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The University of British Columbia Calendar Aug 30, 1934

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CALENDAR
TWENTIETH   SESSION
1934-1935
VANCOUVER,   BRITISH   COLUMBIA
1934
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CALENDAR
TWENTIETH   SESSION
1934-1935
VANCOUVER,   BRITISH  COLUMBIA
1934  CONTENTS
Page
Academic  Year    5
Visitor     7
Chancellor     7
President  7
The Board of Governors  7
The  Senate  7
Officers  and  Staff  9
Historical Sketch  17
The Constitution of the University  19
Location and Buildings  20
Endowments  and  Donations  22
General  Information    24
Admission to the University  27
Registration and  Attendance  29
Fees   32
Medals, Scholarships, Prizes, Bursaries and Loans  37
Faculty of Arts and Science
Time Table of Lectures  52
Time Table of Supplemental Examinations  56
Regulations in Reference to Courses—•
Courses Leading to the Degree of B.A  57
Courses Leading to the Degree of B.Com.  68
Courses Leading to the Degree of M.A  71
Teacher Training Course  77
Courses Leading to the Social Service Diploma  78
Examinations' and  Advancement _  79
Courses of Instruction—
Department of Bacteriology  81
"    Botany   82
"   Chemistry     87
"    Classics     91
"           "    Economics, Political Science, Commerce and Sociology 94
"    Education     102
"    English    -  103
"           "   Geology  and  Geography  107
"    History  Ill
"    Mathematics  115
"            "    Modern Languages    118
"    Philosophy     122
"    Physics      124
"    Zoology     128
Faculty of Applied Science
Foreword     133
Regulations' in Reference to Courses  134
General Outline of Courses  137
Courses in-
Chemical  Engineering    139
Chemistry      1*1 The University of British Columbia
Page
Civil  Engineering    142
Electrical Engineering   144
Forest Engineering   145
Geological Engineering   147
Mechanical  Engineering   149
Metallurgical Engineering  150, 151
Mining Engineering  150, 152
Nursing and Health 153
Double Courses for the Degrees of B.A. and B.Sc.  160
Courses Leading to the Degree of M.A.Sc.  162
Examinations  and  Advancement  163
Courses' of Instruction—
Department of Botany  165
" Chemistry     167
" " Civil Engineering  170
" Economics   179
" Forestry     179
" " Geology and Geography  184
" " Mathematics  187
" " Mechanical and Electrical Engineering  188
" " Mining and Metallurgy  197
" " Physics     200
" " Nursing and Health  201
" " Zoology     205
Faculty of Agriculture
Time Table of Lectures  208
Regulations in Reference to Courses—
For the B.S.A. Degree  210
The Occupational Course  211
Short Courses   211
Extension Courses   211
Graduate   Work    211, 213
Examinations   and   Advancement  214
Courses of Instruction—
Department of Agronomy  216
" "    Animal  Husbandry   218
"   Dairying     219
" "    Horticulture   220
" "    Poultry Husbandry   222
List of Students in Attendance, Session 1933-34  227
Degrees Conferred, 1933  243
Medals, Scholarships and Prizes Awarded, 1933  252
University Summer Session  257
Canadian Officers' Training Corps  259
Student Organization   261
Inter-University Exchange  of  Undergraduates  265
Affiliated Colleges—
Victoria College   266
Union College of British Columbia  267
The Anglican Theological College of British Columbia  267 Academic Year
August
27th Monday
31st Friday
September
1st Saturday
3rd Monday
12th Wednesday
to
19th Wednesday
18th Tuesday
19th Wednesday
21st Friday
24th Monday
25th Tuesday
26th Wednesday
October
1st Monday
8th Monday
10th Wednesday
10th Wednesday
12th Friday
13th Saturday
17th Wednesday
24th Wednesday
26th Friday
November
llth Sunday
December
* 7th Friday
*10th Monday to \
*20th Thursday   )
12th Wednesday
14th Friday
19th Wednesday
25th Tuesday
ACADEMIC YEAR
1934
Matriculation Supplemental Examinations begin.
Last day for submission of applications for admission to the First Year and to the Teacher
Training Course.
ACADEMIC YEAR begins'.
Labour Day, University closed, September lst-3rd,
inclusive.
Supplemental Examinations in Arts.
Supplemental Examinations in Applied Science
begin.
Last day for Registration of First Year Students
in the Faculties of Arts and Science, and Agriculture.    (See August 31, above.)
Last day for Registration of all other undergraduates except students' in Extra-Sessional
Classes.
All students entering the University for the first
time report at 2 p.m. in the Auditorium.
The opening addresses to the students of all the
Faculties at 3 p.m. in the Auditorium.
Lectures begin at 9 a.m.
Last day for Registration of Graduate Students'
and of Students in Extra-Sessional Classes.
Last day for payment of First Term fees. Payment of first instalment of Scholarship money.
Thanksgiving Day.    University closed.
Last day for payment of fees for Autumn Graduation.
Meeting of the Faculty of Arts and Science.
Meeting of the Faculty of Agriculture.
Last day for change in Students' courses.
Meeting of the Senate.
Congregation.
Meeting of the Faculty Council.
Remembrance Day.
Last day of Lectures for Term.
Examinations.
Meeting of the Faculty of Arts and Science.
Meeting of the Faculty of Agriculture.
Meeting of the Senate.
Christmas Day.    University closed December 25th
and 26th.
•These dates are subject to change. The University of British Columbia
January
1st Tuesday
3rd Thursday
7th Monday
21st Monday
February
13th Wednesday
15th Friday
20th Wednesday
22nd Friday
April
llth Thursday
llth Thursday
13th Saturday to
27th Saturday
19th Friday
25th Thursday
May
■ 6th Monday
6th Monday
8th Wednesday
9th Thursday
9th Thursday
24th Friday
June
3rd Monday
10th to 29th
July
1st Monday
2nd Tuesday
August
17th Saturday
23rd Friday
23rd Friday
31st Saturday
1935
New Year's Day. University closed January 1st
and 2nd.
Meeting of the Faculty of Agriculture.
Second Term begins.
Last day for payment of Second Term fees. Payment of second instalment of Scholarship money.
Meeting of the Faculty of Arts and Science.
Meeting of the Faculty of Agriculture.
Meeting of the Senate.
Meeting of the Faculty Council.
Last day of Lectures.
Last day for handing in graduation essays  and
theses.
Sessional Examinations'.
Field work in Applied Science begins immediately
at the close of the examinations.
Good Friday.    University closed April 19th-22nd
inclusive.
Last day for payment of Graduation fees.
Meeting of the Faculty of Arts and Science.
Meeting of the Faculty of Agriculture.
Meeting of the Senate.
Congregation.
Meeting of Convocation.
Victoria Day.    University closed.
King's Birthday.    University closed.
Junior   and   Senior   Matriculation   Examinations.
(Time-tables to be arranged.)
Dominion Day.    University closed.
Summer Session begins.
Summer Session ends.
Meeting of the Faculty of Arts and Science.
Meeting of the Senate.
ACADEMIC YEAR ends. THE UNIVERSITY OF BRITISH COLUMBIA
VISITOR
The Hon. J. W. Fordham Johnson, Lieutenant-Governor of
British Columbia.
CHANCELLOR
R, E. McKechnie, Esq., M.D, CM., LL.D., F.A.C.S., F.R.C.S.
(Can.)
PRESIDENT
L. S. Klinck, Esq., M.S.A, D.Sc, LL.D.,Officier de l'Instruction
Publique.
BOARD OF GOVERNORS
R. E. McKechnie, Esq., M.D., CM., LL.D., F.A.C.S., F.R.C.S.
(Can.)  (ex officio), (Chairman).
L. S. Klinck, Esq., M.S.A., D.Sc, LL.D., Officier de l'Instruction
Publique. (ex officio.)
The Hon. Mr. Justice Denis Murphy, B.A., Vancouver. Term
expires 1935.
Mrs. Maude M. Welsh, New Westminster.   Term expires 1935.
Frank P. Patterson, Esq., M.D., CM., F.R.CS.E, F.A.C.S., Vancouver.    Term expires 1935.
Robie L. Reid, Esq., K.C, Vancouver.   Term expires 1937.
Christopher Spencer, Esq., Vancouver.   Term expires 1937.
Francis James Burd, Esq., Vancouver.   Term expires 1937.
His Honour Joseph N. Ellis, B.C.L., K.C, Vancouver. Term expires 1939.
B. C Nicholas, Esq., Victoria.   Term expires 1939.
W. H. Malkin, Esq., Vancouver.   Term expires 1939.
SENATE
(a) The Minister of Education, The Honourable George M. Weir,
M.A., D.Paed.
The Chancellor, R. E. McKechnie, Esq., M.D., CM., LL.D.,
F.A.C.S., F.R.C.S. (Can.)
The President (Chairman), L. S. Klinck, Esq., M.S.A., D.Sc,
LL.D., Officier de l'Instruction Publique.
(b) Dean of the Faculty of Agriculture, F. M. Clement, Esq.,
B.S.A., M.A.
Dean of the Faculty of Applied Scienee, Reginald W. Brock,
Esq., M.A., LL.D., F.G.S, F.R.S.C The University of British Columbia
Dean of the Faculty of Arts and Science, Daniel Buchanan,
Esq, M.A, Ph.D, LL.D, F.R.S.C.
Representatives of the Faculty of Agriculture: E. A. Lloyd,
Esq, M.S.A.; G. G. Moe, Esq, B.S.A, M.Sc, Ph.D.
Representatives of the  Faculty  of Applied Science:  F. A.
Wilkin, Esq, BA.Sc; H. F. G. Letson, Esq, M.C, B.Sc,.
Ph.D.Engineering, A.M.I. Mech. E.
Representatives of the Faculty of Arts and Science: Henry F.
Angus, Esq, MA, B.C.L.; Andrew H. Hutchinson, Esq,
M.A, Ph.D, F.R.S.C.
(c) Appointed by the Lieutenant-Governor in Council:—
J. Newton Harvey, Esq, Vancouver.
H. C Holmes, Esq, B.A, Victoria.
H. N. MacCorkindale, Esq, BA, Vancouver.
(d) The Superintendent of Education, S. J. Willis, Esq, B.A,
LL.D.
The Principal of Vancouver Normal School, D. M. Robinson,
Esq, B.A.
The Principal of Victoria Normal School, V. L. Denton, Esq,
B.A.
(e) Representative of High School Principals and Assistants, G.
W. Clark, Esq, M.A.
(/) Representatives of Affiliated Colleges:—
Victoria College, Victoria, P. H. Elliott, Esq, M.Sc.
Union College of British Columbia, Vancouver, (Theological), Rev. J. G. Brown, M.A, D.D.
The  Anglican  Theological  College of  British   Columbia,
Vancouver, Rev. W. H. Vance, M.A, D.D.
(g) Elected by Convocation:—
H. T. Logan, Esq, M.A, Vancouver.
G. G. Sedgewick, Esq, B.A, Ph.D, Vancouver.
His Honour F. W. Howay, LL.B, LL.D, F.R.S.C, New
Westminster.
Miss M. L. Bollert, M.A, A.M, Vancouver.
Sherwood Lett, Esq, B.A, Vancouver.
Miss A. B. Jamieson, B.A, Vancouver.
A. E. Lord, Esq, B.A, Vancouver.
The Most Rev. A. U. de Pencier, M.A, D.D, Vancouver.
John C Oliver, Esq, B.A, B.A. Sc, Vancouver.
P. A. Boving, Esq, Cand. Ph., Cand. Agr, Vancouver.
His Honour J. D. Swanson, B.A, Kamloops.
C. Killam, Esq, M.A, LL.D, D.CL, Vancouver.
Mrs. Evlyn F. Farris, M.A, LL.D, Vancouver.
Sydney Anderson, Esq, B.A.Sc, Vancouver.
Miss Isobel Harvey, M.A, Vancouver. Officers and Staff
OFFICERS AND STAFF
L. S. Klinck, B.S.A. (Toronto), M.S.A, D.Sc. (Iowa State College),.LL.D. (Western Ontario), Officier de l'Instruction Publique, President.
Daniel Buchanan, M.A. (McMaster), Ph.D. (Chicago), LL.D.
(McMaster), F.R.S.C, Dean of the Faculty of Arts and Science.
Reginald W. Brock, M.A, LL.D. (Queen's), LL.D. (Hong Kong),
F.G.S, F.R.S.C, Dean of the Faculty of Applied Science.
F. M. Clement, B.S.A. (Toronto), M.A. (Wisconsin), Dean of the
Faculty of Agriculture.
Miss ML. Bollert, M.A. (Toronto), A.M. (Columbia), Dean: of
Women.
Daniel Buchanan, M.A. (McMaster), Ph.D. (Chicago), LL.D.
(McMaster), F.R.S.C, Director of the Summer Session.
Stanley W. Mathews, M.A. (Queen's), Registrar.
Miss E. B. Abernethy, B.A. (Brit. Col.), Assistant Registrar.
F. Dallas, Bursar.
John Ridington, Librarian.
FACULTY COUNCIL
The President  (Chairman), L. S. Klinck, Esq, M.S.A, D.Sc,
LL.D, Officier de l'Instruction Publique.
Dean of the Faculty of Agriculture, F. M. Clement, Esq, B.S;A,
M.A.
Dean of the Faculty of Applied Science, Reginald W. Brock, Esq,
M.A, LL.D, F.G.S, F.R.S.C.
Dean of the Faculty of Arts and Science, Daniel Buchanan, Esq,
M.A, Ph.D, LL.D, F.R.S.C.
Representative of the Faculty of Agriculture, P. A. Boving, Esq,
Cand. Ph., Cand. Agr.
Representative of the Faculty of Applied Science, H. N. Thomson,
Esq, B.Sc.
Representative of the Faculty of Arts and Science, L. F. Robertson, Esq, M.A.
Emeritus Professors
George E. Robinson, B.A. (Dal.), Emeritus Professor of Mathematics.
James Henderson, M.A. (Glasgow), Emeritus Professor of Philosophy.
Department of Agronomy
G. G. Moe, B.S.A, M.Sc. (McGill), Ph.D. (Cornell), Professor and
Head of the Department.
P. A. Boving, Cand. Ph.  (Malmo, Sweden), Cand. Agr.  (Alnarp,
Agriculture, Sweden), Professor.
D. G. Laird, B.S.A. (Toronto), M.S., Ph.D. (Wisconsin), Associate
Professor. 10 The University of British Columbia
Department of Animal Husbandry
H. M. King, B.S.A.  (Toronto), M.S.  (Oregon Agricultural College), Professor and Head of the Department.
Rolfe Forsyth, M.S.A. (Brit. Col.), Assistant.
Department of Bacteriology
Hibbert Winslow Hill, M.B, M.D, D.P.H. (Toronto), LL.D.
(Western Ontario), L.M.C.C, Professor and Head of the
Department.    (On leave of absence.)
D. 0. B. Duff, M.A, Ph.D. (Toronto), Assistant Professor.
Miss Helen M. Mathews, M.A. (Brit. Col.), Instructor.
Department of Botany
Andrew H. Hutchinson, M.A. (McMaster), Ph.D. (Chicago),
F.R.S.C, Professor and Head of the Department.
Frank Dickson, B.A. (Queen's), Ph.D. (Cornell), Associate Professor.
John Davidson, F.L.S, F.B.S.E, Associate Professor.
Miss E. M. R. Ashton, B.Sc. (London), M.A. (Brit. CoL), Assistant.
Edgar Black, B.A. (Brandon Col.), Assistant.
Miss Norah Hughes, M.A. (Brit. Col.), Assistant.
Miss E. Halley, B.A. (Brit. CoL), Assistant.
Department of Chemistry
Robert H. Clark, M.A. (Toronto), Ph.D. (Leipzig), F.R.S.C,
Professor and Head of the Department.
E. H. Archibald, B.Sc. (Dal.), A.M, Ph.D. (Harvard), F.R.-
S.E.&C, Professor of Analytical Chemistry.
W. F. Seyer, B.A, M.Sc (Alberta), Ph.D. (McGill), Associate
Professor.
M. J. Marshall, M.Sc. (McGill), Ph.D. (Mass. Inst, of Technology), Associate Professor.
William Ure, M.A.Sc (Brit. CoL), Ph.D. (Cal. Inst, of Technology), Assistant Professor.
Ralph G. D. Moore, B.A. (Brit. CoL), Assistant.
Allan Bell, B.A. (Brit. CoL), Assistant.
Lisle Hodnett, M.A.Sc. (Brit. CoL), Assistant.
Norman Phillips, B.A. (Brit. CoL), Assistant.
Munro McArthur, B.A. (Brit. CoL), Assistant.
F. Arthur DeLisle, B.A. (Brit. CoL), Assistant. Officers and Staff 11
Department of Civil Engineering
 Professor and Head of the Department.
F. A. Wilkin, B.A.Sc. (McGill), Assistant Professor and Acting
Head of the Department.
E. G. Matheson, B.A.Sc. (McGill), M.E.I.C, M.Am.S.CE, Associate Professor.
Allan H. Finlay, B.A.Sc.  (Brit. Col.) M.S. in CE.  (Illinois),
Assistant Professor.
A. Lighthall, B.Sc. (McGill), Assistant Professor.
Edward S. Pretious, B.A.Sc. (Brit. CoL), Instructor.
Archie Peebles, B.A.Sc. (Brit. CoL), Instructor.
Alexander Hrennikoff, M.A.Sc. (Brit. Col), Instructor.
Department of Classics
Lemuel Robertson, M.A. (McGill), Professor and Head of the Department.
O. J. Todd, Ph.D. (Harvard), Professor.
H. T. Logan, M.C, B.A. (McGill), M.A. (Oxon), Professor.
Department of Dairying
 Professor and Head of the Department.
Blythe Eagles, B.A. (Brit. Col), Ph.D. (Toronto), Associate Professor and Acting Head of the Department.
Department of Economics, Political Science, Commerce
and Sociology
Henry F. Angus, B.A. (McGill), B.C.L, M.A. (Oxon.), Professor
and Head of the Department.
W. A. Cabrothers, B.A. (Manitoba), Ph.D. (Edinburgh), D.F.C,
Professor.    (On leave of absence.)
J. Friend Day, B.A. (Toronto), M.A. (Chicago), Associate Professor of Economics and Commerce.
Coral Wesley Topping, B.A. (Queen's), S.T.D. (Wesleyan Theol.
College), A.M, Ph.D. (Columbia), Associate Professor of Economics and Sociology.
G. F. Drummond, M.A. (St. Andrew's), M.Sc. (Econ.), (London),
Associate Professor.
Frederick Field, C.A., Lecturer in Accountancy.
F. K. Collins, Lecturer in Commercial Law.
Reginald H. Tupper, Lecturer in Commercial Law.
W. H. Taylor, B.A. (Brit. CoL), Lecturer in Economics.
Gordon W. Stead, B.Com, B.A. (Brit. CoL), Assistant. 12 The University of British Columbia
Department of Education
George M. Weir, B.A. (McGill), M.A. (Sask.), D.Paed. (Queen's).
Professor and Head of the Department.   (On leave of absence.)
Daniel Buchanan, M.A. (McMaster), Ph.D. (Chicago), LL.D.
(McMaster), F.R.S.C, Acting Head of the Department.
Mrs. Jennie Wyman Pilcher, B.A, M.Sc (New Zealand), A.M,
Ph.D. (Stanford), Associate Professor of Psychology and Education.
William G. Black, B.A. (Brit. CoL), M.A. (Chicago), Associate
Professor.
C. B. Wood, A.M. (Columbia), Lecturer.
Department of English
G. G. Sedgewick, BA.  (Dal.), Ph.D.  (Harvard), Professor and
Head of the Department.
W. L.  MacDonald,  B.A.   (Toronto),   M.A.   (Wisconsin),   Ph.D.
(Harvard), Professor.
Frederick G. C Wood, B.A. (McGill), A.M. (Harvard), Associate
Professor.
Thorleif Larsen, M.A. (Toronto), B.A. (Oxon.), F.R.S.C, Asso-
Francis Cox Walker, B.A.   (U.N.B.), A.M, Ph.D.   (Harvard),
Associate Professor.
Miss M. L. Bollert, M.A. (Toronto), A.M. (Columbia), Assistant
Professor.
Hunter Campbell Lewis, M.A. (Brit. CoL), Assistant Professor.
(On leave of absence.)
Mrs. H. C Lewis, M.A. (Brit. CoL), Instructor.
Miss Dorothy Blakey, M.A.  (Brit. CoL), Assistant.
Geoffrey Riddehough, B.A. (Brit. CoL), Assistant.
Department of Forestry
 Professor and Head of the Department.
F. Malcolm Knapp, B.S.F. (Syracuse), M.S.F. (Wash.), Assistant
Professor, Acting Head of the Department.
George S. Allen, B.A.Sc. (Brit. CoL), Assistant.
R. M. Brown, B.Sc.F.   (Toronto), Honorary Lecturer in Forest
Products.
William Byers, Honorary Lecturer.
Edward W. Bassett, B.A.Sc.  (Brit. CoL), Honorary Lecturer.
Department of Geology and Geography
R. W. Brock, M.A, LL.D. (Queen's), LL.D. (Hong Kong), F.G.S,
F.R.S.C, Professor and Head of the Department.
S. J. Schofield, M.A, B.Sc. (Queen's), Ph.D. (Mass. Institute of Officers and Staff 13
Technology),  F.G.S.A, F.R.S.C,  Professor of  Physical and
Structural Geology.
M.   Y.   Williams,   B.Sc.   (Queen's),   Ph.D.    (Yale),   F.G.S.A.,
F.R.S.C, Professor of Palaeontology and Stratigraphy.
H. V. Warren, B.A, B.A.Sc (Brit. CoL), B.Sc, D.Phil. (Oxon.),
Lecturer in Mineralogy and Petrography.
Department of History
W. N. Sage, B.A. (Toronto), M.A. (Oxon.), Ph.D. (Toronto),
F.R. Hist. S, Professor and Head of the Department.
F. H. Soward, B.A. (Toronto), B.Litt. (Oxon.),- Associate Professor.
A. C. Cooke, B.A. (Manitoba), M.A. (Oxon.), Assistant Professor.
Department of Horticulture
F. M. Clement, B.S.A. (Toronto), M.A. (Wisconsin), Professor
and Head of the Department.
A. F. Barss, A.B. (Rochester), B.S. in Agr. (Cornell), M.S. (Oregon Agricultural College), Ph.D. (Chicago), Professor.
G. H. Harris, B.S.A. (Brit. CoL), M.S. (Oregon State College),
Ph.D. (California), Assistant Professor.
Frank E. Buck, B.S.A. (McGill), Lecturer.
Department of Mathematics
Daniel Buchanan,  M.A.   (McMaster),  Ph.D.   (Chicago), LL.D.
(McMaster), F.R.S.C, Professor and Head of the Department.
F. S. Nowlan, B.A. (Acadia), A.M. (Harvard), Ph.D. (Chicago),
Professor.
E. E. Jordan, M.A. (Dal.), Associate Professor.
L. Richardson, B.Sc. (London), Associate Professor.
Walter H. Gage, M.A. (Brit. CoL), Assistant Professor.
Frederick J. Brand, B.A. (Brit. CoL), B.Sc. (Oxon.), Assistant
Professor.
Miss May L. Barclay, M.A. (Brit. CoL), Assistant.
Department of Mechanical and Electrical Engineering
Herbert Vickers, M.E. (Liverpool), M.Sc, Ph.D. (Birmingham),
Professor and Head of the Department.    (On leave of absence.)
H. F. G. Letson, M.C, B.Sc. (Brit. CoL), Ph.D.Engineering
(London), A.M.I. Mech. E, Associate Professor of Mechanical
and Electrical Engineering and Acting Head of the Department.
F. Creedy,  M.I.E.E,  A.C.G.I,  Professor.     (Substitute  for Dr.
F. W. Vernon, B.Sc. Eng. (London), Wh.Sch, AM.I.Mech.E,
A.F.R.A.S, Associate Professor of Mechanical Engineering.
