. Dorothy
Mawdsley, B.A, M.A, Ph.D.; J. F. Muir, B.Sc; M. Y. Williams, B.Sc,
Ph.D, F.G.S.A, F.R.S.C; F. Read, LL.B.
President Emeritus
L. S. Klinck, B.S.A. (Toronto), M.S.A, D.Sc. (Iowa State College and Brit.
Col.), LL.D. (Western Ontario), Officier de l'Instruction Publique, F.R.S.C
Professors Emeriti
James Henderson, M.A. (Glasgow), Professor Emeritus of Philosophy.
P A. Boving, Cand.Ph.  (Malmo, Sweden), Cand.Agr. (Alnarp, Agriculture,
Sweden), LL.D. (Brit. Col.), Professor Emeritus of Agronomy. 10 The University of Beitish Columbia
C. McLean   Fraser,  M.A.   (Toronto),  Ph.D.   (Iowa),  LL.D.   (Brit.   Col.),
F.R.S.C, Professor Emeritus of Zoology.
Lemuel Robertson, M.A.  (McGill), LL.D.  (Brit. Col.), Professor Emeritus
of Classics.
E. H. Archibald, B.Sc.  (Dalhousie), A.M, Ph.D.  (Harvard), F.R.S.E.&C,
Professor Emeritus of Chemistry.
H. T. J. Coleman, B.A. (Toronto), Ph.D. (Columbia), Professor Emeritus of
Philosophy and Psychology.
S. J. Schofield, M.A, B.Sc.  (Queen's), Ph.D.  (Mass. Inst, of Technology),
F.G.S.A, F.R.S.C, Professor Emeritus of Geology.
J. M. Turnbull, B.A.Sc.  (McGill), M.C.I.M, Professor Emeritus of Mining.
George A. Gillies, M.Sc (McGill), M.CJ.M, M.A.I.M.E, Professor Emeritus
of Mineral Dressing.
Department of Agricultural Economics
F. M. Clement, B.S.A.  (Toronto), M.A.  (Wisconsin), Professor and Head
of the Department.
Eugene D. Woodward, M.S.A.  (Brit. Col.), Instructor.
Department of Agricultural Engineering
J. R. W. Young, B.S.A, M.Sc. (Sask.), Associate Professor and Acting Head.
Department of Agronomy
G. G. Moe, B.S.A, M.Sc. (McGill), Ph.D.  (Cornell), Professor and Head of
the Department.
D. G. Laird, B.S.A. (Toronto), M.S., Ph.D. (Wisconsin), Professor of Soils.
Vernon C  Brink, M.S.A.  (Brit. Col.), Ph.D.   (Wisconsin), Associate Professor.
Special Winter and Spring Sessions:
Stuart Turner, B.S.A. (Brit. Col.), Instructor.
Special Spring Session:
Edwin J. Fennell, B.S.A. (Brit. Col.), Instructor.
Department of Animal Husbandry
H. M. King, B.S.A. (Toronto), M.S. (Oregon Agricultural College), Professor
and Head of the Department.
Stanley N. Wood, B.S.A.  (Sask.), D.V.M.  (Iowa State College), Professor.
J. C. Berry, M.S.A. (Brit. Col.), Ph.D. (Iowa State College), Associate Professor.
Special Winter Session:
Charles W. Vrooman, B.S.A, M.S.A. (Brit. Col.), Instructor.
Department of Bacteriology and Preventive Medicine
C. E. Dolman, M.R.C.S.  (England), L.R.C.P, M.B, B.S, M.R.C.P, D.P.H,
Ph.D. (London), F.A.P.H.A, Professor and Head of the Department.
D. C B. Duff, M.A, Ph.D. (Toronto), Associate Professor.
Lawrence E. Ranta, M.D, D.P.H. (Toronto), Assistant Professor.
Miss Marjorie Todd, M.A. (Brit. Col.), Instructor.   (Session 1945-46.)
Department of Biology and Botany
Andrew H. Hutchinson, M.A. (McMaster), Ph.D. (Chicago), F.R.S.C, Professor and Head of the Department.
Frank Dickson, B.A. (Queen's), Ph.D. (Cornell), Professor.
John Allardyce, M.A.  (Brit. CoL), Ph.D.  (McGill), Professor. Officers and Staff 11
X. M. C. Taylor, B.A. (Brit. Col.), Ph.D. (McGill), Professor.
John Davidson, F.L.S, F.B.S.E, Associate Professor.
D. J- Wort, M.Sc (Sask.), Ph.D. (Chicago), Associate Professor.
Mrs.  Ruth  Fields  Brink,  B.A.   (Brit. Col.), M.A.   (California),  Assistant
Professor.
R. W. Pillsbury, M.A.  (Brit. Col.), Assistant Professor.
John A. Rattenbury, M.A. (Brit. Col.), Instructor.
"W. Grierson-Jackson, M.S.A, M.A. (Toronto), Lecturer.
Department of Chemistry
Robert H. Clark, M.A. (Toronto), Ph.D. (Leipzig), F.R.S.C, Professor and
Head of the Department.
W. F. Seyer, B.A, M.Sc. (Alberta), Ph.D. (McGill), M.A.I.Ch.E, Professor.
M. J. Marshall, M.Sc. (McGill), Ph.D. (Mass. Inst, of Technology), F.R.S.C,
Professor.
William   Ure,   M.A.Sc.    (Brit.   Col.),   Ph.D.    (Cal.   Inst,   of   Technology),
F.R.S.C, Professor.
J. Allen Harris, M.A.  (Brit. Col.), Ph.D.  (Illinois), Professor.
J. Gilbert Hooley, M.A.  (Brit. Col.), Ph.D.  (Mass. Inst, of Technology),
Associate Professor.
Michael Stusiak, B.A.Sc, M.A.Sc. (Brit. Col.), Lecturer.
Robert A. MacLeod, M.A. (Brit. Col.), Instructor.   (Session 1945-46.)
Percy Mundell, M.A. (Brit. Col.), Instructor.
Alan A. MacLeod, M.A.Sc. (Brit. Col.), Instructor.   (Session 1945-46.)
Special Winter Session:
Mrs. J. G. Hooley, B.A. (Brit. Col.), Instructor.
Special Spring Session:
Roderick F. Robertson, B.A. (Brit. Col.), Instructor.
Department of Civil Engineering
John   Norison   Finlayson,   M.Sc   (McGill),  LL.D.   (Manitoba),  M.E.I.C,
M.Am.Soc.C.E, Professor and Head of the Department.
J. Fred Mutr, B.Sc. (Manitoba), Professor.
Allan   H.   Finlay,   M.C,   B.A.Sc.   (Brit.   Col.),   M.S.   in   C.E.   (Illinois),
Assoc.M.Am.Soc.C.E, Professor.
Edward     S.     Pretious,     B.A.Sc.     (Brit.    Col.),     M.Sc.     (Iowa),     Assoc.
M.Am.Soc.C.E, Associate Professor.
Archie   Peebles,   B.A.Sc,  B.A.   (Brit.  Col.),  M.Sc.   (Iowa  State  College),
M.E.I.C, Assoc.M.Am.Soc.C.E, Associate Professor.
Alexander Hrennikoff, Grad, Inst, of Communication Engineering, Moscow,
Russia, M.A.Sc.  (Brit. Col.), Sc.D. (Mass. Inst, of Technology), Assoc.
M.Am.Soc.C.E, Associate Professor.
S.  D.  deJong,   B.A.Sc.   (Manitoba),  M.A.Sc.   (Toronto),  D.L.S,  Associate
Professor.
W. G. Heslop, B.A.Sc. (Toronto), Associate Professor.
H. R. Bell, B.A.Sc.  (Brit. Col.), Instructor.
Alan M. L. Eyre, B.A.Sc. (Brit. Col.), Instructor.
Robert H. Currie, B.A.Sc.  (Brit. Col.), Instructor.
Geoffrey V. Parkinson, B.A.Sc.  (Brit. Col.), Instructor.
Henry Kolbeins, B.A.Sc.  (Brit. Col.), Instructor.
Alexander H. Rome, B.A.Sc. (Brit. Col.), Instructor.
James H. McNaughton, B.A.Sc (Brit. Col.), Instructor.
J- B. Alexander, M.Sc. (New Brunswick), Part-time Lecturer.
Joseph E. A. Kania, M.A.Sc (Brit. Col.), Ph.D. (Mass. Inst, of Technology),
Special Lecturer. 12 The University of British Columbia
Department of Classics
O. J. Todd, A.B, Ph.D.   (Harvard),  F.R.S.C, Professor and Head of the
Department.
Louis A. MacKay, M.A. (Toronto), B.A. (Oxon.), Associate Professor.
Geoffrey  B.  Riddehough, M.A.   (Brit. Col.),  M.A.   (California), Assistant
Professor.
Wiixiam Leonard Grant, B.A. (Brit. Col.), A.M. (Harvard), Ph.D. (Toronto),
Assistant Professor.
Patrick   C.   F.   Guthrie,   B.A.    (Manitoba),   M.A.    (Toronto),   Assistant
Professor.
Department of Commerce
Ellis H. Morrow, B.A. (Queen's), M.B.A. (Harvard), Professor and Head
of the Department.
Archibald W. Currie, B.A, B.Com. (Queen's), M.B.A, Dr.Com.Sc. (Harvard),  Associate  Professor.    (On  leave of  absence.)
James C. Taylor, B.A.   (Western Ontario), C.A, Associate Professor.
Donald K. Bell, B.Com, M.A.  (Brit. Col.), Associate Professor.
Cecil N. Brennan, B.Com. (Brit. Col.), M.Com. (Columbia), C.A, Associate
Professor.
Frederick Field, C.A, Lecturer in Accountancy.
John Farris, B.A. (Brit. Col.), M.B.A, LL.B. (Harvard), Lecturer in Commercial Law.
John E. Stark, B.Com. (Brit. Col.), M.B.A. (Harvard), Lecturer.
C. William Van Houten, B.Com. (Brit. Col.), Lecturer.
Special Winter Session:   .
Gordon W. Stead, D.S.C and Bar, B.Com, B.A, LL.D. (Brit. Col.),
Instructor.
Department of Dairying
Blythe Eagles, B.A. (Brit. Col.), Ph.D. (Toronto), Professor and Head of
the Department.
J. J. R. Campbell, B.S.A. (Brit. Col.), Ph.D. (Cornell), Associate Professor.
Miss Nora Neilson, M.S.A. (Brit. Col.), Instructor.
Department  of  Economics, Political  Science,   and  Sociology
Henry F. Angus, B.A. (McGill), B.C.L, M.A. (Oxon.), F.R.S.C, Professor
and Head of the Department.
G. F. Drummond, M.A. (St. Andrew's), M.Sc. (Econ.)  (London), Professor.
C W. Topping, B.A. (Queen's), S.T.D. (Wesleyan Theol. College), A.M, Ph.D.
(Columbia), Professor of Sociology.
Joseph A. Crumb, B.B.A. (Washington), M.S., Ph.D. (California), Professor.
Norman A. M. MacKenzie, CM.G, M.M. and Bar, K.C, B.A, LL.B. (Dal-
housie), LL.M. (Harvard), LL.D. (Mount Allison, New Brunswick, Toronto), D.C.L.  (Whitman), F.R.S.C, Honorary Lecturer in Government.
Stuart Jamieson, B.A. (Brit. Col.), M.A. (McGill), Ph.D. (California),
Lecturer.
Lloyd F. Detwiller, A.F.C, M.A. (Brit. Col.), Lecturer. (Session 1945-46.)
David A. Harper, B.Com.  (Brit. Col.), Lecturer.   (Session 1945-46.)
Robert M. Clark, B.A, B.Com. (Brit. Col.), Lecturer.
Special Winter Session:
Gordon W. Stead, D.S.C. and Bar, B.Com, B.A, LL.D. (Brit. Col.),
Instructor. Officers and Staff 18
Department of Education
Maxwell A. Cameron, M.A.  (Brit. Col.), Ph.D.  (Toronto), Professor and
Head of the Department.
Frederick T. Tyler, B.Sc, M.A, B.Ed. (Alberta), Ph.D. (California), Associate Professor of Education and Psychology.
Part-time Lecturers:
Miss C. Black, Miss E. B. Bell, Miss S. M. Boyles, A. C. Cooke, Mrs. A. G.
Graham, T. R. Hall, H. P. Johns, A. R. Lord, Dr. I. Maclnnes, Major J. F.
McLean, Miss M. McManus, E. J. Merrell, R. Osborne, C J. Scott, Mrs. M.
Sleightholme, H. B. Smith, Miss D. Somerset, O. J. Thomas, Dr. O. J. Todd,
B. E. Wales, H. D. Whittle, W. C Wilson.
Demonstration Teachers:
T. H. Adney, W. W. Armstrong, W. A. Ashley, E. Broome, N. Clark, Mrs.
E. R. Davies, J. S. Donaldson, T. B. Edwards, D. M. Flather, D. A. Hards,
A. H. Hutson, Miss M. Langridge, W. Y. McLeish, H. Northrop, Miss K. M.
Portsmouth, W. Putnam, W. E. Reed, O. M. Sanford, Miss M. Sellon, J. E.
Smith, B. E. Wales, J. T. Young.
Special Spring Session:
K. F. Argue, B.A.  (Alberta), M.A.  (Oxon.), D.Ed.  (Columbia), Instructor.
Department of English
G. G. Sedgewick, B.A. (Dalhousie), PhD. (Harvard), F.R.S.C, Professor and
Head of the Department.
W. L. MacDonald,  B.A.   (Toronto), M.A.   (Wisconsin),  PhD.   (Harvard),
Professor.
Frederick G. C Wood, B.A.  (McGill), A.M.  (Harvard), Professor.
Thorleif Larsen, M.A. (Toronto), B.A. (Oxon.), F.R.S.C, Professor.
Miss   M.   Dorothy   Mawdsley,   B.A.   (McGill),   M.A.   (Brit.   CoL),   PhD.
(Chicago), Professor.
J. Roy Daniells, B.A. (Brit. Col.), Ph.D. (Toronto), Professor.
A. Earle Birney, B.A.  (Brit. Col.), M.A, Ph.D.  (Toronto), Professor.
Hunter Campbell Lewis, M.A.  (Brit. Col.), Associate Professor.
Mrs.  Dorothy  Blakey  Smith,  M.A.   (Brit.  Col.),  M.A.   (Toronto),  Ph.D.
(London), Associate Professor.
Edmund Morrison,  B.A.   (Brit.  Col.), A.M, Ph.D.   (California),  Associate
Professor.
John H. Creighton, M.A. (Toronto), Associate Professor.
William Robbins, M.A.  (Brit. Col.), PhD.  (Toronto), Associate Professor.
Robert A. Hume, LL.B.   (Stanford), Ph.D.  (Cornell), Associate Professor.
Stanley E. Read, M.A.  (McGill), Associate Professor.
R. E. Waiters, M.A. (Toronto), Ph.D. (Wisconsin), Associate Professor.
G. Philip V. Akrigg, M.A.  (Brit. Col), A.M, Ph.D.  (California), Assistant
Professor.   (On leave of absence.)
Miss Edith MacRae, M.A.  (New Brunswick), Assistant Professor.
Miss Ruth Humphrey, B.A. (Mount Allison), M.A. (Oxford), Assistant Professor.
R. C. Cragg, B.A.  (Toronto), Assistant Professor.
M. W. Steinberg, B.A.  (Queen's), Assistant Professor.
John D. Grant, B.A. (Brit. Col.), M.A. (Toronto), Assistant Professor.
Holger O. V. Nygard, B.A. (Brit. Col.), Instructor.
Miss Doreen Alley, B.A.  (Dalhousie), Lecturer.
Robert P. apRoberts, B.A.  (Brit. Col.), Lecturer. (Session 1945-46.)
Miss Edna Baxter, B.A.  (Brit. Col.), A.M.  (Washington), Lecturer.
Mrs. Kathleen Creighton, B.A.  (Brit. Col.), M.A.  (Toronto), Lecturer.
A. J. Fyfe, B.A. (Western Ontario), Lecturer. 14 The University of British Columbia
A. R. Haines, D.F.C, B.A. (Brit. Col.), Lecturer.
Mrs. Ferne James, B.A. (California), Lecturer.
Walter E. Knotts, B.A. (Brit. Col.), Lecturer.   (Session 1945-46.)
Burton Kurth, B.A. (Brit. Col.), Lecturer.
Mrs. Stella Lewis, M.A.  (Brit. Col.), Lecturer.
Eric P. Nicol, B.A. (Brit. Col.), Lecturer.
Mrs. Margaret Nygard, B.A.  (Brit. Col.), Lecturer.
Robert H. G. Orchard, M.A. (Cantab.), Lecturer.
Howard Rigney, B.A. (Western Ontario), Lecturer.
Chris. Sanford, B.A.  (Oxon.), Lecturer.
Special Winter Session:
Miss M. Creelman, B.A.  (Dalhousie), Instructor.
Special Winter and Spring Sessions:
Robert MacDougall, B.A.  (Brit. Col.), Instructor.
Miss Catherine McNiven, B.A. (Dalhousie), Instructor.
Miss K. Marcuse, M.A.  (Brit. CoL), Instructor.
Rodney P. D. Poisson, M.A. (Brit. CoL), Instructor.
Department of Farm Mechanics
J. R. W. Young, B.S.A, M.Sc. (Sask.), Associate Professor and Acting Head.
Department of Forestry
John Edward Liersch, B.A, B.A.Sc (Brit. CoL), M.F. (Washington),
M.CS.F.E, M.S.A.F, Professor and Head of the Department.
F. Malcolm Knapp, B.S.F. (Syracuse), M.S.F. (Washington), M.CS.F.E,
M.S.A.F, Professor.
Braham G. Griffith, M.A. (Brit. CoL), M.F. (Harvard), Ph.D. (Washington), M.CS.F.E, Associate Professor.
Thomas G. Wright, B.F. (Penn. State), M.F. (Duke), M.CS.F.E, M.S.A.F,
Associate Professor.
George S. Allen, M.A.Sc. (Brit. CoL), Ph.D. (California), Associate
Professor.
Robert W. Wellwood, B.A.Sc. (Brit. CoL), Ph.D. (Duke), Associate Professor.
Harry C. Haines, B.Sc. (Purdue), M.F. (Duke), Assistant Professor.
J. L. Alexander, B.Sc.F. (Toronto), Special Lecturer.
R. M. Brown, B.Sc.F. (Toronto), M.CS.F.E, Honorary Lecturer in Forest
Products.
L. B. Dixon, Part-time Lecturer.
William Byers, M.CS.F.E, Part-time Lecturer.
Ian McQueen, B.A.Sc (Brit. CoL), Part-time Lecturer.
Department  of French
David Owen Evans, M.A, D.Phil. (Oxon.), DXett. (Univ. of Paris), Professor
and Head of the Department.
A. F. B. Clark, B.A. (Toronto), Ph.D. (Harvard), Officier d'Academie,
F.R.S.C, Professor.
Miss Dorothy Dallas, M.A. (Brit. CoL), D.Lett. (Univ. of Paris), Associate
Professor.
Miss Deborah A. K. Aish, M.A. (Brit. CoL), D.Lett. (Univ. of Paris), Assistant Professor.
Madame Y. Darlington, Assistant Professor.
Miss Ethel Harris, A.B. (Columbia), M.A. (Toronto), D.Lett. (Univ. of
Paris), Officier de l'Instruction Publique, Instructor.
Mrs. W. Kaye Lamb, M.A. (Brit. CoL), D.Lett. (Univ. of Paris), Lecturer.
(Session 1945-46.)
Ronald Oldham, D.F.C, Croix de Guerre, B.A.  (Brit. CoL), Lecturer. Officers and Staff 15
H. Ashton, M.A, LittD.  (Cantab.), D.Lett.   (Birmingham), D.Lett   (Univ.
of Paris),  F.R.S.C,  Officier  de  l'Instruction   Publique,  Chevalier  de  la
Legion d'Honneur, Special Lecturer.
Special Winter Session:
Odin S. Sostad, B.A. (Brit. CoL), Instructor.
Special Spring Session:
A. F. Walsh, B.A.  (Brit. CoL), Instructor.
Department of Geology and Geography
M. Y. Williams, B.Sc. (Queen's), PhD. (Yale), F.G.S.A, F.R.S.C, Professor
and Head of the Department.
Clarence Otto Swanson, M.A.Sc. (Brit. CoL), PhD. (Wisconsin), F.G.S.A,
F.R.S.C, Professor of Mineralogy and Petrography. (Session 1945-46.)
Henry Cecil Gunning, B.A.Sc.   (Brit. CoL), M.S., Ph.D.   (Mass.  Inst, of
Technology), F.G.S.A, F.RS.C, Professor of Economic Geology.
H. V. Warren,  B.A,  B.A.Sc.   (Brit.  CoL),  B.Sc,  D.Phil.   (Oxon.), Assoc.
Inst. M.M, F.G.S.A, F.R.S.C, Professor of Mineralogy and Petrography.
Vladimir   J.   Okulitch,   M.A.Sc.    (Brit.   CoL),   Ph.D.    (McGill),   F.G.S.A,
F.R.S.C, Associate Professor.
Kenneth DeP. Watson, B.A.Sc.   (Brit. CoL), Ph.D.   (Princeton), Associate
Professor.
Thomas R. Weir, B.A. (Brit. CoL), M.A.  (Syracuse), Lecturer.
Department of  German
Miss Isabel MacInnes, M.A. (Queen's), Ph.D. (California), Professor and
Head of the Department.
Miss Joyce Hallamore, M.A. (Brit. CoL), Ph.D. (Munich), Associate Professor.
Charles Ernest Borden, M.A, Ph.D.  (California), Associate Professor.
Murray A. Cowie, M.A. (Queen's), Ph.D. (Chicago), Assistant Professor.
Mrs. P. Taylor, M.A. (Brit. CoL), Instructor.
Mrs. M. Lourie, D. Juris,   (Vienna), Instructor.
Mrs. J. Harris, A.B.  (Smith), M.A.  (Brit. CoL), Instructor.
David Ogilvie, M.A.  (Glasgow), Lecturer.   (Session 1945-46.)
Miss Margaret Miller, B.A.  (Queen's), Lecturer.
Department of History
W N. Sage, B.A.   (Toronto), M.A.   (Oxon.), Ph.D.   (Toronto), F.R.Hist.S,
F.R.S.C, Professor and Head of the Department.
F. H. Soward, B.A.   (Toronto), B.Litt.   (Oxon.), Professor and Director of
International Studies.
A. C. Cooke, B.A. (Manitoba), M.A. (Oxon.), Professor.
Miss Margaret A. Ormsby, M.A. (Brit. Col.), Ph.D. (Bryn Mawr), Assistant
Professor.
T. J. Oleson, M.A.  (Manitoba), Lecturer.   (Session 1945-46.)
Special Winter and Spring Sessions:
B- J. Boroughs, M.A. (Brit. CoL), Instructor.
Special Spring Session:
John P. Heisler, B.A. (Brit. CoL), M.A. (McGill), Instructor.
Department of Home Economics
Miss Dorothy P. Lefebvre, B.H.Sc. (Sask.), M.S. (Iowa State College), Asso-
ciate Professor and Acting Head of the Department.
miss Stella Beil, B.S, M.S. (Kansas State College), Assistant Professor.
-miss  Charlotte  S.  Black,  B.Sc.   (H.Ec.)   (Manitoba),  A.M.   (Columbia),
Assistant Professor. 16 The University of British Columbia
Miss Nina H. Morley, M.A. (Toronto), Assistant Professor.
Miss Mary Holder, B.Sc. in H.Ec (Mt. Allison), Assistant Professor.
Miss Barbara Newcombe, B.Sc. in H.E. (Manitoba), M.S. (Minnesota), Assistant Professor.
Part-time Lecturers:
Dr. Stewart Murray, Miss Katherine Reebel, Dr. R. E. Willits, Mrs. S. N. F.
Chant.
Department of Horticulture
A. F. Barss, A.B. (Rochester), B.S. in Agr. (Cornell), M.S. (Oregon Agricultural College), Ph.D. (Chicago), Professor and Head of the Department.
G. H. Harris, B.S.A. (Brit. CoL), M.S. (Oregon State College), Ph.D. (California), Professor.
Frank E. Buck, B.S.A. (McGill), Lecturer.   (Session 1945-46.)
Special Winter Session:
Miss M. J. McMuijlan, B.S.A. (Brit. Col.), Instructor.
Department of Mathematics
Daniel Buchanan, M.A. (McMaster), Ph.D. (Chicago), LL.D. (McMaster),
F.R.S.C, Professor and Head of the Department.
F. S. Nowlan, B.A. (Acadia), A.M. (Harvard), Ph.D. (Chicago), Professor.
R. D. James, M.A. (Brit. CoL), Ph.D. (Chicago), F.R.S.C, Professor.
Walter H. Gage, M.A. (Brit. CoL), Professor.
S. A. Jennings, M.A, Ph.D. (Toronto), Associate Professor.
D. C Murdoch, M.A. (Brit. CoL), Ph.D. (Toronto), Associate Professor.
Douglas Derby, B.A.  (Toronto), Dr.Phil.  (Gottingen), Associate Professor.
Miss May L. Barclay, M.A. (Brit. CoL), Assistant Professor.
John E. A. Parnaix, B.A. (Brit. CoL), Lecturer.
Miss Cora Brehaut, B.A. (McGill), Lecturer. (Session 1945-46.)
Miss Elizabeth Jenkinson, B.A. (Brit. CoL), Lecturer.
Byron W. Straight, B.A. (Brit. CoL), Lecturer.
Donald G. Duncan, M.A. (Brit. CoL), Lecturer.
W. H. Simons, M.A. (Brit. CoL), Lecturer.
Norman S. Free, M.A. (Brit. CoL), Lecturer.
William C. Campbell, B.A. (Manitoba), Lecturer.
Special Winter Session:
Allan Bowles, B.A. (Toronto), Instructor.
Special Winter and Spring Sessions:
F. J. Field, B.A. (Brit. Col.), M.Sc. (Chicago), Instructor.
Department of  Mechanical  and  Electrical  Engineering
Hector John MacLeod, O.B.E, B.Sc. (McGill), M.Sc. (Alberta), A.M, Ph.D.
(Harvard), Mem.A.I.E.E, M.E.I.C, Mem.I.R.E, FellowA.S.E.E, Professor and Head of the Department.
F. W. Vernon, B.Sc. Eng. (London), Wh.Sch, A.M.I.MechE, A.F.R.A.S,
Professor of Mechanical Engineering and Lecturer in Aeronautical Engineering.
S. C. Morgan, B.Sc. (Queen's), M.Sc (Alberta), M.S. (Calif. Inst, of Technology), Mem.A.I.E.E, M.I.E.S, Professor of Electrical Engineering.
W. B. Coulthard, B.Sc. (London), Mem.A.I.E.E, A.M.I.E.E, Associate Professor of Electrical Engineering.
W. O. Richmond, B.A.Sc. (Brit. CoL), M.S. (Pittsburg), Mem.A.S.M.E.,
■   Associate Professor of Mechanical Engineering.
H. M. McIlroy, M.Sc. (Queen's), Associate Professor of Mechanical Engineering. Officers and Staff 17
Frank Noakes, B.Sc. (Alberta), M.Sc, Ph.D. (Iowa State College), Associate
Professor of Electrical Engineering.
William Wolfe, B.A.Sc. (Brit. CoL), M.Sc. (Case School of Ap.Sc), Assistant
Professor of Mechanical Engineering.
D. W. Thomson, B.A.Sc.  (Brit. CoL), M.Sc.  (Illinois), Assistant Professor
of Mechanical Engineering.
Lorne  R.  Kersey,  B.A.Sc.   (Brit.  CoL), Assistant  Professor  of Electrical
Engineering.
Department of Mining and Metallurgy
Frank A. Forward,B.A.Sc. (Toronto),M.CI.M, Mem.A.I.M.E, M.Aust.I.M.M,
Professor and Head of the Department.
Leslie G. R. Crouch, B.Sc.  (Victoria, Australia), M.Sc.  (Utah), Professor
of Mining Engineering.
C.  S.  Samis,  M.Sc.   (Manitoba),  Ph.D.   (London),  Associate  Professor  of
Metallurgy.
Harold M. Wright, B.S. (Utah), M.A. (Brit. CoL), M.S. (Utah), Part-time
Lecturer.   (Session 1945-46.)
Department of Nursing and Health
C. E. Dolman, M.R.C.S. (England), L.R.CP, M.B, B.S, M.R.C.P, D.P.H,
Ph.D. (London), F.A.P.H.A, Professor and Head of the Department.
Miss H. Evelyn Mallory, R.N., B.Sc. (Columbia), Associate Professor.
Miss Ruth Morrison, R.N., B.S. (Minnesota), Assistant Professor.
Miss Pauline Capelle, R.N, B.A, B.A.Sc. (Brit. CoL), Instructor.
Miss  Barbara   Breeton,   R.N,   B.A.Sc.   (Brit.   CoL),   Part-time   Instructor.
(Session 1945-46.)
Lawrence E. Ranta, M.D, D.P.H.  (Toronto), Lecturer.
Part-time Lecturers:
Dr. C. H. Gundry, Miss Josephine Kilburn, Dr. Gordon Hutton, Dr. A. H.
Spohn, Mr. T. R. Hall, Miss Donna Kerr.
Department of Pharmacy
Esli Longworth Woods, B.S.P.  (Sask.), M.Sc.  (Wisconsin), Professor and
Head of the Department.
Mrs. Phyllis Brewster Brewer, B.Sc (Alberta), M.S. (Minnesota), Associate
Professor.
Department of Philosophy and Psychology
S. N. F. Chant, O.B.E, M.A. (Toronto), Professor and Head of the Department.
Thomas Greenshields Henderson, M.A. (McGill), Ph.D. (Harvard), Associate Professor.   (Session 1945-46.)
Joseph E. Morsh, B.A. (Brit. CoL), Ph.D. (Johns Hopkins), Associate Professor.   (On leave of absence.)
Alexander P. Maslow, A.B, A.M. (Michigan), Ph.D. (California), Associate
Professor.
Frederick T. Tyler, B.Sc, M.A, B.Ed. (Alberta), Ph.D. (California), Associate Professor of Psychology and Education.
E. S. W. Belyea, M.A. (Toronto), Assistant Professor.
W. G. Black, B.A. (Brit. CoL), M.A, Ph.D. (Chicago), Part-time Lecturer.
(Session 1945-46.)
J- W. A. Fleury, M.A.  (Brit. CoL), Part-time Lecturer.   (Session 1945-46.)
Department of Physics
Gordon Merritt Shrum, O.B.E, M.M, M.A, Ph.D. (Toronto), F.R.S.C, Professor and Head of the Department.
A- E. Hennings, M.A. (Lake Forest College), PhD. (Chicago), Professor. 18 The University of British Columbia
Harold D- Smith, M.A. (Brit. CoL), Ph.D. (Toronto), Professor.
A. M. Crooker, B.A. (McMaster), M.A, Ph.D. (Toronto), Professor.
Kenneth C. Mann, O.B.E, B.A. (Sask.), Ph.D. (Toronto), Professor.
George Michael Volkoff, M.A.  (Brit. CoL), Ph.D.  (California), Professor.
Frederick J. Belinfante, B.Sc, M.S.C, Ph.D. (Leiden), Associate Professor.
Kenneth  R.  MacKenzie,  B.A.   (Brit.  CoL),  Ph.D.   (California), Associate
Professor.
R. Keith Brown, B.A.  (Brit. CoL), Lecturer.
Thomas L. Collins, M.A. (Brit. CoL), Instructor.   (Session 1945-46.)
H. R. Milley, M.A. (Brit. CoL), Lecturer.   (Session 1945-46.)
Harry H. A. Davidson, B.A, M.A.Sc (Brit. CoL), Lecturer.
J. G. Retallack, B.A. (Brit. CoL), Lecturer.   (Session 1945-46.)
Otto Bliih, Ph.D. (Prague), Lecturer.
Charles A. Herald, B.Sc, M.Sc. (Dalhousie), Lecturer.
Special Spring Session:
Arthur C Johnson, B.A, M.A. (Brit. CoL), Instructor.
Department of Poultry Husbandry
E. A. Lloyd, B.S.A. (Sask.), M.S.A. (Washington State College), Professor
and Head of the Department.
Jacob Biely, M.S.A.   (Brit. CoL), M.S.   (Kansas  State College), Associate
Professor.
Department of Social Work
Miss Marjorie J. Smith, A.B.  (Minnesota), A.M.  (Chicago), Professor and
Head of the Department,    j
Miss Katherine Reebel, B.A. (Penn. College for Women), M.A. (Pittsburgh),
M.S.S. (Smith), Associate Professor. (Session 1945-46.)
Miss Margaret C Johnson, B.A. (Brit. CoL), M.S.W.  (Washington University), Assistant Professor.
Miss Elizabeth V. Thomas, A.B. (Wesleyan College), M.S. (New York School
of Social Work), Assistant Prof essor.
Gordon H. Hutton, M.D, D.P.H, D.Psy.  (Toronto), Diploma of American
Bd. of Psychiatry and Neurology, Lecturer.   (Session 1945-46.)
Part-time Lecturers:
Dr. C. E. Gould, Dr. J. MacDermott, Dr. W. H. Hatfield, Dr. R. A. Walton,
Dr. W. C. Mooney, Dr. J. Piters, Dr. C E. Davies, Dr. L. Leeson, Dr. D.
Williams, Dr. A. M. Evans, Dr. J. Naden, Dr. J. Neilson, Dr. H. Baker, Dr.
A. E. Trites, Dr. J. S. Kitching, Miss Trenna Hunter, Dr. S. E. C. Turvey, Dr.
G. F. Strong, Dr. L. Hodgins, Dr. Lee Smith.
Department of Spanish
Charles Vyner Brooke, B.A.  (Queen's), A.M., Ph.D.  (Harvard), Associate
Professor and Chairman of the Department.
G. F. McSpadden, A.B, M.A.   (Univ. of New Mexico), Ph.D.   (Stanford),
Associate Professor.
Jack Horace Parker, M.A, Ph.D.  (Toronto), Assistant Professor.   (Session
1945-46.)
Special Winter Session:
Mrs. E. Davison, Instructor.
Department of Zoology
W. A. Clemens, M.A.  (Toronto), PhD. (Cornell), F.R.S.C, Professor and
Head  of the Department.
G. J. Spencer, B.S.A. (Toronto), M.S. (Illinois), Professor. Officers and Staff 19
Ian McTaggart Cowan, B.A. (Brit. CoL), Ph.D. (California), Professor.
W. S. Hoar, B.A. (New Brunswick), M.A. (Western Ontario), Ph.D. (Boston
Univ. Medical), Professor of Zoology and Fisheries.
Staff of Faculty of Law
George Frederick Curtis, LL.B.  (Sask), B.A, B.CL.  (Oxon.), Professor of
Law and Dean of the Faculty.
Frederick Read, LL.B. (Manitoba), Associate Professor of Law.
Lecturers:
Senator J. W. deB. Farris, F. A. Sheppard, S. J. Remnant, Alex Fisher,
Mr. Justice J. O. Wilson, Mr. Justice J. M. Coady, Mr. Justice Sidney Smith,
J. S. Maguire, C W. Brazier, H. R. Bray, Mr. Justice H. I. Bird, Darrell T.
Braidwood.
Special Lecturers:
Chief Justice Wendell B. Farris, Mr. R. H. Tupper.
Department of University Extension
Gordon Merritt Shrum, O.B.E, M.M, M.A, Ph.D. (Toronto), F.R.S.C,
Director.
Robert T. McKenzie, B.A. (Brit. Col.), Assistant to the Director. (On leave
of absence.)
Miss Dorothy Somerset, A.B.  (Radcliffe), Assistant in Dramatics.
Norman Barton, M.A. (Brit. CoL), Assistant in Visual Education.
Miss Marjorie V. Smith, B.A. (Sask.), Assistant
Arthur H. Sager, B.A. (Brit. CoL), Assistant.
Arthur Renney, B.S.A. (Brit. CoL), M.S.A. (California), Assistant in
Agriculture.
University Health Service
Stewart Murray, M.D, D.P.H. (Toronto), Medical Health Officer, Metropolitan Health Committee, University Health Officer.
J. S. Kitching, B.A, M.D, D.P.H. (Toronto), Assistant Senior Medical
Health Officer of the Metropolitan Health Department of Vancouver and
Director of the University Health Service.
C. H. Gundry, M.D, Director of Mental Hygiene, Metropolitan Health Committee.
George T. Cunningham, University representative on the Metropolitan Health
Committee.
Miss Muriel Upshall, R.N, B.A.Sc.  (Brit. CoL), Public Health Nurse.
Mrs. Jeanne E. Worrall, B.A.Sc. (Brit. CoL), Public Health Nurse.
Miss Dorothy M. Ladner, B.A.Sc.  (Brit. CoL), Public Health Nurse.
Physical Education
Robert F. Osborne, B.A.  (Brit. Col.), Director of Physical Education, Men.
Mrs. Jean Sleightholme, B.A. (Brit. CoL), M.A. (Teachers' College, Columbia), Diploma in Physical Education (McGill), Director of Physical Education, Women.   (Session 1945-46.)
II. Douglas Whittle, B.-P.H.E. (Toronto), Associate Director of Physical
Education, Men.
Miss Isobel Clay, Diploma in Physical Education (McGill), Assistant Director
of Physical Education, Women.
Counsellors for Ex-Service Personnel
Major John F. McLean, D.S.O, B.A. (Brit. CoL).
Capt. W. G. Black, B.A. (Brit. CoL), M.A, Ph.D.  (Chicago).
Major Stanley E. Read, M.A. (McGill).
University Employment Bureau
Major John F. McLean, D.S.O, B.A. (Brit. CoL). THE UNIVERSITY OF BRITISH COLUMBIA
HISTORICAL SKETCH
The creation of a university in British Columbia was first
advocated by Superintendent Jessop in 1877, but it was not until
1890 that the Provincial Legislature passed an act establishing
a body politic and corporate named "The University of British
Columbia." In 1891 this act was amended to require that a meeting of the Senate be held within one month after the election of
the Senators by Convocation. The Senators were elected, but a
quorum did not assemble on the date fixed by the Chancellor, Dr.
I. W. Powell, of Victoria. Thus the first attempt to establish a
university in British Columbia failed.
However, some of the work normally done in a university was
begun in 1894, when an act was passed which permitted the
affiliation of high schools in the Province with recognized Canadian
universities. In 1899 Vancouver High School was affiliated with
McGill University in order to provide First Year work in Arts,
and took the name of Vancouver College. First Year work in
Arts was offered by Victoria High School when it became Victoria
College by affiliation with McGill University in 1902. In the same
year Vancouver College undertook the Second Year in Arts.
In 1906 an act was passed incorporating the Royal Institution
for the Advancement of Learning of British Columbia, which, in
the same year, established at Vancouver the McGill University
College of British Columbia. The scope of the work undertaken
by this college was gradually increased until at the time it was
taken over by the University of British Columbia it was giving
three years in Arts and Science and two years in Applied Science.
When the University of British Columbia opened in the autumn
of 1915, both the McGill University College of Vancouver and
Victoria College, which since 1907 had been a part of it, ceased
to exist.
Definite steps to establish the University were taken by Dr.
H. E. Young, Minister of Education, in 1907, when he introduced
a "University Endowment Act." This act was followed in 1908
by an act establishing and incorporating the University of British
Columbia and repealing the old act of 1890-1. This act, with its
subsequent amendments, determines the present constitution of the
University.
As authorized by an act passed by the Provincial Legislature
in 1910, the Lieutenant-Governor in Council appointed a Site
Commission to decide upon a site for the proposed University. The
Commission held its first meeting on May 25th, 1910, in Victoria,
and after a thorough examination of the Province recommended
the vicinitv of Vancouver.   In the autumn the Executive Council Historical Sketch 21
decided to place the University at Point Grey—the site which the
Commission had named as its first choice. In 1911 the Legislature
nassed an act authorizing the Lieutenant-Governor in Council to
grant this site to the University. The grant was increased in 1915,
°j that it now consists of 548 acres at the extremity of Point Grey.
The waters of the Gulf of Georgia form more than half the
boundary of the University campus. A tract of some 3,000 acres
of Government land immediately adjoining the site, and lying
between it and the City of Vancouver, has been set aside by the
Government in order that University revenue may be provided by
its sale or lease.
In February, 1912, the Hon. H. E. Young, Minister of Education called for competitive plans which should include plans in
detail for four buildings to be erected immediately, and a block
plan showing all the proposed buildings on the campus. Messrs.
Sharp and Thompson, of Vancouver, B. C, were the successful
competitors, and were appointed University Architects.
The first Convocation, held on August 21st, 1912, chose Mr.
F. L. Carter-Cotton as first Chancellor of the University. When
he retired at the end of two terms in 1918, Dr. R. E. McKechnie
was elected Chancellor, and served continuously until his death,
May 24th, 1944. On September 18th of that year the Hon. Eric
W. Hamber was elected by acclamation to fill out Dr. McKechnie's
unexpired term, and on March 7th, 1945, again by acclamation,
for the ensuing regular term.
In March, 1913, the Lieutenant-Governor in Council appointed
as first President of the University F. F. Wesbrook, M.A., M.D.,
C.M, LL.D. On his death, October 20th, 1918, L. S. Klinck, Dean
of the Faculty of Agriculture, was appointed by the Board of
Governors as Acting President, and on June 1st, 1919, as President. When he retired, June 30th, 1944, he was succeeded by
Dr. Norman A. M. MacKenzie.
From its opening in 1915 till the Summer of 1925, the University
carried on its work in temporary quarters on part of the site of the
General Hospital in Fairview.
(j0nstruction work was commenced on the Science Building at
tiie permanent site in Point Grey in 1914, but was interrupted
Tq9qUSe °^.war conditions. Work on this building was resumed in
fh i •an<^ *n ^e au*umn of the same year the contract was let for
the Library. These two buildings, which are of stone and are
proof, conform closely to the original plans as prepared by the
architects in 1914. The initial units of these structures, as well
as nine other buildings which are of a less permanent character,
were completed in 1925, and at the beginning or Session 1925-26
e University commenced work in its new quarters. 22 The University of British Columbia
The inauguration of the new buildings was held on October 15th
and 16th, 1925, on which occasion honorary degrees were granted
by the University for the first time.
THE CONSTITUTION OF THE UNIVERSITY
The Constitution of the University is governed by the British
Columbia University Act, B.C.R.S. 1936, c. 299, and Amending
Acts, which provide
That the University shall consist of a Chancellor, Convocation,
Board   of   Governors,   Senate,   Faculty   Council,   and   the
Faculties; that the Convocation shall be composed of the
Chancellor, the Senate, all persons who became members
of  the   Convocation  prior  to   the   first  day  of  January,
1919, all persons holding academic appointments within the
University  and  whose  names  are  added  to  the  roll  of
Convocation by the Registrar of the University from time
to   time   upon   instructions   from  the  President,   and   all
persons who have become graduates of the University; that
the  Chancellor shall  be  elected  by  the  members  of the
Convocation; that the Board of Governors shall consist of
eleven members—the Chancellor, who shall be the Chairman thereof, the President, three persons elected by the
Senate from among its members, and six members appointed
by the Lieutenant-Governor in Council; that the Senate shall
consist of: (a) The Chancellor, and the President of the
University, who shall be chairman thereof; (b) the deans
and two professors of each of the  Faculties elected by
members of the Faculty; (c) three members to be appointed
by the Lieutenant-Governor in Council; (d) the principals
of the normal schools; (e) one member elected by the high
school principals and assistants who are actually engaged in
teaching; (f) one member to be elected by the governing
body of every affiliated college or school in this Province;
(g) fifteen members to be elected by Convocation from the
members thereof;  (h) one member elected by the British
Columbia Teachers' Federation.
It is further provided that the University shall be non-sectarian.
The University Act gives the University full powers to grant
such degrees in the several Faculties and different branches of
knowledge as the Senate may from time to time determine.    It
reserves for the University the sole right in this Province to confer
degrees, except in Theology, and it expressly enacts that "No other
university having corporate powers capable  of being  exercised
within the Province shall be known by the same name, nor shall
any such university have power to grant degrees." LOCATION AND BUILDINGS
Location
The University is situated on the promontory which forms the
western extremity of the Point Grey Peninsula. On three sides it
is bounded by the Gulf of Georgia. The site comprises an area of
548 acres, of which approximately one-half is campus. In all
directions appear snow-capped mountains, strikingly rugged and
impressive.
Buildings
The buildings, planned to meet the requirements of fifteen
hundred students, are of two classes, permanent and semi-permanent. The former were designed by the University architects,
Messrs. Sharp and Thompson, the latter by architects of the
Department of Public Works of the Provincial Government. The
permanent buildings have been erected in the location originally
assigned for them; the others in the quadrangle designated as
"unassigned" in the original plan. By utilizing the "unassigned"
area for the semi-permanent buildings, all the locations intended
for future expansion have been left available.
The entire mechanical equipment of these buildings was
designed after a close study had been made not only of present
requirements, but of the ultimate development of the institution.
This consideration accounts for the. fact that only a part of the
present equipment is permanent. After a careful survey of the
whole situation, a forced hot water system was found to present
advantages that made its adoption advisable. Direct radiation with
a system of warmed air supply and extraction for ventilation is
used to take care of the heat losses in the buildings. A separate
system of ventilation is installed for all sanitary conveniences, and
a specially constructed system for fume closets. The various
services throughout these buildings, such as hot and cold water,
distilled water, gas and steam for laboratory purposes, compressed
air, etc, with the necessary apparatus, are all of a modern type.
An attempt has been made to reduce vibration and noise to a
minimum by installing all moving apparatus on floating slabs, with
a further insulation of cork.
Library
The University Library consists of more than 160,000 volumes.
It includes representative works in all the courses offered by the
University, and a growing collection of books in other subjects.
It is notable for its high percentage of the transactions and pro- 24> The University of British Columbia
ceedings of learned societies, and its long runs of scholarly periodicals—the materials essential to research.
It is one of three Canadian Depositories of the Library of
Congress Catalogue, a collection of 1,750,000 printed cards. The
catalogue is kept fully up to date, and between 50,000 and 60,000
new cards, issued each year, are interfiled as received.
The Library also possesses a College Art Teaching Equipment
Set, organized and presented by the Carnegie Corporation of New
York. This consists of about 185 specially selected works covering
the fine and applied arts, and of more than 2,000 reproductions,
photographed or coloured, illustrating these.
Another notable gift to the University, made by the Carnegie
Corporation of New York, is the College Music Set. This now consists of over 1,800 records representing musical development in all
its forms, with reproducing instruments specially designed for a
large auditorium, and a collection of books on musical theory and
history, together with a large number of orchestral scores. The
Set is regularly used for student recitals, and to illustrate lectures
on the appreciation of music.
The Library receives regularly over 900 serial publications.
The book collection is classified throughout on the Congressional
system.