E. Geoffrey Cullwick, M.A. (Cantab.), A.M.I.E.E, Mem.A.I.
E.E, Assistant Professor of Electrical Engineering. 14 The University of British Columbia
W. B. Coulthard, B.Sc. (London), Assistant Professor of Electrical Engineering.
John F. Bell, Eng. Capt. O.B.E, R.N, M.E.I.C, Lecturer in
Mechanical Engineering.
R. Rolleston West, D.S.O, B.A. (Cantab.), A.M.I.CE. (England), Lecturer in Mechanical Engineering.
Walter J. Lind, B.A.Sc. (Brit, CoL), Assistant.
Department of Mining and Metallurgy
J. M. Turnbull, B.A.Sc. (McGill), Professor and Head of the Department.
H. N. Thomson, B.Sc (McGill), Professor of Metallurgy.
George A. Gillies, M.Sc. (McGill), Associate Professor of Mining.
W. B. Bishop, Assistant in Metallurgy.
Department of Modern Languages
 Professor and Head of the Department.
David Owen Evans, M.A, D.Phil. (Oxon.), D.Lett. (Univ. of
Paris), Professor of French, and Acting Head of the Department.
A. F. B. Clark, B.A. (Toronto), Ph.D. (Harvard), Professor of
French.
Miss Isabel MacInnes, M.A. (Queen's), Ph.D. (California), Associate Professor of German.
Miss Janet T. Greig, B.A. (Queen's), M.A. (Brit. CoL), Officier
d'Academie (France), Assistant Professor of French.
Miss Joyce Hallamore, M.A. (Brit. CoL), Ph.D. (Munich), Instructor in German.
Miss Wessie Tipping, M.A. (Brit. CoL), D. (Univ. Paris), Instructor in French.
Miss Dorothy Dallas, M.A. (Brit, CoL), D. (Univ. Paris), Instructor in French.
Madame G. Barry, Instructor.
Madame D. Darlington, Instructor.
Department of Nursing and Health
Hibbert Winslow Hill, M.B, M.D, D.P.H. (Toronto), LL.D.
(Western Ontario), L.M.C.C, Professor and Head of the Department.    (On leave of absence.)
Miss Mabel F. Gray, R.N, Cert.P.H.N. (Simmons College), Assistant Professor of Nursing.
Miss Margaret E. Kerr, R.N, B.A.Sc Nursing (Brit. CoL), M.A.
(Columbia), Instructor.
G. F. Amyot, M.D, D.P.H. (Toronto), L.M.C.C, Lecturer in Preventable Diseases, and Epidemiology.
J. W. McIntosh, B.A, M.B, D.P.H. (Toronto), L.M.C.C, Lecturer in Public Health. Officers and Staff 15
Department of Philosophy
H. T. J. Coleman, B.A. (Toronto), Ph.D. (Columbia), Professor
and Head of the Department.
Mrs. Jennie Wyman Pilcher, B.A, M.Sc. (New Zealand), A.M,
Ph.D. (Stanford), Associate Professor of Psychology and Education.
Coral Wesley Topping, B.A. (Queen's), S.T.D. (Wesleyan Theol.
College), A.M., Ph.D. (Columbia), Special Lecturer.
Department of Physics
T. C Hebb, M.A, B.Sc. (Dal.), Ph.D. (Chicago), Professor and
Head of the Department.
A. E. Hennings, M.A. (Lake Forest College, 111.), Ph.D. (Chicago), Professor.
J. G. Davidson, B.A. (Toronto), Ph.D. (Calif.), Associate Professor.
Gordon Merritt Shrum, M.A, Ph.D. (Toronto), Associate Professor.
Rognvald T. Hamilton, B.A.Sc (Brit. CoL), Assistant.
Patrick D. McTaggart-Cowan, B.A. (Brit. CoL), Assistant.
Donald K. Coles, B.A. (Brit. CoL), Assistant.
Gordon C Danielson, B.A. (Brit. CoL), Assistant.
Thomas G. How, B.A. (Brit. CoL), Assistant.
Department of Poultry Husbandry
E. A. Lloyd, B.S.A. (Sask.), M.S.A. (Washington State College),.
Professor and Head of the Department.
Department of Zoology
C. McLean Fraser, M.A. (Toronto), Ph.D. (Iowa), F.R.C.S, Professor and Head of the Department.
G. J. Spencer, B.S.A. (Toronto), M.S. (Illinois), Assistant Professor.
Miss Gertrude M. Smith, M.A. (Brit. CoL), Ph.D. (Calif.),
Assistant Professor.
Harold White, M.D, C.M. (McGill), M.D, CM. (ad eundem
Sask.), D.P.H. (Toronto), L.M.C Gr. Brit, L.M.C.C, Medical
Examiner to Students.
Mrs. C A. Lucas, R.N, Public Health Nurse.  THE UNIVERSITY OF BRITISH COLUMBIA
HISTORICAL SKETCH
The creation of a University in British Columbia was first
advocated by Superintendent Jessop in 1877, but it was not until
1890 that the Provincial Legislature passed an Act establishing
a body politic and corporate named "The University of British
Columbia.' In 1891 this Act was amended to require that a
meeting of the Senate be held within one month after the election
of the Senators by Convocation. The Senators were elected, but
a quorum did not assemble on the date fixed by the Chancellor,
Dr. I. W. Powell, of Victoria. Thus the first attempt to establish
a University in British Columbia failed.
However, some of the work normally done in a University was
begun in 1894, when an Act was passed which permitted the
affiliation of high schools in the Province with recognized Canadian
Universities. In 1899 Vancouver High School was affiliated with
McGill University in order to provide First Year work in Arts,
and took the name of Vancouver College. First Year work in Arts
was offered by Victoria High School when it became Victoria
College by affiliation with McGill University in 1902. In the same
year Vancouver College undertook the Second Year in Arts.
In 1906 an Act was passed incorporating the Royal Institution
for the Advancement of Learning of British Columbia, which, in
the same year, established at Vancouver the McGill University
College of British Columbia. The scope of the work undertaken
by this college was gradually increased until at the time it was
taken over by the University of British Columbia it was giving
three years in Arts and Science, and two years in Applied Science.
When the University of British Columbia opened in the autumn
of 1915, both the McGill University College of Vancouver and
Victoria College, which since 1907 had been a part of it, ceased
to exist.
Definite steps to establish the University were taken by Dr.
H. E. Young, Minister of Education, in 1907, when he introduced
a "University Endowment Act." This Act was followed in 1908
by an Aet establishing and incorporating the University of British
Columbia and repealing the old Act of 1890-1. This Act, with its
subsequent amendments, determines the present constitution of the
University.
As authorized by an Act passed by the Provincial Legislature
in 1910, the Lieutenant-Governor in Council appointed a Site
Commission to decide upon a site for the proposed University. The
Commission held its first meeting on May 25th, 1910, in Victoria,
and after a thorough examination of the Province recommended
the vicinity of Vancouver.   In the autumn the Executive Council 18 The University of British Columbia
decided to place the University at Point Grey—the site which the
Commission had named as its first choice. In 1911 the Legislature
passed an Act authorizing the Lieutenant-Governor in Council to
grant this site to the University. The grant was increased in 1915,
so that it now consists of 548 acres at the extremity of Point Grey.
The waters of the Gulf of Georgia form more than half the boundary of the University Campus. A tract of some 3,000 acres of
Government land immediately adjoining the site, and lying between
it and the City of Vancouver, has been set aside by the Government
in order that University revenue may be provided by its sale or
lease.
In February, 1912, the Hon. H. E. Young, Minister of Education, called for competitive plans which should include plans in
detail for four buildings to be erected immediately, and a block
plan showing all the proposed buildings on the Campus. Messrs.
Sharp and Thompson, of Vancouver, B. C, were the successful
competitors, and were appointed University Architects.
The first Convocation, held on August 21st, 1912, chose Mr.
F. L. Carter-Cotton as first Chancellor of the University. In March,
1913, the Lieutenant-Governor in Council appointed as President
of the University F. F. Wesbrook, M.A, M.D, C.M, LL.D. On
April 4th, 1918, Dr. R. E. McKechnie was elected Chancellor.
Dr. McKechnie has been re-elected continuously since that date
and entered on his sixth term in May, 1933. On the death of President Wesbrook, October 20th, 1918, L. S. Klinck, Dean of the
Faculty of Agriculture, was appointed acting President, and on
June 1st, 1919, President.
From its opening in 1915 till the Summer of 1925, the
University carried on its work in temporary quarters on part of
the site of the General Hospital in Fairview.
Construction work was commenced on the Science Building at
the permanent site in Point Grey in 1914, but was interrupted
because of war conditions. Work on this building was resumed in
1923, and in the Autumn of the same year the contract was let for
the Library. These two buildings, which are of stone and are
fireproof, conform closely to the original plans as prepared by
the architects in 1914. The initial units of these structures, as well
as nine other buildings which are of a less permanent character,
were completed in 1925, and at the beginning of Session 1925-26
the University commenced work in its new quarters.
The Inauguration of the new buildings was held on October
15th and 16th, 1925, on which occasion honorary degrees were
granted by the University for the first time. Historical Sketch 19
THE CONSTITUTION OF THE UNIVERSITY
The Constitution of the University is governed by the British
Columbia University Act, B.C.R.S. 1924, c 265, and Amending
Acts, which provide
That the University shall consist of a Chancellor, Convocation,
Board of Governors, Senate, the Faculty Council, and the
Faculties; that the first Convocation shall consist of all
graduates of any university in His Majesty's dominions
resident in the Province two years prior to the date fixed
for the first meeting of Convocation, together with twenty-
five members selected by the Lieutenant-Governor in
Council. After the first Convocation it shall consist of the
Chancellor, Senate, members of the first Convocation, and
all graduates of the University; that the Chancellor shall
be elected by Convocation; that the Board of Governors
shall consist of the Chancellor, President, and nine persons
appointed by the Lieutenant-Governor in Council; that the
Senate shall consist of: (a) The Minister of Education,
the Chancellor, and the President of the University, who
shall be chairman thereof; (b) the deans and two professors
of each of the Faculties elected by members of the Faculty;
(c) three members to be appointed by the Lieutenant-
Governor in Council; (d) the Superintendent of Education,
the principals of the normal schools; (e) one member elected
by the high-school principals and assistants who are actually
engaged in teaching; (/) one member to be elected by the
governing body of every affiliated college or school in
this Province; (g) fifteen members to be elected by Convocation from the members thereof.
It is further provided that the University shall be non-sectarian.
The University Act gives the University full powers to grant
such degrees in the several Faculties and different branches of
knowledge as the Senate may from time to time determine. It
reserves for the University the sole right in this Province to confer
degrees, except in Theology, and it expressly enacts that'' No other
university having corporate powers capable of being exercised
within the Province shall be known by the same name, nor shall
any such university have power to grant degrees.'' LOCATION AND BUILDINGS
Location
The University is situated on the promontory which forms the
western extremity of the Point Grey Peninsula. On three sides
it is bounded by the Gulf of Georgia. The site comprises an area of
548 acres, of which approximately one-half is campus. In all
directions appear snow-capped mountains, strikingly rugged and
impressive.
Buildings
The buildings, planned to meet the requirements of fifteen
hundred students, are of two classes, permanent and semi-permanent. The former were designed by the University architects,
Messrs. Sharp and Thompson, the latter by architects of the
Department of Public Works of the Provincial Government. The
permanent buildings have been erected in the location originally
assigned for them; the others in the quadrangle designated as
"unassigned" in the original plan. By utilizing the "unassigned"
area for the semi-permanent buildings, all the locations intended
for future expansion have been left available.
The entire mechanical equipment of these buildings was
designed after a close study had been made not only of present
requirements, but of the ultimate development of the institution.
This consideration accounts for the fact that only a part of the
present equipment is permanent. After a careful survey of the
whole system, a forced hot water system was found to present
advantages that made its adoption advisable. Direct radiation with
a system of warmed air supply and extraction for ventilation is
used to take care of the heat losses in the buildings. A separate
system of ventilation is installed for all sanitary conveniences,
and a specially constructed system for fume closets. The various
services throughout these buildings, such as hot and cold water,
distilled water, gas and steam for laboratory purposes, compressed
air, etc, with the necessary apparatus, are all of a modern type.
An attempt has been made to reduce vibration and noise to a
minimum by installing all moving apparatus on floating slabs, with
a further insulation of cork.
Library
The University Library consists of 88,000 volumes and about
10,000 pamphlets. It includes representative works in all the
courses offered by the University, and a growing collection of works
on other subjects.
The Library receives regularly about 686 magazines and
periodical publications.
The book collection is classified throughout on the Congressional
system. Location and Buildings 21
Books to which the teaching staff have specially referred their
students are placed in a "Reserved" class. These are shelved apart
from the main collection, and are loaned only for use in the building, and for a limited period.
Unbound periodicals are not loaned. Bound periodicals, and
books that are costly, rare, or unsuitable for general circulation,
are loaned only under special conditions.
While the Library is primarily for the staff and students of
the University, its resources are available to those of the general
public engaged in research or special study, and who make personal
application to the Librarian for the privilege of its use. Such
persons are known as "Extra-mural Readers." By order of the
Board of Governors, a fee of $1.00 per calendar year is charged
such readers. In addition, they pay necessary mailing costs, a
deposit being required from those unable to call personally for
books loaned.
The University is deeply indebted to all who have made gifts
to the Library during the past year. These have been both valuable
and numerous. Their number prevents detailed acknowledgment,
but recognition should be made of a number of sets of transactions,
and complete or partial sets of scientific periodicals, given by
societies and friends of the University. The most interesting and
valuable of these gifts are listed in the annual report of the
Library to the Senate. Special mention should be made of the gift
of $15,000 by the Carnegie Foundation to the Library for the
purchase of books for undergraduate reading. The first unit of
this gift, $5,000, was spent in the year 1933-34.
Gymnasium
This building was completed in 1929 and presented to the
University by the Alma Mater Society. It is situated adjacent to
the tennis courts and conveniently close to the playing fields. The
style of architecture and exterior finish harmonizes well with that
of the other buildings on the campus. The playing floor has an
area of 6,000 square feet, and is surrounded on three sides by tiers
of benches which will accommodate 1,400 persons. In the space
behind these seats are located the dressing rooms, drying rooms,
locker rooms and shower baths. Approximately one-third of this
space has been set aside for the exclusive use of the women
students. In addition there are four large rooms. Three of these
have been assigned to undergraduate clubs; the fourth is a well-
equipped kitchen. Equipment suitable for general gymnasium and
indoor athletic work has been provided. 22 The University of British Columbia
Playing Field
In accordance with the original landscape plan prepared by
Mawson in 1913, the playing fields area, consisting of about 16
acres, is situated east of the East Mall and north of the University
Boulevard. Development work was started early in January, 1931,
as an aid to the acute unemployment situation, and was made
possible by funds provided chiefly by subscriptions from the
Faculty, students, and friends of the University. Much of the
labour was obtained through the courtesy of the Relief Department
of the City of Vancouver. Twenty thousand cubic yards of soil
and gravel were used to bring the track and field to grade. The
total cost to date has been approximately $20,000.
The grass field is full-sized and is surrounded by a quarter-mile
einder track. The area is enclosed by an eight-foot board fence.
It is hoped that in the near future some provision may be made
for either temporary or permanent seating accommodation.
Forest Products Laboratories
The Forest Products Laboratories of Canada, Vancouver
Laboratory, which is maintained by the Forest Service of the
Department of the Interior, Canada, occupies three buildings
provided and kept up through a co-operative agreement between
the University and the Dominion Government.
Plan of Campus
The plan at the back of the Calendar shows the buildings
which have been erected and indicates the nature of their construction. It also shows their relation to the other groups of
buildings which are to be erected in the future.
ENDOWMENTS AND DONATIONS
A list of the most important gifts received during last year
is given below under the various departments.
Department of Botany
(For Herbarium and Botanical Gardens)
SEEDS
CANADA Botany Department,  University of Toronto.
G.   Staoe Smith,  Creston,  B. C.
UNITED STATES Botanical  Garden,  Buffalo City Hospital.
Brooklyn Botanic Garden.
Lexington Botanic Garden.
Botany Department,  University  of Pittsburgh.
Marsh Botanical Garden,  Yale University.
U. S. Department of Agriculture. Endowments and Donations 23
URUGUAY Jardin Botanico,  Montevideo.
GREAT  BRITAIN Royal Botanic Garden, Edinburgh,  Scotland.
Botanic Gardens, Glasnevin, Ireland.
INDIA Lloyd Botanic Garden, Darjeeling.
Dr. M. S. Wallace, Dhar, C. India.
SWEDEN Botanical Garden, Lund.
DENMARK Botanical   Garden,   Universitas   Regia   Fredericiana,
Oslo.
HOLLAND Arboretum Landbouwhoogeschool, Wageningen.
Botanical Garden, Amsterdam.
FRANCE Arboretum des Barres et Fruticetum Vilmorinianum,
Loiret.
Botanical Garden, Nantes.
Jardin Botanique pare de la Tete-d'or, Lyon.
Museum d'Historie Naturelle, Paris.
JAPAN Botanic Garden, Hakkaido Imperial University.
GERMANY Botanischen Gartens, Bremen.
Botanical Gardens, Dresden, Germany.
ITALY University of Rome.
POLAND The Gardens and Arboretum Kornik.
RUSSIA Jardin Botanique de l'Academie Agronomique, Gorky.
HERBARIUM AND GARDEN  SPECIMENS
Miss J. Bostock, Monte Creek, B. C.—Specimens for Botanical Gardens.
D. Gilbert, Kamloops, B. C.—Specimens for Botanical Gardens.
Miss L. Howell, West Vancouver, B. C.—Specimens for Botanical Gardens.
G. Stace Smith, Creston, B. C.—Specimens for Botanical Gardens.
BOTANY DEPARTMENT
Miss Y. L. Mizunzo, Vancouver, B. C.—A collection of white and yellow silkworm cocoons from Japan.
Department of Mechanical and Electrical
Engineering
Prom the B. C. Telephone Company, through the kindness of Mr.
Hamilton, the following donations were received by the Department of
Electrical Engineering:
(a) Two motor-generator sets with switch gear instruments. One set consists of an induction motor of 15 h.p., driving a DC generator, giving
30 volts and 400 amps. The other set consists of an induction motor
of 28 h.p., driving a DC generator, giving 30 volts and 600 amperes.
(b) A mercury-arc rectifier for battery-charging, 10 amp. capacity.
Department of Forestry
Dominion Forest Service, New Westminster—Tree seeds.
Forest   Products   Laboratory,   Vancouver—Special   set   of   British   Columbia
wood samples in yellow cedar box.
Professor  S.  J.  Record,  Yale University, New Haven—Complete  set of back
numbers of the publication, "Tropical Woods."
H. C Sharp, Vancouver—Sample board of Rocky Mountain Juniper.
Professor   G.    J.    Spencer,   Vancouver—Trunk   section   of   sagebrush;   trunk
section  of lodgepole  pine  from Aspen  Grove,  B.C.;  petrified wood from
Upper Hat Creek, B. C.
Timberman Publishing Co..  Portland—Subscription to  "The Timberman."
West Coast Lumberman Publishing Co., Seattle—Subscription to "West Coast
Lumberman."
Dr.  M.  Y. Williams, Vancouver—Petrified wood from McMurray, Alberta.
Department of Geology and Geography
J. B. Bocock, Edmonton—Silver and radium minerals from Great Bear Lake.
H. H. Wilkins,  655 Robson  Street—Recent coral from  Smith Inlet,  opposite
north end of Vancouver Island.
Professor H. F. Angus—Human skull cap from Qualicum Bay, V. I.
Douglas   James   and   Raymond   Claydon—Human   (Indian)   bones   and   burial
wrappings from Cortez Island.
Miss M. Winckler—Tufa from Bridge River.
R. Irving—Fossil leaves from near Chu-Chua. 24 The University op British Columbia
Department of Zoology
Miss Maud Allan, Vancouver—Series of named thrips.
Dr.   J.   N.   Bird,   Brandon,   Man.—Skull   of   big   horn   sheep   from   peat   bog,
Vernon.
Mr. Kenneth Graham, Langley Prairie—Bulk series of forest beetles.
Mr. Jack Gregson, Courtenay, V. I.—-Extensive collection of B. C. Collembola.
Mr. Ralph Hopping, Vernon—Series of 180  named species of beetles.
Mr. Hugh Leech, Salmon Arm—A series of named aquatic beetles.
Mr. William McCallum,  Vancouver—Elasmobranch  skull.
Dr.   C.   H.   Bastin,   Vancouver;   Mr.   R.   A.   Cummings,   Mr.   Kenneth   Racey,
Dr. M. Y. Williams—Further extensive series of Mallophaga from birds.
The Department is particularly indebted to the following specialists
for gratuitous identifications of considerable series of B. C. animals and
insects: Dr. C. P. Alexander, Massachusetts; Dr. Marston Bates, Harvard
University; Dr. C. Bequaert, Harvard Medical School; Dr. J. W. Folsom,
Tallulah, Louisiana; Mr. Eric Hearle, Kamloops, B. C.; Dr. H. Ross, University
of  Illinois;  Dr.  Tracy  Storer,  University  of California.
GENERAL INFORMATION
The Session
The academic year begins on the First of September and ends
on the last day of August. The Winter Session is divided into two
terms—the first, September to December; the second, January to
May. The Summer Session consists of seven weeks' instruction in
July and August, for which preparatory reading is required except
in certain cases. For "Admission to the University," see Page 27,
and for "Registration and Attendance" see Page 29.
Courses of Study
For the Session of 1934-35 the University offers instruction in
each of the three Faculties, Arts and Science, Applied Science
(including Nursing), and Agriculture, leading to the degrees of
Bachelor of Arts, Bachelor of Commerce, Bachelor of Applied
Science and Bachelor of Science in Agriculture. In addition a
course is given in the Faculty ,of Arts and Science leading to a
Diploma of Social Service, and a Teacher Training Course is
offered for graduates of the Faculties of Arts and Science and
Applied Science. It is also possible to proceed to a Master's degree
in each Faculty. Advanced courses of instruction and facilities
for research are offered to students who are graduates of any
University or College of recognized standing. Admission to these
advanced courses, or to the privileges of research, does not in itself
imply admission to candidacy for a higher degree.
Academic Dress
The undergraduate's gown is black in colour and of the
ordinary stuff material, of ankle length, and with long sleeves
and the yoke edged with khaki cord.   The graduate's gown is the General Information 25
same, without cord. The Bachelor's hood is of the Cambridge
pattern, black bordered with the distinctive colour of the particular
Faculty, the Bachelor of Commerce hood being differentiated by
the addition of a white cord; the Master's hood is the same, lined
with the distinctive colour. The colours are, for Arts and Science,
the University blue; for Applied Science, red; for Agriculture,
maize.
University Health Service
The University Campus is situated within the University
Endowment Lands, which, as unorganized territory, comes under
the direct control of the Provincial Government. Shortly after the
opening of the present University Buildings in 1925, the Lieutenant-Governor in Council, by the recommendation of the Provincial Health Officer, appointed a Medical Health Officer for the
Reserve, including the University Campus. This Health Officer has
on the Campus and in the Reserve all the powers of any Health
Officer anywhere.
In the fall of 1927, the Provincial Health Officer added to the
University Health Service a Public Health Nurse, whose presence
permits the continuous operation of a local Health Department on
the Campus and Reserve.
In addition, the Public Health Nurse is engaged by the
University for the general supervision of the individual health of
the students, first aid, etc. An office for the Public Health Murse
is provided in the Auditorium Building, and, by the gift of the
Graduating Class of 1927, has been equipped with first aid
furniture and supplies.
Physical Examination. — In order to promote the physical
welfare of the student body, students on entering the University
are required to report immediately to the University Health
Service and obtain an appointment for their physical examination;
the examination is conducted by, or under the direction of, the
University Medical Examiner. Physical defects and weaknesses,
amenable to treatment, may thus be discovered, and the student is
advised to apply to his physician for such remedial measures as
his case may require. About 10 to 15 per cent, of the students are
re-examined in their second and subsequent years.