While the Library is primarily for the staff and students of
the University, its resources are available to those of the general
public engaged in research or special study, and who make personal
application to the Librarian for the privilege of its use. Such
persons are known as "extra-mural readers." By order of the
Board of Governors a fee of $1.00 per calendar year is charged
such readers. In addition, they pay necessary mailing costs, a
deposit being required from those unable to call personally for
books loaned.
The Library also administers the book collection of the University
Extension Department. This consists of about 1,600 volumes, and
is increasing as the Department's work develops.
The Extension Department's collection also includes more than
4,000 plays, for the service of dramatic groups and theatre students
throughout the Province.
The Extension Department's book and play collections are available to those who have registered with the Department.
The University is deeply indebted to all who have made gifts to
the Library.  These have been both valuable and numerous.  Their Location and Buildings 25
number prevents detailed acknowledgment, but recognition should
be made of a number of sets of transactions, and complete or partial
sets of scientific periodicals, given by societies and friends of the
University. The most interesting and valuable of these gifts are
listed in the annual report of the Library to the Senate.
Museums
These consist of (1) the Burnet Collection of South Seas and
other ethnological specimens, housed on the main floor of the
Library; (2) the Geological and Geographical Museum, in Room
116, Applied Science Building; (3) the Zoological Museum, housed
in various rooms of the Applied Science Building.
The Burnet Collection was made by the late Frank Burnet, who
donated it and arranged it in its present home. It contains groups
of artifacts representative of the ethnology and archaeology of
various parts of the Pacific Basin. The largest unit, 1170 catalogued
items, is from the islands of the South Pacific, but Malaysia and
North and South America are also strongly represented. Doors
are open from 4 to 6 hours five days a week throughout the year.
The Geological and Geographical Museum has been developed as
a medium for the visual instruction of students and visitors. It is
closely coordinated with the Department of Geology and Geography, but is used freely by students of sociology and history, as
well as by art students from city studios. The exhibits include the
Dr. H. M. Ami collection of pre-historical artifacts from Les Eyzies,
France; the Buttimer collection of Indian baskets; the Michell
Pierce collection of Eskimo clothing and utensils; the Peach and
Home geological model of the Assynt Mountains, Scotland; suites
of fossils, minerals, birds, and mammals, relief map-models, and
many other things of interest.
The Zoological Museum, containing material representative of
both the vertebrate and the invertebrate fields, is housed mainly in
the northern wing of the Applied Science Building. Owing to lack
of room in the museum, the collection is scattered in hallways and
rooms wherever space can be found. The collection of marine invertebrates of the northeastern Pacific Ocean is one of the largest
extant. A collection of 12 beautifully mounted heads of B. C.
game, donated by Messrs. G. L. and R. J. Pop, hangs on the walls
of Room 100, Applied Science Building, and a fine suite of African
game horns, donated by Mr. W. F. Byers, hangs in Room 120 of
the same building.
The collections are freely available to students and research
institutions. 26 The University of British Columbia
Gymnasium
This building was completed in 1929 and presented to the University by the Alma Mater Society. The playing floor has an area
of 6,000 square feet, and is surrounded on all sides by tiers of
benches which will accommodate 1,400 persons. In the space behind
these seats are located the dressing rooms, drying rooms, locker
rooms, and shower baths. On the main floor of the building are
located the, offices of the instructors in physical education, a training and first-aid room, a store room, and a kitchen. Equipment for
physical education activities and indoor athletics has been provided.
Stadium and Playing Fields
In accordance with the original landscape plan prepared by
Mawson in 1913, the main playing field area, consisting of about
16 acres, is situated east of the East Mall and north of the University Boulevard. Development work was started early in January,
1931, as an aid in alleviating the acute unemployment situation,
and was made possible by funds provided chiefly by subscriptions
from the Faculty, students, and friends of the University. Much
of the labour was obtained through the courtesy of the Relief Department of the City of Vancouver. Twenty thousand cubic yards
of soil and gravel were used to bring the track and field to grade.
In addition to the main playing field of the stadium, there are
three other full-size fields and a number of smaller areas set aside
for outdoor games. Another playing field is being prepared east
of the Brock Memorial Building.
The first section of the grandstand for the stadium was erected
in the summer of 1937 on the west side of the main playing field. It
is a covered, reinforced concrete structure, 126 feet long, and provides seating accommodation for 1,600 spectators. On either side
are two wooden bleacher sections of 500 seats each. The plan provides for the ultimate continuance of the main section around the
field, and for this reason the present bleachers are so constructed
as to be movable. Underneath the present main stand there are
locker rooms, dressing rooms, showers, ticket booths, drying rooms,
and a room for special activities, such as boxing, handball, weight-
lifting, basketball, and fencing. Funds for the construction of the
grandstand were provided through a $40,000 bond issue sponsored
by the Alma Mater Society. The Provincial Government has undertaken to assume the annual charges for interest on the bonds.
Additional Accommodation Provided in 1946
The special activities room in the stadium referred to above was
completed and equipped early in 1946.  In addition, an army hut, Location and Buildings 27
located north of the Brock Memorial Building, was supplied to
relieve the congestion in the gymnasium. This hut will be used
primarily for dancing classes and recreational activities.
The Brock Memorial Building
In connection with the celebration of the twenty-first anniversary of the opening of the University in 1936, it was decided
that a memorial be established by general appeal to students,
graduates, and friends of the University throughout Canada. A
committee representing all branches of the University decided
that the memorial should take the form of a student union building,
dedicated to the memory of the late Dean of Applied Science,
Reginald W. Brock, and Mrs. Brock, by whose tragic deaths as a
result of an aeroplane accident the University suffered a great loss.
The original fund for the construction of the building was
subscribed by relatives of Dean and Mrs. Brock, friends of the
University throughout Canada and the United States, alumni
and students of the University, and former colleagues of Dean
Brock. The balance of the amount required to complete construction was provided by the students and the Board of Governors
in cash and through a bond issue of the Alma Mater Society.
Furnishings for the building were provided from a fund raised
over a period of years by the Women's Union Building Committee
of the University.
The building is situated adjacent to the playing fields and
gymnasium. In it are located the offices of the Alma Mater Society
and various clubs and student activities. The building contains,
also, common rooms, lunch and tea rooms, and accommodation for
social activities. In architectural design and exterior finish, it
harmonizes well with the other buildings on the campus.
The Brock Memorial Building was dedicated in January, 1940.
Forest Products Laboratories
The Forest Products Laboratories of Canada, Vancouver Laboratory, which is maintained by the Forest Service of the Department
of Mines and Resources, Canada, occupies three buildings provided
and kept up through a co-operative agreement between the
University and the Dominion Government.
Plan of Campus
The plan at the back of the Calendar shows the buildings which
have been erected and indicates the nature of their construction. 28 The University of British Columbia
GENERAL INFORMATION
The Session
The academic year begins on the first of September and ends
on the last day of August. The Winter Session is divided into two
terms—the first, September to December; the second, January to
May. The Summer Session consists of seven weeks' instruction in
July and August. For Admission to the University, see page 34,
and for Registration and Attendance, see page 36.
Courses of Study
The University offers instruction in each of the four faculties,
Arts and Science, Applied Science (including Nursing), Agriculture, and Law, leading to the degrees of Bachelor of Arts, Bachelor
of Commerce, Bachelor of Education, Bachelor of Home Economics,
Bachelor of Social Work, Bachelor of Applied Science, Bachelor of
Science in Forestry, Bachelor of Science in Agriculture, and
Bachelor of Laws. In the Faculty of Arts and Science a course is
offered leading to a Teacher Training Diploma. Advanced courses
of instruction and facilities for research leading to a Master's
degree are offered in each faculty except Law. Admission to these
advanced courses, or to the privileges of research, does not in itself
imply admission to candidacy for a higher degree.
In the session 1946-47 the University proposes to offer one year
of work leading to a degree in Pharmacy and also work leading to
a degree or diploma in Physical Education.
In each case the details are subject to the consideration of the
Senate of the University. Full information will be issued in a
supplementary bulletin as soon as possible.
Academic Dress
The undergraduate's gown is black in colour and of the ordinary
stuff material, of ankle length, and with long sleeves and the yoke
edged with khaki cord. The graduate's gown is the same, without
cord.
The Bachelor's hood is of the Cambridge pattern, black bordered
with the colour of the degree obtained; the Master's hood is the
same, lined with the distinctive colour. The Bachelor of Arts hood
has a border of University blue; the Bachelor of Commerce hood
differs from that of Bachelor of Arts by the addition of a white
cord; the Bachelor of Education hood has a border of white edged
with a cord of University blue. The hood for the degree of Bachelor
of Home Economics has a border of turquoise, and that for the General Information 29
degree of Bachelor of Social Service has a border of magenta. The
colour for the degree of Bachelor of Applied Science is scarlet red;
for the Bachelor of Science in Agriculture it is maize. The hood
for the degree of Bachelor of Science in Forestry differs from that
of the Bachelor of Applied Science by the addition of a green cord.
University Health Service
In 1925 the Lieutenant-Governor in Council, upon the recommendation of the Provincial Health Officer, appointed a Medical
Health Officer for the University Area.
In the Fall of 1927 the Provincial Health Officer added to the
University Health Service a Public Health Nurse, thus commencing
the continuous operation of a full-time local Health Department on
the campus and University Endowment Area.
In November, 1936, the University Endowment Area became
part of the Metropolitan Health Area under the direction of the
Metropolitan Health Committee, thus affording the University the
extra services and facilities enjoyed by the larger organization,
which provides through its Health Units a Public Health Service
to the entire Greater Vancouver Area. The University Area is
now Health Unit 3A of the Greater Vancouver Area.
The University Health Service is at present housed in Hut No. 2,
just west of the Auditorium Building. The original furniture and
first aid equipment for this office were the generous gift of the
Graduating Class of 1927.   |
Functions of the University Health Service
On admission to the University each new student must report
to the Health Service Office to make an appointment for a medical
examination. All ex-service students are required to fill in the
medical history card, obtainable at the office. Such students are
not required to have a University medical examination until at
least nine months after discharge unless special examination is
indicated. Students registered in the Second Year (ex-service
excepted) must report to make an appointment for a re-check
medical examination to determine their capacity for physical exercise. Those students who have been away from the University for
a year or more are also required to report. At the time of the
examination the student is informed of any physical defect, given
advice, and urged to have remediable conditions corrected. Evidence, satisfactory to the medical officer, of successful immunization
against smallpox is required. Preventive vaccinations and inoculations are given by the Health Service.
The Medical Officer is available at specified hours for consultations with students on health problems. 30 The University of British Columbia
One of the most important tasks of the Health Service is the
control of communicable disease. Much valuable time can be
saved the student body by the prompt and immediate application
of preventive measures in checking the spread of communicable
Tuberculosis Control
Because tuberculosis occupies first place as a cause of death of
persons of college age, it is given special attention. Therefore the
University Health Service, with the co-operation of the Provincial
Board of Health, Tuberculosis Division, and the B. C. Tuberculosis
Association through its Christmas Seal fund, provides for a chest
X-ray. This project is of very great value, for when tuberculosis
is diagnosed and treatment instituted before physical breakdown
occurs, the patient is saved from years of invalidism and perhaps
death, and his fellow students are protected from infection.
Rules Governing Communicable and Other Illnesses
Students developing any illness or suffering from any injury
while on the campus should apply for first aid to the University
Health Service. This is particularly required if the student
develops any illness of a communicable nature, including the
common cold.
Students developing any illness or suffering any injury while
at home, boarding house, fraternity house, etc., are required to
report the same to the University Health Service. The development of any communicable disease in a University Student or
any person living in the same house, must be reported by the student
to the University Health Service without delay. Students exposed
to a communicable disease may be permitted, by special order of
the Medical Health Officer, to attend the University for a prescribed
period, despite the exposure.
Such students shall report daily (or oftener, at the discretion
of the Medical Health Officer) to the University Health Service
for such prescribed period. Failure to so report will result in
immediate exclusion from the University.
Students absent on account of illness must report to the Health
Service Office before attending lectures. If a doctor has been
in attendance the student is to bring a medical certificate from
him. If the student is absent from an examination he must present
a medical certificate, which is to be in the Health Service Office
within one day after the termination of the examination period.
The dean of the faculty is notified of absence from classes or exam- General Information 31
inations because of illness. A medical certificate must show the
nature and the period of the disability. Medical report forms may
be obtained from the Health Service Office.
Summer Session
The University Health Service provides a health service for
students attending the Spring and Summer Sessions. Details of
this service may be found in the Announcement of the Summer
Session.
Ex-service students attending the University for the first time
must report to fill in the University medical history card.
PHYSICAL EDUCATION
The Programme of Physical Education includes three main
divisions:
(1) Physical Education activity programme.
(2) Intramural sports and recreation.   1^
(3) Professional education in teacher training and recreational
leadership, limited to members of the teacher training class
and members of voluntary instructors' classes.
In September, 1946, the University proposes to begin to give
work in Physical Education leading to a degree or diploma, the
details being subject to the consideration of the Senate.
Physical Education Requirements for Men and Women
Two hours weekly of Physical Education activity courses are
required of all students in First and Second Years except ex-service
personnel and members of military units operating on the campus.
Students who enter with Senior Matriculation or equivalent, with
the exception of ex-service personnel and members of military units
operating on the campus, will be required to take the Physical
Education courses during their first year at the University and for
oue year only.
Students who enter with a standing equivalent to the first two
years at the University will not be required to take Physical Education courses.
No student will receive a degree who has not completed the
"hysical Education courses required of him at entrance. If a
student's work in the Physical Education courses is unsatisfactory
in any year, he will be required to repeat the work during the
following year.
Students who are placed in a special medical category by the
■-1-diversity Health Service will be assigned to remedial classes or 32 The University of British Columbia
special groups after individual consultation with the Physical Education Staff.
Men: Male students who pass the medical examination will choose
two courses or activities from the following.
Group I.
(a) Archery
(b) Badminton
(c) Beginners' Games and Sports
(d) Fencing
(e) Golf
(f) Square and Ballroom Dancing
(g) Weight Lifting
Only one period a week may be selected from Group I.
Group II.
(a) Boxing
(b) Physical Training
(c) Swimming—Beginners, Intermediates, Life Saving
(d) Track and Field
(e) Tumbling and Apparatus
(f) Volunteer Instructors' Corps
Two periods a week may be selected from Group II.
First Year students may substitute membership on a Varsity
team for one period and must select the other period from either
Group I or Group II.
Second Year students may satisfy the regulations by:
1. membership on a Varsity team and one period from either Group
I or Group II;
OB
2. membership on a Varsity team and participation in three intramural leagues or events;
OB
3. participation in three intramural leagues or events, and one
period from either Group I or Group II.
Women:
Women who pass the medical examination will choose two courses
from the following groups during each of the first'two years.  Only
one course may be chosen from each group.
Group I.
(a) Archery and Fencing
(b) Badminton and Table Tennis
(c) Golf
(d) Swimming—(1) Life Saving
(2) Beginners and Intermediates General Information
(e) Team Sports for Beginners—Volleyball, Field Hockey,
Basketball
(f) Advanced Tumbling and Apparatus
Group II-
(a) Folk Dancing
(b) Fundamental Rhythmics
(e)  Gymnastics
(d) Modern Dance (course (b) of this group is a prerequisite)
(e) Square and Ballroom Dancing
First Year students may substitute membership on a Varsity
team for one period and must select the other period from either
Group I or Group II.
Second Year students may satisfy the regulations by:
1. membership on a Varsity team and one period from either Group
I or Group II;
OR
2. membership on a Varsity team and participation in three intramural leagues or events;
OB
3. participation in three intramural leagues or events, and one
period from either Group I or Group II.
Dean of Women
During the session the Dean of Women may be consulted by
parents and students on matters pertaining to living conditions,
vocational guidance, and other questions that directly affect the
social and intellectual life of the women students.
Board and Residence
Women
The Dean of Women undertakes the inspection of all accommodation offered for women students. Lists of available boarding
houses and housekeeping rooms may be secured by applying to the
Dean of Women's office. Men and women students are not permitted to lodge in the same house, unless they are members of
the same family or receive special permission from the Senate.
Women students under twenty-five years of age are permitted to
occupy suites in apartment houses only when accompanied by some
older person. Any residence accommodation arranged by women
students for themselves must also meet with the approval of the
-jJean of Women, who should be informed of such plans in advance.
The cost of good board and lodging is from $35 to $40 a month. The University of British Columbia
Room and breakfast can be secured for $20 a month. Meals may
be obtained in the Cafeteria and the Brock Memorial Building $
light refreshments are available at different points on the campus.
For the session 1946-47 there will be accommodation for about
50 women at Acadia Camp. The dining room at the camp is under1
the supervision of a trained dietitian. Accommodation is in single,
double, or triple rooms, and the rates charged are $38 or $40 a
month. Request for reservations should be made to the Dean of
Women's office. Preference will be given to returned service women,
Men
Information concerning accommodation available for men may
be obtained by applying to the JJepartment of Extension or to the
Registrar of the University. Charges for board and room vary from
$35 to $45 a month, for room and breakfast from $20 to $25 a
month, and for room alone from $15 to $20 a month. Meals may
be obtained in the Cafeteria and the Brock Memorial Building;
light refreshments are available at different points on the campus.
Students wishing accommodation either in Acadia Camp or in
the Fort huts should apply to the Department of Extension at the
University. The charge for room and board is $40 a month, and
about 330 students can be accommodated. Preference will be given
to returned service men.
General Conduct
The University authorities do not assume responsibilities which
naturally rest with parents. This being so, it is the policy of the
University to rely on the good sense and on the home training of
students for the preservation of good moral standards.
ADMISSION TO THE UNIVERSITY
All enquiries relating to admission to the University should be
addressed to the Registrar.
The accommodation for students in the University is limited.
The University, therefore, reserves the right to limit the attendance.
The Faculty of Applied Science reserves the right of selection
and admission of students entering the First Year of the Combined
Course and the Second Year of the Double Course in Arts and
Science and Nursing.
The University reserves the right to limit the registration in, or
to cancel, any of the courses listed. Limitation may be imposed if
the numbers desiring any course are found to be too large for the
lecture rooms and laboratories available for that course, or for Admission to the University 35
the number of instructors in the department concerned, or for the
equipment and supplies which can be obtained. Certain courses
may be cancelled if the numbers of instructors in the departments
concerned prove to be inadequate to offer all the courses listed.
1. Except under special circumstances, no student under the
age of sixteen is admitted to the University. For admission to the
First Year of the course in Nursing (or the Second Year of the
Double Course in Arts and Nursing) a student must be eighteen
years of age, and for admission to the course in Social Work,
twenty-one years of age.
2. Candidates for admission to the courses in the First Year of
the Faculty of Arts and Science or the Faculty of Agriculture
and to the course in Nursing in Applied Science are required to
pass the University Entrance (Junior Matriculation) examination
of the Province of British Columbia or to submit certificates showing that they have passed an equivalent examination elsewhere.
Special regulations are prescribed for admission to courses in
Applied Science, and are given under the heading of Admission in
the Applied Science section of the Calendar.
3. Students who have passed the Senior Matriculation examination are admitted to the courses of the Second Year in the
Faculty of Arts and Science. Students who have partial Senior
Matriculation standing will be granted credit in the First Yei.r in
each subject in which they have made 50 per cent, or over.
4. A student who has a failure in a subject of the University
Entrance examination standing against him will not be admitted
to the University.
5. The University Entrance and Senior Matriculation examinations of the Province of British Columbia are conducted by the
High School and University Matriculation Board of the Province.
This Board consists of members appointed by the Department of
Education and by the University. The requirements for these
examinations are stated in the publication, Requirements for
University Entrance and Senior Matriculation, issued by the University. The courses of study for the various grades in the high
schools are given in the Programme of Studies for the High Schools,
issued by the Provincial Department of Education.
6. Certificates or diplomas showing that a candidate has passed
the matriculation examination of another university will be
accepted in lieu of the University Entrance or Senior Matriculation
examinations if the faculty concerned considers that the examination has covered the same subjects and required the same standards.    If, however, the examinations cover some but not all of 36 The University of British Columbia
the necessary subjects, the candidate will be required to pass the
examinations in the subjects not covered.
7. A candidate who wishes to enter by certificates other them a
Matriculation or University Entrance certificate issued in British
Columbia should submit to the Registrar the original certificates.
If he wishes these returned to him, he must present also a copy of
each certificate for record at the University. He should under no
circumstances come to the University without having first obtained
from the Registrar a statement of the value of the certificates he
holds, as these may lack one or more essential subjects, or the work
done in a subject may not be adequate, or, again, the percentage
gained may not be sufficiently high. Moreover, it must be remembered that a certificate may admit to one faculty and not to
another. When an applicant's diploma or certificate does not show
the marks obtained in the several subjects of the examination, he
must arrange to have a statement of his marks sent to the Registrar
by the Education Department or university issuing such diploma
or certificate.
8. A student of another university applying for exemption from
any subject or subjects which he has already studied is required
to submit with his application a calendar of the university in
which he has previously studied, together with a complete statement of the course he has followed and a certificate of the standing
gained in the several subjects.* The faculty concerned will determine the standing of such a student in this University.
REGISTRATION AND ATTENDANCE
Preliminary registration may be made by mail. Except in the
case of ex-service students receiving educational benefits from the
Department of Veterans' Affairs, applications must be accompanied
by the registration fee of $5.00. Students registering for the first
time must present their certificates in accordance with the regulations given under Admission to the University. Those who apply
by mail will receive notice concerning their admission and standing.
Registration, except for Directed Reading courses, must be completed in person at the Registrar's office between September 12th
and the last day for registration as follows: for First and Second
Year students, Wednesday, September 18th; for other undergraduate students of the regular Winter Session, Friday, Septem-
*For the conditions under which exemption is granted in the Faculty of Arts and
Science, see Courses Leading to the Degree of B.A. Registration and Attendance 37
ber 20th; for graduate students and for students in Extra-Sessional
classes and Directed Reading courses, Tuesday, October 15th.
Registration is not complete until the applicant has turned in his
registration booklet at the Registrar's office and has paid his First
Term fees. Those who have not completed registration by the last
day prescribed will be subject to payment of the late registration
fee of $2.00. Students who have been awarded scholarships or
bursaries, the first instalment of which is less than the First Term
fees, will be required to pay the difference upon registration.
No student with unsatisfactory standing will be permitted to
register in September without the permission of Faculty.
In the Faculty of Arts and Science no student will be admitted
who has more than three units of failures outstanding either from
Senior Matriculation or from a previous year in the University.
The Faculty of Applied Science reserves the right of selection
and admission of students entering the First Year of the Combined
Course in Nursing and the Second Year of the Double Course in
Arts and Science and Nursing.
Application for admission to First Year Nursing must be made
to the Registrar on or before August 15th. A selection of candidates
will be made immediately thereafter on the basis of qualifications.
Forms of application for admission to these courses may be obtained
from the Registrar's office.
1. There are four classes of students:
(a) Graduate students—students who are pursuing courses of
study in a faculty in which they hold a degree, whether
they are proceeding to a Master's degree or not. Students,
however, who are proceeding to a Bachelor's degree in
another course in the same faculty in which they hold a
degree, or in another faculty, will register as undergraduates.
(b) Full undergraduates—students proceeding to a degree in
any faculty who have passed all the examinations precedent
to the year in which they are registered.
(c) Conditioned undergraduates—students proceeding to a
degree with defects in their standing which do not prevent
their entering a higher year under the regulations governing Examinations and Advancement of the faculty in
which they are registered.
(d) Partial students—students not belonging to one of the
three preceding classes.   (See 7, below.) 38 The University of British Columbia
2. All students are required to furnish the information necessary
for the University records, to enrol for the particular classes which
they wish to attend, and to sign the following declaration:
'' I hereby accept and submit myself to the statutes, rules, regula.
tions, and ordinances of The University of British Columbia, and
of the faculty or faculties in which I am registered, and to any
amendments thereto which may be made while I am a student of
the University, and I promise to observe the same."
In the information furnished for the University records, students
are requested to state what church they propose to make their place
of worship. This information is available for any of the city
churches desiring it.
3. No registration for undergraduate students of the regular
Winter Session will be accepted after Monday, September 30th,
without the special permission of the faculty concerned, and a
candidate so accepted for registration may be required to take
fewer courses than the regular year's work.
4. The Registrar is empowered to register all duly qualified stu-:
dents. Doubtful cases will be dealt with by the faculty concerned.
5. Students doing work in two academic years will register in
the lower year and fill out their course cards in such a way as to
make clear which courses are required to complete the lower year.
6. Students desiring to make a change in the course for which
they have registered must apply to the Registrar on the proper
form for a "change of course." Except in special circumstances,
no change will be allowed after the second week of the session. If the
application is approved by the faculty concerned, the Registrar
will give the necessary notifications.
7. Partial students, who are not proceeding to a degree, are not
normally required to pass an examination for admission, but before
registering they must produce a certificate showing that they have
satisfied the Dean and the heads of the departments concerned
that they are qualified to pursue with advantage the course of
study which they propose to undertake.
8. Students are required to attend at least seven-eighths of the
lectures in each course that they take. Admission to a lecture or laboratory and credit for attendance may be refused by the instructor
for lateness, misconduct, inattention, or neglect of duty. Absence
consequent on illness or domestic affliction may be excused only by
the dean of the faculty concerned, and medical certificates or other
evidence must be presented. // the absence occurs during the session,
the student must appear in person, with the certificate, at the Uni- Registration and Attendance 39
versity Health Service immediately on return to the University,
and before attendance upon class work. The University Health
Service will examine the person concerned and will immediately
forward the certificate, with report thereon, to the dean of the
faculty. If the absence occurs during the examinations, the
certificate must be sent to the Health Service within one day after
the termination of the examination period. A medical certificate
must show the nature and the period of the disability. Medical
report forms may be obtained from the Health Service office. In
cases of deficient attendance students may (with the sanction of
the dean and the head of the department concerned) be excluded
from the Christmas or the final examinations in a course; but, in
the case of a final examination, unless the unexcused absences
exceed one-fourth of the total number of lectures in a course, such
student may be permitted to sit for supplemental examination.
(See regulation in each faculty in reference to Examinations and
Advancement.)
9. All candidates for a degree must make formal application
for graduation at least one month previous to the Congregation at
which they expect to obtain the degree. Special forms for this
purpose may be obtained from the Registrar's office.
10. All students new to this University (First and other years)
and all students registered in the Second Year must report to the
Student Health Service for a medical examination.
LECTURESHIPS
The Hewitt Bostock Lectureship
Through the generosity of the Misses Bostock a lectureship has
been established in honour of their father, the late Senator Hewitt
Bostock, providing for a public lecture at least once in three years
by a speaker of national or international reputation on a subject
of educational or social importance.
FEES
All cheques must be certified and made payable to "The University of British Columbia."
The registration fee is not returnable.
If fees are not paid when due an additional fee of $2.00 will be
charged.
Registration is not complete until the First Term fees have been
Paid, and no student is entitled to admission to classes until after
such payment. 40 The University of British Columbia
Holders of scholarships or bursaries the first instalment of which
is less than the First Term fees must pay the difference before
registration is complete.
Ex-service students whose eligibility for assistance under P.C.
5210 has been approved by the Department of Veterans' Affairs
are not required to pay fees.
Fees are not transferable from one session to another.
A request for a REFUND OF FEES must be made by the
student to the BURSAR within FOUR WEEKS after the student
has discontinued his work; and fees for which a refund has not
been so requested WILL NOT BE RETURNED.
The Sessional Fees are as follows.
Fob Full and Conditioned Undebgbaduates
in abts and science :
Registration—Payable before registration $   5.00
First Term—Payable on or before last day of registration :
Sessional Fee $ 80.00
Alma Mater Fee    13.00
 93.00
Second Term—Payable on or before January 15th    75.00
$173.00
IN SOCIAL WOEK COUESE :
Registration—Payable before registration $   5.00
First Term—Payable on or before last day of registration :
Sessional Fee  $ 80.00
Secc'nd Term—Payable on or before January 15th    75.00
IN TEACHEB TEAINING COUESE:
Registration—Payable before registration	
First Term—Payable on or before last day of registration :
Sessional Fee $ 77.00
Alma Mater Fee    13.00
    90.00
Second Term—Payable on or before January 15th    75.00
$170.00 Fees 41
IN APPLIED SCIENCE:
Registration—Payable before registration $   5.00
First Term—Payable on or before last day of registration :
Sessional Fee $105.00
Alma Mater Fee.    13.00
 118.00
Second Term—Payable on or before January 15th  100.00
$223.00
Registration—Payable before registration $   5.00
First Term—Payable* on or before last day of registration :
Sessional Fee $ 80.00
Alma Mater Fee    13.00
    93.00
Second Term—Payable on or before January 15th    75.00
IN AGEICULTUEE :
Registration—Payable before registration..
First Term—Payable on or before last day of registration :
Sessional Fee $ 80.00
Alma Mater Fee    13.00
    93.00
Second Term—Payable on or before January 15th    75.00
$173.00
IN LAW: ==
Registration—Payable before registration $   5.00
First Term—Payable on or before last day of registration :
Sessional Fee $105.00
Alma Mater Fee    13.00
  118.00
Second Term—Payable on or before January 15th  100.00
$223.00
*For Second, Third, and Fourth Year students in Nursing (i.e., students in the
affiliated hospital) the Sessional fee is $1.00, payable with an Alma Mater fee of $4.00,
°n or before last day of registration.
Students admitted to a one-year course for graduate nurses and proceeding to the
Certificate on a basis of part-time attendance over two or more years will pay $10.00
Per unit. 42 The University of British Columbia
OCCUPATIONAL COUESE :*
Registration—Payable before registration $   5.00
First Term—Payable on or before last day of registration :
Sessional Fee $ 32.00
Alma Mater Fee    13.00
    45.00
Second Term—Payable on or before January 15th    30.00
$ 80.00
Foe Paetial Students ■
Fees per "Unit" $10.00
Registration—Payable before registration
For 6 units or less    3.00
For over 6 units    5.00
First Half payable on or before last day of registration, along with
Alma Mater Fee  13.00
Second Half payable on or before January 15th.
Foe Students in Extea-sessional Classes and
Dieected Reading Coubses
Registration—Payable before registration $ 3.00
Fees per 3-Unit Course  30.00
First Half Unit Fees payable on or before October 15th.
Second Half Unit Fees payable on or before January 15th.
For Graduates
Registration—Payable before registration
For 6 units or less $    2.00
For over 6 units      5.00
Course Fees (payable at $10.00 per unit for courses taken) 125.00
Course fees due in any session may be paid in two equal instalments, on October 15th and January 15th.
Foe Bachelor of Education
Registration—Payable before registration
For 6 units or less $    2.00
For over 6 units ....     5.00
Course Fees (payable at $10.00 per unit for courses taken) 150.00
Course fees due in any session may be paid in two equal instalments, on October 15th and January 15th.
Late Registeation
See page 36 $2.00
*Note.   Students transferring credit from the Occupational to the Degree Course
In Agriculture must pay the difference in fees. Fees 43
The Alma Mater Fee, authorized by the Board of Governors at
the request of the students, is a fee exacted from all students for
the support of the Alma Mater Society.
Immediately after the last day for the payment of fees, students
whose fees have not been paid will have their registrations cancelled,
and will be excluded from classes. Such students will not be permitted to register again during the term until they obtain the
consent of the Dean, pay all fees, and present to the Registrar a
statement from the Bursar certifying that fees have been paid.
Students borrowing books from the University Library for
preparatory reading courses will be required to make the usual
deposit of $2.00 with the Librarian to cover mailing cost.
Foe Summeb Session Students
Fees are payable on registration, otherwise an additional fee of
$2.00 will be exacted.
Registration—Payable before registration $ 3.00
Minimum Class Fee  15.00
Per "Unit"   10.00
Summer Session Association ,     2.00
Special Fees
Regular supplemental examination, per paper $ 5.00
Special examination (Applied Science and Agriculture),
per paper     7.50
Re-reading, per paper    2.00
Supplemental examination fees must be paid by August 15th
when application for examination is made. Special examination
fees and fees for re-reading are payable with application. 44 The University of British Columbia
MEDALS, SCHOLARSHIPS, PRIZES, BURSARIES,
AND LOANS FOR 1946-47
GENERAL REGULATIONS
1. Scholarships, prizes, and bursaries which are not based solely
on academic standing are indicated by an asterisk. Unless other
instructions are given in the Calendar notice, intending candidates
must make application to the Registrar not later than the last day
of the final examinations on forms provided for the purpose.
2. All awards of medals, scholarships, fellowships, prizes, and
bursaries are made by Senate, on the recommendation of the Joint
Faculty Committee on Prizes, Scholarships, and Bursaries and the
faculties concerned, unless otherwise provided for by special
resolution of Senate.
The award of a medal, prize, scholarship, or bursary is final when
announced by the University.
3. Medals, scholarships, prizes, bursaries, and loans are open to
Winter Session students only, unless otherwise stated, and marks
obtained in Summer Session courses are not taken into account in
awarding them.
4. If the award of a medal, scholarship, or prize is based on an
examination, no award will be made to a candidate who obtains
less than 75 per cent, of the possible marks.
5. To be eligible for a General Proficiency Scholarship a student
must take the full year's course, which must include the required
courses for the year in which he is registered, except that in the
Faculty of Arts and Science and in Agriculture other subjects
may be substituted for the required courses if credit for these has
already been obtained.
The standing of students taking more than the required number
of units will be determined on the basis of the required number of
units to be chosen in a manner most advantageous to the students.
6. Unless otherwise specified in the Calendar notice, no student
may enjoy the proceeds of more than one scholarship in the same
academic year, and the scholarships thus relinquished will be
awarded to the candidates next in order of merit. Winners of more
than one scholarship will be given recognition in the published lists.
7. Winners of scholarships who desire to do so may resign the
monetary value. Nevertheless, their names will appear as winners
in the University lists. Any funds thus made available will be used
for additional scholarships, bursaries, or student loans. Medals, Scholarships, and Prizes 45
8. Scholarships under the jurisdiction of the University are
payable in two instalments, one at the beginning of each term.
Undergraduate winners must continue their courses to the satisfaction of the faculty concerned during the session following the
award. The payment for the Second Term may be withheld in the
case of an undergraduate scholarship holder whose work in the First
Term has been unsatisfactory. A faculty is authorized to permit a
scholarship to be reserved for one year, provided the student shows
satisfactory reasons for postponing attendance. In the case of
University Entrance and Senior Matriculation scholarships, postponement will be granted on medical grounds only. Application
for reservation should be made to the Registrar.
9. In awarding bursaries consideration will be given to the
financial need of applicants.
10. Endowed scholarships and bursaries will be paid provided
the invested funds produce the necessary revenue.
If the invested funds do not produce the revenue required for the
amount of scholarships and bursaries as named in the Calendar,
these scholarships and bursaries will be correspondingly reduced.
11. The University does not guarantee the payment of any prizes
or scholarships other than those from the funds of the University.
With respect to prizes or scholarships based upon the gifts of individuals or associations other than the University, no award will
be made unless the funds required for the same have been actually
received from the private donor or donors.
12. The Senate of the University of British Columbia reserves
the right so to change the terms under which any exhibition,
scholarship, or prize may be established at the University of British
Columbia that the terms may better meet new conditions as they
arise and may more fully carry out the intentions of the donor and
maintain the usefulness of the benefaction. The right so reserved
shall be exercised by a resolution of the Senate duly confirmed by
the Board of Governors, provided always that a year's notice shall
be given in Senate of any proposed change and that the donor or
his representatives, if living, shall be consulted about the proposed
change.
13. Limited funds are provided from which loans, not to exceed
$100, may be made to undergraduate students who have completed
satisfactorily two years' University work and who can show that they
are in need of pecuniary assistance. Interest at the rate of 5 per
cent, per annum is charged on these loans. They must be secured
by approved joint promissory note given for a definite term and
signed by the applicant and his parent or guardian.   Loans are not 46 The University of British Columbia
granted to graduate students, except in the Teacher Training
Course, nor to students in diploma courses. Applications for loans
should be addressed to the Bursar of the University.
14. The University is in possession of a great deal of information
regarding graduate scholarships, fellowships, and assistantships
which other universities and various research bodies make available.
This information may be obtained from the Registrar.
MEDALS
The Governor-General's Gold Medal
A gold medal, presented by His Excellency the Governor-General
of Canada, will be awarded to the student standing at the head of
the graduating class for the BA. degree. Honours and General
Course students are eligible for this medal.
The Wilfrid Sadler Memorial Gold Medal
A gold medal, given by Sigma Tau Upsilon Honorary Agricultural Fraternity in memory of Professor Wilfrid Sadler,
Professor and Head of the Department of Dairying, 1918-33, will
be awarded to the student standing at the head of the graduating
class for the B.S.A. degree.
The Kiwanis Club Gold Medal
A gold medal, given by the Kiwanis Club of Vancouver, will be
awarded to the student standing at the head of the graduating class
for the B.Com. degree.
The United Empire Loyalists' Association Medal*
The Vancouver Branch of the United Empire Loyalists' Association of Canada is offering a silver medal, and a book prize to
the value of $10, for the best essay received during the session
1946-47 on any topic dealing with the history of the United Empire
Loyalists and their influence on the development of Canada. The
competition is open to all undergraduates of the University, but
preference is given to students enrolled in a Canadian History
course.
The Lefevre Gold Medal and Scholarship
Out of funds provided by the late Mrs. Lefevre in memory of her
husband, Dr. J. M. Lefevre, a gold medal and scholarship will be
awarded annually to the student standing highest in general proficiency and research ability in one of the following courses: (a)
*See paragraph 1, page 44. Medals, Scholarships, and Prizes 47
Honours in Chemistry in the Faculty of Arts and Science; (b)
Chemical Engineering in the Faculty of Applied Science. The
award will be based upon the work of the last two years in these
courses. The value of the scholarship is approximately $150. The
winning of this scholarship will not preclude the holder from
enjoying the proceeds of a further award.
SCHOLARSHIPS FOR GRADUATES
University Graduate Scholarship*
A scholarship of $200 may be awarded to a student of the
graduating class who shows special aptitude for graduate studies
and who is proceeding in the following year to graduate study in
this or any other approved university.
The Anne Wesbrook Scholarship*
This scholarship of $125, given by the Faculty Women's Club
of the University, is open to a student of the graduating class of
this University who is proceeding in the following year to graduate
study in this or any other approved university.
The Dr. F. J. Nicholson Scholarships*
Out of the proceeds of a fund donated by Dr. Francis John
Nicholson, the following scholarships will be awarded annually
for the purpose of enabling students to do graduate study in the
University of British Columbia or in any other approved university: (1) One scholarship of the value of $500 for graduate
work in Chemistry. Applicants must be Honours graduates in
Chemistry of the Faculty of Arts and Science, with the degree of
B.A. or M.A., or graduates in Chemical Engineering of the Faculty
of Applied Science, with the degree of B.A.Sc. or M.A.Sc. (2)
One scholarship of the value of $500 for graduate work in Geology.
Applicants must be graduates of the Faculty of Applied Science
in Geological or Mining Engineering, with the degree of B.A.Sc.
or M.A.Sc.
Normally the scholarships will be payable in two instalments
of $250 each to provide for two years of graduate work. The
payment of the second instalment will be subject to approval by
the University of British Columbia of the first year's graduate
work. In exceptional circumstances the full sum of $500 may be
made available for work to be completed in a single year.
Recipients must be qualified to undertake graduate and research
work, in respect of scholarship, ability, character, and health. These
scholarships will be granted with due consideration for the financial
*See paragraph 1, page 44. 48 The University of British Columbia
status of the candidate. The spirit of the endowment is to aid those
to whom financial help is necessary or of material assistance in
furthering their studies.
Applicants must be graduates of the University of British
Columbia, have British citizenship, and be not more than 30 year!
of age on the last day for receiving applications. Preference will be
given in making awards to native-born British Columbians.
The John and Annie Southcott Memorial
Scholarship*
A scholarship of the value of $100, given annually by Mrs.
Thomas H. Kirk, will be awarded to that student who, possessing
exceptional aptitude for research, either intends to pursue, or is
already pursuing some approved investigation in the field of British
Columbia history. The scholarship will normally be awarded to a
Fourth Year student or to a graduate proceeding to a higher degree,
but may be awarded to a student of the Third Year.
The Native Daughters of British Columbia
Scholarship*
A scholarship of $50 is given by the Native Daughters of British
Columbia to a Canadian-born graduate student for research work
in the early history of British Columbia, such work to be carried
on in the Provincial Archives in Victoria, B. C.
The B'nai B'rith District No. 4 Hillel Foundation
Scholarships*
From the sum of $250 made available by District Grand Lodge
No. 4, B'nai B'rith, through Vancouver Lodge, Vancouver, B. C,
two scholarships of the value of $125 each were available in the
session 1945-46. The terms of award were as follows: These scholarships will be awarded to outstanding graduate students in any of the
three faculties—Aflts and Science, Agriculture, and Applied
Science. The winners shall indicate satisfactory plans for graduate
study at the University of British Columbia or at any other university approved by the Joint Faculty Committee on Prizes, Scholarships, and Bursaries. Only one scholarship shall be available in any
one faculty in one year. Applications must be made on forms available at the Registrar's office.
*See paragraph l, page 44. Medals, Scholarships, and Prizes 49
The Standard Oil Company of British Columbia
Limited Fellowship*
For research in petroleum engineering the Standard Oil Company
of British Columbia Limited offers a fellowship of $950 open to
Honours graduates in Chemistry in the Faculty of Arts and Science
or graduates in Chemical Engineering in the Faculty of Applied
Science. An additional amount, not to exceed $150, may be granted
for special equipment for the research problem. The topic of
research shall be chosen after consultation with the Department
of Chemistry of the University and Standard of B. C. Recipients
must be qualified to undertake graduate and research work in
respect of scholarship, research ability, personality, and health.
The Britannia Mining and Smelting Company Limited
Scholarship*
For research in mineralography the Britannia Mining and
Smelting Company Limited offers a scholarship of $250, open to
graduates in Geological, Mining, or Metallurgical Engineering in
the Faculty of Applied Science. A portion of the scholarship not
to exceed $50 may be used for special equipment for the research
problem. The topic of research shall be chosen after consultation
with the Department of Geology and Geography of the University
of British Columbia and the Britannia Mining and Smelting Company. Applications should be in the hands of the Registrar by
December 10th. Recipients must be qualified to undertake the
research work in respect not only of scholarship and research ability
but also of personality and health.
The Cariboo Gold Quartz Mining Company Limited
Scholarship*
A scholarship of $100, given by the Cariboo Gold Quartz Mining
Company Limited, for research in mineralography, was available
in the session 1945-46. The terms of award were as follows: This
scholarship will be awarded to a graduate in Geological, Mining,
or Metallurgical Engineering in the Faculty of Applied Science.
A portion of the scholarship not to exceed $20 may be used for
special equipment for the research problem. The topic of research
shall be chosen after consultation with the Department of Geology
and Geography of the University of British Columbia and the
Cariboo Gold Quartz Mining Company Limited. Applications
should  be  in  the  hands  of  the  Registrar  by  December  10th.
See Paragraph 1, page 44. 50 The University of British Columbia
Recipients must be qualified to undertake the research work in
respect not only of scholarship and research ability but also of
personality and health.
The Powell River Company Limited Scholarship*
For research in wood chemistry, the Powell River Company
Limited offers annually a scholarship of $700, open to Honours
graduates in Chemistry in the Faculty of Arts and Science, or
graduates in Chemical Engineering in the Faculty of Applied
Science. A portion of the scholarship, not to exceed $100, may be
used for special equipment for the research problem. The topic
of research shall be chosen after consultation with the Department
of Chemistry of the University and the Powell River Company.
Recipients must be qualified in respect of scholarship, research
ability, personality, and health to undertake graduate and research work.
Furthermore, if special aptitude is shown in carrying out this
work, an equal amount may be offered for further graduate study
and research in wood chemistry, in this or any other approved
university.
The British Columbia Electric Railway Company
Limited Research Scholarship*
The British Columbia Electric Railway Company Limited offers
a scholarship of $500 for research related to electrical and mechanical engineering problems. An additional amount not to exceed
$100 will be available for special equipment, for other expenses, or
for extension of the research beyond the close of the Second Term.
The scholarship is open to graduates in the Electrical and Mechanical Engineering courses in the Faculty of Applied Science. The
topic of research will be chosen after consultation with the Dean of
the Faculty, the Head of the Department, and the donors.
The Cominco Fellowship*
The Consolidated Mining and Smelting Company of Canada
Limited offers annually a fellowship of $750 for research related
to the general field of metals, chemicals, and fertilizers. An additional sum of $450 will be available for special equipment, supplies,
and other expenses incidental to the investigation to be carried out
under the fellowship. The fellowship is open to graduates in the
Faculty of Arts and Science, Applied Science, or Agriculture of
this or any approved university, provided that in the Faculty of
*See paragraph 1, page 44. Medals,  Scholarships, and Prizes 51
Arts and Science their undergraduate work has been in the field of
the sciences. The topic of research will be chosen after consultation
with the deans of the faculties and the donors. Copies of the full
terms of award, which must be read by all applicants, may be
obtained at the Registrar's office. Applications for the Cominco
Fellowship should be submitted to the Registrar not later than
April 15th.
The Edith Ashton Memorial Scholarship*
A scholarship of $250, given by Mr. and Mrs. Daniel M. Armstead in memory of Edith Ashton, will be offered in the Department
of Biology and Botany. This scholarship will be awarded to an
outstanding graduate student whose topic of research is in the
field of marine and freshwater botany or some field approved by
the Head of the Department.
The Lions Club Fellowship*
The Lions Service Club offers a fellowship of $1200 for training
and research in some problem connected with cancer or virus
diseases. An additional amount of approximately $300 will be
available for special equipment. The fellowship is open to a
recent graduate who has taken Honours or majored with high
standing in the Department of Bacteriology and Preventive Medicine. The topic of research will be chosen by the Head of the
Department.
The Canadian Pulp and Paper Association,
Western Branch, Fellowship*
The Canadian Pulp and Paper Association, Western Branch,
Vancouver, offers a fellowship of $1000 renewable annually, and
tenable at the University of British Columbia, to students who are
graduates in Forestry of this or any approved university and who
are planning a career in some field related to Forestry. Winners of
this award must have high scholastic standing and ability to do
research. During tenure of the fellowship they are expected to
undertake graduate study and pursue investigation of some problem
approved by the Department of Forestry. Applications, on forms
available at the Registrar's office, must be submitted not later than
March 15th.
The Shell Oil Fellowship for Research*
The Shell Oil Company Limited presents an annual fellowship,
tenable at the University of British Columbia, to a graduate of
a-oy approved university,  for study  and research leading to  a
See Paragraph 1, page 44. 52 The University of British Columbia
graduate degree in Chemistry, Chemical Engineering, Geology,
Geophysics, Mechanical Engineering, or Physics. Through this
fellowship, the student will receive $750 for living expenses, an
his University fees for that year will be paid by the Shell 0:
Company. Full details of the award should be obtained from thi
Registrar's office. Applications, on forms available for that purpose, must be received by the Registrar not later than March 15th.