Bides Governing Medical Examinations.—(1) Students must
present themselves for medical examination on the date and at
the time assigned by the University Health Service. (2) Students
failing to report on the right date or reporting on a wrong date
lose their assignment. (3) Students who do not conform to the
above regulations will be referred to the University Health Committee. 26 The University of British Columbia
Infectious Diseases.—Students developing any illness or suffering from any injury while on the Campus should apply for first
aid to the Public Health Nurse. This is particularly required if the
student develops any illness of an infectious nature, including
the Common Cold. Provision is made also for the diagnosis of the
infectious cases and their safe removal to suitable quarters.
Students developing any illness or suffering any injury while
at home, boarding house, fraternity house, etc., are required to
report the same to the Public Health Nurse. The development
of any infectious disease in a University student must be reported
by the student to the University Health Service without delay.
Students exposed to any infectious disease must immediately
report to the University Health Service. Such students may be
permitted, by special order of the Medical Health Officer, to attend
the University for a prescribed period, despite the exposure.
Such students shall report daily (or oftener, at the discretion
of the Medical Health Officer) to the Public Health Nurse for such
prescribed period. Failure to so report will result in immediate
exclusion from the University.
Students absent on account of illness must present Medical
Certificates. If the absence occurs during the session, the student
must appear in person, with the certificate, at the University
Health Service immediately on return to the University, and before
attendance upon class work. The University Health Service will
examine the person concerned and will immediately forward the
certificate, with report thereon, to the Dean of the Faculty. //
the absence occurs during the examinations, the medical certificate
must be sent to the Dean of the Faculty within two days after the
termination of the examination period. A medical certificate must
show the nature and the period of the disability. Medical report
forms may be obtained from the Dean's office.
University Employment Bureau
The objects of the Employment Bureau are to provide students
with summer employment, to provide part-time work for students
during the Winter Session, and to help students in obtaining
positions after graduation. This service is for employers seeking
help and for students desiring employment. Those who know of
positions vacant are requested to notify the Bureau. Correspondence should be addressed to the Employment Bureau, Registrar's
Office.
Dean of Women
During the session the Dean of Women may be consulted by
parents and students on matters pertaining to living conditions, Admission to the University 27
vocational guidance, and other questions that directly affect the
social and intellectual life of the women students.
Board and Residence
A list of boarding-houses, which receive men or women students,
but not both, may be obtained from the Registrar after September
1st. Men and women students are not permitted to lodge in the
same house, unless they are members of the same family, or receive
special permission from the Senate. Women students under
twenty-five years of age are permitted to occupy suites in apartment houses only when accompanied by some older person. Any
such arrangement must be made in consultation with the Dean of
Women. The Dean of Women also undertakes the inspection and
approval of the boarding houses listed for women. The cost of
good board and lodging is from $25 per month upwards; of a
room alone, $8 to $12 per month. A grill is operated under the
supervision of the University, and lunch, afternoon tea and light
supper may be obtained there at very reasonable prices. Refreshments at social functions are also supplied.
General Conduct
The University authorities do not assume responsibilities which
naturally rest with parents. This being so, it is the policy of the
University to rely on the good sense and on the home training of
students for the preservation of good moral standards.
ADMISSION TO THE UNIVERSITY
All inquiries relating to admission to the University slwuld be
addressed to the Registrar.
The accommodation for students in the University is limited.
The University, therefore, reserves the right to limit the attendance.
For the session 1934-35 the number of First Year students in
the Faculty of Arts and Science and the Faculty of Agriculture
will be limited to 500, in the Second Year of the course in Applied
Science to 120, in the First Year of the course in Nursing to 15,
and in the Teacher Training course to 60.
1. Except under special circumstances, no student under the
age of sixteen is admitted to the University. For admission to the
course in Nursing a student must be seventeen years of age, and
for admission to any course in Social Service, twenty-one years of
age. 28 The University of British Columbia
2. Candidates for admission to the courses in the First Year
of the Faculty of Arts and Science or the Faculty of Agriculture
and to the course in Nursing in Applied Science are required to
pass the Junior Matriculation Examination of the Province of
British Columbia or to submit certificates showing that they have
passed an equivalent examination elsewhere. Students over 18
years of age with full "Normal Entrance" standing, who hold
Normal School certificates, are admitted to the University as having
full Junior Matriculation standing. Special regulations are prescribed for admission to courses in Applied Science, and are given
under the heading of "Admission" in the Applied Science Section
of the Calendar.
3. Students who have passed the Senior Matriculation Examination are admitted to the courses of the Second Year in the
Faculty of Arts and Science. Students who have partial Senior
Matriculation standing, obtained in 1927 or subsequently, will be
granted credit in the First Year in each subject in which they have
made 50 per cent, or over, or in each paper in which they have
made 50 per cent, or over, in so far as these papers correspond with
those of the First Year.
4. A student who has a failure in a subject of the Junior
Matriculation examination standing against him will not be
admitted to the University.
5. The Junior and Senior Matriculation Examinations of the
Province of British Columbia are conducted by the High School
and University Matriculation Board of the Province. This Board
consists of members appointed by the Department of Education
and by the University. The requirements for Matriculation are
stated in the publication, "Requirements for Matriculation,"
issued by the University. The courses of study for the various
grades in the high school are given in the "Programme of Studies
for the High and Technical Schools," issued by the Department
of Education.
6. Certificates or diplomas showing that a candidate has passed
the Matriculation Examination of another University will be
accepted in lieu of the Junior or Senior Matriculation Examinations if the Faculty concerned considers that the examination has
covered the same subjects and required the same standard. If,
however, the examination covers some but not all of the necessary
subjects, the candidate will be required to pass the Matriculation
Examination in the subjects not covered.
7. A candidate who wishes to enter by certificates other than a
Matriculation certificate issued in British Columbia should submit
to the Registrar the original certificates. If he wishes these returned Registration and Attendance 29
to him, he must present also a copy of each certificate for record at
the University. He should under no circumstances come to the
University without having first obtained from the Registrar a
statement of the value of the certificates he holds, as these may
lack one or more essential subjects, or the work done in a subject
may not be adequate, or, again, the percentage gained may not be
sufficiently high. Moreover, it must be remembered that a certificate
may admit to one Faculty and not to another. When an applicant's
diploma or certificate does not show the marks obtained in the
several subjects of the examination, he must arrange to have a
statement of his marks sent to the Registrar by the Education
Department or University issuing such diploma or certificate. The
fee for examination of certificates is $2.00. This fee must accompany the application.
8. A student of another University applying for exemption
from any subject or subjects which he has already studied is
required to submit with his application a Calendar of the University in which he has previously studied, together with a complete
statement of the course he has followed and a certificate of the
standing gained in the several subjects.* The Faculty concerned
will determine the standing of such a student in this University.
The fee for the examination of certificates is $2.00. This fee must
accompany the application.
REGISTRATION AND ATTENDANCE
Those who intend to register as students of the University are
required to make application to the Registrar, on forms to be
obtained from the Registrar's Office. This application should be
made in person or by mail early in August, or as soon as the results
of the Matriculation examinations are known, and must be accompanied by the Registration and Library Fee of $5.00. For First
Year students in the Faculties of Arts and Science, and Agriculture, and for other students coming to the University for the
first time, the last day for registration is Wednesday, September
19th, and for all other undergraduate students, Friday, September 21st, 1934. (See regulations in reference to "Admission to the
University," Page 27.)
1. There are four classes of students:—
(a) Graduate students—Students who are pursuing courses of
study in a Faculty in which they hold a degree, whether
they are proceeding to a Master's degree or not.   Students,
*For the conditions under which exemption is granted in the Faculty of
Arts and Science, see "Courses Leading to the Degree of B.A." 30 The University of British Columbia
however, who are proceeding to a Bachelor's degree in
another course in the same Faculty in which they hold a
degree, or in another Faculty, will register as undergraduates.
(b) Full undergraduates—Students proceeding to a degree in
any Faculty who have passed all the examinations precedent to the year in which they are registered.
(c) Conditioned undergraduates—Students proceeding to a
degree with defects in their standing which do not prevent
their entering a higher year under the regulations governing "Examinations and Advancement" of the Faculty in
which they are registered.
(d) Partial students—Students not belonging to one of the
three preceding classes.    (See 7, Page 31.)
2. All students other than graduate students are required to
register at the office of the Registrar on or before the last day for
registration, to furnish the information necessary for the University records, to enroll for the particular classes -which they wish
to attend, and to sign the following declaration:
"I hereby accept and submit myself to the statutes, rules,
regulations, and ordinances of The University of British Columbia,
and of the Faculty or Faculties in which I am registered, and to
any amendments thereto which may be made while I am a student
of the University, and I promise to observe the same.''
In the information furnished for the University records,
students are requested to state what churches they propose to
make their place of worship. This information is available for any
of the city churches desiring it.
3. A late registration fee of $2.00 will be charged all students
who register after the above dates and up to and including the
day when lectures begin—Wednesday, September 26th.
Ill addition to the $2.00 for late registration a fine of $1.00 a
day ($6.00 a week) for a period of two weeks will be imposed upon
all students who register after the day when lectures begin, the
maximum fine being $14.00.
No registration after Wednesday, October 10th (two weeks
beyond the date when lectures begin), will be accepted without the
special permission of the Faculty concerned. A candidate so
accepted for registration will have to pay the maximum fine of
$14.00 and may be required to take fewer courses than the regular
year's work: provided that if the student is required (on account
of late registration) to take less than fifteen units the fine may be
reduced or waived by the Faculty concerned. Registration and Attendance 31
4. Students registering for the first time must present the
certificates which constitute their qualification for admission to
the course of study for which they wish to register. The Registrar
is empowered to register all duly qualified students. Doubtful cases
will be dealt with by the Faculty concerned.
5. Students doing work in two academic years will register in
the lower year and fill out their course cards in such a way as to
make clear which courses are required to complete the lower year.
6. Students desiring to make a change in the course for which
they have registered must apply to the Registrar on the proper
form for a "change of course." Except in special circumstance,
no change will be allowed after the fifteenth day of the session.
If the application is approved by the Faculty concerned, the Registrar will give the necessary notifications.
7. Partial students, who are not proceeding to a degree, are
not normally required to pass an examination for admission, but
before registering they must produce a certificate showing that
they have satisfied the Dean and the Heads of the Departments
concerned that they are qualified to pursue with advantage the
course of study which they propose to undertake.
8. Students are required to attend at least seven-eighths of
the lectures in each course that they take. Lectures will commence
on the hour, and admission to a lecture or laboratory and credit
for attendance may be refused by the Instructor for lateness, misconduct, inattention or neglect of duty. Absence consequent on
illness or domestic affliction may be excused only by the Dean of
the Faculty concerned, and medical certificates or other evidence
must be presented. // the absence occurs during the session, the
student must appear in person, with the certificate, at the University Health Service immediately on return to the University,
and before attendance upon class work. The University Health
Service will examine the person concerned and will immediately
forward the certificate, with report thereon, to the Dean of the
Faculty. If the absence occurs during the examinations, the certificate must be sent to the Dean of the Faculty within two days
after the termination of the examination period. A medical certificate must show the nature and the period of the disability.
Medical report forms may be obtained from the Dean's office. In
cases of deficient attendance students may (with the sanction of
the Dean and the Head of the Department concerned) be excluded
from the Christmas or the final examinations in a course; but, in
the case of a final examination, unless the unexcused absences
exceed one-fourth of the total number of lectures in a course, such 32 The University of British Columbia
student may be permitted to sit for supplemental examination.
(See regulation in each Faculty in reference to "Examinations and
Advancement.")
9. All candidates for a degree must make formal application
for graduation at least one month previous to the Congregation at
which they expect to obtain the degree. Special forms for this
purpose may be obtained from the Registrar's office.
FEES
All cheques must be certified and made payable to "The University of British Columbia."
The Registration Fee is not returnable.
The Sessional Fees are as follows:—       ^^^k
For Full and Conditioned Undergraduates
in arts and science	
Registration and Library Fee—Payable before registration $     5.00
First Term—Payable on or before October 8th:
•   . Sessional Fee $65.00
Alma Mater Fee  10.00
Caution Money     5.00
L/\  —      80.00
Second Term—Payable on or before January 21st       60.00
$145.00
IN SOCIAL SERVICE COURSE—
Registration and Library Fee—Payable before registration  $     5.00
First Term—Payable on or before October 8th:
Sessional Fee.. $65.00
Alma Mater Fee  10.00
Caution Money      5.00
      80.00
Second Term—Payable on or before January 21st       60.00
$145.00
NOTE:—Social   Service  Workers  taking any of Courses  1-10,  and  these
courses  only,  are  relieved  from   paying  the  Alma  Mater  fee. Fees
IN TEACHER TRAINING COURSE—
Registration and Library Fee—Payable before registration  $     5.00
First Term—Payable on or before October 8th:
Sessional Fee $65.00
Alma Mater Fee  10.00
Caution Money      5.00
      80.00
Second Term—Payable on or before January 21st       60.00
$145.00
IN APPLIED SCIENCE	
Registration and Library Fee—Payable before registration  $     5.00
First Term—Payable on or before October 8th:
Sessional Fee $90.00
Alma Mater Fee  10.00
Caution Money      5.00
    105.00
Second Term—Payable on or before January 21st      85.00
$195.00
IN NURSING AND PUBLIC HEALTH	
Registration and Library Fee—Payable before registration  $     5.00
First Term,—Payable on or before October 8th:
Sessional Fee $65.00
Alma Mater Fee  10.00
Caution Money     5.00
      80.00
Second Term—Payable on or before January 21st       60.00
$145.00
NOTE:—For Third and Fourth Year students in Nursing the Sessional
fee is $1.00, payable with an Alma Mater fee of $5.00, on or before October
8th.
Students admitted to Nursing B or C and proceeding to the Certificate on
a basis of part-time attendance over two or more years, will pay the regular
fee for the whole course, but the amount payable each year will be pro-rated
to correspond with the proportion of work taken in that year. 34 The University of British Columbia
in agriculture	
Registration and Library Fee—Payable before registration  $     5.00
First Term—Payable on or before October 8th:
Sessional Fee $65.00
Alma Mater Fee  10.00
Caution Money      5.00
      80.00
Second Term—Payable on or before January 21st       60.00
$145.00
OCCUPATIONAL  COURSE	
Registration and Library Fee—Payable before registration  $     5.00
First Term—Payable on or before October 8th:
Sessional Fee  $25.00
Alma Mater Fee  10.00
Caution Money      5.00
      40.00
Second Term—Payable on or before January 21st       25.00
$ 70.00
For Partial Students
Fees per "Unit" $10.00
Registration and Library Fee—Payable before registration       5.00
First half payable on or before October 8th, along
with—
Alma Mater Fee  10.00
Caution Money      5.00
Second half payable on or before January 21st.
For Students in Extra Sessional Classes
Fees per 3-Unit Course $30.00
First half payable on or before October 8th,
along with Caution Money    5.00
Second half payable on or before January 21st. Fees 35
For Graduates
Registration and Library Fee—Payable before registration    $     5.00
Class Fees—Payable on or before October 8th:
First Registration  $75.00
Caution Money     5.00
      80.00
$ 85.00
Each subsequent Session Registration $ 5.00
Caution Money      5.00
Registration and Library Fee—Payable before
registration         5.00
 $   15.00
Late Registration
See page 30 ...$2.00 to $14.00
After the dates given above and up to and including October
25th and February 7th an additional fee of $2.00 will be exacted
of all students in default.
The Alma Mater Fee is a fee exacted from all students for the
support of the Alma Mater Society. It was authorized by the
Board of Governors at the request of the students themselves.
The Caution Money is a deposit from which deductions will be
made to cover breakages, wastage, and use of special materials in
laboratories, Library, etc. If the balance to the credit of a student
falls below $1.50, a further deposit of $5.00 may be required.
Caution Money will be refunded after the 30th day of April. Any
caution money unclaimed by the llth day of May will be turned
over to the Alma Mater Society.
Immediately after the last day for the payment of fees, students
whose fees have not been paid will have their registrations cancelled, and will be excluded from classes. Such students will not
be permitted to register again during the term until they obtain
the consent of the Dean, pay all fees, and present to the Registrar
a statement from the Bursar certifying that fees have been paid.
Students registering after October 8th shall pay their fees at
the time of registration, failing which they become subject to the
provisions of the preceding Regulation.
Students borrowing books from the University Library for
Preparatory Reading courses will be required to make the usual
deposit of two dollars ($2.00) with the Librarian to cover mailing
cost. 36 The University of British Columbia
For Summer Session Students
Fees are payable on registration, otherwise an additional fee
of $2.00 will be exacted.
Registration and Library Fee—Payable before registration  $ 5.00
Minimum Class Fee  25.00
Per "Unit"    10.00
Caution Money      5.00
Summer Session Association     2.00
Special Fees
Regular supplemental examination,
per paper  $ 5.00
Special examination   (Applied Science and Agriculture), per paper     7.50
Re-reading, per paper     2.00
Graduation    15.00
Supplemental examination fees must be paid two weeks before
the examination, and special examination fees and fees for rereading when application is made.
Graduation fees must be paid two weeks before Congregation.
(See regulation in reference to application for a degree, page 32.)
If fees are not paid when due an additional fee of $2.00 will be
charged. dfrn^ Medals, Scholarships and Prizes 37
MEDALS,   SCHOLARSHIPS,  PRIZES,   BURSARIES
AND LOANS FOR 1934-3 5
GENERAL REGULATIONS
1. Scholarships, prizes and bursaries which are not based solely
on academic standing are indicated by an asterisk. Unless other
instructions are given in the Calendar notice, intending candidates
must make application to the Registrar not later than the last day
of the final examinations on forms provided for the purpose.
2. All awards of medals, scholarships, prizes and bursaries are
made by Senate, unless otherwise provided for by special resolution
of Senate.
3. Medals, scholarships, prizes, bursaries and loans are open to
winter session students only, unless otherwise stated, and marks
obtained in summer session courses are not taken into account in
awarding them.
4. If the award of a medal, scholarship, or prize is based on an
examination, no award will be made to a candidate who obtains
less than 75 per cent, of the possible marks.
5. To be eligible for a General Proficiency Scholarship a student
must take the full year's course, which must include the required
courses for the year in which he is registered, except that in the
Faculty of Arts and Science and in Agriculture, other subjects
may be substituted for the required courses if credit for these has
already been obtained.
The standing of students taking more than the required number
of units shall be determined on the basis of the required number of
units to be chosen in a manner most advantageous to the students.
6. Winners of more than one scholarship will be given recognition in the published lists. No student may enjoy the proceeds
of more than one scholarship in the same academic year and the
scholarships thus relinquished will be awarded to the candidates
next in order of merit.
7. Winners of scholarships who desire to do so may resign the
monetary value, while the appearance of their names in the University list enables them to retain the honour. Any funds thus
made available will be used for additional scholarships, bursaries,
or student loans.
8. Scholarships under the jurisdiction of the University are
paid in two instalments—on the last day for the payment of fees 38 The University of British Columbia
in each term. Undergraduate winners must continue their courses
to the satisfaction of the Faculty concerned during the session
following the award. A Faculty is authorized, in some cases, to
permit the scholarship to be reserved for one year, provided the
student shows satisfactory reasons for postponing attendance. Application for reservation should be made to the Registrar.
9. In awarding bursaries consideration will be given to the
financial need of the applicant.
10. The Senate of the University of British Columbia reserves
the right so to change the terms under which any exhibition,
scholarship or prize may be established at the University of British
Columbia that the terms may better meet new conditions as they
arise and may more fully carry out the intentions of the donor
and maintain the usefulness of the benefaction. The right so
reserved shall be exercised by a resolution of the Senate duly confirmed by the Board of Governors, provided always that a year's
notice shall be given in Senate of any proposed change and that
the donor or his representatives, if living, shall be consulted about
the proposed change.
11. Limited funds are provided from which loans, not to exceed
$100, may be made to undergraduate students who have completed
satisfactorily two years' University work and who can show they
are in need of pecuniary assistance. Interest at the rate of 5 per
cent, per annum is charged on these loans. They must be secured
by approved joint promissory note given for a definite term and
signed by the applicant and his parent or guardian. Loans are
not granted to graduate students, to students in the Teacher
Training Course, nor to students in diploma courses. Applications
for loans should be addressed to the Bursar of the University.
12. The University is in possession of a great deal of information regarding post-graduate scholarships, fellowships and assist-
antships which other Universities and various research bodies make
available.    This information may be obtained from the Registrar.
13. Endowed scholarships and bursaries will be paid provided
the invested funds produce the necessary revenue.
MEDALS
The Governor-General's Gold Medal
A gold medal, presented by His Excellency the Governor-
General of Canada, will be awarded to the student standing at
the head of the graduating class for the B.A. degree. Honour and
pass students are eligible for this medal. Medals, Scholarships and Prizes 39
The Kiwanis Club Gold Medal
A gold medal, given by the Kiwanis Club of Vancouver, will
be awarded to the student standing at the head of the graduating
class for the B.Com. degree.
The French Government Medal
A bronze medal, offered by the French Consul for Western
Canada on behalf of the French Government, will be awarded to
a student of the French language on the recommendation of the
Head of the Department of Modern Languages.
United Empire Loyalists' Association Medal*
The Vancouver Branch of the United Empire Loyalists' Association of Canada is offering a silver medal for the best essay
received during the Session 1934-35 on any topic dealing with the
history of the United Empire Loyalists and their influence on the
development of Canada.
The award will be made on the recommendation of the Department of History, the competition being open to all undergraduates
of the University, preference being given to students enrolled in a
Canadian History course.
SCHOLARSHIPS FOR GRADUATES
University Graduate Scholarship*
A scholarship of $200 may be awarded to a graduate student
who shows special aptitude for post-graduate studies and who is
proceeding in the following year to post-graduate study in this
or any other approved University.
The Anne Wesbrook Scholarship*
This scholarship of $100, given by the Faculty Women's Club
of the University, is open to graduates of this University who
are proceeding in the following year to post-graduate study in
this or any other approved university.
The French Government Scholarship*
A scholarship of 10,000 francs is donated by the French Government for one year's post-graduate study in France. It is tenable
for one year and is contingent upon the voting of the credits for
the year by the French Chambers. As this contingency applies to
every item of the French budget, the scholarship may be considered
as permanent.
•See Page 37. 40 The University of British Columbia
The award is made by the French Consul for Western Canada,
residing in Vancouver, on the recommendation of the Head of the
Department of French in the University.
The Brock Scholarship*
A scholarship of $100, given by Dean R. W. Brock, may be
awarded to a graduate student in Applied Science who shows
special aptitude for post-graduate studies.
The Exhibition of 1851 Scholarship*
Under the revised conditions for the award of the Exhibition
of 1851 Scholarship in Science, the University of British Columbia
is included in the list of universities from which nominations for
scholarships allotted to Canada may be made. These scholarships
of £250 per annum are tenable, ordinarily, for two years. They
are granted only to British subjects under 26 years of age who are
bona fide students of pure or applied science of not less than three
years' standing.
SCHOLARSHIPS FOR UNDERGRADUATES
1.   IN ALL FACULTIES
The Rhodes Scholarship*
A Rhodes Scholarship is tenable at the University of Oxford
and may be held for three years. Since, however, the majority
of Rhodes Scholars obtain standing which enables them to take a
degree in two years, appointments are made for two years in the
first instance, and a Rhodes Scholar who may wish to remain for
a third year will be expected to present a definite plan of study
for that period satisfactory to his College and to the Rhodes
Trustees.
Rhodes Scholars may be allowed, if the conditions are approved
by their own College and by the Oxford Secretary to the Rhodes
Trustees, either to postpone their third year, returning to Oxford
for it after a period of work in their own countries, or to spend
their third year in post-graduate work at any University of Great
Britain, and in special cases at any University on the continent of
Europe, the overseas Dominions, or in the United States, but not
in the country of their origin.
The stipend of a Rhodes Scholarship is fixed at £400 per year.
At most colleges, and for most men, this sum is not sufficient to
meet a Rhodes Scholar's necessary expenses for Term-time and
Vacations, and Scholars who can afford to supplement it by say
•See Page 37. Medals, Scholarships and Prizes 41
£50 per year from their own resources will find it advantageous
to do so.
A candidate to be eligible must:
1. Be a British subject, with at least five years' domicile in
Canada and unmarried. He must have passed his nineteenth, but not have passed his twenty-fifth birthday on
October 1st of the year for which he is elected.
2. Have reached such a stage in his course at one of the Universities of Canada that he will have completed at least
two years at the University in question by October 1st of
the year for which he is elected.
Candidates may apply either for the Province in which they
have their ordinary private domicile, home, or residence, or for
any Province in which they have received at least two years of
their college education before applying. *
In that section of the will in which he defined the general type
of scholar he desired, Mr. Rhodes wrote as follows:
'' My desire being that the students who shall be elected to the
Scholarships shall not be merely bookworms, I direct that in the
election of a student to a Scholarship regard shall be had to:
1. His literary and scholastic attainments.
2. His fondness for and success in manly outdoor sports such
as cricket, football and the like.
3. His qualities of manhood, truth, courage, devotion to duty,
sympathy for and protection of the weak, kindliness, unselfishness and fellowship, and
4. His exhibition during school days of moral force of character
and of instincts to lead and to take an interest in his schoolmates, for those latter attributes will be likely in after life
to guide him to esteem the performance of public duties as
his highest aim.''
Full particulars can be obtained from Sherwood Lett, Esq.,
626 Pender Sireet West, Vancouver, B. O, Secretary of the Selection Committee for the Province of British Columbia.
Each candidate for a Scholarship is required to make application to the Secretary of the Committee of Selection of the province
in which he wishes to compete not later than October 31st. Application forms may be obtained from the Registrar's office or from
the Secretary of the Selection Committee. 42 The University of British Columbia
University Great War Scholarships*
Two scholarships of $150 each may be awarded, on the basis
of the work of the First Year, to returned soldiers, their dependents and the children of deceased soldiers proceeding to the
Second Year.
2.   IN ARTS AND SCIENCE
University Scholarships in Arts and Science
Two scholarships in Arts and Science of $150 each will be
awarded to students proceeding to the Fourth Year, the award
to be based on the work of the Third Year. These scholarships
will be awarded respectively: 1. To the student standing highest
with majors in group (a). (See page 60.) 2. To the student
standing highest with majors in group (b). (See page 60.)
Students taking full honours in Mathematics will be classified in
group (a).
Two scholarships in Arts and Science of $150 each will be
awarded to students proceeding to the Third Year, the award to
be based on the work of the Second Year.
The Shaw Memorial Scholarshipt
This scholarship of $125, founded by friends of the late James
Curtis Shaw, Principal of Vancouver College, and afterwards of
McGill University College, Vancouver, will be awarded upon the
results of the examination of the Second Year in Arts and Science
to the undergraduate student standing highest in any two of three
courses, English 2, Latin 2, Greek (A or 2), and proceeding to the
work of the Third Year.
The McGill Graduates' Scholarshipt
A scholarship of $125, founded by the McGill Graduates' Society
of British Columbia, will be awarded to the student standing highest in English and French of the Second Year in Arts and Science
and proceeding to the Third Year.
The Terminal City Club Memorial Scholarship
This scholarship of $100, founded by the members of the Terminal City Club as a memorial to those members of the Club who lost
their lives in the Great War, will be awarded to the student standing highest in English 2 and Economics 2 in the Second Year in
Arts and Science and proceeding to the Third Year.
•See Page  37.
tOrig-lnally donated to the Royal Institution (See Historical Sketch), this
has been transferred by that body, with the consent of the donors, to the
University of British Columbia. Medals, Scholarships and Prizes 43
The Imperial Order Daughters of the Empire
Scott Memorial Scholarship*
This scholarship of $100—the proceeds of an endowment of
$2,000—founded by the Imperial Order Daughters of the Empire
of the City of Vancouver, in memory of Captain Robert Falcon
Scott, R.N., the Antarctic explorer, who sacrificed his life in the
cause of Science, will be awarded for general proficiency in biological subjects to the student who has completed his Second Year
in Arts and Science, and who is proceeding in the Third Year to
Honour work either in Biology or in a course including Biology.
Royal Institution Scholarship in Arts and Science
A scholarship of $150 will be awarded to the student taking
first place in the examinations of the First Year in Arts and
Science.
University Scholarships in Arts and Science
Two scholarships of $150 each will be awarded to the students
taking second and third places in the examinations of the First
Year in Arts and Science.
The P.E.O. Sisterhood Scholarship
A scholarship of $75, given by the Vancouver Chapters of the
P.E.O. Sisterhood, will be awarded to the woman student standing
highest in English 1 in the First Year of the Faculty of Arts and
Science.
The I. J. Klein Scholarship
This annual scholarship of $100, given by I. J. Klein, Esq.,
Vancouver, B. C, for ten years, beginning in May, 1930, will be
awarded to the student obtaining first place in the examinations
of the Third Year of the course in Commerce.
The Vancouver Women's Canadian Club Scholarship
A scholarship of $100, the proceeds of a fund created by the
Vancouver Women's Canadian Club, will be awarded to the undergraduate obtaining first place in the subject, Canadian History
(History 2 or 20).
The Summer Session Students' Association Scholarship
A scholarship of $30, given by the Summer Session Students'
Association, will be awarded to the Summer Session student who
completes the second year with the highest standing. To be eligible
a student must have taken his entire second year at The University
•See Page 37. 44 The University of British Columbia
of British Columbia Summer Session or Extra-sessional classes and
must continue in his third year at The University of British
Columbia.
The British Columbia Teachers' Federation
Scholarship
A scholarship of $50 given by the British Columbia Teachers'
Federation will be awarded to a Summer Session student, who,
being a member of the British Columbia Teachers' Federation,
completes the third year with the highest standing. To be eligible
a student must have taken his entire third year at The University
of British Columbia Summer Session or Extra-sessional classes and
must continue in his fourth year at The University of British
Columbia.
3.    IN APPLIED SCIENCE
University Scholarship in Nursing and Health*
A scholarship of $150 will be awarded for general proficiency
in previous work in this University, to a student proceeding to the
Third Year (or in the double course proceeding to the fourth year)
of the Course in Nursing and Health and having successfully completed the hospital probationary period. Applications shall be
made to the Registrar not later than September 1st.
The Vancouver Women's Canadian Club Scholarship
A scholarship of $100, given by the Vancouver Women's Canadian Club, will be awarded to the student who attains the highest
standing in the first four years' training, academic and practical
(or in the first five years' training, academic and practical, in the
double course) of the Nursing and Health course.
The Dunsmuir Scholarshipt
A scholarship of $150, founded by the Hon. James Dunsmuir,
will be awarded to the undergraduate student standing highest in
the Mining Engineering Course of the Fourth Year in Applied
Science, and proceeding to the work of the Fifth Year.
University Scholarship in Applied Science
A scholarship of $150 will be awarded to a student proceeding
to the Fourth Year in Applied Science, the award to be based on
the work of the Third Year.
•See Page 37.
fOriginally donated to the Boyal Institution (See Historical Sketch), this
has been transferred by that body, with the consent of the donors, to the
University of British Columbia. Medals, Scholarships and Prizes 45
Royal Institution Scholarship in Applied Science
A scholarship of $150 will be awarded for general proficiency
in the work of the Second Year in Applied Science.
G. M. Dawson Scholarship
A scholarship of $50 will be awarded to the undergraduate
student standing highest in the Geological Engineering course, in
Geological subjects, in the Fourth Year of the Faculty of Applied
Science, and proceeding to the work of the Fifth Year.
4.    IN AGRICULTURE
University Scholarship in Agriculture
A scholarship in Agriculture of $150 will be awarded to a
student proceeding to the Second Year, the award to be based on
the work of the First Year.
The David Thom Scholarship
A scholarship in Agriculture of $100 will be awarded to a
student proceeding to the Third Year, the award to be based on the
work of the Second Year.
MATRICULATION  SCHOLARSHIPS
University Senior Matriculation Scholarship
One scholarship of $150 will be awarded upon the results of
the Senior Matriculation Examination to the candidate of highest
standing in the Province.
Royal Institution Senior Matriculation Scholarships
Scholarships of the value of $150 each will be awarded to two
other students upon the results of the Senior Matriculation examinations. One of these scholarships will be for open competition
throughout the Province; the other will be for open competition
in all school districts of the Province other than the City of Vancouver, the City of North Vancouver, the District Municipalities
of North Vancouver, West Vancouver, and Burnaby, and the City
of New Westminster.
Royal Institution Junior Matriculation Scholarships
Eight General Proficiency scholarships will be awarded on the
result of the Junior Matriculation examinations: (a) $150 to the
candidate of highest standing in the Province, and (b) $150 to
the candidate of next highest standing in each of the following 46 The University of British Columbia
districts: (1) Victoria District, (2) Vancouver Island (exclusive
of Victoria District), and Northern Mainland, (exclusive of North
Vancouver and West Vancouver), (3), Vancouver Central District
(comprising the former limits of the City of Vancouver), together
with West Vancouver and North Vancouver, (4) Part of the Lower
Mainland in the Fraser Harbour area, (5) The Fraser Valley, (6)
Yale, (7) Kootenays.
These scholarships will be paid only to students in attendance
at the University of British Columbia, with the exception that the
Victoria District Scholarship will be paid to any winner of that
scholarship in attendance at Victoria College.
Winners of all Matriculation Scholarships must notify the
Registrar before September 1st of their intention of attending
the University (or Victoria College in the case of the Victoria
District Junior Matriculation Scholarship) during the following
session; failing such notification, the winner's rights will lapse.
Postponement of Matriculation Scholarships will be granted
only on medical grounds.
PRIZES
1.    IN ALL FACULTIES
The University Essay Prize*
A book prize of the value of $25, open to all students of the
University, will be awarded for an essay on a special literary
subject, to be announced at the beginning of the session by the
Department of English.
The Players' Club Prize*
A prize of $50, given by the Players' Club, is offered for an
original play suitable for the Club's Christmas performance. The
award will be made on the recommendation of the Faculty members of the Advisory Board of the Players' Club. All entries for
this prize must be in the hands of the Honorary President of the
Players' Club not later than September 30th, 1934.
The Isabel Ecclestone Mackay Prize*
A prize of $25 from the estate of the late Mrs. Isabel Ecclestone
Mackay will be awarded to the student of the University who submits an original poem in the English language which shall be
deemed of sufficient merit, the award to be made upon the recommendation of the Head of the Department of English.    The poem
•See Page 37. Medals, Scholarships and Prizes 47
submitted may have been published or may be published subsequently by the writer.
Poems entered for this competition must be in the hands of
the Registrar not later than the last day of the final examinations.
2.    IN ARTS AND SCIENCE
The French Government Book Prize
A book prize, offered by the French Consul for Western Canada
on behalf of the French Government, will be awarded to a student
of the French language on the recommendation of the Head of
the Department of Modern Languages.
The John Marr Memorial Prize*
A prize of $25, given by Mr. J. F. K. English, known as the
John Marr Memorial Prize, will be awarded to the student, enrolled in the Education class or pursuing graduate work for the
M.A. degree with Education as a Minor, who presents the best
essay on some phase of Secondary Education in this Province.
The essay may be prepared especially for the Prize Competition
or it may be submitted as part of a Course Requirement. It must
be submitted to the Head of the Department of Education not
later than the last day of the sessional examinations.
3.    IN APPLIED SCIENCE
The Convocation Prize
A prize of $50, given by Convocation of The University of
British Columbia, will be awarded to the student in the Fifth
Year of Applied Science whose record, in the opinion of the
Faculty, is the most outstanding.
The Walter Moberly Memorial Prize
A book prize of the value of $25, given by the Vancouver
Branch of the Engineering Institute of Canada in memory of the
late Walter Moberly, will be awarded for the best engineering thesis
submitted by any Fifth Year student in the Faculty of Applied
Science.
The Engineering Profession's Prizes
Five book prizes, each of the value of $25, are offered by the
Engineering Profession in British Columbia (Association of Professional Engineers) for competition by those students in the
Fourth Year of the Faculty of Applied Science who are registered
as engineering pupils according to the by-laws of the Association.
•See Page  37. 48 The University of British Columbia
One of these prizes is awarded for the best summer essay in
each of any five branches of engineering, to be selected and specified
by the Faculty.
The five successful essays may be made available by the Faculty
to the Council of the Engineering Profession and, through the
Council, may be referred to or quoted in the literature of the
Profession.
The Provincial Board of Health Prizes
The Provincial Board of Health of the Province of British
Columbia offers the sum of $100 in prizes for competition in the
Course in Public Health Nursing.
The Engineering Institute of Canada Prize
The Engineering Institute of Canada offers an annual prize
of $25 to each of eleven Canadian Universities of which the University of British Columbia is one.
The prize will be awarded to a student of the Fourth Year in
Applied Science on the basis of the marks made in his academic
work in that year. His activities in the students' engineering
organization or in the local branch of a recognized engineering
society will also be considered.
BURSARIES
The Captain LeRoy Memorial Bursary*
This bursary of the annual value of $250 was given by the
Universities Service Club in memory of their comrades who fell
in the Great War. It is named after Captain 0. E. LeRoy, who
commanded the overseas contingent from this University and who
was killed at Passchendaele in 1917.
It will be awarded to a student, or students, requiring financial
assistance to enable him, or them, to attend the University. For
this purpose it may be awarded to a matriculant, to a student of
any year or to a graduate student of the University proceeding to
post-graduate work in this or any approved university. In making
the award preference will be given first to returned soldiers, then
to the dependents of soldiers, and finally to suitable candidates
from the student body at large.
Application must contain a statement of the academic record
and special circumstances of the applicant, with two supporting
references, and, in the case of the preferred categories, of the war
record of the soldier.
•See Page 37. Medals, Scholarships and Prizes 49
The award will be made by the Senate upon the recommendation
of the Faculties acting in consultation with the Executive or accredited representatives of the Universities Service Club.
The Khaki University and Young Men's Christian
Association Memorial Fund Bursaries*
A sum of money given to the University by the administrators
of the Khaki University of Canada provides a fund from which
are awarded annually ten bursaries of the value of $100 each,
known as the Khaki University and Young Men's Christian Association Memorial Bursaries.
Under conditions specified by the donors these bursaries may
be used for undergraduate purposes only, and in making the awards
a preference is given to the sons and daughters of the soldiers of
the Great War. The financial necessities of candidates are also
taken into account.
To be eligible for an award a soldier's dependent must obtain
at least second class standing, i.e. 65 per cent.; for all others 75
per cent, is required.
Dependents of soldiers and others who have expectations of
attaining standing as stated above and who are in need of financial
assistance should apply to the Registrar on the special form provided, not later than the last day of the final examinations.
These bursaries are open to students from Victoria College
proceeding to a course of study in this University.
The American Woman's Club Bursary*
A bursary of $125, given by the American Woman's Club of
Vancouver will be available for 1934-35 to assist a woman undergraduate who has completed at least one year in Arts and Science
with satisfactory standing, and who could not otherwise continue
her course. Application must be made to the Registrar not later
than September 1st.
The University Women's Club Bursary*
A bursary of $100 given by the University Women's Club of
Vancouver will be available for a woman student of high scholastic
standing in the Third Year of the Faculty of Arts and Science who
is proceeding to the work of the Fourth Year.
•See Page  37. 50 The University of British Columbia
David Thom Bursaries
From the funds of the David Thom Estate a sum of $160 is
available annually for the following bursaries:
1. A sum of $100 to be awarded to the junior or senior matriculant with the highest standing who is registering for the first
time in the Faculty of Agriculture. In the awarding of this
bursary Regulation 9 under General Regulations for Medals,
Scholarships and Prizes does not apply.
*2. A sum of $60 to be awarded to a student who has satisfactorily
completed the work of the First Year in Agriculture and is
proceeding to the work of the Second Year.
Special Bursaries Fund*
For the Session 1934-35 a Special Bursaries Fund has been
made available by the Board of Governors to enable students to
attend the University who would not otherwise be able to do so.
To be eligible for an award from this fund a student must have
attained at least Second Class standing in the examinations last
written, and must give evidence of need.
Applications for these bursaries must be in the hands of the
Registrar not later than October 1st, 1934. Special forms may be
obtained in the Registrar's office.
LOANS
General Loan Fund
The General Loan Fund is maintained by annual grants made
by the Board of Governors. Its operation is described in paragraph
11 under General Regulations for Medals, Scholarships, Prizes, etc.
The Canadian Institute of Mining and Metallurgy,
B. C. Division, Fund
This is a fund of $100, given by the Canadian Institute of
Mining and Metallurgy to the University as a trust to be used for
loans to students taking the mining course. Applicants for loans
must be recommended by the Departments of Geology, Mining and
Metallurgy.
The David Thom Fund
From the David Thom Estate funds a sum of $1500 has been
set aside for loans to Third and Fourth Year students in Agriculture who have been unable to borrow from the General Loan Fund
or who have obtained loans from that fund insufficient for their
needs.
•See Page 37. THE
FACULTY
OF  0
ARTS AND SCIENCE TIME TABLE
FACULTY OF ARTS
KEY TO BUILDINGS:   A, Arts; Ag, Agr
Mornings
Monday
Room
Tuesday
Room
Wednesday
Room
Biology 2	
Biology 3	
Botany 6 e	
Economics 6	
Education	
English 1  	
English 13	
Ap 101
Ap 101
Ap 101
S 300
Ap 204
A 103
106, 203,
200
A 100
A 101
104, 105,
108
Ap 102
A 102
A 207
A 205
A 204
A 208
A 201
Ap 100
S200
Botany 2	
Botany 4 	
Economics 2	
Economics 17	
Education	
English 1	
French 2,
Biology 2	
Biology 3	
Botany 6 e	
Economics 6	
Education	
English 1	
English 13	
Ap 101
Ap 101
S300
Ap 100
Ap204
A 100
106, 205,
206
A 101,
104, 105,
207
Ap 102
A 108
A 201
A 204
A 103
A 102
A 208
S200
Ap 101
Ap 101
AplOl
AplOl
S300
Ap204
A 103,
10S, 203,
206
A 100
French 2
Sees, a, b, c, d	
Geology 4	
B'rench 2,
A 101
Geology 5 and 12	
104, 105,
9
Geology 4	
Greek A 	
History 15	
Latin 7	
Mathematics 3..„	
Mathematics 10	
Mathematics 17	
Philosophy 1 a. Sec. 1 .
Physics 1	
108
German 1, Sec. a	
Ap 102
German 4	
A 102
History 4	
A 207
Latin 2 a	
A20S
Latin 5	
A 204
Matheiaati'"1 io
A 208
physics 2 .^>	
A 201
Philosophy l a, Sec. 1
AplOO
S 200
Zoology 3  	
1
Ap 101
Ap 101
S 300
S 400
A 201
A 102
A 204
A 100
A 104
A 105
Ap 100
A 101
Aioa
203, 205,
206 '
Ap 202
A 103
S 210
Botany 3	
Ap 101
Ap 101
S417
A 100
A 103
Ap 202
A 204
A 104
Ap 102
A 203
A 108
A 101
A 201
A 105,
106, 205
A 102
A 207
Botany 5 b _	
Botany 6 b and d	
Botany 0 c	
Ap 101
Chemistry 9 	
Chemistry 3	
S 300
Economics 1, Sec. 1.
Economics 1, Sec. 3
Economics 1, Sec. 1
S400
A 201
Education	
Economics 19	
A 102
English io..         JW
Education	
A 204
English 9  	
B'rench 4 a	
English 9 	
French 3 h	
A 100
Geology 2        	
German 1, Sec. b	
Government 1	
History 14
Latin 2 b
Mathematics 1,
Sees. 5, 6, 7	
A 104
10
French 4 b	
A 105
Geology 1 	
Ap 100
Geology 7	
Ap 106
Mathematics l,
Sees. 1, 2, 3, 4	
History 20	
A 101
Mathematics 1,
Sees. 1, 2, 3, 4	
A 106,
Philosophy 1 a, Sec. 2
Philosophy 8, Sec 2
203, 205,
Mathematics 13	
Philosophy la. Sec. 2
Philosophy 8, See. 2    ,
206
A 103
S 210
Agricultural
Ag 104
AplOO
S417
S 400
S200
Ap 202
A 103
A105, 106
108, 206
A 201
Ap 102
A 205
A 208
A 203
A 101
A 204
A 102
S 210
AplOl
Ap 101
Ap 235
S 300
S417
Ap 100
A 100
A 206
S 200
A 104,
105, 108,
203
106, 208
A 100
Ap 102
A 201
A 207
A 103
A 101
A 205
Ap 101
Agricultural
Ag 104
Ap 100
Biology 1	
Chemistry 7	
Economics 1, Sec. 2	
Economics 5	
Education	
English 14	
French 1
Sees, a, b, c, d	
French 4 e  	
Geology 8	
German, Beg., Sec. a.....
Government 4	
History 11	
History 19	
Mathematics 2	
Philosophy 3 	
Physics 5	
Chemistry 1, Sec. 2
Chemistry 4	
Botany 6 b 	
Economics 1, Sec. 4
Economics 1, Sec. 2
S 417
Ap 202
11
French 1,
Sees, e, f, g, h	
English 14   	
French 1,
A 105,
106, 108,
Ap 102
German, Beg. Sec. a
Government 4	
History 13  	
Latin 1	
Philosophy 8, Sec. 1
A 102
S 210
Zoology 1	
Ap 101
CONSULT DEPARTMENT HEADS FOR --- 1934-35
AND SCIENCE
iculture; Ap, Applied Science;
S, Science.
Mornings
Thursday
Room
Friday
Room
Saturday
Room
Botany 2	
Economics 2	
Economics 17	
Education	
"s's'bo
AplOO
Ap204
A 100,
106, 205,
206
A 101,
104, 105,
207
Ap 102
A 108
A 201
A 204
A 103
A 102
A 208
S 200
AplOl
Ap 101
Biology 2 	
Botany 6 t	
Botany 7 a 	
Economics 6	
Education	
English 1	
English 13	
French 2,
Ap 101
Ap 101
s sob"
Ap 204
A 103,
106, 203,
206
A 100
A 101,
104, 105,
108
Ap 102
A 102
A 207
A 205
A 204
A 208
A 201
AplOO
S200
Botany 5 bl.ab. 	
Chemistry .9 Lab	
Economics 2	
Economics 17	
Education _
English 1	
French 2,
S800
Ap 100
Ap 204
A 100,
106, 205,
206
A 101,
104, 105,
207
A 108
A 201
A 204
A 103
A 102
A 208
S 200
French 2,
Geology 5 and 12	
Geology 10	
German 1, Sec. a	
German 4	
History 4	
Latin 2 a	
Latin 5 	
German 1, Sec. a 	
German 4	
9
History 4	
Latin 2 a	
Greek A	
History IS	
Latin 5	
Mathematics 16	
"FhysicsjS?	
Latin 7	
Mathematics 3 	
Mathematics 10	
Mathematics 17 ,
Philosophy 1 b, Sec. 1
TOoTBgyT	
P~hysics 2 ^}	
Zoology 3	
Botany 8	
Ap 101
AplOl
S417
A 100
A 103
Ap202
A 204
A 104
Ap 102
A 203
A 108
A 101
A 201
A 105,
108, 205
A 102
A 207
Botany 5 a	
Ap 101
S 300
S400
A 201
A 102
A 204
A 100
A 104
A 105
Ap 100
A 101
A 106,
208, 205,
206
Ap 202
A 103
Botany 6 c	
Chemistry 2	
Chemistry 9 Lab	
A 100
A 103
Ap 202
A 204
A 104
aTob"
A 108
A 101
A 201
A 105,
106, 205
A 102
A 207
Chemistry 9	
Economics 1, Sec. 3	
Economics 4	
Education	
English 10 .,
French 4 a	
Geology 2	
German I, Sec. b	
Government 1	
History 14	
Economies l, Sec. 1
Economics 9	
Economics 19	
Education	
English 9	
French 3 b	
French 4 b	
Geology 7	
History 20	
Mathematics 1,
Sees. 1, 2, 3, 4
Economics 1, Sec. 3	
Economics 4	
Education	
English 10 	
French 4 a	
Geology 10	
German 1, Sec. b	
Government 1	
History 14	
Latin 2 b	
Mathematics 1,
Sees. 5, 6, 7	
Mathematics 13	
Philosophy 2	
10
Mathematics 1,
Sees. 5, 6, 7	
Mathematics 13	
Philosophy 2	
Philosophy 1 b, Sec. a....