The Dorothy and William Dorbils  Scholarship*
A scholarship of total value of $2000, the gift of Dorothy and
William Dorbils, will be available for award in 1950, and subsequently, to enable a student to undertake an approved programme
of graduate studies in the field of the humanities or the pure
sciences. To be eligible for the scholarship, an applicant must have
completed four years at the University of British Columbia, including at least one year of graduate study. The award will be made
to an outstanding student on the basis of scholastic achievement
and promise in research. The winner will receive one third of the
total value of the scholarship during each of the first three years
of his graduate work outlined in the approved programme. In the
event that he complete his course in less than three years, the balance
of the award will be used to provide a scholarship for another
graduate student. Further details may be obtained from the
Chairman of the Committee.
The Shanahan's Limited Scholarship*
For research in colloidal chemistry Shanahan's Limited offers a
scholarship of $500, open to Honours graduates in Chemistry in the
Faculty of Arts and Science, or graduates in Chemical Engineering
in the Faculty of Applied Science. The topic of research will be
chosen after consultation with the Department of Chemistry of the
University and the donors. Recipients must be qualified to undertake graduate and research work in respect of scholarship, research
ability, .personality, and health.
The General Construction Company Limited
Scholarship
(Donated through the Vancouver Men's Canadian Club)
A scholarship  of $300, the gift of the General  Construction
Company Limited, will be available for graduates in Civil Engineering of the University of British Columbia to undertake graduate
study in engineering at this or any approved university. Recipients
*See paragraph 1, page 44. Medals, Scholarships, and Prizes 53
must be qualified to undertake graduate work in respect of scholarship, ability, character, and health. If, in the opinion of the Department of Civil Engineering, no applicant is sufficiently qualified,
the sum will be used to provide scholarships or bursaries for
students completing the Third Year of Civil Engineering, and
proceeding to the Fourth Year.
SCHOLARSHIPS FOR UNDERGRADUATES
1. IN ALL FACULTIES
University Great War Scholarships*
Two scholarships of $200 each may be awarded, on the basis of
the work of the First Year in Arts and Science or Agriculture, to
returned soldiers, their dependents, and the children of deceased
soldiers, proceeding to a higher year in any faculty.
2.    IN ARTS AND SCIENCE
University Scholarships in Arts and Science
Two scholarships in Arts and Science of $200 each will be
awarded to students proceeding to the Fourth Year, the award
to be based on the work of the Third Year. These scholarships will
be awarded respectively: 1. To the student standing highest with
majors in group (1). (See page 94.) 2. To the student standing
highest with majors in group (2). (See page 94.) Students taking
full Honours in Mathematics will be classified in group (1).
Two scholarships in Arts and Science of $200 each will be
awarded on the basis of the work of the Second Year to students
proceeding to a higher year.
Two scholarships of $200 each will be awarded to the students
taking second and third places in the examinations of the First
Year in Arts and Science, and proceeding to a higher year.
The Shaw Memorial Scholarshipf
This scholarship of $125, founded by friends of the late James
Curtis Shaw, Principal of Vancouver College, and afterwards of
McGill University College, Vancouver, will be awarded upon the
results of the examinations of the Second Year in Arts and Science
to the undergraduate student standing highest in any two of three
courses, English 200, Latin 202, Greek 90, Greek 101, or Greek
202, and proceeding to a higher year.
tOriginally  donated to the Royal  Institution   (see  Historical Sketch),  this  has  been
transferred by that body, with the consent of the donors, to the University of British
Columbia.
*See paragraph 1, page 44. 54 The University of British Columbia
The McGill    Graduates' Scholarshipf
A scholarship of $125, founded by the McGill Graduates' Society
of British Columbia, will be awarded to the student standing
highest in English and French of the Second Year in Arts and
Science and proceeding to a higher year.
The Terminal City Club Memorial Scholarship
This scholarship of $100, founded by the members of the Terminal
City Club as a memorial to those members of the Club who lost their
lives in the Great War, will be awarded to the student standing
highest in English 200 and Economics 100 or 200 in the Second
Year in Arts and Science, and proceeding to a higher year.
The Imperial Order Daughters of the Empire Scott
Memorial Scholarship*
This Scholarship of $100, derived from an endowment founded
by the Imperial Order Daughters of the Empire of the City of
Vancouver, in memory of Captain Robert Falcon Scott, R.N., the
Antarctic explorer, who sacrificed his life in the cause of science,
will be awarded to a student who combines high standing in
Biology 300-303 with promise of service in the Empire. Applications
should be submitted to the Registrar not later than the last day of
the final examinations on forms provided for the purpose.
Royal Institution Scholarship in Arts and Science
A scholarship of $200 will be awarded to the student taking first
place in the examinations of the First Year in Arts and Science,
and proceeding to a higher year.
The Beverley Cayley Scholarship
A scholarship of $100, in memory of Beverley Cayley, Arts '18,
given under the terms of the will of his mother, the late Mrs. Cayley,
will be awarded to the male student standing highest in English
100 and 101 in the First Year of the Faculty of Arts and Science.
The N. Leo Klein Memorial Scholarship
A scholarship of $50, in memory of N. Leo Klein, given by Mr.
I. J. Klein, Vancouver, B. O, will be awarded to the student
obtaining first place in the examinations of the Third Year of the
course in Commerce.
tOriginally donated  to the  Royal  Institution   (see Historical Sketch), this has  been
transferred by that body, with the consent of the donors, to the University of British
Columbia.
*9ee paragraph 1, page 44. Medals,  Scholarships, and Prizes 55
The Vancouver Women's Canadian Club Scholarship
A scholarship of $100, the proceeds of a fund created by the
Vancouver Women's Canadian Club, will be awarded to the undergraduate obtaining first place in Canadian History (History 202,
or 203, or 420).
The John and Annie Southcott Memorial
Scholarship*
As on page 48.
The Summer Session Students' Association
Scholarship*
A scholarship of $40, given by the Summer Session Students'
Association, will be awarded at the close of the Summer Session to
the Summer Session student who in that session completes the
Second Year with the highest standing. To be eligible a student must
have taken his entire Second Year in the University of British
Columbia Summer Session, extra-sessional classes, or reading
courses and must be proceeding to a higher year in the University
of British Columbia.
The British Columbia Teachers' Federation
Scholarship*
A scholarship of $50 given by the British Columbia Teachers'
Federation will be awarded at the close of the Summer Session to
the Summer Session student who, having been an active member
of the British Columbia Teachers' Federation for the three years
previous to the granting of the scholarship, completes, in that
session, the Third Year of his University work with the highest
standing in that year. To be eligible a student must have taken his
entire Third Year in the University of British Columbia Summer
Session, extra-sessional classes, or reading courses, and must continue in his Fourth Year at the University of British Columbia.
The Vancouver Women's Canadian Club Scholarship
in Home Economics
A scholarship of $100, given by the Vancouver Women's Canadian Club, will be awarded for general proficiency in the work of
the Third Year of the Home Economics course to a student proceeding to the Fourth Year of that course.
*See paragraph 1, page 44. 56 The University of British Columbia
The Edwin Waterhouse Scholarship*
A scholarship of $250, the gift of Price, Waterhouse, and Company, will be awarded to a student in Commerce who has completed
his Third Year with high standing in the final examinations, and ii
proceeding to his Fourth Year. The award will be made to afl
applicant whose academic record, ability, and other qualifications
are considered to be outstanding and who is deserving of financial
assistance. Applications must be submitted to the Registrar not
later than the last day of the final examinations.
The R. J. Pop Scholarship in Zoology
A scholarship of $150, given annually by Mr. R. J. Pop, will be
awarded to the student who completes the third year of the Honour
Course in Zoology with highest standing and intends to pursue
an investigation into terrestrial vertebrate Zoology related to the
conservation of natural resources. If no third year student presents
work of sufficient merit, the award may be made to a student in
the fourth year who is proceeding to graduate work in the above
field at this or any other university.
The Alaska Pine Company Scholarship in
Wood Chemistry*
(Donated through the Vancouver Men's Canadian Club)
A scholarship of $150, the gift of the Alaska Pine Company
Limited, will be awarded to a student completing the Third Year
of the Honours Course in Chemistry with high standing, and proceeding to the Fourth Year. The award will be made to a student
who intends to undertake research in wood chemistry.
The Alaska Pine Company Scholarship in Commerce
(Donated through the Vancouver Men's Canadian Club)
A scholarship of $150, the gift of the Alaska Pine Company
Limited, will be awarded to the student who obtains the highest
standing in Second Year Commerce and is proceeding to the Third
Year of that course. To be eligible for this award the student must
take Commerce 251 in the Second Year.
The Vancouver Daily Province Scholarship
(Donated through the Vancouver Men's Canadian Club)
A scholarship of $250, given by the Vancouver Daily Province
for the promotion of the study of government, will be awarded to
a student taking an Honours course in Political Science  (or a
*See paragraph 1, page 44. Medals, Scholarships, and Prizes 57
combined Honours course in Political Science and some other
subject). The award will be made to the student who completes the
Third Year with highest standing in Government 300 and is proceeding to the Fourth Year of the Honours course.
The Alaska Pine Company Scholarship in Economics
(Donated through the Vancouver Men's Canadian Club)
A scholarship of $150, the gift of the Alaska Pine Company
Limited, will be awarded to the student who obtains highest standing in the Third Year of an Honours course in Economics and is
proceeding to the Fourth Year of that course. In making the award,
standing will be determined on the basis of the marks obtained in
any six units of Third Year courses in Economics..
The Burbidge Scholarships
(Donated through the Vancouver Men's Canadian Club)
Two scholarships of $125 each, the gift of Mr. P. W. Burbidge,
will be awarded for general proficiency in the Honours course in
Physics, or in Mathematics and Physics. These awards will be made
to the two students obtaining highest standing in the examinations
of the Third Year and proceeding to the Fourth Year.
The Alaska Pine Company Scholarship in Forestry
(Donated through the Vancouver Men's Canadian Club)
A scholarship of $150, the gift of the Alaska Pine Company Limited, will be awarded to the student who obtains highest standing in
the Fourth Year of Arts and Science and is proceeding to the final
year in Forestry in the course leading to the degree of B.S.F.
The Cunningham Scholarship in Pharmacy
(Donated through the Vancouver Men's Canadian Club)
A general proficiency scholarship of $100, the gift of Mr. George
T. Cunningham, will be awarded annually to the student obtaining
highest standing in the Third Year of Pharmacy and proceeding to
the Fourth Year of the course.
The Woodward Scholarships
(Donated through the Vancouver Men's Canadian Club)
Two scholarships, the gift of the Honourable W. C. Woodward,
will be available as follows. 58 The University of British Columbia
1. The sum of $125 will be awarded to the student in Third Year
Commerce who obtains highest standing in Commerce 261 and
is proceeding to the Fourth Year.
2. The sum of $125 will be awarded to the student in Third Year
Commerce who obtains highest standing in Commerce 467 and
is proceeding to the Fourth Year.
To be eligible for either of these awards, a student must also
obtain high standing in the other courses of the Third Year.
3.    IN APPLIED SCIENCE
University  Scholarship   in   Nursing   and  Health*
A scholarship of $200 will be awarded for general proficiency
in previous work of university grade (which must include a
minimum of two years' work in the Province of British Columbia),
to a student who is proceeding to the Second Year (or in the Double
Course, proceeding to the Third Year) of the Course in Nursing and
Health and has successfully completed the hospital probationary
period. Applications shall be made to the Registrar not later than
December 1st.
The Vancouver Women's Canadian Club Scholarship
A scholarship of $100, given by the Vancouver Women's Canadian Club, will b% awarded to the student who attains the highest
standing in the first four years' training, academic and practical
(or in the first five years' training, academic and practical, in the
Double Course) of the Nursing and Health course.
The Dunsmuir Scholarshipf
A scholarship of $150, founded by the Hon. James Dunsmuir,
will be awarded to the undergraduate student standing highest in
the Mining Engineering Course of the Third Year in Applied
Science, and proceeding to the Fourth Year.
University Scholarship in Applied Science
A scholarship of $200 will be awarded to the student who obtains
the highest marks in the Second Year in Applied Science and who
is proceeding to the Third Year in that Faculty.
tOriginally  donated  to the  Royal  Institution   (see Historical Sketch), this has  been
transferred by that body, with the consent of the donors, to the University of British
Columbia.
*See paragraph 1, page 44. Medals,  Scholarships, and Prizes 59
Royal Institution Scholarship in Applied Science
A scholarship of $200 will be awarded for general proficiency in
the work of the First Year in Applied Science to a student who
is proceeding to the Second Year in that Faculty.
The G. M. Dawson Scholarship
A scholarship of $50 will be awarded to the undergraduate
student standing highest in the Geological Engineering course, in
Geological subjects, in the Third Year of the Faculty of Applied
Science, and proceeding to the Fourth Year.
The B'nai B'rith Auxiliary No. 77 Scholarship
A scholarship of $50, given by the Women's Auxiliary No. 77 of
the B'nai B'rith, will be awarded to the student in the Third Year
Applied Science standing highest in the class of Chemical Engineering or Chemistry and proceeding to the Fourth Year.
The R. Randolph Bruce Scholarship
Out of the proceeds of a fund bequeathed to the University of
British Columbia by the late Honourable R. Randolph Bruce in
memory of his term as Official Visitor, a scholarship of $200 will
be offered annually to the undergraduate student standing highest
in the Metallurgical Engineering course of the Third Year in
Applied Science and proceeding to the Fourth Year.
The British Columbia Electric Railway Company
Limited Scholarships
Two scholarships given by the British Columbia Electric Railway
Company Limited will be available as follows:
(1) the sum of $200 will be awarded to the undergraduate
student standing highest in the Electrical Engineering
course of the Third Year in Applied Science, and proceeding to the Fourth Year-
(2) the sum of $200 will be awarded to the undergraduate
student standing highest in the Mechanical Engineering
course of the Third Year in Applied Science, and proceeding to the Fourth Year. 60 The University of British Columbia
The Canadian Forest Products Limited Scholarships
(Donated through the Vancouver Men's Canadian Club)
Two scholarships of $150 each, the gift of Canadian Forest
Products Limited, will be awarded to the students obtaining highest,
standing in the Third Year of the Forest Engineering course and
proceeding to the Fourth Year.
The Lambert Scholarship
(Donated through the Vancouver Men's Canadian Club)
A scholarship of $200, the gift of Brigadier Noel D. Lambert,
will be awarded annually to the student obtaining highest standing
in the Third Year of Civil Engineering and proceeding to the
Fourth Year of that course.
The General Construction Company Limited
Scholarship
(Donated through the Vancouver Men's Canadian Club)
A scholarship of $200, the gift of the General Construction Company Limited, will be awarded to a student who completes the
Second Year of Applied Science (Engineering) and is proceeding
to the Third Year. The award will be for proficiency in the work
of the First and Second Years.
The John Inglis Company Limited Scholarships
(Donated through the Vancouver Men's Canadian Club)
Two scholarships of $125 each, the gift of the John Inglis Company Limited, Toronto, will be awarded annually to the students
completing the Second Year with highest standing and proceeding
to the Third Year in Mining or Metallurgical Engineering. Second
Year students who intend to specialize in either of these fields, and
are therefore eligible to be considered for these awards, should
notify the Head of the Department of Mining and Metallurgy not
later than the last day of the final examinations.
4.    IN AGRICULTURE
University Scholarship in Agriculture
A scholarship in Agriculture of $200 will be awarded to a student
proceeding to a higher year, the award to be based on the work of
the First Year. Medals, Scholarships, and Prizes 61
The David Thom Scholarship
A scholarship in Agriculture of $100 will be awarded to a
student proceeding to a higher year in that Faculty, the award to
be based on the work of the Second Year.
The British Columbia Fruit Growers'
Association Golden Jubilee Scholarship*
This scholarship, of the annual value of $125, donated by the
British Columbia Fruit Growers' Association, will be awarded to
a student taking the horticultural options of the Third Year. To
qualify for this scholarship candidates must obtain scholarship
standing, not only in horticultural subjects, but also in the work
of the year, and must be proceeding to the Horticultural Course
of the Fourth Year—the year in which the scholarship shall be
enjoyed.
The Hogarth Scholarships
(Donated through the Vancouver Men's Canadian Club)
Two scholarships of $125 each, the gift of Major General D. M.
Hogarth, Toronto, will be awarded annually to students completing
the Third Year of Agriculture and proceeding to the Fourth Year.
The recipients will be recommended by the Faculty of Agriculture
on the basis of general proficiency and outstanding ability in one
or more of the fields of Agricultural Economics, Agronomy, Animal
Husbandry, Dairying, Horticulture (including Plant Nutrition),
Poultry Husbandry, and Farm Mechanics.
5.    IN LAW
The Norgan Scholarships
(Donated through the Vancouver Men's Canadian Club)
Six general proficiency scholarships, the gift of Mr. George W.
Norgan, will be awarded annually in the Faculty of Law as follows:
1. $150 each to the three students obtaining highest standing in
the examinations of the First Year and proceeding to the
Second Year;
2. $150 each to the three students obtaining highest standing in
the examinations of the Second Year and proceeding to the
Third Year.
*See paragraph 1, page 41. 62 The University of British Columbia
UNIVERSITY ENTRANCE AND SENIOR
MATRICULATION SCHOLARSHIPS
The Vancouver Sun Scholarships for Carriers*
The Vancouver Sun offers annually two scholarships of $200
each to students entering the First Year of Arts and Science or
Agriculture at the University of British Columbia. The terms of
the scholarships require that applicants must have been carriers of
the Vancouver Sun for at least two years. The scholarships will be
awarded to the two applicants who rank highest on the basis of the
marks obtained in any year on the written examinations in the
scholarship subjects of University Entrance as outlined in The
Requirements for University Entrance and Senior Matriculation.
The selection of the winners will be made by the University, and
applications, accompanied by the service certificate of the Vancouver
Sun, should be forwarded to the Registrar not later than September
10th.
The Pacific Mills Limited Scholarship*
The Pacific Mills Limited offers annually a scholarship of $250
to students entering the First Year of Arts and Science or Agriculture at the University of British Columbia. This scholarship is open
to sons and daughters of employees of Pacific Mills Limited and
Canadian Boxes Limited who are resident in British Columbia.
The scholarship will be awarded to the applicant who ranks highest
on the basis of the marks obtained in any year on the written
examinations in the scholarship subjects of University Entrance,
as outlined in The Requirements for University Entrance and
Senior Matriculation. Selection of the winner will be made by the
University. Full details of the terms of award may be obtained
from the Personnel Manager of Pacific Mills Limited, or from the
Registrar's office. Applications should be forwarded to the Personnel Manager not later than June 1st.
University Scholarships for University Entrance
Fifteen general proficiency scholarships will be awarded on the
result of the University Entrance examinations: (a) $175 to the
candidate of highest standing in the Province, and (b) $175 each
to the two candidates of next highest standing in each of the
following districts:  (1) Victoria District,  (2)  Vancouver Island
*9ee paragraph 1, page 44. Medals,  Scholarships, and Prizes 63
(exclusive of Victoria District), and Northern Mainland (exclusive
of North Vancouver and West Vancouver), (3) Vancouver Central
District (comprising the former limits of the City of Vancouver),
together with West Vancouver and North Vancouver, (4) the part
of the Lower Mainland in the Fraser Harbour area, (5) the Fraser
Valley, (6) Yale, (7) the Kootenays.
These scholarships will be paid only to students in attendance at
the University of British Columbia, with the exception that the
Victoria District University Entrance Scholarships will be paid to
any winners of those scholarships in attendance at Victoria College.
Postponement of University Entrance Scholarships will be
granted only on medical grounds.
Royal Institution Scholarships for Senior
Matriculation
Six general proficiency scholarships will be awarded on the
result of the Senior Matriculation examinations: (a) $200 to the
candidate of highest standing in the Province, (b) $200 to the
candidate of next highest standing in the Province, (c) $200 to
the candidate of next highest standing in all school districts of
the Province other than the City of Vancouver, the City of North
Vancouver, the District Municipalities of North Vancouver, West
Vancouver, and Burnaby, and the City of New Westminster, and
(d) $200 each to the three candidates of next highest standing in
Districts (2) Vancouver Island (exclusive of Victoria District),
and Northern Mainland (exclusive of North Vancouver and West
Vancouver), (5) the Fraser Valley, (6) Yale, and (7) the
Kootenays.
These scholarships will be paid only to students in attendance
at the University of British Columbia.
Winners of all University Entrance and Senior Matriculation
scholarships must notify the Registrar before September 1st of
their intention of attending the University (or Victoria College
in the case of the Victoria District University Entrance Scholarships) during the following session; failing such notification, the
winner's rights will lapse.
Postponement of Senior Matriculation scholarships will be
granted only on medical grounds. 64 The University of British Columbia
PRIZES
1.    IN ALL FACULTIES
The University Essay Prize*
A book prize of the value of $25 will be awarded to a Fourth
Year student for the best essay presented in any of the courses
regularly given by the Department of English.
The News-Herald Awards in Journalism*
The Vancouver News-Herald offers annually two prizes to students
who show promise in journalism. The first prize of $200 is open
to undergraduates of the Third or higher years of Arts and Science
and Agriculture, the Second or higher years of Applied Science,
and any year of Law. The second prize of $150 is open to First or
Second Year students of Arts and Science and Agriculture and
First Year students of Applied Science. A winner in one of these
categories is not eligible for a second award in the same category.
Each competitor must submit five original articles published or
suitable for publication in the Ubyssey or other newspapers during
the year preceding the awards. These articles may be news-stories,
feature articles, reports, reviews, or editorials. Awards will be made
by Senate on the recommendation of a committee consisting of the
Editor of the News-Herald and the Head of the Department of
English. Articles must be in the hands of the Registrar not later
than March 31st.
2.    IN ARTS AND SCIENCE
Frances Willard Prize*
A prize of $50, given by the Woman's Christian Temperance
Union of British Columbia, will be awarded to Third or Fourth
Year undergraduates or to graduate students for an essay in the
field of Economics, Education, History, Psychology, or Sociology, on
a subject to be approved by the department concerned in consultation with a committee of the Woman's Christian Temperance Union
The award will be made for the session 1946-47 on recommendation of the Heads of the Department of Education and the Department of Economics, Political Science, and Sociology. Essays must
be submitted by April 10th, 1947.
If in any year no student reaches the required standard the
award will be withheld.
*See paragraph 1, page 44. Medals, Scholarships, and Prizes 65
The David Bolocan Memorial Prize
A prize of $25 given by Mr. and Mrs. J. L. Bolocan will be
awarded to the student in the Fourth Year of the Faculty of Arts
and Science who is regarded by the Department of Philosophy
and Psychology as the outstanding student in that subject in the
graduating year.
The Ahepa Prize
A prize of $100, given by the Gladstone Chapter No. 6, C.J.,
Order of Ahepa, will be awarded to the student of the Fourth
Year who has shown the greatest promise in Greek studies. If
possible, the award will be made to an Honours student, but if
there is no outstanding Honours student the scholarship may be
given to a student in the General Course.
The Armstead Prize in Biology and Botany
A prize of $50, the gift of Mr. and Mrs. Daniel M. Armstead,
will be awarded to a graduating student in the Honours course of
the Department of Biology and Botany. The winner will be recommended on the basis of scholastic achievement and promise of ability
in research.
The Llewellyn Jones Prize in Zoology
A cash prize of $50, offered by Mr. J. R. J. Llewellyn Jones, will
be awarded to the student in the graduating year of the Faculty
of Arts and Science whose academic work and promise of research
ability in the Honours Course in Zoology, in the field of entomology,
have been outstanding and worthy of recognition. In the event of
there being no undergraduate of outstanding merit, the award will
be made to a graduate of the University of British Columbia who is
carrying out noteworthy graduate work at this or another university.