Philosophy 8, Sec. 2
Botany 1	
Ap 101
S 300
S417
Ap 100
A 100
A 206
S200
A 104,
105, 108,
203
A106, 208
Agricultural
Agl04
S400
S 200
Ap 202
A 103
A105, 106,
108, 206
A 201
Ap 102
A 205
A 208
A 203
A 101
A 204
A 102
S 210
AplOl
Ap 101
Botany 5 b Lab	
Chemistry 1, Sec. 2
Chemistry 1, Sec. 2
Chemistry 9 Lab	
Economics 1, Sec. 4
S 300
Chemistry 4	
Economics 1, Sec. 2
Ap 100
A 100
A 206
S 200
A 104,
105, 108,
203
\ 106, 208
A 100
A 201
A 207
A 103
A 205
A 101
Education	
English 14	
English 19	
French 1,
Sees, a, b, c, d	
French 4 e   	
Geology 8      	
German, Beg. Sec. a
Government 4	
History 11	
History 19    	
Mathematics 2	
Philosophy 3	
Physics 5 	
Zoology 6	
Zoology 5	
French 1,
French 1,
11
French 3 a	
French 3 a	
Geography 5 	
Geology 10  	
Government 2	
History 13	
Latin 1 	
Philosophy 8, Sec. 1
Geography 5	
Geology 6	
Government 2	
History 13	
A 100
Ap 102
A 201
A 207
A 103
A 101
A 205
AplOl
SUBJECTS NOT IN THIS TIME TABLE Afternoons
TIME TABLE
Monday
Botany 3 Lab	
Botany 5 c Lab.	
Chemistry 1, Sec. 1	
Chemistry 1 Lab.,
Sees, a and b	
Education	
English 2 a	
French 1,
Sees, i, j	
French 4e	
History 10
Latin 3	
Philosophy 7	
Philosophy 9	
Statistics 1	
Zoology 5 Lab	
Zoology 6 Lab	
Bacteriology 1 and 2
Botany 3 Lab	
Botany 5 c Lab	
Chemistry 7 Lab.	
Education	
English 16	
French 4 c	
Geography 1	
German, Beg. Sec. c
German 2..	
History 1	
Philosophy 1 c	
Physics 5 Lab	
Sociology 1	
Zoology 5 Lab	
Zoology 6 Lab	
Bacteriology 1 and 2..
Botany 1 Lab...
Chemistry 1 Lab.,
Sees, a, b  	
Chemistry 2 Lab. a ..
Chemistry 7 Lab	
Economics 15	
Education	
Geology 5	
Physics 5 Lab	
Zoology 5 Lab.	
Zoology 6 Lab	
Bacteriology 1 and
Botany 1 Lab	
Chemistry 1 Lab.,
Sees, a, b	
Chemistry 2 Lab. a
Chemistry 7 Lab	
Economics 15....„	
Geology 5 Lab.	
Physics 5 Lab	
Zoology 5 Lab.	
Zoology 6 Lab	
Chemistry 1 Lab.,
Sees, a, b. .
Chemistry 2 Lab, a...
Room
S300
A 108
A 100
Ap 100
A 104,
105
A 204
A 106
A 207
A 201
Ap202
S 210
A 106
A 206
A 203
Ap 100
A 205
A 207
A 100
S210
——
Ap 120
A 100
Apl02
Apl20
Tuesday
Botany 2	
Botany 4	
Botany 6 e	
Education 1	
A 100
English 20 	
A 104
Geology 7 Lab	
Ap 106
Mathematics 1,
Sees, l, 2, 3, 4	
Physics 3 Lab., Sec. 1
Economics 13	
Economics 14	
Zoology 2 Lab	
Zoology 3 Lab	
Bacteriology 1 and 2
Biology 1, Sec. 1	
Botany 2	
Botany 4	
Botany 6 e	
Chemistry 4 Lab	
Education	
English 1	
Geology 1 Lab.	
Geology 7 Lab	
Latin 8 B	
Physics 8 Lab., Sec. 1
Zoology 2 Lab	
Zoology 3 Lab	
Biology 1, Sec. 1	
Botany 2 Lab.	
Botany 4 Lab	
Chemistry 2 Lab. b	
Chemistry 4 Lab.	
Education 2	
Geology 6 Lab	
Greek, Begs	
Physics 3 Lab., Sec. 1 .
Zoology 2 Lab	
Zoology 8 Lab	
Biology 1, See. 2	
Botany 2 Lab	
Botany 4 Lab	
Chemistry 2 Lab. b	
Chemistry 4 Lab	
Geology 6 Lab	
Zoology 2 Lab	
Zoology 3 Lab	
Biology 1 Lab. 2	
Botany 2 Lab.	
Botany 4 Lab	
Chemistry 2 Lab, b
Room
A 106,
203, 205,
206
Ap"'T"
A 102
A 104
A 100,
106,'205,
206
Ap 106
A 203
A 100
Wednesday
Botany 3 Lab.	
Botany 5 a and c	
Botany 6 c Lab	
Chemistry 1, Sec. 1...
Education	
English 2 a	
French 1,
Sees, i, j	
French 4 e	
Geology 7 Lab.
History 10	
Latin 3 „
Philosophy 7	
Philosophy 9	
Statistics 1	
Zoology 5 Lab....
Zoology 6 Lab..
Botany 3 Lab.	
Botany 5 a and c	
Botany 6c Lab	
Education	
English 16	
French 4 c	
Geology 7 Lab 	
Geography l_	
German, Beg. Sec. c
German 2 _..
History 1	
Philosophy 1 e	
Sociology 1	
Statistics 1 _
Zoology 5 Lab 	
Zoology 6 Lab	
Room
S300
A 108
A 100,
Ap 100
A 104,
105
A 204
Ap 106
A 106
A 207
A 201
Ap 202
Ap208
A 106
A 206
A 203
Ap 106
Ap 100
A 205
A 207
A 100
S210
A 108
Ap208
CONSULT DEPARTMENT HEADS FOR —Continued
Afternoons
Thursday
Room
Friday
Room
Bacteriology 5	
Biology 1, Sec. 5	
Biology 3   	
Botany 6 d Lab	
Chemistry 1, Sec. 1	
Chemistry 8 Lab. a	
Education	
English 2 a 	
French l,
S800
A 100
A 104
English 20	
A 103
A 100,
Ap 100
A 104,
105
A 204
Geology 9	
Mathematics 1,
Sees. 5, 6, 7	
Ap 112
A 105,
106, 205
Ap "T"
Ap212
Physics 8 Lab., Sec 2...
1
Economics 13	
Geology 2 Lab	
History 10	
Latin 3   	
Philosophy 7	
Philosophy 9	
Zoology 7 Lab	
A 106
A 207
A 201
Ap202
Bacteriology l and 2	
Biolosrv 2. S«- .1
Botany 6 d l.ab	
Chemistry 3 Lab. a	
Chemistry 4 Lab.
Education	
English 16	
French 4 c	
A 106
A 206
A 203
AplOO
A 104
A 103,
106, 205,
206
A 106
English 1	
English 2 c	
2
Geology 9	
A 203
German, Beg. Sec. c
German 2	
History 1	
Philosophy 1 c	
Sociology 1       ■	
Zoology 7 Lab	
A 205
A 207
A 100
S210
A 103
Physics 3 Lab., Sec. 2
Ap "T"
Ap212
Botany 7 Lab	
Biology 1, Sec. 6	
Biology 3	
Botany 6 d Lab	
Chemistry 1 Lab.,
Sees, d, e   	
Chemistry 2 Lab. a	
Chemistry 3 Lah. a
Chemistry 4 Lab	
Education 2	
English 24	
aToo
A 104
Chemistry l Lab.,
Chemistry 2 Lab. b	
Chemistry 8 Lab. b	
3
Education 2 	
A 100
Physics 3 Lab., Sec. 2
Biology 1, Sec. 4	
Chemistry 3 Lab. b	
Zoology 1 Lab	
Chemistry 1 Lab.,
Sees, d, e.._ ,
Chemistry 2 Lab. a ....
Chemistry 3 Lab. a	
Chemistry 4 Lab	
English 24      	
Zoology 7 Lab	
4
A 104
Chemistry 1 Lab.,
Sees, d, e	
Chemistry 2 Lab. a	
5
SUBJECTS NOT IN THIS TIME TABLE Faculty of Arts and Science Supplemental Examinations
SEPTEMBER,   1934
Date
Hour
First Year
History 1,2,3	
English Literature	
Latin Authors	
Chemistryl	
Latin Composition	
French	
Geometry	
Greek A	
Physics 1, 2 lj|
Trigonometry	
Algebra	
English Composition	
German Beg. and 1	
Biology 1	
Economics 1	
Geography 1	
Second Year
History 1,2, 3	
English Literature	
Latin 2	
Chemistry 1, 2	
French	
Geometry	
Greek 2	
Physics 1, 2, 3	
Botany	
Calculus	
Zoology 1	
Algebra	
Psychology	
Biology 1	
German Beg., 1 and 2	
Economics 1,2	
Economics 10	
Third and
Fourth Years
Wednesday,
September 12th
Thursday,
Friday,
Saturday,
Monday,
Tuesday,
September 13th
September 14th
September 15th
September 17th
September 18th
Wednesday,
September 19th
9 A.M.
1 P.M.
9 A.M.
1 P.M.
9 A.M.
1 P.M.
9 A.M.
9 A.M.
1 P.M.
9 A.M.
1 P.M.
9 A.M.
1P.M.
a
3
era FACULTY OF ARTS AND SCIENCE
The degrees offered in this Faculty are Bachelor of Arts (B.A.),
Bachelor of Commerce (B.Com.), and Master of Arts (M.A.).
Courses which do not lead to degrees are offered in Teacher
Training and Social Service.
^COURSES LEADING TO THE DEGREE OF B.A.
The degree of B.A. is granted with Honours or as a Pass degree.
A Pass degree will be granted on completion of courses amounting
to 60 units chosen in conformity with Calendar regulations. No
distinction is made between Pass and Honour students in the First
and Second Years, except as regards prerequisites for later work,
but in the Third and Fourth Years there are special requirements
for Honour Students.
Students holding the degree of B.Com. from this University
may proceed to the degree of B.A. in one year by completing 15
additional units of work open to students in their Third and
Fourth Years, provided that their additional units are chosen so
as to complete the requirements for the B.A. degree.
It is also possible to obtain the B.A. and B.Com. degrees
concurrently in five years on completion of 75 units chosen so as
to cover the requirements for both degrees.
Double courses are offered in Arts and Science and Applied
Science leading to the degrees of B.A. and B.A.Sc, or B.A. and
B.A.Sc. (in Nursing).
Credit will not be given for more than 15 units in the First or
Second Year of the Winter Session; nor for more than 18 units in
the Third or Fourth Year. (See regulations under "First and
Second Years" and "Third and Fourth Years.")
Credits obtained at the Summer Session (see "University
Summer Session") may be combined with Winter Session credits
to complete the 60 units required for the degree of B.A.; but not
more than 30 units of credit may be obtained in the two academic
years subsequent to Junior Matriculation nor more than 15 in the
academic year subsequent to Senior Matriculation. The degree of
B.A. will not be granted within three years from Senior Matriculation nor within four years from Junior Matriculation.
The maximum credit for Summer Session work in any one
Calendar year is 6 units; and the maximum credit for work other
than that of the regular Summer and Winter Sessions is 3 units
•The University reserves the right to limit the registration in, or to
cancel, any of the courses listed In this Faculty. Limitation may be imposed
if the numbers desiring any course are found to be too large for the lecture
rooms and laboratories available for that course, or for the number of
Instructors in the Department concerned, or for the equipment and supplies
which can be obtained. Certain courses may be cancelled if the numbers of
instructors In the Departments concerned prove to be Inadequate to offer all
the  courses  listed. 58 Faculty op Arts and Science
per academic year, and 15 units in all subsequent to Senior
Matriculation or First Year Arts.
No credit will be granted for work done at other universities
in the same academic year in which work has been attempted at
this University, whether in the Summer Session or in the Winter
Session or otherwise. Extra-mural work done at other universities
prior to registration at this University may be accepted, if approved
by the Faculty, but may not exceed 3 units in respect of any one
academic year or 15 units in all subsequent to Senior Matriculation.
If a student is granted credit for extra-mural work taken elsewhere
the number of units which he may take at this University without
attendance at a Winter or Summer Session will be correspondingly
reduced.
Candidates for the degree of B.A. are advised to attend at
least one Winter Session, preferably that of the Fourth Year.
Courses are described in terms of units. A unit normally
consists of one lecture hour (or one continuous laboratory period
of not less than two or more than three hours) each week throughout the session, or two lecture hours (or equivalent laboratory
periods) throughout a single term.
Note 1:—Students in any of the affiliated Theological Colleges
who file with the Registrar a written statement expressing their
intention of graduating in Theology will be allowed to offer in each
year of their Arts course, in place of optional subjects set down
in the Calendar for the Year and eourse in which they are
registered, Religious Knowledge options, to the extent of three
units taken from the following list: Hebrew, Biblical Literature,
New Testament Greek, Church History, Christian Ethics and
Apologetics.
Note 2:—Students who intend to enter Normal School at any
time before or after graduation are reminded they will have to
meet the requirements for Normal Entrance in Health IV,
Geography II, Arithmetic II and Art I.
First and Second Years
1. The requirements of the first two years consist of 30 units,
15 of which must be taken in each year.  Courses must be chosen in
conformity with the requirements that follow.   Details of courses
are given under the various departments.
*Each student must take: Units
(a) English 1 in the First Year and English 2 in the
Second Year       6
t(fc)  The first two courses in a language offered for
Matriculation, one course in each year     6
•For credit that can be given for Senior Matriculation standing, complete
or partial, see Page 28.
tSee   Regulation   "2." First and Second Years 59
(c) Mathematics 1, in the First Year     3
(d) Economics 1, or History 1 or 2 or 4, or Philosophy
1 (a) or 1 (b)     3
(e) Biology   1,   or   Chemistry  1,   or  Geology  1,   or
Physics 1, or Physics 2     3
(/)   Three courses—not already chosen—selected from
the following:
Biology 1, Botany 1, Chemistry 1, Chemistry 2,
Economics 1, Economics 2, Economics 10,
French 1, French 2, Geography 1, Geology 1,
Geology 2, fBeginners' German, German 1,
German 2, Greek A, Greek 2, History 1, History 2, History 4, Latin 1, Latin 2 (a), Latin
2 (b), Mathematics 2, Mathematics 3, Philosophy 1 (a), Philosophy 1 (b), Physics 1 or
Physics 2, Physics 3, Zoology 1     9
Note:—Botany 1, Zoology 1, Geology 1 and 2,
Geography 1, Economics 10, History 4 and
Philosophy 1 (b) are not open to First Year
students. Economics 1, and Philosophy 1 are
open to First Year students only if the permission of the Heads of these departments is
obtained. History 2 is open to First Year
students only if they are preparing for entrance to the Normal School. Geography 1,
Geology 1, and Philosophy 1 (b), normally
Third Year subjects, may be taken by Second
Year students (Full Undergraduate and Conditioned). Geology 1 must be taken in the
Second Year by students intending to take the
Honour course in Geology.
2. Students who have not matriculated in German may take
the Beginners' Course to meet the Junior Matriculation requirements (without University credit) and follow it up with German 1
and German 2 to satisfy the language requirements under Section
1 (b). Students who contemplate specializing in any of the natural
sciences are advised to take German under this regulation.
3. No student in his First Year may elect more than one
beginners' course in a language, and no beginners' course in a
language will count towards a degree unless followed by a second
year's work in that language.
4. Except in the case of beginners' courses, no course in a
language may be taken by a student who has not offered that
tSee Regulations "3" and "4." 60 Faculty of Arts and Science
language at Matriculation. A beginners' course in a language may
not be taken for credit by a student who has obtained credit for
that language at Matriculation.
Greek A (which may be taken by students having no previous
knowledge of Greek), followed by Greek 2, will be accepted as
satisfying the Language requirements in the case of students who
have matriculated in Latin.
5. A student taking three languages in the first two years may
defer the course selected under Section 1 (e) to the Third or
Fourth Year, and a student taking four science courses may defer
the course selected under Section 1 (d) to the Third or Fourth
Year.
6. Students who intend to enter the Teacher Training Course
are advised to take Philosophy 1 in the First or Second Year.
Note-.—Students thinking of entering Applied Science are
referred to the list of subjects required to be taken by them in
First Year Arts and to the regulations in reference to these, given
under "Admission" and "General Outline of Courses" in Applied
Science. They are advised to attend the noon hour talks on the
choice of a profession and on the life and work in vocations likely
to appeal to Applied Science graduates.
To ensure the conformity of their courses to Calendar regulations, all students in their Second Year are advised to submit to
the Dean of the Faculty, on or before March 31st of each year, a
scheme of the courses they propose to take during the last two
years.
Third and Fourth Years
The requirements of the Third and Fourth Years consist of
30 units, of which students must take, in their Third Year, not
less than 15 units. The graduation standing is determined by the
results of the Third and Fourth Years combined.
Pass Curriculum
1. A minimum of 15 units must be taken in two Major subjects,
not less than 6 units in either, and a minimum of 6 units in some
other subject or subjects of the Third and Fourth Years. Work
in the First or Second Year is required in each of the Major
subjects, except Education and Bacteriology. Both Major subjects
must be chosen from one of the following groups:
(a) Bacteriology, Botany, Chemistry, Geology, Mathematics,
Physics, Zoology.
(b) Economics, Education (not more than six units), English,
French, German, Government, Greek, History, Latin,
Mathematics, Philosophy. Honour Courses 61
2. Details of courses available in the Third and Fourth Years
are given under the various departments.
3. Only two subjects (6 units) of the First or Second Year
courses may be taken in the combined Third and Fourth Years.
In a number of these courses extra reading will be required of
Third and Fourth Year students.
When two First or Second Year subjects, other than a Beginners' Language or Language 1, are taken in the Third and Fourth
Years, not more than one of these subjects may be outside the
departments in which the student is doing his major work.
4. No credit will be given for a language course normally taken
in the First Year unless it is taken in the Third Year and continued
in the Fourth Year. Some courses, however, are intended for
Honour students only.
5. Students in the Third and Fourth Years may, with the
consent of the departments concerned, take one or two courses of
private reading (each to count not more than 3 units), provided
that:
1. (a)  The  candidate  for  a  reading  course  shall  have  com
pleted his First and Second Years and shall have taken
at least 6 units either of Second or Third Year work
or of Second and Third Year work in the subject in
which the reading course is taken; and
(b) shall have made an average of at least Second Class in
the 6 units in question.
2. Both reading courses shall not be chosen in the same subject.
3. A reading course shall not be taken concurrently with Extra-
Sessional or with Summer Session courses except by a
student in the Fourth Year.
Credit for a course of private reading is part of the maximum
of 15 units which may be taken in addition to the regular work of
Winter and Summer Sessions; and no other additional work may
be taken in the same academic year.
HONOURS
1. Students whose proposed scheme of work involves Honour
courses must obtain the consent of the departments concerned and
of the Dean before entering on these courses; and this consent
will normally be granted only to those students who have a clear
academic record at the end of their Second Year with at least
Second Class standing in the subject or subjects of specialization.
(Cards of application for admission to Honour courses may be
obtained at the Registrar's office.) 62 Faculty of Arts and Science
2. Certain departments offer Honour courses either alone or in
combination with other departments. For Honours in a single
department, at least 18 of the requisite 30 units must be taken
in the department concerned, and at least 6 outside it. For Honours
in combined courses, at least 12 units are required in each of two
subjects.  Particulars of these courses are given below.
3. 'Candidates for Honours may, with the consent of the
department concerned, offer a special reading course (to count not
more than 3 units) in addition to the reading courses offered on
page 61, section 5.
4. All candidates for Honours may, at the option of the
department or departments concerned, be required to present a
graduating essay embodying the results of some investigation that
they have made independently. Credit for the graduating essay
will be not less than 3 or more than 6 units.
5. Candidates for Honours are required, at the end of their
Fourth Year, to take a general examination, oral or written, or
both, as the dePartment or departments concerned shall decide.
This examination is designed to test the student's knowledge of
his chosen subject or subjects as a whole, and is in addition to the
ordinary class examinations of the Third and Fourth Years.
6. Honours are of two grades—First Class and Second Class.
Students who, in the opinion of the department concerned, have
not attained a sufficiently high ranking, may be awarded a pass
degree. If a combined Honour course is taken, First Class Honours
will be given only if both the departments concerned agree; and
an Honour degree will be withheld if either department refuses a
sufficiently high grade.
7. It is hoped to offer the following Honour Courses during the
session 1934-35. But if, for the reasons stated in the footnote to
page 57, it is found impossible to do so, the University reserves
the right to refuse new registrations in any of them.
HONOUR COURSES IN SINGLE DEPARTMENTS
Biology (Botany Option)
Prerequisites:  Biology 1, Chemistry 1, Botany 1.
Chemistry 2 and 3, Physics 1 or 2, and Zoology 1 are required
before completion of the course and should be taken as early as
possible.
Required Courses: Botany 3 (a), 4, 5 (a), and 6 (c).
Optional Courses: Biology 2 and 3; courses in Botany not
specifically required; and courses in Zoology. Optional courses
should be selected in consultation with the department. Honour Courses 63
Biology (Zoology Option)
Prerequisites:  Biology 1, Chemistry 1, Botany 1.
Physics 1 or 2, Zoology 1, Chemistry 2 and 3 are required
before completion of the course and should be taken as early as
possible.
Students specializing in Entomology may substitute Zoology 9
for one of the required courses given above.
Required Courses: Zoology 2, 3, 5, 6.
Optional Courses: Zoology 4, 7, 8, 9; courses in Botany;
Geology 6. These optional courses should be selected in consultation with the Head of the department.
Chemistry
Prerequisites: Chemistry 1; Physics 1 or 2 and Mathematics 2.
Course:   Candidates are  required to complete the following
courses:   Chemistry 2, 3, 4, 5, 7, 9 and 10.
Classics       ^ 4
Course: Any three of Greek 3, 5,6,7; any three of Latin 3, 4,
5, 6; and either Greek 9 or Latin 7. a
As proof of ability to write Greek and Latin prose, candidates
must attain not less than Second Class standing in Greek 8 and
Latin 8. During the candidate's Fourth Year, papers will be set
on sight translation, and the candidate is advised to pursue a course
of private reading under the supervision of the department.
There wdl also be a general paper on Antiquities, Literature
and History.
Economics
Prerequisites: A reading knowledge of French or German. A
paper in translation to be written at the end of the Fourth Year
will be required to ensure that this knowledge has been kept up.
Course: Economics 2, if not already taken, any 15 further
units in the department, to include Economics 4, Economics 9, and
Statistics 1, and two from the following group:
Economics 3, Economies 5, Economies 6, Economics 7, Economics 11, Statistics 2, Government 1, Sociology 1. Also a graduating essay which will count 3 units. (Tutorial instruction will be
arranged in connection with the essay.)
Students must pass an oral examination, and, if required,
address a general audience on a designated subject.
Attendance at the Seminar in Economics is required in the
Third and Fourth Years. 64 Faculty of Arts and Science
Economics and Political Science
Prerequisites: A reading knowledge of French or German. A
paper in translation to be written at the end of the Fourth Year
will be required to ensure that this knowledge has been kept up.
Course: Economics 2, if not already taken, any 15 further
units in the department, to include Government 1, Statistics 1, and
three from the following group:
Sociology 1, Sociology 2, Government 2, Government 3, Government 4, Economics 3, Economics 4, Economics 5, Economics 6,
Economics 7, Economics 9, Statistics 2.
Also a graduating essay which will count 3 units. (Tutorial
instruction will be arranged in connection with the essay.)
Students must pass an oral examination and, if required,
address a general audience on a designated subject.
Attendance at the Seminar in Economics is required in the
Third and Fourth Years.
English Language and Literature
Prerequisites: 1. A First Class or high Second Class in English
2. Ordinarily, special work is required of students who intend to
take Honours. Such work, if required, is announced at the beginning of the session.
2. A reading knowledge of French or German. The Department
may require candidates to write a paper in translation at the end
of the Fourth Year.
Course: English 25 (involving an examination on the life,
times, and complete works of some major English author), 20,
21 (a), 21 (6), 22, 24 (the seminar, which must be attended in
both years, though credit will be given only for the work of the
final year), and a graduating essay which will count 3 units. The
graduating essay must be submitted on or before March 31.
Candidates will be required to take the following final Honours
examinations on the History of English Literature:
1. From the beginning to 1500.
2. From 1500 to 1660.
3. From 1660 to 1780.
4. From 1780 to 1890.
One of these examinations will be oral.
In the award of Honours special importance will be attached
to the graduating essay and to the final Honours examinations.
If the candidate's work outside the department does not include
a course in English History, he must take an examination in that
subject. Honour Courses 65
Geology
Prerequisites: Geology 1. If possible Geology 2 also should
be taken in the Second Year. Chemistry 1 and if possible Physics
1 or 2 should be taken in the First Year, as these are required for
Geology 2 and 7 and are of great value in Geology 1. Biology 1 is
recommended in the Second Year, as it is prerequisite to Zoology
1, which should be taken in the Third Year as a valuable preparation for Geology 6.
Courses: Eighteen units to be chosen from Geology 4, 5, 6,
7, 8, 10, 12. If Geology 2 has not been taken in the Second Year
it must be taken in the Third Year, as it is prerequisite to Geology
7 and 8.
History
Course: Any 18 units, of which the graduating essay will count
3 units. The Seminar (which carries no credit) must be attended
in the Third and the Fourth Years. A reading knowledge of
French is required.
French
Course:   French 3  (a), 3 (&), 3  (c) in the Third Year.
French 4 (a), 4 (b), 4 (c), in the Fourth Year.
A graduating essay (in French) which will count 3 units.
Latin
Course: Latin 3, 4, 5, 6 and 7 and Greek 9. The candidate
must also take Latin 8 in both years, obtaining at least second
class standing. His general knowledge will be tested by papers on
Antiquities, Literature, and History at the end of the Fourth
Year.
Mathematics
Prerequisites:  Mathematics 2, Physics 1 or 2.
Course: Any 18 units in Mathematics, and Physics 3 and 5.
A final Honours examination is required.
Physics
Prerequisites:  Mathematics 2, Physics 1 or 2, Chemistry 1.
Course: Mathematics 10, 16, 17. Physics 3 and 5, and 15
additional units. Students are advised to take Chemistry 4 and
7, if possible. 66 Faculty of Arts and Science
COMBINED HONOUR COURSES
(a) Biology (Botany and Zoology) and Bacteriology
Prerequisites: Chemistry 1 and 2; Biology 1; Botany 1, or
Zoology 1.
Course: Bacteriology 1, 2 and 5; the required courses for either
the Botany option or the Zoology option of the Honour course in
Biology.
(b) Biology (Botany and Zoology) and Geology
Prerequisites:   Chemistry 1; Biology 1; Geology 1.
Course: Geology 2 and 6; the required courses for either the
Botany option or the Zoology option of the Honour course in
Biology.
(c) Chemistry and Biology (Botany and Zoology)
Prerequisites:   Chemistry 1 and 2; Physics 1 or 2; Biology 1.
Course: Chemistry 3, 4, 5, 7 and 9; the required courses for
either the Botany option or the Zoology option of the Honour
course in Biology.
(d) Chemistry and Physics
Prerequisites: Chemistry 1; Physics 1 or 2 and Mathematics 2.
Course: Chemistry 2, 3, 4, 5 and 7, and Physics 3, 5, 8 or 19,
and two units from 7, 10, 12, 13 or 14. Candidates are advised to
take Mathematics 10.
(e) Chemistry and Geology
Prerequisites:   Chemistry 1; Physics 1 or 2; and Geology 1.
Course: Chemistry 2, 3, 4, 5 and 7, and at least 12 units in
Geology.
(f) Chemistry and Mathematics
Prerequisites: Chemistry 1; Physics 1 or 2; and Mathematics 2.
Course:  Chemistry 2, 3, 4, 5, 7, and at least 12 units in Mathematics, including Mathematics 10.
(g)  Mathematics and Physics
Prerequisites: Mathematics 2; Physics 1 or 2.
Course: Mathematics, at least 12 units, including Mathematics
10, 16 and 17.
Physics 3, 5, 8, and six additional units. Honour Courses 67
(h) Any Two of
Economics or Economics and Political Science, English, French,
History, Latin, Philosophy.
Economics or Economics and Political Science
Prerequisite: A reading knowledge of French or German. A
paper in translation to be written at the end of the Fourth Year
will be required to ensure that this knowledge has been kept up.
Course in Economcis: Twelve units, including Economics 4,
Economics 9, Statistics 1, and Economics 2, if not already taken.
Course in Economics and Political Science: Twelve units,
including Government 1, Statistics 1, and Economics 2, if not
already taken.
English
Prerequisite: A reading knowledge of French or German.
The Department may require candidates to write a paper in
translation at the end of the Fourth Year.
Course: English 20 and 24, and any three of the English
courses of the first division. The seminar must be attended during
both the final years, but credits which count for the B.A. degree
will be given only for the work of the Fourth Year.
Candidates will be required to take the following final Honours
examinations on the History of English Literature:
1. From 1500 to 1660.
2. From 1660 to 1780.
3. From 1780 to 1890.
In the award of Honours special importance will be attached
to these examinations.   One of them will be oral.
The graduating essay, when written for the Department of
English, must be submitted on or before March 31.
French
Course: If the graduating essay is written on a French subject,
3 (a) and 3 (c), 4 (a) and 4 (c) ; otherwise either these courses
or 3 (a) and 3 (b), 4 (a) and 4 (b).
Courses 3 (b) and 4 (b) are intended primarily for Honour
students and should be taken whenever possible, even if they are
not required to make up the minimum number of units. 68 Faculty of Arts and Science
History
Prerequisite:  A reading knowledge of French.
Course: History 10 and any 9 additional units, of which the
graduating essay, if written in History, will count 3 units.
The seminar (which carries no credits) must be attended in
the Third and Fourth Years.
Latin
Course: Latin 8 and any four of 3, 4, 5, 6, 7. In the final year
candidates must pass an examination (a) in sight translation, and
(b) in Latin Literature, History and Antiquities. Private reading
under the direction of the department is recommended.
Philosophy
Course: Any 12 units besides Philosophy 1, six units in each
year.
COURSES LEADING TO THE DEGREE OF B.Com.
The degree of B.Com. is granted with Honours or as a Pass
degree. A Pass degree will be granted on completion of courses
amounting to 60 units chosen in conformity with Calendar regulations.
Students holding the degree of B.A. from this University may
proceed to the degree of B.Com. by completing 15 additional units
of work, provided that the additional units are chosen so as to
complete the requirements for the B.Com. degree.
It is also possible to obtain the B.A. and B.Com. degrees concurrently in five years on completion of 75 units chosen so as to
cover the requirements for both degrees.
No distinction is made between Pass and Honour students in
the First and Second Years; but a student will not be accepted
as a candidate for Honours in the Third Year unless he has
obtained an average of second class on the courses required to be
taken in the Second Year.
While the B.A. degree can be completed in one year by students
holding the B.Com. degree, the converse is not true, as work in
two consecutive years is required for the B.Com. degree in both
Accountany and Commercial Law. It is, however, possible for
students who are taking the combined degree in five years to
qualify for the B.A. degree at the end of four years by taking
additional courses either in Winter or Summer Session to make
up for the six units of Accountancy and Commercial Law 1 which
do not count towards the B.A. degree. Courses Leading to the Degree of B.Com. 69
The regulations as to Summer Session credits, number of units
to be taken in any academic year, etc., apply to courses leading
to the degree of B.Com. in the same way as to courses leading to
the degree of B.A.
During the summer vacations students are advised to obtain
as much business experience as possible.
First Year
The following courses comprising 15 units are required:
English 1.
The first course in a language offered for matriculation (Latin
or French or German or Greek).
Mathematics 1.
Economics 1.
One course selected from the following: Biology 1, Chemistry
1, Physics 1, or Physics 2.
Second Year
The following courses comprising 15 units are required:
English 2.
A continuation course in the language taken in the First Year.
Mathematics 3.
Economics 2.
Economics 10.
A clear academic record at the end of the Second Year will be
required of students proceeding to the Third Year.
In view of the importance which rightly attaches to the capacity
for adequate and clear expression in writing, regulation 13, on page
81 of the Calendar, will be rigidly enforced at the end of the
Second Year, and reasonable legibility in handwriting will be
insisted on.
To ensure the conformity of their courses to Calendar regulations, all students in their Second Year are advised, to submit to
the Dean of the Faculty, on or before March 31 of each year, a
scheme of the courses they propose to take during their last two
years.
Third and Fourth Years
The requirements of the Third and Fourth Years comprise 30
units, of which students must take, in their Third Year, not less
than 15 units. The graduation standing is determined by the
results of the Third and Fourth Years combined. Courses must
be chosen in conformity with the requirements that follow. 70 Faculty of Arts and Science
Each student must take:
(a) An additional course in a language already taken for
credit in the first two years, that is French, German or
Latin (to be taken in the Third Year) or an additional
course in English. 3 units.
(b) The following seven courses:
Economics 4.    (Money and Banking.)
Economics 6.    (Foreign Trade.)
Economics 17.     (Commercial Law 1.)
Economics 18.     (Commercial Law 2.)
Economics 14.    (Accountancy 1.)
Economics 12.    (Statistics 1.)
Economics 15 or 16. (Accountancy 2 or 3.)    21 units.
(c) One of the following courses:
Economics 19.    (Marketing.)
Economics 13.    (Statistics 2.)
Economics 11.    (Transportation.) 3 units.
(d) Mathematics 3, if not already chosen, otherwise one
course—not already chosen—selected from the following:
Economics 15 or 16.   (Accountancy 2 or 3.)
Economics 13.    (Statistics 2.)
Economics 11 (Transportation).
Government 1.
Government 4.
Economics 5 (Taxation).
Mathematics 2.
Education (3 units).
English, if not chosen under (a), (3 units).
Additional course in Latin, French or German.
Geology (3 units).
Forestry (3 units).
Mining (3 units).
Agricultural Economics 1.
Biology (3 units). 3 units.
In the Fourth Year satisfactory work must be done in connection with a discussion class of one hour a week. Courses Leading to the Degree of M.A. 71
HONOURS
1. Candidates for Honours are required to take Statistics 2
and to present a graduating essay embodying the results of some
investigation that they have made independently. Credit for the
graduating essay will be 3 units. These requirements take the
place of the options offered to Pass students under (c) and (d)
above.
2. Candidates for Honours are required at the end of their
Fourth Year to take a general examination, oral or written or
both. This examination is designed to test the student's knowledge
of his chosen subject as a whole and is in addition to the ordinary
class examinations of the Third and Fourth Years.
3. Honours are of two grades—First Class and Second Class.
First Class Honours will not be given unless the Graduating Essay
is First Class nor will Second Class Honours be given unless the
Graduating Essay is at least Second Class. Students who, in the
opinion of the department, have not attained a sufficiently high
ranking for Honours may be awarded a Pass degree.
COURSES LEADING TO THE DEGREE OF M.A.
1. Candidates for the M.A. degree must hold the B.A. degree
from this University, or its equivalent.
2. A graduate of another university applying for permission
to enter as a graduate student is required to submit with his
application, on or before September 1, an official statement of his
graduation together with a certificate of the standing gained in
the several subjects of his course. The Faculty will determine
the standing of such a student in this University. The fee for
examination of certificates is $2.00. This fee must accompany the
application.
3. Candidates with approved degrees and academic records who
proceed to the Master's degree shall be required:
To spend one year in resident graduate study; or
(i) To do two or more years of private work under the
supervision of the University, such work to be equivalent to one year of graduate study; or
(ii) To do one year of private work under University
supervision and one term of resident graduate study,
the total of such work to be equivalent to one year of
resident graduate study.
4. One major and one minor shall be required. In general the
minor shall be taken outside the Department in which the student
is taking his major, but special permission may be given by the Faculty of Arts and Science
Faculty to take both major and minor in the same department,
provided the subjects are different and are under different professors. The major or the minor may, with the consent of the
Department or the Departments concerned, be extended to include
work in an allied subject.
5. Two typewritten copies of each thesis, on standardized thesis
paper, shall be submitted. (See special circular of "Instructions
for the Preparation of Masters' Theses.")
6. Application for admission as a graduate student shall be
made to the Registrar by October 1st.
7. The following requirements apply to all Departments:
Prerequisites:
Minor: For a minor, courses regularly offered in the Third
and Fourth Years amounting to at least six units are
prerequisite, and at least second class standing must
have been obtained in each of these courses. For details
of requirements, see regulations of the several departments.
Major:   For a major,  courses regularly offered in the Third
and Fourth Years amounting to at least eight units
are prerequisite,  and at least second class standing
' must have been obtained in each of these courses.  For
details of requirements, see regulations of the several
departments.
Students who have not fulfilled the requirements outlined above
•during their undergraduate course may fulfil the same by devoting
more than one academic year's study to the M.A. work.
M.A. Courses: {
Minor: Five or six units of regular Third or Fourth Year
work, or equivalents in reading courses. Examinations
to be written, or oral, or both at the discretion of the
Department concerned. At least second class standing
is required in the subjects of the minor.
Major: Nine or ten units of regular Third or Fourth Year
work, or equivalents in reading courses, of which units
three to six shall be counted for the thesis.
All candidates must submit to a general examination
on the major field. This examination may be written,
or oral, or both, at the discretion of the Department
concerned.
At least second class standing is required in the work
of the major. Courses Leading to the Degree of M.A. 73
Languages: No candidate will receive the degree of M.A. who
has not satisfied the Head of the Department in which he is majoring of his ability to read technical articles either in French or in
German.
8. Philosophy 7 and 9 will be accepted as prerequisites for a
minor in Education, if these subjects have not already been counted
as prerequisites towards a major or a minor in Philosophy.
Graduate students, who are Assistants, giving not more than
four hours a week of tutorial instruction, are permitted to qualify
for the M.A. degree after one regular winter session of University
attendance, provided they have done, in the summer vacation,
research work of a nature and extent satisfactory to the Head of
the Department concerned. Such students must be registered as
graduate students and must have secured the approval of the
Head of the Department concerned and of the Faculty before
entering upon the research in question. Other graduate students
doing tutorial work shall not be allowed to come up for final examination in less than two academic years after registration as M.A.
students.
The following special requirements are prescribed by different
departments:
Bacteriology
Prerequisites:
Minor:   Bacteriology 1, 2, 3, and 6.
Major:   Bacteriology 1, 2, 5, and Bacteriology 3 or 6.
M.A. Course:
Minor:   A minimum of five units chosen in consultation with
the Department.
Major:   Thesis, five or six units, and other courses to complete
the required units.
Biology (Botany Option)
Prerequisites:
Minor: Biology 1, and six additional units in Botany and
Zoology.
Major: Biology 1, Botany 1, and eight additional units, including Zoology 1.
M.A. Course:
Minor:   A minimum of five units chosen in consultation with
the Department.
Major:   Thesis, at least five units, and other courses to complete
the required units. 74 Faculty of Arts and Science
Biology (Zoology Option)
Prerequisites:
Minor: Biology 1, and six additional units in Botany and
Zoology.
Major: Biology 1, Zoology 1, and eight additional units, including Botany 1.
M.A. Course:
Minor: A minimum of five units chosen in consultation with
the Department.
Major: Thesis, at least five units, and other courses to complete the required number of units.
Economics
Prerequisites:
Minor: A minimum of fifteen units of work in subjects in
the Department, or an equivalent. The fifteen units
must include Economics 4, Economics 9, and Statistics
1-
Major: Honours in Economics; or in Economics in combination with some other subject; or an equivalent.
Economics and Political Science
Prerequisites:
Minor: A minimum of fifteen units in the Department (or an
equivalent), including Government 1 and Statistics 1.
Major: Honours in Economics and Political Science; or in
Economics; or in Economics in combination with some
other subject; or an equivalent.
M.A. Course:
All candidates for the Master's degree in this Department must
attend the Honour Seminar.
English
Prerequisites:
Minor: At least nine units of credit for English courses
elective in the Third and Fourth years of the undergraduate curriculum.
Major: At least fifteen units of credit for courses elective in
the Third and Fourth years. Courses Leading to the Degree of M.A.
M.A. Course:
Minor:   Six units of credit in advanced courses in English not
already taken.
Major: (a) Twelve units of credit in advanced courses not
already taken, one of which courses must be English 21a, or its equivalent, if this has not been
previously offered for credit.
(6) A graduating essay which will count as an advanced course involving three units of credit.
(c) Oral examinations on the history of English
Literature.
(d) A reading knowledge of either French or German.
A student who offers both languages will be
allowed three units of credit towards the M.A.
degree.
French
Detailed Study:
(a) O.F.—Aucassin et Nicolette.
(b) XVIth Century—Authors: Rabelais, Ronsard and Montaigne  [see under French 5(b)].
Less Detailed:
(c) XVIIth Century and after—The evolution of the French
Novel, particularly the novels treated in Le Breton's
Roman au XVIIe siecle, and the chief Romantic Novels.
(d) XVIIIth Century—Beaumarchais, Barbier de Seville.
Rousseau, La Nouvelle Heloise—Emile. Diderot, Le Neveu
de Rameau.   Voltaire, Les Lettres philosophiques.
(e) XIXth Century—Auzas, La Poesie au 19e siecle, Oxford.
Alfred de Musset, Theatre. Oxford. Rostand, Cyrano de
Bergerac, Fasquelle.
(/) A  general  knowledge  of  French  literary   history   from
XVIth Century to end of XlXth.   This not to be detailed,
but to treat of main movements.
(g) A thesis in French on a subject to be approved by the
Head of the Department.
Note :—It is expected that the candidate will have read and
will be able to discuss three plays of Moliere, three of Corneille,
three of Racine, and something of Boileau, Bossuet, Chateaubriand,
La Fontaine, Lamartine, Victor Hugo, Balzac, Flaubert, Anatole
France.
Some help will be given by lectures, explanations of texts, and
advice in reading; but the Department cannot undertake to cover
the whole or any considerable part of the syllabus. 76 Faculty of Arts and Science
History
Prerequisites:
Minor:   Three courses (nine units) to be chosen from History
10 to 20 inclusive.
Major:   Four courses (twelve units) to be chosen from History
10 to 20 inclusive.
M.A. Course:
Minor: Two courses (six units) to be chosen from History 10
to 20 inclusive, or the equivalent in Reading Courses.
Major: Two related courses (six units) to be chosen from
History 10 to 20 inclusive, or the equivalent in Reading Courses, and a thesis embodying original work to
which 3 units of credit are given. All candidates for
a major in History who have not already done so
must attend the Honours Seminar in Historical
Method, or submit to an examination on a parallel
Reading Course approved by the Department.
Mathematics
Prerequisites:
Minor:   Mathematics   10   and   at   least   two   other   Honour
Courses.
Major:   Candidates must have completed the Honour Coursf3
in Mathematics, or its equivalent.
M.A. Course:
Minor:   Mathematics 16 and an additional three units to bo
chosen from the Honour Courses.
Major:   Any four of the graduate courses and a thesis.
Physics
Prerequisites:
Minor: Physics 3 and 5 and at least two more units of work
regularly offered in the Third or Fourth Year.
Major: At least eight units of work regularly offered in the
Third and Fourth Years.
M.A. Course:
Minor:   Six units of work in advanced courses in Physics not
already taken.
Major:   (a) At least six units of work in the graduate courses.
(b) A thesis. Teacher Training Course 77
TEACHER TRAINING COURSE
Candidates qualifying for the "Academic Certificate" (given
by the Provincial Department of Education, Victoria, on the completion of the Teacher Training Course) take the courses prescribed
on Pages 102, 103. These courses are open only to graduates
registered in the Teacher Training Course.
1. Registration
Documentary evidence of graduation in Arts or Science from
a recognized university must be submitted to the Registrar by all
candidates other than graduates of the University of British
Columbia. All correspondence in connection with the Teacher
Training Course should be addressed to the Registrar, from whom
registration cards may be procured.
2. Certificates and Standing
At the close of the University session successful candidates in
the Teacher Training Course will be recommended to the Faculty
of Arts and Science for the University Diploma in Education and
to the Provincial Department of Education for the Academic Certificate. Successful candidates will be graded as follows: First
Class, an average of 80 per cent, or over; Second Class, 65 to 80
per cent.; Passed, 50 to 65 per cent.
All students registered in the Teacher Training Course at the
University are entitled to the privileges accorded to students in
the various faculties, and are also subject to the regulations of the
University regarding discipline and attendance at lectures.
In the case of students who have completed the Teacher Training Course, First or Second Class standing in each of (1) History
and Principles of Education, and (2) Educational Psychology is
accepted as equivalent to a minor for an M.A. degree, subject
in each case to the consent of the Head of the Department in which
the student wishes to take his major.
3. Preparatory Courses in Arts and Science
Candidates will not be admitted to courses in High School
Methods unless they have obtained at least nine (9) units of credit
in each of the corresponding subjects from the academic courses
normally offered in the Third and Fourth Years. Special cases
will be decided on their merits by the Head of the Department
concerned and by the Professor of Education. (The academic
courses referred to above are English, History, Mathematics, etc.,
and not courses in Education.)
4. A description of the courses offered is given under Department of Education. 78
Faculty of Arts and Science
COURSES LEADING TO THE SOCIAL
SERVICE DIPLOMA
The Diploma in Social Service will be granted on the completion of courses amounting to 30 units chosen in conformity with
the following outline:
First Year:
Biology 1 (Introductory Biology) 3 units
Economics 1  (Principles of Economics) or
Economics 2 (Economic History) 3 units
English 1 (Literature and Composition) 3 units
Social Service 1  ((Introduction) 2 units
Social Service 2 (Case Work) 1 unit
(Child Welfare) 1 unit
(Hygiene) 1 unit
(Field Work Seminar) 1 unit
Social Service 3
Social Service 4
Social Service 9
Second Year:
Either one of:
Philosophy 1 (Psychology)
Nursing 24 (Psychology for Nurses) and
Nursing 27 (The Family)
Any two of:
Philosophy 8 (Social Psychology)
Philosophy 9  (Child Psychology)
Economics   3  (Labour Problems)
Sociology 1 (General Sociology)
Social Service 5  (Advanced Case Work)
Social Service 6  (Advanced Child Welfare)
Social Service 7 (Group Work)
Social Service 10 (Field Work Seminar)
Social Service 11   (Administration)
A minimum of eight hours' field work each week for four terms
is required. A student must, in addition, spend two months with
an accredited social agency as a full-time worker under supervision
prior to registration for the technical courses of the second year.
The agency is not responsible for expenses (such as carfare) incident to the field work.
Graduates in Arts and Science, who have some experience in
social work, and who have taken as part of their undergraduate
courses a sufficient number of the subjects required for the Diploma
in Social Service to enable them to devote additional time to field
work, may be allowed to obtain the Diploma in one Winter Session
and the succeeding Summer Session.
2 units
6 units
3 units
1 unit
1 unit
1 unit
1 unit Examinations and Advancement 79
EXAMINATIONS AND ADVANCEMENT
1. Examinations in all subjects, obligatory for all students, are
held in April. In the case of subjects which are final at Christmas
and in the case of courses of the First and Second years, examinations will be held in December as well. Applications for special
consideration on account of illness or domestic affliction must be
submitted to the Dean not later than two days after the close of
the examination period. In cases where illness is the plea for
absence from examinations, a medical certificate must be presented
on the appropriate form which may be obtained from the Dean's
office.