The British Columbia Packers Limited Prizes in
Fisheries
During the Session 1945-46, the British Columbia Packers Limited
offered a first prize of $100 and a second prize of $50 for the two
best essays on each of two designated subjects in the field of the
fishing industry. Any student registered for courses in fisheries
was permitted to submit one essay. 66 The University of British Columbia
The J. W. Dafoe Foundation Prizes
Two prizes of $100 each, the gift of the J. W. Dafoe Foundation!
will be awarded to undergraduate students registered in the Thirijj
or Fourth Year during the Session 1945-46. Of these prizes, on|
will be awarded in the Department of Economics, Political Science,
and Sociology, and the other in the Department of History, fof
the best essay on a subject approved by the Department and related
to the significance of international co-operation. No candidate will
be allowed to write on a subject closely related to that of his graduating essay. Essays must be submitted by October 1st, 1946. If no
student reaches the required standard, the awards will be withheld.
The Essay Prize in International Relations
A prize of $30, provided from the income of a trust fund established by an anonymous donor, will be awarded to Third or Fourth
Year undergraduates for an essay in the field of international
relations, on a subject to be approved by the Department of Economics, Political Science, and Sociology, and by the Department
of History. No candidate will be allowed to write on a subject
closely related to that of his graduating essay. Essays must be
submitted by April 10th, 1947. If no student reaches the required
standard, the award will be withheld.
The Cunningham Prize in Pharmacy
(Donated through the Vancouver Men's Canadian Club)
A cash prize of $50, the gift of Mr. George T. Cunningham, will
be awarded to the student in Pharmacy whose scholastic record in
all years of the course has been the most outstanding.
3.    IN APPLIED SCIENCE
The Convocation Prize
A prize of $50, given by Convocation of the University of British
Columbia, will be awarded to the student in the Fourth Year of
Applied Science whose record, in the opinion of the Faculty, is the
most outstanding.
Engineering Institute of Canada (Vancouver Branch)
Walter Moberly Memorial Prize
A hook prize of the value of $25, given by the Vancouver Branch
of the Engineering Institute of Canada, will be awarded for the
best engineering thesis submitted by any Fourth Year student in the
Faculty of Applied Science.   This prize is given in memory of the Medals,  Scholarships, and Prizes 67
late Walter Moberly, pioneer engineer and explorer, discoverer of
the Yellowhead Pass through the Rocky Mountains, whose work in
railway location has influenced so greatly the development of the
Province of British Columbia.
The Association of Professional Engineers' Prizes
Five book prizes, each of the value of $25, are offered by the
Association of Professional Engineers of the Province for competition by those students in the Third Year of the Faculty of Applied
Science who are enrolled as engineering pupils in the Association.
These prizes are awarded for the best summer essay in each of any
five branches of engineering to be selected by the Faculty. The
successful essays may be made available by the Faculty to the
Council and members of the Association.
The Provincial Board of Health Prizes
The Provincial Board of Health of the Province of British
Columbia offers the sum of $100 to be given as prizes in the Public
Health Nursing Course. 1
The Engineering Institute of Canada Prize
The Engineering Institute of Canada offers an annual prize of
$25 to each of twelve Canadian universities of which the University
of British Columbia is one. The prize will be awarded to a student
of the Third Year in Applied Science on the basis of the marks
made in his academic work in that year. His activities in the
students' engineering organization or in the local branch of a recognized engineering society will also be considered.
The British Columbia Lumber and Shingle Manufacturers' Association Prizes*
Prizes of the value of $100, $50, and $25, given by the British
Columbia Lumber and Shingle Manufacturers' Association, will be
awarded to the students enrolled in the course Structural Design 1
(C.E. 370) who submit the designs judged to be the best, of a wooden
roof truss. The awards will be made upon the recommendation of
the Dean of the Faculty of Applied Science in collaboration with
the instructor in charge of the course and with the donor. Applications should be forwarded to the Registrar not later than January
15th.
The William N. Kelly Prize
A prize of $15 offered by Mr. William N. Kelly, M.E.I.C., Consulting Engineer and Marine Surveyor, Vancouver, will be awarded
*See paragraph 1, page 44. 68 The University of British Columbia
to the student in the Third Year of the Faculty of Applied Science
who obtains the highest standing in Mechanical Engineering 358,
Machine Shop Practice. Skill in the use of hand tools will receive
special consideration.
The Timber Preservers Limited Prizes*
Prizes of the value of $65, $45, and $25, given by the Timber
Preservers Limited, will be awarded to the students enrolled in the
course in Engineering Law (C.E. 476) of the Fourth Year of the
Civil Engineering course in the Faculty of Applied Science who
submit plans and specifications judged to be the best of a structure
of treated timber. The awards will be made upon the recommendation of the Dean of the Faculty of Applied Science in
collaboration with the instructor in charge of the course and with
the donors.
The Canadian Institute of Mining and Metallurgy
(British Columbia Section)   Prize
A cash prize of $100, the gift of the Canadian Institute of Mining
and Metallurgy (British Columbia Section), was offered for the
best Master's thesis submitted in the Session 1945-46 by a graduate
student at the University of British Columbia on the subject of
mining, geology, or metallurgy.
The Ingledow Prizes
Two prizes of $50 each, the gift of Mr. T. Ingledow, are available
for undergraduates in Electrical Engineering'who are members of
the student branch of the American Institute of Electrical Engineers. One of these prizes will be awarded to a Third Year student
for proficiency in the laboratory work of the courses E.E. 353 and
355, and the other to a Fourth Year student for proficiency in the
laboratory work of E.E. 457. In making the awards, emphasis will
be placed on the neatness, accuracy, and completeness of laboratory
reports, and on practical ability in experimental work.
The H. R. MacMillan Export Company Limited
Prizes
Through the generosity of the H. R. MacMillan Export Company
Limited, prizes to the total of $750 are available annually for
undergraduates registered in the Forestry course. This sum will
be divided into three equal parts, to provide a first prize of $150
*See paragraph 1, page 44. Medals,  Scholarships, and Prizes 69
and a second prize of $100 for the best two reports on each of three
specified subjects. Full details regarding the subjects may be obtained from the Head of the Department of Forestry.
The Canadian Forest Products Limited Prizes
(Donated through the Vancouver Men's Canadian Club)
Two prizes of $100 each, the gift of Canadian Forest Products
Limited, will be awarded to students graduating in Forestry with
the degree of B.A.Sc. The awards will be made on the basis of
general proficiency in the work of the final two years.
The Northern Electric Company Limited Prize
(Donated through the Vancouver Men's Canadian Club)
A cash prize of $100, the gift of the Northern Electric Company
Limited, will be awarded to the student in Electrical Engineering
whose scholastic record in the final two years of the course has been
the most outstanding.
4.    IN AGRICULTURE
The Dr. D. A. (McKee Memorial Prize
A cash prize of $30, established from the income of a trust fund
donated by Mrs. D. A. McKee in memory of her husband, will be
awarded annually to the student with the highest standing in the
Third Year Agriculture, who is proceeding to the Fourth Year.
5.    IN LAW
The Carswell Company Limited, Prizes
The Carswell Company Limited, Law Publishers, Toronto, offer
annually three book prizes of the value of $20 each. Of these prizes,
one will be awarded in each year of the Law course to the student
obtaining highest standing in that year.
The Norgan Essay Prize*
(Donated through the Vancouver Men's Canadian Club)
A cash prize of $100, the gift of Mr. George W. Norgan, will be
awarded to a student in the Third Year of Law for the best essay
presented on a topic set or approved by the Faculty. If in any year
no student reaches the required standard, the award will be withheld.
"See paragraph 1, page 44. 70 The University of British Columbia
BURSARIES
The Captain LeRoy Memorial Bursary*
This bursary of the annual value of $150 was given by thi
Universities Service Club in memory of their comrades who fell
in the First Great War. It is named after Captain 0. E. LeRoy, whfl
commanded the overseas contingent from this University and who
was killed at Passchendaele in 1917. <,
It will be awarded to a student, or students, requiring financial
assistance to enable him, or them, to attend the University. Fori,
this purpose it may be awarded to a matriculant, to a student of
any year, or to a graduate student of the University proceeding to
graduate work in this or any approved university. In making the
award preference will be given first to returned soldiers, then to the
dependents of soldiers, and finally to suitable candidates from the
student body at large.
Application must contain a statement of the academic record
and special circumstances of the applicant, with two supporting
references, and, in the ease of the preferred categories, of the war
record of the soldier.
The Khaki University and Young Men's Christian
Association Memorial Fund Bursaries*
A sum of money given to the University by the administrators
of the Khaki University of Canada provides a fund from which are
awarded annually five bursaries of the value of $100 each, known
as the Khaki University and Young Men's Christian Association
Memorial Bursaries.
Under conditions specified by the donors these bursaries may be
used for undergraduate purposes only, and in making the awards a
preference is given to the sons and daughters of soldiers of the
First Great War. The financial necessities of candidates are also
taken into account.
To be eligible for an award a soldier's dependent must obtain
at least Second Class standing, i.e., 65 per cent.; for all others 75
per cent, is required.
Dependents of soldiers and others who have attained the standing
as stated above and who are in need of financial assistance should
apply to the Registrar not later than August 15th. The next awards
will be made in 1947.
These bursaries are open to students from Victoria College proceeding to a course of study in the University.
Application forms may be obtained at the Registrar's office.
*See paragraph 1, page 44. Medals,  Scholarships, and Prizes 71
The American Woman's Club Bursary*
A bursary of $100, given by the American Woman's Club of
Vancouver, will be available for the session 1946-47 to assist a
woman undergraduate who has completed at least one year in Arts
and Science with satisfactory standing, and who could not otherwise
continue her course. Application must be made to the Registrar not
later than August 15th.
The University Women's Club Bursary*
A bursary of $100, given by the University Women's Club of
Vancouver, will be available for a woman student of high scholastic
standing in the Third Year of the Faculty of Arts and Science who
is proceeding to the Fourth Year.
The Inter-Sorority Alumnae Club Bursary*
A bursary of $200, given by the Inter-Sorority Alumnae Club
of Vancouver, will be awarded to a woman student of satisfactory
academic standing, proceeding to her Third Year or any higher
year or to the Education Class, or, if a graduate, to the course leading to the Diploma or Degree in Social Work. The award will be
made on the recommendation of the Dean of Women, to whom
applications should be sent not later than August 15th on forms
available in the Registrar's office.
The Mildred Brock Memorial Bursary*
A bursary of $75, given by the Delta Gamma Fraternity, m
memory of Mrs. Mildred Brock, wife of the late R. W. Brock, Dean
of the Faculty of Applied Science, whose personal charm and high
ideals were an inspiration to the students, who greatly benefited by
her sympathetic understanding and generosity, will be available
for a woman student ®f high scholastic standing proceeding to the
Third or Fourth Year of her undergraduate studies; or, if a
graduate, to the Teacher Training Course, or to the course leading
to the Diploma or Degree in Social Work. Application must be
made to the Registrar not later than August 15th.
The Frances Milburn P. E. O. Bursary*
A bursary of $150, given by the Vancouver Chapters of the
P. E. O. Sisterhood in memory of the late Frances Milburn, will
be available for the session 1946-47 to assist a woman undergraduate
who has completed at least one year in Arts and Science with high
standing in English, and who could not otherwise continue her
*See paragraph 1, page 44. 72 The University of British Columbia
course. The award will be made on the recommendation of the
Dean of Women, to whom applications should be sent not later than
August 15th on forms available in the Registrar's office.
The Lady Laurier Club Bursary*
A bursary of $100, given by the Lady Laurier Club of Vancouver,
will be awarded to a woman student in Third or Fourth Year on
the basis of scholastic standing and financial need. Applications,
on forms available at the Registrar's office, must be received not
later than August 15th.
The Alliance Francaise Bursary*
A bursary of not less than $25, given by the Alliance Francaise,
will be awarded on a basis of merit and need to a student specializing in French at the University. The bursary will normally be
awarded to a student who has completed his Second Year and is
proceeding to his Third Year. Applications, on forms available at
the Registrar's office, must be received by the Registrar not later
than August 15th.
The Faculty Women's Club Bursary*
A bursary of the value of $75, given by the Faculty Women's
Club of Vancouver, will be awarded to a Third Year woman student,
such student to have scholastic ability and real need of financial
assistance. Applications, on forms available at the Registrar's office,
must be received by the Registrar not later than August 15th.
The Alumni Association Bursary*
A bursary of the value of $50, given by the Alumni Association
of the University of British Columbia, will be awarded on the basis
of scholarship and need to a student entering the First Year in
Arts and Science or Agriculture. Applications, on forms available
at the Registrar's office, must be received by the Registrar not later
than August 15th.
The William MacKenzie Swan Memorial Bursary*
A bursary of the annual value of $250, given by Colonel and Mrs.
W. G. Swan in memory of their son, William MacKenzie Swan, an
outstanding all-round undergraduate student and popular athlete
who died July 28th, 1937, as a result of injuries received in a fall
from the Pattullo Bridge at New Westminster on which he was
engaged as Assistant Engineer, will be awarded to a student or
students registered in the Second, Third, or Fourth Year of the
Faculty of Applied Science, requiring financial assistance to enable
*See paragraph 1, page 44. Medals,  Scholarships, and Prizes 73
him or them to continue studies at the University. In making the
award, consideration will be given to the academic record of the
applicant and to his participation in undergraduate affairs. Applications on forms available at the Registrar's office must be filed
with the Registrar not later than August 15th.
The Phil Wilson Bursary in Forestry*
A bursary of $225, given by the British Columbia Loggers'
Association, will be awarded to a student registered in Fourth Year
Forestry. To be eligible for the award a student must have been
a resident in British Columbia for the previous two years, must
have a scholastic average of at least 65 per cent, in the work of the
Second and Third Years at the University of British Columbia,
and must give evidence of leadership, sterling character, and
physical vigour. He shall also have been engaged during at least
two summer sessions in woods employment, logging operations,
cruising, or logging engineering. Applications, on forms available
at the Registrar's office, must be received by the Registrar not later
than August 15th.
The David Thom Bursaries
From the funds of the David Thom Estate a sum of $300 is
available annually for the following bursaries:
1. A sum of $150 to be awarded to the student who has passed
University Entrance or Senior Matriculation with the highest
standing and who is registering for the first time in the Faculty
of Agriculture. In the awarding of this bursary regulation 9
under General Regulations for Medals, Scholarships, and Prizes
does not apply.
*2. A sum of $75 to be awarded to a student who has satisfactorily
completed the work of the First Year in Agriculture and is
proceeding to a higher year in that Faculty. Application must
be made to the Registrar not later than August 15th.
*3. A sum of $75 to be awarded to a student who has satisfactorily completed the work of the Third Year in Agriculture and
is proceeding to the Fourth Year in that Faculty. Application
must be made to the Registrar not later than August 15th.
Delta Gamma Bursary for the Blind*
A bursary of $100 given by the Delta Gamma Fraternity will
be awarded to a blind student requiring financial assistance to
enable him or her to enter the University or to proceed to further
*See paragraph 1, page 44. 74 The University of British Columbia
studies. The award will be made by the Senate upon recommend^
tion of the Joint Faculty Committee on Prizes, Scholarships, ana
Bursaries acting in consultation with the Principal of the B. Gs3
School for the Deaf and Blind, the Superintendent of the Canadian^
National Institute for the Blind of Vancouver, and an accredited'
representative of Delta Gamma fraternity. Applications should be
in the hands of the Registrar by August 15th.
The Geldart Riadore Bursary*
A sum of $150 will be awarded to a student who has completed"
at least one year of work in the Faculty of Agriculture, who is
proceeding to a higher year in the Faculty, and who has given
evidence of possessing those qualities necessary for community
leadership.
The Flying Officer Reverend George Robert Pringle
Memorial Bursary*
A bursary of the annual value of $200, endowed by friends and
associates, in memory of the late Flying Officer Reverend George
Robert Pringle, a much beloved graduate of outstanding Christian
character and athletic ability who was killed on January 24th,
1943, while on active service overseas, will be awarded to a student
who has completed two years at this University and has registered at the University for further study. To be eligible for this
award the student must show evidence of academic ability, sterling,
unselfish character, and active participation and leadership in
University sport. The award will be made in the fall on the
recommendation of the Joint Faculty Committee on Prizes, Scholarships, and Bursaries, in consultation with interested members of
Faculty.
The Alberta Meat Company Bursary*
A bursary of $50, given by the Alberta Meat Company of Vancouver, will be awarded annually on the basis of merit and need to
an Animal Husbandry student conducting livestock feeding trials
at the University Farm. Applications should be in the hands of the
Registrar by August 15th.
The Mary C. Lipsett Bursary*
A bursary of $300, offered annually by Mrs. Mary C. Lipsett,
will be awarded to a student who has completed at least the Second
Year in the Faculty of Arts and Science, and who proposes to take
*See paragraph 1, page 44. Medals,  Scholarships, and Prizes 75
his major work in Sociology or Psychology. In making the award,
consideration will be given to the applicant's interest in problems
of social anthropology and his ability to pursue work in that field.
The Rotary Memorial Bursaries*
To commemorate the sacrifice and services of Rotarians and their
families in the Second World War, the Rotary Club of Vancouver
offers annually to students at the University five bursaries of the
value of $200 each. These bursaries are open to students in any
year and in any Faculty. Wherever practicable, however, the five
awards will be made to students in different years. Preference will
be given to those who, during the Second World War, were in the
Services or the Merchant Navy, or to their dependents. To be
eligible for the awards, applicants are required to be of good moral
character and to have a reasonable interest in extra-curricular
activities and a good record of scholastic attainment. Awards will
be made only to those who have limited financial ability to enter
the University or proceed to a higher year. Applications, on forms
available at the Registrar's office, must be received by the Registrar
not later than August 15th.
The Cooperative Seed Growers' Bursary*
A bursary of $100, given by the British Columbia Cooperative
Seed Association, will be awarded annually to a student who has
completed the work of the Third Year in Agriculture and is proceeding to the Fourth Year in that Faculty. Application must be
made to the Registrar by August 15th.
The Vancouver Section National Council of
Jewish Women Bursary*
A bursary of $100, the gift of the Vancouver Section of the
National Council of Jewish Women of Canada, will be awarded to
a woman student who is an undergraduate in any year of any
Faculty, or who is a graduate registered in the Teacher Training
or Social Work courses. To be eligible for this award a student
must have good ability and financial need. Applications, on forms
available at the Registrar's office, must be received by the Registrar
not later than August 15th.
*9ee paragraph 1, page 44. 76 The University of British Columbia
The Gamma Phi Beta Bursary*
A bursary of $50, the gift of the Alpha Lambda Chapter of
Gamma Phi Beta Sorority, will be awarded annually to a student
in any year of the Home Economics course. To be eligible for this
award a student must have financial need and high scholastic
standing. Applications, on forms available at the Registrar's office,
must be received by the Registrar not later than August 15th.
The Provincial Council of British Columbia, Canadian
Daughters' League, Bursaries*
Two bursaries of $100 each, the gift of the Provincial Council
of British Columbia, Canadian Daughters' League, will be available annually to assist women students who could not otherwise
continue their courses. The awards, which will be made on the basis
of character, academic record, and scholastic ability, will be open
to students entering the Teacher Training course. In the event that
no applicant in this course can qualify, the awards will be open to
students entering Social Work. Applications, on forms available at
the Registrar's office, must be received by the Registrar not later
than August 15th. \
University Women's Club Bursary for Social Work*
A bursary of $100, given by the University Women's Club of
Vancouver, will be available to assist a woman student in the Professional Course in Social Work. To be eligible for this award a
student must have high scholastic standing, an aptitude for social
work, and financial need. Applications, on forms available at the
Registrar's office, must be received by the Registrar not later than
August 15th.
Bursary for Proficiency (Special Award)*
Through the generosity of an anonymous donor, a bursary of
-$1,000 was made available to enable a student with high scholastic
standing and need of financial assistance to complete his or her
undergraduate course. The recipient was chosen in September,
1944, from among bursary applicants entering First or Second
Year in any faculty.
The Jack Cohen Bursary*
A bursary of $150, the gift of Mr. S. J. Cohen, is available for
a student who has completed the Third Year in Commerce and is
proceeding to the work of the Fourth Year. To be eligible for this
award, the student must have high scholastic standing, and financial
*See paragraph 1, page 44. Medals,  Scholarships, and Prizes 77
need.   Applications, on forms available at the Registrar's office,
must be received by the Registrar not later than August 15th.
The Kiwassa Club of Vancouver Bursaries*
Four bursaries of $150 each, the gift of the Kiwassa Club of
Vancouver, will be available annually to assist women students
proceeding to the course in Public Health Nursing (Nursing B),
or the Professional Course in Social Work. To be eligible for these
bursaries, applicants must have high scholastic standing, an aptitude
for the field in which they are enrolling, and need of financial
assistance. In making the awards, preference will be given to
dependents of veterans and residents of Vancouver. Applications,
on forms available at the Registrar's office, must be received by the
Rgistrar not later than August 15th.
The McLean Bursaries*
Through the generosity of Mr. and Mrs. J. S. McLean of Toronto,
four bursaries of $250 each are available for the Session 1946-47.
These bursaries will be awarded to students entering the Second
Year in Arts and Science or Agriculture, or the First Year in
Applied Science. Preference will be given to students whose homes
are in more remote parts of the Province. In making the awards,
consideration will be given to scholastic ability and financial need.
Applications, on forms available at the Registrar's office, must be
received by the Registrar not later than August 15th.
The Pacific Meat Company Bursary*
A bursary of $200 is offered annually by the Pacific Meat Company of Vancouver for research related to problems of the meat
industry. The award is open to a student, or students, in the
Department of Animal Husbandry. Applications should be in the
hands of the Registrar by August 15th.
The Nat Bell Bursary*
A bursary of $150, given by Angela Bell in memory of her father,
will be awarded annually to a student registered in any year and
any faculty who has outstanding ability and financial need. Applications, on forms available at the Registrar's office, must be received
by the Registrar not later than August 15th.
*9ee paragraph 1, page 44. 78 The University of British Columbia
The R.C.A.F. Veterans' Bursary Fund*
A sum of money given to the University by the Wartime Con|
valescent Homes, War Charity Funds, Incorporated, Vancouvei
Division, provides an annual fund of approximately $300 foj
bursaries. These bursaries will be available for R.C.A.F. veteranj
of the War 1939-1945 and for their dependents. Awards will bj
made on the basis of scholastic standing and financial need;
Applications, on forms obtainable at the Registrar's office, should hi
submitted to the Registrar not later than August 15th. Thes^
awards will be available for the first time in the Session 1947-48!
The Teamsters' Joint Council No. 36 Bursary*
(Donated through the Vancouver Men's Canadian Club)
An annual bursary of $250, donated by the Teamsters' Joint
Council No. 36, is offered to a student in any year and faculty. This
bursary will be given to a student who has need of financial
assistance and has high scholastic standing. To be eligible for the
award, an applicant must be the son or daughter of a member of
the International Brotherhood of Teamsters in B.C. In the event
that no such applicant can qualify, the bursary will be awarded to
the son or daughter of a member of any International Trade Union.
In choosing the recipient, preference will be given to students who
are registered in the lower years. Applications, on forms available
at the Registrar's office, must be submitted to the Registrar not
later than August 15th.