2. The passing mark will be 50 per cent, in each subject, except
in the case of First and Second Year students who, during one
session, do 15 units of regular work, in which case a percentage
of 50 or more will be required in each subject or a general average
of 60 per cent, and not less than 40 per cent, in each subject. In
Beginners' German, however, the passing mark is 50 per cent.
In any course which involves both laboratory work and written
examinations, students may be debarred from examinations if they
fail to present satisfactory results in laboratory work, and they will
be required to pass in both parts of the course.
3. Successful candidates will be graded as follows: First Class,
an average of 80 per cent, or over; Second Class, 65 to 80 per cent.;
Passed, 50 to 65 per cent
4. A student who makes 50 per cent, of the total required for
a full year's work (at least 15 units chosen in conformity with
Calendar regulations), but who fails in an individual subject will
be granted a supplemental examination in that subject if he has
not fallen below 30 per cent, in that subject. If his mark is below
30 per cent, a supplemental examination will not be granted.
Notice will be sent to all students to whom supplemental examinations have been granted.
A student who makes less than 50 per cent, of the total required
for a full year's work (15 units) will not be allowed a supplemental
examination.
5. A request for the re-reading of an answer paper must be
forwarded to the Registrar WITHIN FOUR WEEKS after the
results of the examinations are announced. Each applicant must
state clearly his reasons for making such a request in view of the
fact that the paper of a candidate who makes less than a passing
mark in a subject is read at least a second time before results are
tabulated and announced. A re-reading of an examination paper
will be granted only with the consent of the Head of the Department concerned. The fee for re-reading a paper is $2.00. 80 Faculty of Arts and Science
6. Supplemental Examinations will be held in September in
respect of Winter Session examinations, and in June or July
in respect of Summer Session examinations. In the Teacher Training Course, Supplemental Examinations will be held not earlier
than the third week in June. To pass a supplemental examination a candidate must obtain at least 50 per cent.
In the first three years a candidate who has been granted a
supplemental may try the supplemental only once. If he fails
in the supplemental, he must either repeat his attendance in the
course or substitute an alternative chosen in accordance with
Calendar regulations. In the case of Fourth Year students two
supplemental examinations in respect of the same course will be
allowed.
A candidate with a supplemental examination outstanding in
any subject which is on the Summer Session curriculum may clear
his record by attending the Summer Session course in the subject
and passing the required examinations.
7. Applications for supplemental examinations, accompanied by
the necessary fees (see Schedule of Fees), must be in the hands
of the Registrar at least two weeks before the date set for the
examinations.
8. No student may enter a higher year with standing defective
in respect of more than 3 units. (See regulations in regard to
advancement to Third Year Commerce, page 69, and in reference
to admission to Second Year Applied Science, page 60.)
No student who has failures or supplemental outstanding in
more than 3 units, or who has any failure or supplemental outstanding for more than a year of registered attendance, shall be
allowed to register for more than 15 units of work, these units to
include either the subject (or subjects) in which he is conditioned
or permissible substitutes.
9. A student may not continue in a later year any subject in
which he has a supplemental examination outstanding from an
earlier year, except in the case of compulsory subjects in the
Second Year.
10. A student who is not allowed to proceed to a higher year
may not register as a partial student in respect of the subjects of
that higher year. But a student who is required to repeat his year
will be exempt from attending lectures and passing examinations
in subjects in which he has already made at least 50 per cent. In
this case he may take, in addition to the subjects of the year which
he is repeating, certain subjects of the following year.
11. A student who fails twice in the work of the same year may,
upon the recommendation of the Faculty, be required by the
Senate to withdraw from the University. Bacteriology - 81
12. Any student whose academic record, as determined by the
tests and examinations of the first term of the First or Second
Year, is found to be unsatisfactory, may, upon the recommendation
of the Faculty, be required by the Senate to discontinue attendance
at the University for the remainder of the session. Such a student
will not be readmitted to the University as long as any supplementary examinations are outstanding.
13. Term essays and examination papers will be refused a
passing mark if they are noticeably deficient in English; and, in
this event, students will be required to pass a special examination
in English to be set by the Department of English.
DEPARTMENTS IN ARTS AND SCIENCE
Department of Bacteriology
Professor: Hibbert Winslow Hill. (On leave of absence.)
Assistant Professor:   D. C. B. Duff.
Instructor:   Helen M. Mathews.
1. General Bacteriology. — A course consisting of lectures,
demonstrations, and laboratory work.
The history of bacteriology, the place of bacteria in nature,
the classification of bacterial forms, methods of culture and isolation and various bactericidal substances and conditions will be
studied. The relationship of bacteria to agriculture, household
science, and public health will be carefully considered.
Text-book:  Lutman, Microbiology, latest edition, McGraw-Hill.
Students proceeding to Bacteriology 2 need procure Park,
Williams & Krumweide only (see Bacteriology 2).
Prerequisites:   Chemistry 1, and Biology 1.
Seven hours a week.   First Term. 2 units.
2. Special Bacteriology. — A course consisting of lectures,
demonstrations, and laboratory work.
The more common pathogenic bacteria will be studied, together
with the reactions of the animal body against invasion by these
bacteria. The course will include demonstrations in immunity and
the various diagnostic methods in use in public health laboratories.
Text-book: Park, Williams & Krumwiede, Pathogenic Microorganisms, latest edition, Lea & Febiger.
Prerequisite:   Bacteriology 1.
Seven hours a week.  Second Term. 2 units.
3. As in Dairying 3   (under Faculty of Agriculture).
l1/^ units.
4. As in Dairying B  (under Faculty of Agriculture).
iy2 units. 82 Faculty of Arts and Science
5. Advanced Bacteriology.—A reading and laboratory course,
including immunology. Tutorial instruction of one hour per week;
laboratory and demonstration hours to be arranged with the class.
Prerequisites: Bacteriology 1 and 2, with at least second class
standing in Bacteriology 2. 3 units.
6. Soil Bacteriology.—A laboratory and lecture course, in which
the bacteria of soils are studied qualitatively and quantitatively,
with special reference to soil fertility.
Text-book:    Lohnis   and   Fred,   Text-book   of   Agricultural
Bacteriology, latest edition, McGraw-Hill.
Prerequisite:   Bacteriology 1.
Six hours a week.  First Term. 2 units.
7. As in Dairying 7 (under Faculty of Agriculture).     3 units.
8. Reading Course in Bacteriology—A directed reading course
in advanced bacteriology or immunity. Written or oral examination to be given at the discretion of the department.
Prerequisites: Bacteriology 1, 2 and 5. (The course in certain
cases may run concurrently with Bacteriology 5.) 3 units.
Department of Botany
Professor:   A. H. Hutchinson.
Associate Professor:   Frank Dickson.
Associate Professor:   John Davidson.
Assistant:  E. Miriam R. Ashton.
Assistant:   Edgar Black.
Assistant:   Norah Hughes.
Assistant:   Elizabeth Halley.
Biology
1. Introductory Biology.—The course is introductory to more
advanced work in Botany or Zoology; also to courses closely
related to Biological Science, such as Agriculture, Forestry,
Medicine.
The fundamental principles of Biology; the interrelationship
of plants and animals; life processes; the cell and division of
labour; life-histories; relation to environment.
The course is prerequisite to all courses in Botany and Zoology.
A list of Reference Books is supplied.
Two lectures and two hours laboratory a week. 3 units.
2. (a) Principles of Genetics.—The fundamentals of Genetics
illustrated by the race histories of certain plants and animals;
the physical basis of heredity; variations; mutations; acquired
characters; Mendel's law with suggested applications.
Text-book:   Castle, Genetics and Eugenics, Harvard Press. Botany 83
Prerequisite:  Biology 1.
Two lectures and one laboratory period a week.   First Term.
iy2 units.
2. (b) Principles of Genetics.—A continuation of the studies
of genetic principles with suggested applications. A lecture and
laboratory course. The laboratory work will consist of problems,
examination of illustrative material and experiments with Droso-
phila.
Text-book: Sinnott and Dunn, Principles of Genetics, McGraw-
Hill.
Prerequisite:  Biology 2 (a).
One lecture and four hours laboratory a week.   Second Term.
iy2 units.
2. (c) An introduction to biometrical methods as applied to
genetics.
Prerequisite: Biology 2 (a).
One lecture and two hours laboratory a week.   Second Term.
1 unit.
2. (d) A review of advanced phases and the more recent development in genetics.
Prerequisite:  Biology 2 (b).
Two hours a week.   First Term.
3. General Physiology. — A study of animal and plant life
processes. Open to students of Third and Fourth years having
prerequisite Biology, Chemistry and Physics; the Department
should be consulted.
Text-book: Bayliss, Principles of General Physiology, Longmans, Green.
Two lectures and three hours laboratory a week. Reference
reading.    Second term. 3 units.
Botany
1. General Botany.—A course including a general survey of
the several fields of Botany and introductory to more specialized
courses in Botany.
This course is prerequisite to all other courses in Botany, except
the Evening Course. Partial credit (2 units) toward Botany 1
may be obtained through the Evening Course.
Text-book: Coulter, Barnes & Cowles, Text-book of Botany,
Vol. I, University of Chicago Press.
Prerequisite:   Biology 1.
Two lectures and two hours laboratory a week. 3 units.
2. Morphology.—A comparative study of plant structures. The
relationship of plant groups. Comparative life histories. Emphasis is placed upon the increasing complexity of plant structures, 84 Faculty of Arts and Science
from the lower to the higher forms, involving a progressive differentiation accompanied by an interdependence of parts.
Text-book: Coulter, Barnes & Cowles, Text-book of Botany,
Vol. I, University of Chicago Press.
Prerequisite:   Botany 1.
Two lectures and four hours laboratory a week. First Term.
(Not given in 1933-34.) 2 units.
3. Plant Physiology.
3. (a) A course dealing with the fundamental life processes
in plants, such as nutrition, photosynthesis, absorption, permeability, respiration, transpiration and growth. This course is prerequisite for Botany 3 (b) and 3 (c).
Text-book: 0. Raber, Principles of Plant Physiology, 1929,
Macmillan.
Prerequisite:   Botany 1.
Two lectures and four hours laboratory work a week. First
Term. 2 units.
3. (b) This course comprises a more advanced study of the
organic constituents of plants and the physiological changes occurring during plant growth.
Prerequisite:   Botany 3 (a).
Two lectures and four hours laboratory work a week. First
Term. 2 units.
3. (c) A course similar to Botany 3 (a) designed to train
students of the plant sciences in an understanding of the interrelations of plants and soils.
Prerequisite:   Botany 3  (a).
Two lectures and four hours laboratory work a week. Second
Term. 2 units.
4. Histology.—A study of the structure and development of
plants; methods of killing, fixing, embedding, sectioning, staining,
mounting, drawing, reconstruction. Use of microscope, camera
lucida, photo-micrographic apparatus.
Text-books: Eames and McDaniels, Introduction to Plant
Anatomy, McGraw-Hill. Chamberlain, Methods in Plant Histology,
University of Chicago Press.
Prerequisite:   Botany 1.
Seven hours a week.    Second Term. 2 units.
5. Systematic Botany.
5. (a) Economic Flora.—An introduction to the classification
of plants through a study of selected families of economic plants
of British Columbia; useful for food, fodder, medicine and industrial arts; harmful to crops and stock. Weeds, and poisonous
plants.    Methods of control. Botany 85
Prerequisite:   Botany 1.
Texts: Jepson, Economic Plants of California, University of
California; Thomson & Sifton, Poisonous Plants and Weed Seeds,
University of Toronto Press.
Two lectures and two hours laboratory a week.   First Term.
l1/^ units.
5. (6) Dendrology.—A study of the forest trees of Canada,
the common shrubs of British Columbia, the important trees of
the United States which are not native to Canada. Emphasis on
the species of economic importance. Identification, distribution,
relative importance, construction of keys.
Prerequisite:   Botany 1.
Text-books: Morton & Lewis, Native Trees of Canada, Dominion
Forestry Branch, Ottawa; Sudworth, Forest Trees of the Pacific
Slope, Superintendent of Documents, Washington; Davidson and
Abercrombie, Conifers, Junipers and Yew, T. F. Unwin.
One lecture and one period of two or three hours laboratory
or field work a week. 2 units.
5. (c) Descriptive Taxonomy.—An advanced course dealing
with the collection, preparation and classification of "flowering
plants". Methods of field, herbarium and laboratory work. Plant
description, the use of floras, preparation of keys, identification
of species.    Systems of classification.   Nomenclature.
Prerequisites:   Botany 1 and 5 (a).
Texts:   Hitchcock,  Descriptive  Systematic  Botany, Wiley  &
Sons; Henry, Flora of Southern British Columbia, Gage, Toronto.
One lecture and four hours laboratory a week.   Second Term.
iy2 units.
6. (b) Forest Pathology.—Nature, identification and control of
the more important tree-destroying fungi and other plant parasites
of the forest.
Text-book:   Rankin, Manual of Tree Diseases, Macmillan.
One lecture and two hours laboratory a week during one-half
of the Second Term. iy2 units.
6. (c) Plant Pathology (Elementary).—A course dealing with
basic concepts of plant disease and plant disease control. A number
of economically important plant diseases are studied in detail.
Text-book:   Heald, Manual of Plant Diseases, McGraw-Hill.
Prerequisite:   Botany 1.
Two lectures and four hours laboratory a week.    Second Term.
2 units.
6 (d) Plant Pathology (Advanced).—A course designed for
Honour or Graduate students. Technique, isolation and culture
work; inoculations; details concerning the various stages in the
progress of plant diseases; a detailed study of control measures. 86 Faculty of Arts and Science
Prerequisite:   Botany 6  (c).
Two lectures and four hours laboratory a week. 3 units.
6 (e) Mycology.—A course designed to give the student a
general knowledge of the fungi from a taxonomic point of view.
Text-books:  Stevens, Plant Disease Fungi, Macmillan.
Prerequisite:   Botany 1.
Two lectures and four hours laboratory a week. Credit will be
given for a collection of fungi made during the summer preceding
the course.    First Term. 2 units.
6 (/) History of Plant Pathology.—A lecture course dealing
with the history of the science of Plant Pathology from ancient
times to the present.
Text-book: Whetzel, An Outline of the History of Phytopathology, Saunders.
Prerequisite:   Botany 6 (c).
One lecture a week.   Second Term. y2 unit.
(Not given in 1933-34.)
7. Plant Ecology.
7 (a) Forest Ecology and Geography.—The interrelations of
forest trees and their environment; the ecological characteristics
of important forest trees; forest associations; types and regions;
physiography.
Reference books: Whitford and Craig, Forests of British Columbia, Ottawa; Zon and Sparhawk, Forests of the World, McGraw-Hill; Hardy, The Geography of Plants, Oxford University
Press.
Prerequisite:   Botany 1.
One lecture and one period of field and practical work a week.
First Term. 1 unit.
Evening and Short Courses in Botany
A course in General Botany, comprising approximately fifty
lectures, is open to all interested in the study of plant life of the
Province. No entrance examination and no previous knowledge
of the subject is required.
The course is designed to assist teachers, gardeners, foresters,
and other lovers of outdoor life in the Province. As far as possible,
illustrative material will be selected from the flora of British
Columbia.
The classes meet every Tuesday evening during the University
session (September-May) from 7.30 to 9.30 p.m. Field or laboratory work, under direction, is regarded as a regular part of the
course.
No examination is required except in the case of University
students desiring credit for this course.   Biology 1 is a prerequisite Chemistry
in the case of students desiring credit for this course. This course
may be substituted for the lecture part of Botany; but credit is
not given until the laboratory work is complete.
Other students desiring to ascertain their standing in the class
may apply for a written test.
A detailed statement of requirements and of work covered in
this course is issued as a separate circular. Copies may be had on
request.
Department of Chemistry
Professor:   R. H. Clark.
Professor of Analytical Chemistry:  E. H. Archibald.
Associate Professor:   W. F. Seyer.
Associate Professor:  M. J. Marshall.
Assistant Professor:   William Ure.
Assistant:   Ralph G. D. Moore.
Assistant:   Allan Bell.
Assistant:  Lisle Hodnett. ^F
Assistant:   Norman Phillips.
Assistant:   Munro McArthur.
Assistant:   F. Arthur DeLisle.
1. General Chemistry.—The course comprises a general survey
of the whole field of Chemistry and is designed on the one hand
to provide a thorough groundwork for further study in the sciences
and on the other to give an insight into the methods of chemical
investigation, the fundamental theories and some important applications such as are suitable to the needs of a cultural education.
Students must reach the required standard in both lecture and
laboratory work.
Texts: Smith's College Chemistry, revised by Kendall, 1929
Edition, the Century Co. For the laboratory: Harris and Ure,
Experimental Chemistry for Colleges, McGraw-Hill.
Three lectures and two and one-half hours laboratory a week.
3 units.
2. Qualitative and Quantitative Analysis.
(a) Qualitative Analysis.—A study of the chemical reactions
of the common metallic and acid radicals, together with the theoretical considerations involved in these reactions.
Text:  A. A. Noyes, Qualitative Analysis, Macmillan.
Reference:    Miller,   The  Elementary   Theory  of  Qualitative
Analysis, The Century Co.
One lecture and six hours laboratory a week.    First Term.
(b) Quantitative Analysis.—This course embraces the more
important methods of gravimetric and volumetric analysis.
Text-book: Engelder, Elementary Quantitative Analysis, John
Wiley & Sons.
Prerequisite:   Chemistry 1. Faculty of Arts and Science
One lecture and six hours laboratory a week.   Second Term.
3 units.
Course (b) must be preceded by Course (a).
3. Organic Chemistry.—This introduction to the study of the
compounds of carbon will include the methods of preparation and
a description of the more important groups of compounds in both
the aliphatic and the aromatic series.
Chemistry 3 will only be given to those students taking Chemistry 2, or those who have had the equivalent of Chemistry 2.
Books recommended: Holleman-Walker, Text-book of Organic
Chemistry, Wiley; Gatterman-Wielands, Laboratory Methods of
Organic Chemistry, Macmillan.
Two lectures and three hours laboratory a week. 3 units.
4 (a) Theoretical Chemistry.—An introductory course in the
development of modern theoretical chemistry, including a study
of gases, liquids and solids, solutions, ionization and electrical
conductivity, chemical equilibrium, kinetics of reactions, thermochemistry and thermodynamics, colloids.
Text-book: Millard, Physical Chemistry for Colleges, McGraw-
Hill.
Reference: Noyes and Sherrill, Chemical Principles, Macmillan.
For laboratory use: Findlay, Practical, Physical, Chemistry,
Longmans; and Sherrill, Laboratory Experiments on Physical
Chemical Principles, Macmillan.
Prerequisites: Chemistry 2 (except for students majoring in
Physics) and Mathematics 2. Honour students majoring in Chemistry should take Mathematics 10 concurrently.
Two lectures and three hours laboratory a week. 3 units.
4 (6) This course is the same as Chemistry 4 (a) with the
omission of the laboratory, and is open only to students not majoring in Chemistry. 2 units.
5 Advanced Qualitative and Quantitative Analysis.
(a) Qualitative Analysis.—The work of this course will include
the detection and separation of the less common metals, particularly those that are important industrially, together with the analysis of somewhat complex substances occurring in nature.
One lecture and six hours laboratory a week.   First Term.
(b) Quantitative Analysis.—-The determinations made will include the more difficult estimations in the analysis of rocks as well
as certain constituents of steel and alloys. The principles on which
analytical chemistry is based will receive a more minute consideration than was possible in the elementary course.
Prerequisite:   Chemistry 2.
One lecture and six hours laboratory a week.    Second Term.
3 units. Chemistry 89
6. Industrial Chemistry.—Those industries which are dependent on the facts and principles of Chemistry will be considered
in as much detail as time will permit. The lectures will be supplemented by visits to manufacturing establishments in the neighbourhood, and it is hoped that some lectures will be given by specialists
in their respective fields.
Prerequisites:   Chemistry 2, 3 and 4.
Two lectures a week. 2 units.
7. Physical Chemistry.—This course is a continuation of Chemistry 4 and treats in more detail the kinetic theory of gases, properties of liquids and solids, elementary thermodynamics and thermochemistry, properties of solutions, theoretical electrochemistry,
chemical equilibrium, kinetics of reactions, radioactivity.
Books recommended: Getman, Outlines of Theoretical Chemistry, Wiley; Noyes and Sherrill, Chemical Principles, Macmillan;
for Laboratory: Sherrill, Laboratory Experiments on Physico-
Chemical Principles, Macmillan; Findlay, Practical Physical Chemistry, Longmans.
Prerequisites: Chemistry 2, 3 and 4. Mathematics 10, which
may be taken concurrently.
Two lectures and three hours laboratory a week. 3 units.
8. Electrochemistry.— (a) Solutions are studied from the standpoint of the osmotic and dissociation theories. The laws of electrolysis, electroplating, electromotive force, primary and secondary
cells are considered in detail.
Texts: LeBlanc, Elements of Electrochemistry, Macmillan;
Creighton-Fink, Theoretical Electrochemistry, Vol. I, Wiley; All-
mand, Applied Electrochemistry, Longmans.
Two lectures and three hours laboratory a week.   First Term.
iy2 units.
(b) As in Applied Science.
9 (a) Advanced Organic Chemistry.—The lectures will deal
with some of the more complex carbon compounds, such as the
carbohydrates and their stereochemical configurations, fats, proteins, ureides and purine derivatives and enzyme action.
Two lectures and three hours laboratory a week.   First Term.
IV2 units.
9 (b) The terpenes and alkaloids will be considered. The more
complicated types of organic reaction and various theoretical conceptions will be presented. In the laboratory some complex compounds will be prepared and quantitative determinations of carbon,
hydrogen, nitrogen, sulphur and the halogens made.
Text:  Cohen, Organic Chemistry, Arnold.
Prerequisites:   Chemistry 2 and 3.
Two lectures and three hours laboratory a week.   Second Term.
iy2 units. 90 Faculty of Arts and Science
10. History of Chemistry.—A general survey of the development of chemical knowledge from the earliest times up to the
present day, with particular emphasis on chemical theory.
References: Moore, History of Chemistry, McGraw-Hill; Campbell-Brown, History of Chemistry, Blakiston's Son.
Two hours a week.    Second Term. 1 unit.
11. Physical Organic Chemistry.—Stereochemical theories will
be discussed in greater detail than in Chemistry 9, and chemical
and physico-chemical methods employed in determining the constitution of organic compounds will be studied. The electronic
conception of valency as applied to organic compounds will be
considered, and an outline of the work done in Electro-Organic
Chemistry will be given.
Prerequisites:   Chemistry 7 and 9.
One hour a week. 1 unit.
(Given in 1935-36 and alternate years.)
12. Colloid and Surface Chemistry.—A consideration of the
principles which underlie the behaviour of disperse systems and
reactions at surfaces including electro-capillary phenomena, preparation of colloids, Brownian movement, surface tension, adsorption,
emulsions, membrane equilibria and gels.
References: Taylor, The Chemistry of Colloids, Arnold and
Co.; Svedberg, Colloid Chemistry, Chemical Catalog Co.; Freund-
lich, Colloid Chemistry, Methuen.
Prerequisites:   Chemistry 3 and 4.
Two hours a week.   First Term. 1 unit.
(Given in 1934-35 and alternate years.)
17. Chemical Thermodynamics.—Study of first, second and
third laws. Derivation of fundamental equations and application
gas laws, chemical equilibrium, theory of solutions, electro-chemistry and capillarity.
Text-book: Lewis & Randall, Principles of Thermodynamics,
McGraw-Hill. Reference: Sackur, Thermochemistry and Thermodynamics, Macmillan.
Prerequisite:   Chemistry 7.
One lecture a week. 1 unit.
(Given in 1935-36 and alternate years.)
18. Advanced Inorganic Chemistry.—A more detailed treatment of chemistry of the metals than is possible in Chemistry 1,
together with the Chemistry of the Rare Elements.
Prerequisites:   Chemistry 2 and 4.
Two lectures a week.   Second Term. 1 unit.
(Given in 1934-35 and alternate years.) Classics 91
19. Biochemistry.—This course will deal with such topics as,
some special applications of colloid chemistry to Biology, the
determination of hydrogen-ion concentration, the chemical and
physical processes involved in the digestion, absorption and assimilation of foodstuffs in the animal body, the intermediate and ultimate products of metabolism, and nutrition.