The Lauder Mercer and Company Limited
Bursary*
(Donated through the Vancouver Men's Canadian Club)
A bursary of $250, donated by Lauder Mercer and Company
Limited, will be available to assist a male student entering the final
year of the course leading to the degree of Bachelor of Commerce.
The award will be made to a student who has high standing in the
work of the preceding year, and need of financial assistance.
Applications, on forms available at the Registrar's office, must be
received by the Registrar not later than August 15th.
The Pattison Bursaries*
(Donated through the Vancouver Men's Canadian Club)
Two bursaries of $100 each, the gift of Mr. J. W. Pattison, are
available for graduates taking the Professional Course in Social
Work or for undergraduates who intend to enter this field.   The
*See paragraph 1, page 44. Medals, Scholarships, and Prizes 79
awards will be made to students with high scholastic standing and
need of financial assistance. Applications, on forms available at
the Registrar's office, must be submitted to the Registrar by August
15th.
Special Bursaries Fund*
For the Session 1946-47 a Special Bursaries Fund has been made
available by the Board of Governors to enable students to attend
the University who would not otherwise be able to do so. To be
eligible for an award from this fund a student must have attained
at least Second Class standing in the examinations last written, and
must give evidence of need.
Applications, on forms available at the Registrar's office, must be
in the hands of the Registrar not later than August 15th.
LOANS
General Loan Fund
The General Loan Fund is maintained by annual grants made
by the Board of Governors. Its operation is described in paragraph
13 under General Regulations for Medals, Scholarships, Prizes,
Bursaries, and Loans.
The Wheatley Memorial Loan Fund
The Association of Professional Engineers of the Province of
British Columbia has established a loan fund in memory of Edward
Augustus Wheatley, who, as Registrar of the Association during
the years 1921 to 1938, exerted a vital influence on the engineering
profession, not only in this Province but throughout Canada.
The fund is available to engineering pupils of the Association
in attendance at the University, and all applicants for loans must
be recommended by the Dean of the Faculty of Applied Science.
The Roy Graham Memorial Loan Fund
In memory of Roy Graham, M.A.Sc. (Brit. Col.), Ph.D. (Chicago), a loan fund has been established to assist students in the
Faculty of Applied Science. Preference will be given to students
in the First and Second Years of that Faculty. All applicants for
loans must be recommended by the Dean of the Faculty of Applied
Science.
The Canadian Institute of Mining and Metallurgy,
B. C. Division, Fund
This is a fund of $100, given by the Canadian Institute of Mining
and Metallurgy to the University as a trust to be used for loans to
students taking the mining course.
*See paragraph 1, page 44. 80 The University of British Columbia
The Alma Mater Loan Fund
This fund was established by the graduating classes of 1937 as 8
trust to be used for loans to undergraduates who have completed at
least one year at the University and who have attained satisfactory
academic standing. The fund is administered by the University and
distributed by the Joint Faculty Committee on Prizes, Scholarships,
and Bursaries. Applications for assistance under this fund must
be made to the Bursar.
The University Chapter I.O.D.E. Loan Fund
This fund was established by the University Chapter of the
I.O.D.E. to assist women students of the Second, Third, and Fourth
Years. Loans are to be made, on the basis of scholarship and
financial need. Applications for assistance under this fund should
be made to the Bursar.
The T. Sato Loan Fund
This fund has been established by Mr. Tsutae Sato for students
of Second Class standing, or better, in the Third or Fourth Years
in the Faculties of Arts and Science, Agriculture, and Applied
Science, or for students in the Fifth Year of a Double Course. For
such loans the regulations in paragraph 13 of the General Regulations for Medals, Scholarships, Prizes, Bursaries, and Loans are
applicable.
The H. R. MacMillan Loan Fund
Through the generosity of Mr. H. R. MacMillan, a loan fund has
been established to assist students in Forestry. Loans from this
fund are to be repaid within three years from graduation, and until
then no interest will be charged. Assistance to any one student is
limited to $300. Loans will be made on the basis of scholarship and
financial need. Students may obtain application forms and further
details from the Bursar.
Dean of Women's Fund
Through the generosity of several donors a fund has been established to assist women students who are temporarily in financial
need. The fund is intended for use in emergency situations where
limited assistance is required, and is administered by the Dean
of Women. In the Session 1945-46 contributions to the fund were
received from the Alumnae of the University of Toronto (The
Marion McElhanney Memorial Bursary), the Kappa Kappa Gamma
Mother's Club, and the Kappa Kappa Gamma Sorority. Medals, Scholarships, and Prizes 81
SCHOLARSHIPS ANNOUNCED BY
THE UNIVERSITY BUT AWARDED BY
OTHER INSTITUTIONS
The Rhodes Scholarships
A Rhodes Scholarship is tenable at the University of Oxford and
may be held for three years. Since, however, the majority of Rhodes
Scholars obtain standing which enables them to take a degree in
two years, appointments are made for two years in the first instance,
and a Rhodes Scholar will be awarded a third year only if he
presents a definite plan of study for that period satisfactory to
his College and to the Rhodes Trustees.
In special circumstances Rhodes Scholars may be allowed, if the
conditions are approved by their own College and by the Rhodes
Trustees, either to postpone the third year, returning to Oxford
for it after a period of work in their own countries, or to spend
it in graduate work at any university of Great Britain, and in
special cases in other parts of the world (excluding, in the case of
Canadian Rhodes Scholars, Canada or the United States).
The value of a Rhodes Scholarship is £400 a year. At most
Colleges, and for most men, this sum is scarcely sufficient to meet
a Rhodes Scholar's necessary expenses for term-time and vacations,
and Scholars who can afford to supplement it by, say, £50 a year
from their own resources are strongly advised to do so. The cost
of the voyage to and from England must be borne by the Scholar.
A candidate to be eligible must be a male British Subject, with
at least five years' residence, with the intention of permanent residence, in Canada. At the time of application the candidate must
be of such an age that he will have passed his nineteenth and not
have passed his twenty-fifth birthday by October 1st, 1947, and
must be unmarried. He must have completed at least two years
at a Canadian university,
A candidate may apply either in the province of residence or
in the province in which he has attended university.
In the election for 1946 (held in the fall of 1945) certain of the
rules regarding eligibility, viz. age, marriage, were eased for candidates who had been in war service. At the time of the University
Calendar going to press it is not known if the same relaxation will
aPply to the 1947 election, and candidates should make enquiry
from the Registrar at the University or the local Secretary of the
Rhodes Trust.
In that section of the Will in which he defined the general type
of scholar he desired, Mr. Rhodes mentioned four groups of qualities,. 82 The University of British Columbia
the first two of which he considered most important:
1. Literary and scholastic attainments;
2. Qualities of manhood, truth, courage, devotion to duty, syn%
pathy, kindliness, unselfishness, and fellowship;
3. Exhibition of moral force of character and of instincts t«
lead and to take an interest in his fellows;
4. Physical vigour, as shown by fondness for and success iii
outdoor sports.
Some definite quality of distinction, whether in intellect, charac
ter, or personality, or in any combination of these, is the most important requirement for a Rhodes Scholarship, and it is upon this that
Committees will insist. Success in being elected to office in student
organizations may or may not be evidence of leadership in the true
sense of the word. Mr. Rhodes evidently regarded leadership as
consisting in moral courage and in interest in one's fellow men quite
as much as in the more aggressive qualities. Physical vigour is an
essential qualification for a Rhodes Scholarship, but athletic prowess
is of less importance than the moral qualities developed in playing
outdoor games. Poverty does not give a special claim to a Scholarship. The best candidate should be appointed regardless of his
financial circumstances.
Each candidate for a Scholarship is required to make application
by October 31st, 1946, to the Secretary of the Committee of Selection
of the province in which he wishes to compete. Full information
may be obtained from Mr. W. T. Brown, c/o Odium Brown Investments Ltd., 470 Granville Street, Vancouver, B. C.
The Exhibition of  1851   Scholarship*
Under the revised conditions for the award of the Exhibition
of 1851 Scholarship in Science, the University of British Columbia
is included in the list of universities from which nominations for
scholarships allotted to Canada may be made. These scholarships
of £350 per annum are tenable, ordinarily, for two years. Scholarship winners with special needs may receive additional money
grants during the period of their tenure. The scholarships are
granted only to British subjects of not more than 26 years of age
who have already completed a full university course and given
evidence of capacity for scientific investigation. The scholarships
are open to graduates of any university who have spent not less
than three years in the study of science. Detailed information may
be obtained from the Registrar's office.
*See paragraph 1, page 44. Medals, Scholarships, and Prizes 83
Imperial Order Daughters of the Empire War
Memorial Scholarship  (Overseas)*
This fund was established by the I.O.D.E. in order to perpetuate
the memory of the men and women who gave their lives in the
defence of the Empire in the First Great War. Nine graduate
scholarships to the value of $1300 each are offered annually, one in
each province of the Dominion. The conditions under which they
are awarded may be obtained from the Registrar. Applications
must be submitted by October 15th of each year.
Canadian Federation of University Women
Scholarships*
The Travelling Scholarship of the Canadian Federation of
University Women, of the value of $1,250, available for study or
research work, is open to any woman holding a degree from a
Canadian university, who is not more than 35 years of age at the
time of award. In general, preference will be given to those candidates who have completed one or more years of graduate study
and have a definite course of study or research in view. The award
is based on evidence of character, intellectual achievement, and
promise of success in the subject to which the candidate is devoting herself.
The Junior Scholarship of the Canadian Federation of University
Women, of the value of $850, is open to any woman holding a degree
from a Canadian university, who is not more than 25 years of age
at the time of award. Preference will be given to students who have
studied in only one university and who desire to continue their
studies in another.
The proposed place and plan of study or research must be approved by the Scholarship Committee.
Application blanks and further information may be obtained
from the Convener of the Scholarship Committee, Dr. Cecilia
Krieger, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ont. Applications and
recommendations must be received not later than February 1st.
The International Brotherhood of Pulp, Sulphite
and Paper Mill Workers Scholarship
A scholarship of $200, given by the International Brotherhood
of Pulp, Sulphite, and Paper Mill Workers, Local 312, Ocean Falls,
is available annually for a student entering First Year at-the
*See paragraph 1, page 44. 84 Faculty of Arts and Science
University of British Columbia. This scholarship, which is open
to students in Ocean Falls, Powell River, Port Alice, Port Mellon,
and Woodfibre, will be awarded to the applicant obtaining highest
standing in the written examinations in the scholarship subjects
for University Entrance. Application forms and further information may be obtained by writing to the Secretary, Local 312, Ocean
Falls, B. C.
The French Government Scholarship
Scholarships of the present value of 54,000 francs and fees are
donated by the French Government for graduate study in France.
They are tenable for one year and are renewable. The awards are
made by the French Embassy on the recommendation of the Head
of the Department of French in the University.
The Summerland Scholarship*
A scholarship of $250, given by the citizens of Summerland, is
available annually for a student of Summerland High School proceeding to the University of British Columbia, or some other
institution of higher learning in the event that courses of the
winner's choice are not available at the University of British
Columbia. The scholarship will be awarded to the applicant who,
in the opinion of the Summerland selection committee, best
exemplifies the qualities of the all-round student.
Viscount Bennett Trust Fund*
Under the terms of a deed of gift to the Canadian Bar Association
from the Right Honourable Viscount Bennett, P.C, K.C, LL.D.,
D.C.L., Honorary Life President of the Association, a trust fund
known as the Viscount Bennett Trust Fund has been established.
The annual income from the fund or the sum of $1,000, whichever
is less, will be paid annually as a scholarship for graduate study at
an institution of higher learning to be approved by a scholarship
committee. The scholarship is open to a person of either sex who
has graduated from an approved law school in Canada or who, at
the time of application, is pursuing his or her final year of studies
as an undergraduate student. The award is to be made by the
committee at the time of the mid-winter meeting of the Council of
the Association. The Faculty of Law of this University has been
approved by the Committee. Full information as to qualifications
of applicants and the necessary forms may be had on application
to the Registrar.
*9ee paragraph 1, page 44. Medals, Scholarships, and Prizes 85
The Crofton House Alumnae Scholarship*
A scholarship of $175, the gift of the Crofton House Alumnae, is
available annually for a student of Crofton House School who is
proceeding to the University of British Columbia. In making the
award, consideration will be given to scholastic ability, character,
leadership, and participation in the activities of the School. The
winner will be selected by the Headmistress and Staff.
The Imperial Oil Graduate Research Fellowships*
The Imperial Oil Limited has established four research fellowships of the value of $1,000 each, open to graduates of any approved
university in Canada. These fellowships are offered for graduate
work leading to a Master's or Doctor's degree in the fields of
petroleum engineering, petroleum geology, chemistry or chemical
engineering, and mechanical engineering. Applications must be
submitted to the Imperial Oil Scholarship Committee, Imperial Oil
Limited, 56 Church Street, Toronto, not later than June 1st.
Application forms are available at the Registrar's office.
*See paragraph 1, page 44.  THE
FACULTY
OF
ARTS AND SCIENCE
1946-1947  FACULTY OF ARTS AND SCIENCE
The degrees offered in this Faculty are Bachelor of Arts (B.A.),
Bachelor of Commerce (B.Com.), Bachelor of Education (B.Ed.),
Bachelor of Home Economics (B.H.E.), Bachelor of Social Work
(B.S.W.), Master of Arts (M.A), and Master of Social Work
(M.S.W.). _
In addition, a course is provided leading to a Diploma in
Teacher Training.
COURSES LEADING TO THE DEGREE OF B.A.
The degree of B.A. is granted with Honours or as a General
Course degree. A General Course degree will be granted on completion of courses amounting to 60 units chosen in conformity
with Calendar regulations. No distinction is made between General
Course and Honours students in the First and Second Years,
except as regards prerequisites for later work, but in the Third and
Fourth Years there are special requirements for Honours students.
Students holding the degree of B.Com. from this University may
proceed to the degree of B.A. in one year by completing 15
additional units of work open to students in their Third and
Fourth Years, provided that their additional units are chosen so
as to complete the requirements for the B.A. degree.
It is possible to obtain the B.A. and B.Com. degrees concurrently
in six years on completion of 90 units chosen so as to cover the
requirements for both degrees. Students entering Second Year
Commerce not later than September, 1946, may complete the
double course in five years under the old regulation.
Double courses are offered in Arts and Science and Applied
Science leading to the degrees of B.A. and B.A.Sc, and B.A.
and B.A.Sc. (in Nursing), and in Arts and Science and Agriculture leading to the degrees of B.A. and B.S.A. For the regulations governing these, see the section Double Courses at the end
of the Calendar.
Credits obtained at the Summer Session (see University Summer Session) may be combined with Winter Session credits to
complete the 60 units required for the degree of B.A. The degree
of B.A. will not be granted within three years from Senior
Matriculation nor within four years from University Entrance.
The maximum credit for Summer Session work in any one
calendar year is 6 units; and the maximum credit for work other
than that of the regular Summer and Winter Sessions is 3 units
in each academic year, and 15 units in all subsequent to Senior
Matriculation or First Year Arts. 90 Faculty of Aets and  Science
No credit will be granted for work done at other universities
the same academic year in which work has been attempted at th
University, whether in the Summer Session or in the Winter Sessio
or otherwise.  Extra-mural work done at other universities prid
to registration at this University may be accepted, if approved
the Faculty, but may not exceed 3 units in respect of any ob
academic year or 15 units in all subsequent to Senior Matriculatior
If a student is granted credit for extra-mural work taken elsewhere
the number of units which he may take at this University withou
attendance at a Winter or Summer Session will be correspondingly-]
reduced.
Pending the establishment of a department of Music in the
University of British Columbia, six units of undergraduate credit
towards a B.A. degree may be granted for music to a student whd
holds at the time of graduation any one of the following diplomas:
Associate of the Toronto Conservatory of Music (A.T.C.M.), Licentiate of McGill Conservatorium (L.Mus.), Licentiate of the Royal
Schools of Music, London (L.R.S.M.), Licentiate of Trinity College
of Music, London (L.T.C.L.), or an equivalent diploma or certificate from other schools of Music which may be accepted by the
University of British Columbia. If the student's work in music is
done concurrently with the usual University work of the Third and
Fourth Years, the credit will be assigned in the Fourth Year; if a
student enters Third Year University having already acquired the
diploma, the credits will normally be assigned evenly between the
Third and Fourth Years. No credits for music will be granted in
the First and Second Years and no student may get credit for music
until the other requirements for the BA. degree have been satisfied.
Candidates for the degree of B.A. are advised to attend at least
one Winter Session, preferably that of the Fourth Year.
Courses are described in terms of units. A unit normally consists
of one lecture hour (or one continuous laboratory period of not less
than two or more than three hours) each week throughout the
session, or two lecture hours (or equivalent laboratory periods)
throughout a single term.
Note 1. Students in any of the affiliated Theological Colleges
who file with the Registrar a written statement expressing their
intention of graduating in Theology will be allowed to offer in each
year of their Arts course, in place of optional subjects set down in
the Calendar for the year and the course in which they are regis- Courses Leading to the Degree of B.A. 91
tered, Religious Knowledge options, to the extent of three units
taken from the following list: Hebrew, Biblical Literature, New
Testament Greek, Church History, Christian Ethics, and Apologetics.
Note 2. Students intending to enter Normal School are advised
to consult Regulations for Admission to Normal Schools, issued by
the Department of Education, Victoria.
First and Second Years
1. The requirements of the first two years consist of 30 units,
15 of which must be taken in each year. Courses must be chosen in
conformity with the requirements that follow.  Details of courses
are given under the various departments.
*Each student must take: Units
(a) English 100 and 101 in the First Year and English
200 in the Second Year    6
f (b) The first two courses in a language offered for University Entrance, one course in each year    6
(c) Mathematics 100, in the First Year    3
(d) Economics 100 or 200, or History 101, 202, 203, or
304, or Psychology 100 or 101, or Philosophy 100, or
Sociology 200     3
(e) Biology 100, or Chemistry 100, or Geography 101,
or Geology 201 and 202, or Physics 90, or Physics
100      3
(f) Three courses—not already chosen—selected from the
following :
Bacteriology 201, Biology 100, Botany 200, Chemistry 100, Chemistry 200, Chemistry 304 and 305,
Commerce 191 (Economics 205 or Geography
205), Economics 100, Economics 200, Economics
335, French 101, French 202, Geography 101,
Geography 202, Geology 201 and 202, Geology 302
and 303, ^German 90 (Beginners'), German 100
or 101, German 200, JGreek 90 (Beginners'),
Greek 101, Greek 202, Greek A (see Calendar
1935-1936)**, Greek 2 (see Calendar, 1936-
1937)**, Greek 314, Greek 315, History 101,
History 202, History 203, History 304,  JLatin
*For credit that can be given  for Senior Matriculation standing,  complete or
partial, see page 92.
tSee regulations t, 7, and 8.
(See regulations 4, 3, 7, and 8.
"These courses are offered only by Victoria College. 92 Faculty of Arts and Science
90 (Beginners'), Latin 101, Latin 202, Mathematics 200, Mathematics 201, Philosophy 100,
Physics 90, Physics 100, Physics 200, Physics 220,
Psychology 100, Psychology 101, Sociology 200,
Spanish 90 (Beginners'), Spanish 101, Spanish
201, Zoology 200    9
Notes
Bacteriology 201, Botany 200, Commerce 191, Economics 200|
Economics 335, Geography 202, Geology 201 and 202, 302 and 303,
Greek 314, Greek 315, History 304, Philosophy 100, Sociology 200,-
and Zoology 200 are not open to First Year Students.
History 202 is open to First Year students only if they are pre-i
paring for entrance to the Normal School. Geology 201 and 202
are normally Third Year subjects, but may be taken by Second Year
students (full undergraduate and conditioned).
Chemistry 304 and 305 are open to Second Year students providing that the prerequisites have been taken.
Geology 201 and 202 must be taken in the Second Year by
students intending to take the Honours course in Geology. Geography 101 may not be taken for credit along with Geology 201
and 202. Geography 101, however, may be substituted for
Geology 201 and 202 as a prerequisite by the addition of extra
laboratory work to be arranged by the Department of Geology and
Geography.
2. Students who have not presented German or Greek or Latin
or Spanish for University Entrance may fulfil the language requirements for the degree by taking Beginners' German or Beginners'
Greek or Beginners' Latin or Beginners' Spanish (courses numbered 90 in the several departments), to be followed respectively
by German 100 or 101 and German 200 or Greek 101 and Greek 201
or Latin 101 and Latin 202 or Spanish 101 and Spanish 202 to
complete 63 units. The extra three units may be taken in any year.
Students who have completed German III of the high school
course of study, or its equivalent, may fulfil the language requirements by taking German 200 for the First Year and German
300 for the Second Year.
3. Students who offer either French IV, German IV, or Latin IV
of Senior Matriculation under Group 1 of the Optional Courses of
University Entrance may fulfil the language requirements for the
First and Second Years by taking French 200, German 200, or
Latin 202 respectively in either the First or the Second Year. If
the Second Year language is taken in the First Year, a Third Year
course in this language may be taken in the Second Year. First and Second Years 93
4. No student in his First Year may elect more than one beginners'
course in a language, and, except as provided in Sections 7 and 8,
no beginners' course in a language will count towards a degree
unless followed by a second year's work in that language.
5. Except in the case of beginners' courses, no course in a
language may be taken by a student who has not offered that
language for entrance to the University. A beginners' course in
a language may not be taken for credit by a student who has
obtained credit for that language at entrance.
6. A student taking three languages in the first two years (18
units) may defer the course selected under section 1 (e) to the
Third or Fourth Year, and a student taking four science courses
(12 units) may defer the course selected under section 1 (d) to
the Third or Fourth Year.
7. Students offering four science courses (12 units) in the First
and Second Years may fulfil the language requirement indicated
above in section 1 (b) by taking any two of the following:
French 101, French 202; Latin 90 (Beginners'), Latin 101,
Latin 202; German 90 (Beginners'), German 100 or 101, German 200; Greek 90 (Beginners'), Greek 101, Greek 202,
Greek A (see Calendar, 1935-36)*, Greek 2 (see Calendar,
1936-37)*; Spanish 90 (Beginners'), Spanish 101, Spanish 201.
Only one beginners' course may be selected.
8. Students offering six science courses (18 units) in the First
and Second Years may postpone the second course in a language
under section 7 until the Third or Fourth Year.
The science courses in sections 7 and 8 may be selected from the
following:
Bacteriology, Biology, Botany, Chemistry, Geography,
Geology, Physics, Zoology.
Note. Students thinking of entering Applied Science are referred to the list
of subjects required to be taken by them in First Year Arts and to the regulations in reference to these, given under Admission and General Outline of
Courses in Faculty of Applied Science. They are advised to attend the noon
hour talks on the choice of a profession and on the life and work in vocations
likely to appeal to Applied Science graduates.
Third and Fourth Years
The requirements of the Third and Fourth Years consist of 30
units, of which students must take in their Third Year not less
than 15 units. The graduation standing is determined by the results
of the Third and Fourth Years combined.
*These courses are offered only by Victoria College. 94 Faculty of Arts and Science
A.     General Course Curriculum
1. For the General  Course a student must select two majdl
subjects according to either of the following schemes :f
a. A minimum of 9 units in one subject and a minimum of
units in another subject, both subjects to be chosen froq
one of the following groups:
(1) Bacteriology, Biology and Botany, Chemistry, Geo|
raphy, Geology, Mathematics, Physics, Psychology
Zoology.
(2) Economics, Education (not more than six units, chosei|
from Education 509 and Education 510 to 582 inclusive^
and only for those who have completed their Normal
Training), English, French, Geography, German, Gov*
ernment, Greek, History, Latin, Mathematics, Phil*
osophy, Psychology, Sociology, Spanish, Music (6 units).
Or
b. A minimum of 9 units in each of two subjects to be chosen
from the following:
Biology and Botany, Chemistry, English, French, Geography,
German,    Greek,    History,    Latin,    Mathematics,    Physics,
Zoology.
Work in the First or Second Year is required in each of the
major subjects, except in Education, Government, and Music.
In certain cases, however, this requirement may be fulfilled by
taking a First or Second Year course in the Third Year (see
section 3), but a course thus taken may not count towards the
required units for a major.
In addition to the major subjects a minimum of 6 units must
be chosen from some other subject or subjects.
2. Details of courses available in the Third and Fourth Years
are given under the various departments.
3. Only two subjects (6 units) of the First or Second Year
courses may be taken in the combined Third and Fourth Years.
In a number of these courses extra reading will be required of
Third and Fourth Year students.
When two First or Second Year subjects, other than a beginners'
language course or a language course numbered 100-199, are
taken in the Third and Fourth Years, not more than one of these
subjects may be outside the departments in which the student is
doing his major work.
tThose who intend to enter the Teacher Training Course should consult section t,
page 120. Third and Fourth Years 95
For the purpose of this regulation the following subjects are
considered Third and Fourth Year subjects: Botany 200 or
Zoology 200 (if both are taken), Chemistry 304* and 305*, Economics 512, Geography 202, Geology 201 and 202, Geology 302 and
303, German 200 (if preceded by German 90 and German 100 or
101), Greek 202, Greek 314, Greek 315, History 304, Latin 202 (if
preceded by Latin 90 and Latin 101), and Philosophy 100; also the
subjects under 1 (d) or 1 (e) postponed to the Third or Fourth
Year, as provided for under paragraph 6, page 93.
4. No credit will be given for a language course normally taken
in the First Year unless it is taken in the Third Year and continued
in the Fourth Year.
5. Students in the Third and Fourth Years, with the consent
of the departments concerned, may take one or two courses of
private reading (each to count not more than 3 units), provided
that:
a. (1) The candidate for a reading course shall have completed
his First and Second Years and shall have taken at least
6 units either of Second or Third Year work or of Second
and Third Year work in the subject in which the reading
course is taken; and
(2) Shall have made an average of at least Second Class in
the 6 units in question.
b. Both reading courses shall not be chosen in the same subject.
c. A reading course shall not be taken concurrently with Extra-
Sessional or with Summer Session courses except by a student
in the Fourth Year.
Credit for a course of private reading is part of the maximum
of 15 units which may be taken in addition to the regular work of
Winter and Summer Sessions; and no other additional work may
be taken in the same academic year.
B.    Honours Curriculum
1. Students whose proposed scheme of work involves Honours
courses must obtain the consent of the departments concerned and
of the Dean before entering on these courses; and this consent will
normally be granted only to those students who have a clear
academic record at the end of their Second Year with at least
Second Class standing in the subject or subjects of specialization.
(Cards of application for admission to Honours courses may be
obtained at the Registrar's office.)
*See prerequisite for Chemistry 304 and 305. 96 Faculty of Arts and Science
2. Certain departments offer Honours courses either alone or
in combination with other departments. For Honours in a single
department, at least 18 of the requisite 30 units must be taken in
the department concerned, and at least 6 outside it. For Honours
in combined courses, at least 12 units are required in each of two
subjects.   Particulars of these courses are given below.
3. Candidates for Honours, with the consent of the department
concerned, may offer a special reading course (to count not more
than 3 units) in addition to the reading courses offered above under
General Course Curriculum, section 5.
4. All candidates for Honours, at the option of the department
or departments concerned, may be required to present a graduating
essay embodying the results of some investigation that they have
made independently. Credit for the graduating essay will be not
less than 3 or more than 6 units. The latest date for receiving
graduating essays in the Second Term shall be the last day of
lectures; and the corresponding date for the Autumn Congregation
shall be October 1st.
5. Candidates for Honours are required to take at the end of
their Fourth Year a general examination, oral or written, or both,
as the department or departments concerned shall decide. This
examination is designed to test the student's knowledge of his
chosen subject or subjects as a whole, and is in addition to the
ordinary class examinations of the Third and Fourth Years.
6. Honours are of two grades, First Class and Second Class.
Students who, in the opinion of the department concerned, have
not attained a sufficiently high ranking, may be awarded a General
Course degree. If a combined Honours course is taken, First Class
Honours will be given only if both the departments concerned
agree; and an Honours degree will be withheld if either department
refuses a sufficiently high grade.
7. It is hoped to offer the following Honours courses during the
session 1946-47. But if it is found impossible to do so, the University reserves the right to refuse new registrations in any of them.
SINGLE HONOURS COURSES
Bacteriology and Preventive Medicine
Prerequisites: Chemistry 100, Biology 100.
Required Courses: Bacteriology 301; candidates must select the
remaining 15 units required in consultation with the Head of the
Department. Honours Courses 9T
Biology and Botany
Prerequisites: Biology 100, Chemistry 100, Botany 200.
Chemistry 300, Physics 100*, and Zoology 200 are required
before completion of the course and should be taken as early as
possible.
Required Courses: Botany 300, 330, 340, and 315 or 316.
Optional Courses: Biology 301 and 302, Biology 400; courses in
Botany not specifically required; and courses in Zoology. Optional
courses should be selected in consultation with the Department.
Biology and Botany  (Genetics Option)
Prerequisites: Biology 100; Chemistry 100, 300; one of Botany
200, Zoology 200, Biology 310. (Where possible both Botany 100
and Zoology 200 should be taken.)
Course: Biology 300, 301, 302, 303. Six units of more advanced
courses in Biology, Botany, Zoology. Three to six units from
Agronomy 407, 421, 500; Genetics 302, 303; Animal Husbandry
323; Poultry Husbandry 310, 311. Thesis (three units).
Biology and Botany (Physiology Option)
Prerequisites: Biology 100; Botany 200 or Zoology 200 (both
should be taken where possible); Chemistry 300.
Required Courses: Biology 400; Botany 330, 331 (Horticulture
441); problem; thesis.
Optional Courses: At least 9 units from the following: Botany
340; Zoology 300, 303; Chemistry 409, 419; Bacteriology 402;
Agronomy 415; Animal Husbandry 421, 422; Dairying 305;
Poultry Husbandry 410.
Biology and Botany (Plant Pathology Option)
Prerequisites: Biology 100; Botany 200; Zoology 200; Chemistry
100, 300.
Required Courses: Botany 315, 316, 330, 340, 415; Zoology 302,
305; thesis.
Optional Courses: In consultation with the Department, students
in Arts and Science will select at least 8 units from the following:
Agronomy 202, 211; Horticulture 213, 317, 441, 442; Agricultural
Economics 301; Botany 300, 411. Students in Agriculture are
required to select 12 units, from three departments in the Faculty
of Agriculture.
*Or, with the consent of the Department of Biology and Botany, Physics 90. 98 Faculty of Arts and Science
Chemistry
Prerequisites: Chemistry 100 and 200, Physics 100, Mathematics
200.
Course: Chemistry 300, 304, 305, 310, 407, 409, 410, 411.
Classics
Prerequisites: Greek 202, Latin 202.
Course: Greek 310, 410 and Latin 310, 410; any three of Greek
303, 305, 306, 407; any three of Latin 303, 304, 405, 406; and
either Greek 330 or Latin 329.
As proof of ability to write Greek and Latin prose, candidates
must attain not less than Second Class standing in Greek 310, 410
and Latin 310, 410. During the candidate's Fourth Year, papers
will be set in sight translation, and the candidate is advised to
pursue a course of private reading under the supervision of the
Department.
There will also be a general paper on antiquities, literature, and
history.
Economics
Prerequisite: A reading knowledge of French or German.
Course: Economics 100, if not already taken; any 15 further units
in the Department, to include Economics 300, 330 or 400, and 335;
and two from the following group: Economics 305, 310, 320, 325,
405, 435, Government 300, Sociology 200. Also a graduating essay
which will count 3 units. (Tutorial instruction will be arranged
in connection with the essay.)
Students must pass an oral examination, and, if required, address
a general audience on a designated subject.
Attendance at the seminar in Economies is required in the Third
and Fourth Years.
English Language and Literature
Students who intend to take Honours must have the permission
of the Department before beginning the course.
Prerequisites: (1) A First Class or high Second Class in English
200. Ordinarily, special work is required of students who intend to
take Honours. Such work, if required, is announced at the beginning
of the session. (2) A reading knowledge of French or German. The
Department may require candidates to write a paper in translation
at the end of the Fourth Year. Honours Courses 99
Course: English 434 and 435 (involving an examination on the
life, times, and complete works of some major English author),
440, 442 (in the Third Year), 443 (in the Fourth Year), 444 and 445
(the seminars, of which 445 must be attended in both years), and a
graduating essay which will count 3 units.
Candidates will be required to take the following final Honours
examinations on the history of English literature:
1. From the beginning to 1500.
2. From 1500 to 1660.
3. From 1660 to 1780.
4. From 1780 to 1890.
One of these examinations will be oral.
In the award of Honours special importance will be attached to
the graduating essay and to the final Honours examinations.
If the candidate's work outside the Department does not include
a course in English history, he must take an examination in that
subject.
French
Prerequisite: French 202.
Course: French 300, 301, 302 in the Third Year;
French 400, 401, 402 in the Fourth Year.
A graduating essay (in French) which will count 3 units.
Geography
Prerequisites: Geography 101 and Geology 201 and 202. If
possible Geography 202 should be taken in the Second Year.
Course: Fifteen units chosen from Geography 202, 303, 305, 306,
407, 409, and 412. Because of breadth of field encompassed by
Geography, courses in Economies, Geology, History, Mathematics,
Sociology, and the natural sciences may be substituted with the
approval of the Department of Geology and Geography.
Geology
Prerequisites: Geology 201 and 202. If possible, Geology 302 and
303 and Geology 412 should be taken in the Second Year. Chemistry
100 and if possible Physics 100 should be taken in the First Year,
as these are required for Geology 302 and 303, and Geology 407, and
are of great value in Geology 201 and 202. Biology 100 is recommended in the Second Year, as it is prerequisite to Zoology 200,
which should be taken in the Third Year as a valuable preparation
for Geology 406. 100 Faculty of Arts and Science
Course: Eighteen units to be chosen from Geology 304, 305, 40(
407, 408, 409, 410, 411, and 522. If Geology 302 and 303 have nc
been taken in the Second Year they must be taken in the Third Yeai
as they are prerequisite to Geology 407 and 408.
History
Prerequisites: (1) A First Class or high Second Class averagi
in the History course or courses taken in the First and Second Yeart
(2) A reading knowledge of French or German.
Students whose standing in Honours History during the Third
Year is inadequate may, at the discretion of the Department, be
required to discontinue the Honours course.
Course: History 309 and twelve other units which normally must
be chosen from courses offered in the Third and Fourth Years pim
a graduating essay which will count three units. The seminal
(which carries no credit) must be attended in the Third and
Fourth Years.
An Honours paper will be set at the end of the Fourth Year on
the work of the seminar and of the courses studied in the Third and
Fourth Years. There will be an oral examination on the field
covered in the graduating essay.
Latin
Prerequisite: Latin 202.
Course: Latin 303, 304, 329, 405, 406, and Greek 330. The candidate must also take Latin 310 and 410, obtaining at least Second
Class standing. His general knowledge will be tested by papers on
antiquities, literature, and history at the end of the Fourth Year.
Mathematics
Prerequisites: Mathematics 200, Physics 100.
Course: Any 18 units of Mathematics 300, 301, 302, 303, 304,
400, 401, 402, and 403, and Physics 200 and 300. A final Honours
examination, written or oral, is required.
Philosophy
Prerequisites: Philosophy 100, Psychology 101.
Course: Psychology 200 or 500, and 15 units chosen from Philosophy 200, 201, 300, 301, 302, 303, 400, 401, 402, 500. Honours Courses 101
Physics
Prerequisites: Mathematics 200, Physics 100, Chemistry 100.
Course: Mathematics 300, 302, 401; Physics 200 and 300; and 15
additional units. Students are advised to take Chemistry 304 and
305 and Chemistry 310, if possible.
Political Science
Prerequisite: A reading knowledge of French or German.
Course: Economics 100, if not already taken, any 15 further units
in the Department, to include Government 300, Economics 335, and
three from the following group: Sociology 200, 325, Government
325, 400, 425, 430, 435, Economics 300, 305, 310, 320, 325, 330, 400,
435. Also a graduating essay which will count 3 units. (Tutorial
instruction will be arranged in connection with the essay.)
Students must pass an oral examination and, if required, address
a general audience on a designated subject.
Attendance at the seminar in Economics is required in the Third
and Fourth Years.
Psychology
Prerequisites: Psychology 101, Philosophy 100, Biology 100,
Mathematics 200, Physics 90 or 100.
Course: Philosophy 303, and 15 units chosen from Psychology
200, 201, 202, 300, 301, 302, 400, 401, 402, 500.
Sociology
Prerequisite: A reading knowledge of French or German.
Course: A minimum of nine and a maximum of twelve units
selected from Sociology 300, 325, 330, 400, 425, 430, 435 and a
minimum of six and maximum of nine additional units selected
from Economics 100, 300, 310, 320, 325, 330, 335, 435, to a total
of not more than eighteen units.
Students must pass an oral examination and, if required, address
a general audience on a designated subject.
Attendance at the seminar in Economics is required in the Third
and Fourth Years.
Zoology
Prerequisites: Biology 100, Chemistry 100, Zoology 200.
Physics 100*, Botany 200, and Chemistry 200 and 300 are
required before completion of the course and should be taken as
early as possible.
*Or, with the consent of the departments concerned, Physics 90. 102 Faculty of Arts and Science
Required Courses: Zoology 300, 301, 303, 304.
Optional Courses: Zoology 302, 305, 306, 307, 400, 401, 402
courses in Botany; Biology 300, 301, 302, 303, 400; Geology 40#
These optional courses should be selected in consultation with thi
Head of the Department of Zoology.
COMBINED HONOURS COURSES
(a) Any two of:
Bacteriology and  Preventive  Medicine,  Biology  and  Botanf
Chemistry, Geography, Geology, Mathematics, Physics, Zoology,
(b) Any two of:
Economics, English, French, German, History, Latin or Classical
Philosophy, Political Science, Psychology, Sociology.
(c) Other combinations not listed above may be taken with th§
consent of Faculty. '
The requirements in each of these subjects in such combinations
are as follows:
Bacteriology and Preventive Medicine
Prerequisites: Bacteriology 201, Biology 100, Chemistry 100.
Course:- Bacteriology 301, 401, 402, and 403, and a thesis.
Biology and Botany
Prerequisites: Biology 100, Chemistry 100, Botany 200.
Course: Twelve units to be selected in consultation with the
Head of the Department.
Chemistry
Prerequisites: Chemistry 100 and 200, Physics 100, Mathematics
200.
Course: To be arranged in consultation with the Head of the
Department.
Classics
Prerequisites: Greek 202, Latin 202.
Course: Latin 310 and 410; any two of Greek 303, 305, 306, 407;
any two of Latin 303, 304, 405, 406. Honours Courses 103
Economics
Prerequisite: A reading knowledge of French or German.
Economics 100 is not available as an option in Economics to students taking combined Honours courses including either History
416 or History 417.
Course: Twelve units, including Economics 300, 330 or 400, 335,
and Economies 100, if not already taken.
English
Students who intend to take Honours must have the permission
of the Department before beginning the course.
Prerequisites: (1) A First Class or high Second Class in English
200. Ordinarily, special work is required of students who intend to
take Honours. Such work, if required, is announced at the beginning of the session. (2) A reading knowledge of French or German.
The Department may require candidates to write a paper in translation at the end of the Fourth Year.
Course: English 440, 444, 445, and any three of the Englisli
courses specified for the Third and Fourth Years. The seminar
must be attended during both the final years, but credits which
count for the B.A. degree will be given only for the work of the
Fourth Year.
Candidates will be required to take the following final Honours
examinations on the history of English literature:
1. From 1500 to 1660.
2. From 1660 to 1780.
3. From 1780 to 1890.
In the award of Honours special importance will be attached to
these examinations.   One of them may be oral.
French
Prerequisite: French 202.
Course: If the graduating essay is written on a French subject,
French 300 and 302, 400 and 402; otherwise either these courses or
French 300 and 301, 400 and 401.
Courses 301 and 401 are intended primarily for Honours
students and should be taken whenever possible, even if they are
not required to make up the minimum number of units.
Geology
Prerequisites: Geology 201 and 202.
Course: Twelve units to be selected in consultation with the Head
of the Department. 104 Faculty of Arts and Science
Geology and Geography
Prerequisites: Geology 201 and 202 and Geography 202.
Course: Twelve units to be selected in consultation with the
Head of the Department.
German
Prerequisite: A First Class or high Second Class in German 200.
Course: German 300, 302, and any two of 301, 400, 401, 500.
In  addition,  a comprehensive  examination  in  the  history  of
German literature.
History
Prerequisites: (1) First Class or high Second Class average in
the History course or courses taken in the First and Second Years.
(2) A reading knowledge of French or German.
Students whose standing in Honours History during the Third
Year is inadequate may, at the discretion of the Department, be
required to discontinue the Honours course.
Course: History 310 and any nine additional units, of which the
graduating essay, if written in History, will count three units. The
seminar (which carries no credit) must be attended in the Third
■and Fourth Years.
An Honours paper will be set at the end of the Fourth Year on
the work of the seminar and of the courses studied in the Third
and Fourth Years. There will be an oral examination on the field
covered by the graduating essay.
Latin
Prerequisite: Latin 202.
Course: Latin 310 and 410 and any four of 303, 304, 329, 405,
406. In the final year candidates must pass an examination (a)
in sight translation and (b) in Latin literature, history, and antiquities. Private reading under the direction of the Department
is recommended.
Mathematics
Prerequisite: Mathematics 200.
Course: Any twelve units of Mathematics 300, 301, 302, 303,
304, 400, 401, 402, 403.
Philosophy
Prerequisites: Philosophy 100, Psychology 101.
Course: Twelve units chosen from Philosophy 200, 201, 300, 301,
302, 303, 400, 401, 402, 500. Honours Courses 105
Physics
prerequisites: Mathematics 200, Physics 100.
Course: Physics 200, 300, and 303 and four units from the following: Physics 301, 302, 401, 402, and 403.
Political Science
Prerequisite: A reading knowledge of French or German.
Course: Twelve units, including at least six in Government.
Psychology
Prerequisites: Psychology 101, Philosophy 100.
Course: Twelve units chosen from Psychology 200, 201, 202, 300,
301, 302, 400, 401, 402, 500.
Sociology
Prerequisite: A reading knowledge of French or German.
Course: Twelve units selected from Sociology 300, 325, 330, 400,
425, 430, 435.
Zoology
Prerequisites: Chemistry 100 and 200, Biology 100, Zoology 200;.
Course: Zoology 300, 301, 303, and 304.
COURSE LEADING TO THE DEGREE of B.Com.
Students entering the University in the session beginning
September, 1946, and thereafter, who have not completed the
First Year of Arts and Science or its equivalent or who do not hold
an honourable discharge from His Majesty's armed services will
be required to complete a full five years of work as prescribed by
Calendar regulations before being granted the degree of B.Com.
Students who are eligible to enter the Second Year of Commerce in the session 1946-47 as prescribed in the Calendar announcement of 1945-46 or who hold honourable discharge from His
Majesty's armed services will be permitted to proceed to the degree
of B.Com. on completion of courses amounting to 60 units chosen in
conformity with Calendar regulations (i.e. upon completion of four
years of work including First Year Arts and Science or its,
equivalent).
Honours standing will be accorded those students who obtain am
average standing of 80 per cent, in the Fifth Year and 75 per 106 Faculty of Arts and Science
cent, in the Fourth Year, and who do not fail in* any subject taken
in the Fourth and Fifth Years.
For the regulations governing the double course leading to the
degrees of B.A. and B.Com. see the section Double Courses at the
end of the Calendar.
The regulations as to Summer Session credits, number of units
to be taken in any academic year, etc., apply to courses leading to
the degree of B.Com. in the same way as to courses leading to the
degree of B.A.
As the student progresses in his course he will be expected to
do an increasing amount of field work in the business community
available to him. In this way he will learn to work on his own
initiative and will acquire a first hand knowledge of business
practice.
Periodic written reports are an important part of the different
courses, and students are warned that demands upon their time
will be sustained throughout the course.
Students proceeding to the degree of B.Com. are required so
to arrange their courses that they will be registered in Commerce
subjects over a period of at least three years. Any departure from
this regulation must have the approval of the Head of the Department of Commerce and the Dean.
First Year
A course in First Year Arts and Science or the equivalent.
Second Year
The following courses comprising 15 units:
English 200 or 205; Mathematics 201 or 202, or an additional
course in the language taken in the First Year (students who contemplate taking advanced work in Statistics, Economics 435, should
take Mathematics 202); Economics 200; Commerce 191; elective,
3 units, preferably Commerce 251.
Students will not be permitted to register for the Third Year in
Commerce unless they have secured a standing of 60 per cent.
in Economics 200.
In view of the importance which rightly attaches to the capacity
for adequate and clear expression in writing, Regulation 12, on
page 127 of the Calendar, will be rigidly enforced at the end of
the Second Year, and reasonahle legibility in handwriting will be
insisted upon Coi'RSK Leading to the Degree of B.Com. 107
Third Year
The following courses comprising 15 units:
Economics 300; Economics 335, or a third course in the language
elected in the Second Year; Commerce 261; Commerce 251, if not
already taken; electives, three or six units to be chosen from the
elective list in consultation with the Head of the Department and
the Dean.
Fourth Year
The following courses comprising 15 units:
Economics 310, if not already taken; Commerce 391; Commerce
371; two courses, not already chosen, to be selected from the elective
list in consultation with the Department. Students who select the
language option will be required to take in the Fourth Year an
additional course in the language selected.
Students in the Fourth Year should not under any circumstances plan to carry more than the prescribed fifteen units of
work. If for any reason they do not enter the Fourth Year with
a complete Third Year they must expect to attend an extra year
in order to satisfy the requirements of graduation.
Electives for Third and Fourth Years: Commerce 356, 381, 457,
466, 467; Economics 320, 325, 405, 435; Agricultural Economics 301,
400; English, 3 units; Government 300, 400, 425, 430; language, 6
units; Mathematics 201, 202; Mining, 3 units; Philosophy 401;
Psychology 101, 201, or 300.
Fifth Year
The details of courses to be taken in the Fifth Year will be
announced in subsequent issues of the Calendar.
COURSE LEADING TO THE DEGREE OF B.H.E.
First and Second Years
Courses must be chosen in conformity with the following requirements. Units
(1)  Required course  24
(a) English 100 and 101 in the First Year ._    3
(b) Chemistry 100 in the First Year     3
(c) Chemistry 225  :     3: 108 Faculty of Arts and Science
(d) Biology  100
(e) Physics 90 or Physics 100 or Physics 110     3
(f) Home Economics 90 (First Term)    V/2
Required only if the student does not have credit
in Home Economics (A) III or Home Economics
(CC) III or equivalent.
(g) Home Economics 91   (Second Term)    iy2
Required only if the student does not have credit
in Home Economics (B) III or Home Economics
(CC) III or equivalent.
(h) Home Economics 100 (First Term)    \y2
(i) Home Economics 101 (Second Term)    V/2
(j) Home Economics 200 (First Term)    V/2
(k) Home Economics 201 (Second Term)    iy2
(2)  Three courses from the following:
Agriculture 100, Bacteriology 201, Botany 200, Commerce 191, Economics 200 or Economics 100, English
200 or English