Prerequisites: Chemistry 3 and 9 (a). Chemistry 9 (a) and
19 may, on permission, be taken conjointly.
Two lectures a week.   Second Term. 1 unit.
(Given in 1934-35.)
20. Methods in Teaching High School Chemistry.—This course
is offered primarily for students in the Teacher Training Course
and does not carry undergraduate credit.
References: Black and Conant, Practical Chemistry, The Macmillan Company. Smith's College Chemistry, revised by Kendall,
1929 Edition.    The Century Company.
Two lectures a week.    First Term.
21. Chemical Kinetics.—The applications of statistical mechanics to chemical problems, such as the rates of thermal and photochemical reactions, and the emission and absorption of radiation
by molecules. The Quantum theory as applied to molecular processes and band spectra.
Reference: Tolman, Statistical Mechanics with Applications to
Physics and Chemistry.
Two lectures a week.    Second Term. 1 unit.
(Given in 1934-35 and alternate years.)
Department of Classics
Professor:  Lemuel Robertson.
Professor:   O. J. Todd.
►  Professor:   H. T. Logan.
Greek
A.—Homeric Greek, A Book for Beginners, Clyde Pharr, Heath.
History.—Robertson and Robertson, The Story of Greece and
Rome, Chap. I-XXXII.
Four hours a week. 3 units.
2. Lectures.—Homer, Iliad I, 304-611 and VI; Plato, Apology,
Adam, Pitt Press.
Composition.—North and Hillard, Greek Prose Composition,
Longmans & Green. Selected passages will occasionally be set for
Unseen Translation.
Literature.—Norwood, The Writers of Greece.
Four hours a week. 3 units. 92 Faculty of Arts and Science
3. Lectures.—Thucydides, History, Book VII, Marchant, Macmillan; Sophocles, Antigone, Jebb and Shuckburgh, Cambridge;
Euripides, Iphigenia at Aulis, Headlam, Cambridge.
Three hours a week. 3 units.
(Given in 1934-35 and alternate years.)
5. Lectures.—Homer, Iliad (Selections), Monro, Iliad, 2 Vols.,
Oxford; Greek Elegiac, Iambic, and Lyric Poets, Harvard; Demosthenes, Third Olynthiac and Third Philippic, Butcher, Oxford
(Vol. I).
Three hours a week. 3 units.
(Given in 1935-36 and alternate years.)
6. Lectures.—Herodoti Historiae (selections), Hude, Oxford;
Lysiae Orationes XVI (selections), Shuckburgh, Macmillan; Aristophanes, The Birds, Hall and Geldart, Oxford. (Open only to
those who have taken or are taking Greek 3 or 5.)
Three hours a week. 3 units.
(Given in 1934-35 and alternate years.)
7. Lectures.—Aristotle, Ars Poetica, Bywater, Oxford; Plato,
The Republic (selections), Burnet, Oxford. (Open only to those
who have taken or are taking Greek 3 or 5.)
Three hours a week. 3 units.
(Given in 1935-36 and alternate years.)
8. Composition.—Obligatory for Honour students; to be taken
in both Third and Fourth Years. 1 unit.
9. Greek History to 14 A.D.—The course will begin with a
brief survey of contributory civilizations of pre-Hellenic times
and will include a study of social and political life in the Greek
world during the period.   Knowledge of Greek is not prerequisite.
Text-books: M. L. W. Laistner, Greek History, Heath; E. S.
Shuckburgh, Greece, Fisher Unwin.
Three hours a week. 3 units.
(Given in 1935-36 and alternate years.)
Latin
1. Lectures.—Cicero, De Senectute, Shuckburgh-Egbert, Macmillan ; A Book of Latin Poetry, Neville, Jolliffe, Dale and Bres-
love, Macmillan.
Composition.—Pilsbury, Latin Prose Composition, Clarendon
Press.
History.—Robertson and Robertson, The Story of Greece and
Rome, Dent, Chap. I to XXXII.
Three hours a week. 3 units. Classics 93
2. (a) Lectures.—A Book of Latin Poetry, Macmillan; Cicero,
Pro Archia, Nail, Macmillan; Horace, Odes III, Page, Macmillan.
History.—Robertson and Robertson, The Story of Greece and
Rome, Dent, Chap. XXXII-LIV.
Three hours a week. 3 units.
2. (b) Lectures.—Cicero, Pro Archia, Nail, Macmillan; A Book
of Latin Poetry, Macmillan.
History.—Robertson and Robertson, The Story of Greece and
Rome, Dent, Chap. XXXII-LIV.
Literature.—Duff, Writers of Rome, Oxford.
Composition.—Pilsbury, Latin Prose Composition, Clarendon
Press.
All students are expected to provide themselves with Allen and
Greenough New Latin Grammar.
Three hours a week. 3 units.
2 (o) and 2 (b) are alternate courses; students intending to
read for Honours in the Third and Fourth Years are expected,
and students intending to offer Latin as a subject in the Education
course, are advised to take Latin 2 (b).
3. Lectures.—Terence, Phormio, Bond and Walpole, Macmillan; Virgil, Bucolics and Georgics, Page, Macmillan.
Three hours a week. 3 units.
(Given in 1934-35 and alternate years.)
4. Lectures.—Tacitus, Histories, I, II, Godley, Macmillan;
Horace, Epistles, Wilkins, Macmillan.
Literature.—Duff, Writers of Rome, Oxford.
Three hours a week. 3 units.
(Given in 1935-36 and alternate years.)
5. Lectures.—Avery, Latin Prose Literature (selections 34-40,
44, 50-51, 56, 59-66), Little, Brown & Co.; Juvenal, Satires, Duff,
Cambridge.
Three hours a week. 3 units.
(Given in 1934-35 and alternate years.)
6. Lectures.—Avery, Latin Prose Literature, Little, Brown &
Co.; Garrod, Oxford Book of Latin Verse (selections), Oxford.
Three hours a week. 3 units.
(Given in 1935-36 and alternate years.)
7. Lectures.—Roman History from 133 B.C. to 180 A.D.
Text-books: A Short History of the Roman Republic, Heitland,
Cambridge; A Short History of the Roman Empire, Wells and
Barrow, Methuen.
A knowledge of Latin is not prerequisite for this course.
Three hours a week. 3 units.
(Given in 1934-35 and alternate years.) 94 Faculty of Arts and Science
8. Composition.—Obligatory for Honour students; to be taken
in both Third and Fourth Years.
One lecture a week; individual conferences at the pleasure of
the instructor. 1 unit.
9. Methods in High School Latin. Spring term only. This
course is offered primarily for students in the Teacher Training
Course, and does not carry undergraduate credit. Readings to be
assigned.
Two hours a week.
Department of Economics, Political Science,
Commerce and Sociology
Professor:   H. F. Angus.
Professor:   W. A. Carrothers.   (On leave of absence.)
Associate Professor:  J. Friend Day.
Associate Professor:  C. W. Topping.
Associate Professor:  G. F. Drummond.
Lecturer in Accountancy:   Frederick Field.
Lecturer in Commercial Law:   F. K. Collins.
Lecturer in Commercial Law:   Reginald H. Tupper.
Lecturer in Economics:   W. H. Taylor.
Assistant:   Gordon W. Stead.
Honorary Lecturers:
J. Howard T. Falk.
Laura Holland, O.B.E., Cert. School of Social Work (Simmons College),
Part-time Lecturer (Social Service Course).
Mary McPhedran, Diploma, Social Service Department (Toronto), Part-
time Lecturer   (Social Service Course).
Edna Pearce, B.S. (Knox, Illinois), Supervisor of Field Work, (Social
Service Course).
Miss Zella Collins.
Economics
1. Principles of Economics.—An introductory study of general
economic theory, including a survey of the principles of value,
prices, money and banking, international trade, tariffs, monopoly,
taxation, labour and wages, socialism, the control of railways and
trusts, etc.
Deibler, Principles of Economics, McGraw-Hill; Cole, Intelligent Man's Guide Through World Chaos, Ryerson; The Canada
Year Book, 1933.
Additional readings will be assigned for students offering this
course for credit in the Third or Fourth Year.
Economics 1 is the prerequisite for all other courses in this
department, but may be taken concurrently with Economics 2,
with Sociology 1, or with Government 1.
Three hours a week. 3 units. Economics 95
2. Economic History. —• A survey of the factors of economic
significance from earliest recorded times, leading to consideration
of the more important phases of European organisation, with
special reference to the Industrial Revolution, the progress of
agriculture, and resultant social conditions.
Southgate, English Economic History, Dent; Toynbee, Industrial Revolution, Longmans; Knowles, Industrial and Commercial
Revolutions, Dutton; and assigned readings.
Three hours a week.   Mr. Day. 3 units.
3. Labour Problems and Social Reform.—A study of the rise
of the factory system and capitalistic production, and of the more
important phases of trade unionism in England, Canada and the
United States. A critical analysis of various solutions of the labour
problem attempted and proposed; profit-sharing, co-operation, arbitration and conciliation, scientific management, labour legislation
and socialism.
Patterson, Social Aspects of Industry, McGraw-Hill; Simkho-
vitch, Marxism versus Socialism, Williams & Norgate; and
assigned readings.   Beveridge, Unemployment, Longmans.
Three hours a week. 3 units.
(Given in 1935-36 and alternate years.)
4. Money and Banking. — The origin and development of
money. Banking principles and operations, laws of coinage, credit,
price movements, foreign exchange. Banking policy in the leading
countries, with particular reference to Canada.
Text:   To be assigned.
Readings: G. D. H. Cole, What Everybody Wants to Know
About Money, London, Gollancz, 1933; L. D. Edie, Money, Bank
Credit and Prices, Harpers, New York, 1928; and Report of-the
Royal Commission on Banking and Currency in Canada, Ottawa,
1933.
Three hours a week. 3 units.
5. Government Finance.—An outline course dealing with the
principles and methods of taxation, and administration of public
funds. Topics examined include: Growth of taxation methods;
theories of justice in taxation, classification, increase, economic
effects and control of expenditures; property, business, personal,
commodity and inheritance taxes, with reference to Canada,
Britain and other countries; the single tax; double taxation;
shifting, incidence and economic effects of taxation; flotation,
administration,  conversion and redemption of government loans.
Text: To be assigned. H. L. Lutz, Public Finance. 96 Faculty op Arts and Science
Readings: E. R. A. Seligman, Essays in Finance, 1925; H.
Dalton, Principles of Public Finance, 1929; A. Comstock, Taxation
in the Modern State, 1931.
Three hours a week. 3 units.
(Given in 1934-35 and alternate years.)
6. International Trade and Tariff Policy.—A survey of the
theory of international trade and the foreign exchanges; the balance of trade, foreign investments and other fundamental factors;
the problem of Reparations and of War Debts; the protective
tariff and commercial imperialism; the commercial policy of the
leading countries, with considerable attention to Canada.
Taussig, International Trade, Macmillan; Griffin, Principles of
Foreign Trade, Macmillan; Taussig, Selected Readings in International Trade and Tariff Problems, Ginn; and assigned readings.
Three hours a week.  Mr. Drummond. 3 units.
7. Corporation Economics. — Historical development of the
different forms of industrial organization, including the partnership, joint stock company and the corporation, and the later
developments, such as the pool, trust, combination and holding
company. Methods of promotion and financing, over-capitalization,
stock market activities, the public policy toward corporations, etc.
Readings to be assigned.
Three hours a week. 3 units.
(Not given in 1934-35.)
9. History of Economic Thought.—A study of the development
of modern economic theory, with special reference to the Mercantilists; the Physiocrats; Adam Smith; the Classical School and
its critics; the Historical School; Jevons and Austrian School;
Marshall; together with a study of recent trends in economic
thought.
Text: W. A. Scott, The Development of Economics, New York,
Century Co., 1933.
Readings: C. Gide & C. Rist, A History of Economic Doctnnes,
New York, D. C. Heath & Co., n.d.; A. Gray, The Development of
Economic Doctrine, London, Longmans, Green & Co., 1931; T.
Veblen, The Place of Science in Modern Civilization, New York,
Viking Press, 1930.
Three hours a week. 3 units.
(This may be made a Reading Course in 1934-35.)
10. Economic Geography (formerly Geography 5).—A general
survey of the principal resources and industries of the world, with
emphasis on those entering into international trade, leading to a
study of the principles and problems of transportation by sea. Economics 97
MacFarlane, Economic Geography, latest edition, Pitman; and
assigned readings.
Three hours a week.   Mr. Day. 3 units.
11. Transportation. — A comprehensive study of the fundamentals of railroad development and organization, with the legal
and economic problems involved; theory and practice of rate-
making; discriminations; factors in public control, etc.
Acworth, Elements of Railway Economics, Clarendon Press,
Oxford; Jackman, Economics of Transportation, University of
Toronto Press; and assigned readings.
Three hours a week. 3 units.
(Not given in 1934-35.)
12. Statistics 1. — Statistical methods in relation to economic
and social investigations. Statistical groups; types of average.
Statistical series in time; trend and fluctuation. Index numbers.
Methods of measuring correlation. Elementary probabilities and
the normal curve of error. Problem of sampling.
Mills, F. C, Statistical Methods; Mills, F. C, and Davenport,
D. H., A Manual of Problems and Tables in Statistics, Henry Holt
and Company.
Prerequisite:   Mathematics 2 or 3.
One lecture and two hours laboratory work a week. Mr. Drummond. 3 units.
13. Statistics 2.—This course is a continuation of Statistics 1,
and aims at giving an understanding of statistical technique in
its application to problems of business and economic research.
It involves a study of more advanced methods of correlation
analysis, cyclical fluctuations and business forecasting. In addition
to covering a wide course of reading, students will be required to
construct tables, diagrams, etc., based on original data (official
or private) of the statistics of trade, production, sales, prices,
wages, etc., and to write reports and precis.
Texts: Ezekiel, Methods of Correlation Analysis, John Wiley
& Sons; Riggleman and Frisbee, Business Statistics, McGraw-Hill;
Haney, Business Forecasting, Ginn & Co.; Persons, The Problem
of Business Forecasting, Houghton Mifflin; Warren-Pearson, Prices,
Wiley.
Brown, Bingham and Temnomeroff, Laboratory Hand Book of
Statistical Methods, McGraw-Hill.
Mills, Economic Tendencies in the United States, National
Bureau of Economic Research.
Assigned readings.
Three hours a week.   Mr. Drummond. 3 units. 98 Faculty of Arts and Science
Courses Open Only to Candidates for the Degree
of B.Com.
14. Accountancy 1.—An introductory course to give a broad
perspective of accounting principles and methods, and to promote
an intelligent appreciation of business transactions in their relation
to the balance sheet and income account.
Kester, Accounting Theory and Practice, Vol. I, Ronald Press;
and assigned readings.
Prerequisites:   Economics 2, Economics 10, Mathematics 3.
Three hours a week.  Mr. Day. 3 units.
15. Accountancy 2.—More advanced work in connection with
the accounting and financial problems of corporations, including
liquidations and consolidations, and the miscellaneous details connected therewith.
Kester, Accounting Theory and Practice, Vol. II, Ronald Press;
and assigned readings.
Prerequisite:   Accountancy 1.
Three hours a week.   Mr. Field. 3 units.
16. Accountancy 3.—A study of the principles involved in cost
accounting, including the practical working through a model set
of accounts and a consideration of the managerial use of cost
records.
Prerequisite: Accountancy 1.
Three hours a week. 3 units.
(Not given in 1934-35.)
17. Commercial Law 1.—The formation, operation, construction and discharge of contracts; bills of exchange, promissory notes
and cheques; company law; principal and agent; the Bank Act;
sales of goods.
Three hours a week. 3 units.
(Given in 1934-35 and alternate years.)
18. Commercial Law 2. — Bankruptcy; mortgages and liens;
trusts; partnership; certain principles in the law of real property
and landlord and tenant.
Three hours a week. 3 units.
(Given in 1935-36 and alternate years.)
19. Marketing and Problems in Sales Management.—A detailed
study of marketing functions, leading up to the analysis of problems which have to be solved by sales executives.
Three hours a week.   Mr. Day. 3 units.
(Given in 1934-35 and alternate years.) Economics 99
Agricultural Economics
1. Agricultural Economics.—The principles of Economics as
applied to Agriculture; historical background, the agricultural
problem; and some special topics, such as the agricultural surplus,
production in relation to population growth, the farm income and
the share of Agriculture in the national income.
Taylor, Agricultural Economics, Macmillan.
References and assigned readings from Gray, Carver, Nourse
and others.
Three lectures a week.   Mr. Clement. 3 units.
2. Marketing.—The principles of Marketing as applied to the
individual farm and to Agriculture as a whole. The general principles of Marketing, the marketing of agricultural products as
compared to wholesale and retail distribution of manufactured
goods, the contributions of national Farmer Movements, co-operative marketing as illustrated by the marketing of wheat, fruit
and milk in Canada.
Hibbard, Marketing Agricultural Products, Appleton; Mackintosh, Agricultural Co-operation in Western Canada, Ryerson Press,
Toronto; references and assigned readings from Macklin, Boyle,
Benton, Black, Patton and others.
Three lectures a week. Mr. Clement. 3 units.
Government
1. Constitutional Government. — This course deals with the
nature, origin and aims of the State; and with the organization of
government in the British Empire, the United States of America,
France and Germany.
Readings to be assigned.
Three hours a week. Mr. Angus. 3 units.
2. Introduction to the Study of Law.— (a) A rapid survey of
Legal History,   (b)  Outlines of Jurisprudence.
Readings to be assigned.
Three hours a week. Mr. Angus. 3 units.
3. Imperial Problems. — A course on problems of government
within the British Empire.
Readings to be assigned.
Three hours a week.  Mr. Angus. 3 units.
(Not given in 1934-35.)
4. Problems of the Pacific.—A course on the problems of the
Pacific Area discussed at the Conference of the Institute of Pacific
Relations in 1933. Each problem will be related to its economic
and political background.
Readings to be assigned.
Three hours a week.  Mr. Angus. 3 units.
(Given in 1935-36 and alternate years.) 100 Faculty of Arts and Science
Sociology
1. Introduction to Sociology.—The approach to the study of
society is by way of the local community and its institutions. An
evaluation of the importance of the geographic, the biological, the
psychological and the cultural factors in the determination of
the rise, growth and functioning of groups will be undertaken.
There will be an attempt to discover fundamental principles and
to trace these principles in their interrelationships. Several of the
problems resulting from group contacts will be studied.
Texts: Davis and Barnes, Introduction to Sociology, Heath;
Reuter and Hart, Principles of Sociology, McGraw-Hill.
The rule that Economics 1 must be taken prior to this course
or concurrently with it may be waived in the ease of students in
Nursing.
Three hours a week.   Mr. Topping. 3 units.
2. Social Origins and Development. — The different views
relating to the origin and evolution of human society; the
geographic factor and economic methods in their bearing upon
social life; primitive mental attitudes; the development of ethical,
etc., ideas among primitive peoples; primitive institutions, tools,
art and their modern forms; the growth of cardinal social ideas
through the ancient and classical period to the present time.
Text:   Wallis, Introduction to Anthropology, Harper.
Three hours a week.  Mr. Topping. 3 units.
(Not given in 1934-35.)
3. The Urban Community.—The structural characteristics of
the modern city will be outlined and the sociological significance
of the functions performed by its inhabitants discussed. A factual
study will be made of urban personalities, groups and cultural
patterns. Methods of urban social control will be investigated and
solutions for urban problems will be evaluated.
Text:   Anderson, Lindeman, Urban Sociology, Knopf, 1928.
Three hours a week.   Mr. Topping. 3 units.
(Not given in 1934-35.)
Courses Open Only to Candidates for the Diploma
of Social Service
Note : A student must be of the full age of Twenty-one years
for admission to any of these courses.
1. Introduction to Social Service.—An introductory course in
which is presented a general view of the entire field of social service
as illustrated by its present scope and methods.
Two hours a week.  Mr. Topping. 2 units. Economics IOl
2. Social Organization and Case Work Metlwds.—An introductory course in which the general principles of the social
treatment of unadjusted individuals and disorganized families are
elucidated.
One hour a week.   Miss McPhedran. 1 unit.
3. Child Welfare.—An introductory course in which methods
of caring for dependent, neglected, and delinquent children are
presented and discussed.
One hour a week.   Miss Holland. 1 unit.
4. Personal Hygiene.—An introductory course in which basic
facts concerning physiological processes, infection, immunity and
the more common diseases, as related to the task of the social
worker, are presented.
One hour a week. Miss Kerr. 1 unit.
5. Case Work Methods.—Selected case records which present
complex or difficult situations are studied with a view to determining the principles of diagnosis and treatment involved.
One hour a week.  Miss McPhedran. 1 unit,
6. Child Welfare Case Studies. — An intensive study of the
records of a child welfare organization will be undertaken. Field
work to supplement the lectures is arranged for in a child welfare
agency.
One hour a week.   Miss Collins. 1 unit.
7. Group Work. ■— The principles underlying community organization and group organization are established by a study of
case records and through the working out of projects. Field work
is arranged to supplement the lectures and discussions.
One hour a week.  Miss Pearce. 1 unit.
8. Public Health.—Such an understanding of the work of the
chief public and private health agencies will be given as will
encourage intelligent co-operation on the part of the social worker
with these agencies.
One hour a week. 1 unit.
9 and 10. Field Work Seminar. — The problems met by the
students in connection with field work are discussed, as well as
certain other selected problems. The object of the seminar is to
unify and integrate the whole course.
One hour a week.   Mr. Topping, Miss Pearce.
1 unit each session.
11. Administration.—One hour a week.   Mr. Falk. 1 unit. 102 Faculty of Arts and Science
Department of Education
Professor: G. M. Weir.    (On leave of absence.)
Acting Head: Daniel Buchanan.
Associate Professor: Jennie Wyman Pilcher.
Associate Professor: W. G. Black.
Special Lecturer: C. B. Wood.
Lecturers in High School Methods: The following professors:
R. H. Clark, A. C. Cooke, J. G. Davidson, Janet T. Greig,
A. H. Hutchinson, L. Richardson, L. Robertson, G. G. Sedgewick.
Notes
1. Education 2 and 3 are the same as 10 and 11. They are
offered as undergraduate courses only during the Summer Session
or as extra-sessional classes and are open only to students who have
completed their Normal Training.
2. Philosophy 7 and 9 may be counted as courses in Education.
3. Undergraduates who intend to proceed to the Teacher Training Course are required to take Philosophy 1 (a) and are advised
to select at least one of the following: Education 1, Philosophy
1 (b), 7, 9.
4. Registration for the Teacher Training Course is limited to
sixty (60). Applications for admission, accompanied by the registration and Library fee, should be made to the Registrar on or
before August 31.
Undergraduate Courses
1. Introduction to the Study of Education. — This course is
intended to serve as a broad survey of current educational theory
and practice. The following topics will be studied: The needs of
society and of the individual; general and specific objectives of
education; educative agencies; the school system; school law; school
finance; the pupil; the teacher; the curriculum; the educative
process; current tendencies in education; the development of the
science of education.
Text-book: Cubberley and Eells, Introduction to the Study of
Education (Revised Edition), Houghton Mifflin.
2. Educational Psychology.   (See Education 10.)
3. History and Principles of Education.   (See Education 11.)
Teacher Training Courses
10. Educational Psychology.
Texts: Gates, Psychology for Students of Education (Revised
Edition), Macmillan.
Prerequisite: Philosophy 1 (a). English 103
11. History and Principles of Education.
(a) A study of educational leaders and movements and of
school practices, with special attention to the period
since 1800.
(b) Modern educational systems: Canada, with special
reference to British Columbia; England; France; Germany; the United States.
Text-books: Cubberley, A Brief History of Education, Houghton Mifflin; Kandel, Comparative Education, Houghton Mifflin.
12. School Administration and Law.
Texts: Douglass, Organization and Administration of Secondary
Schools, Ginn & Co. (Selected Chapters); School Law of British
Columbia; Report of the School Survey Commission of British
Columbia; Koos, The Junior High School, Ginn & Co.
A list of references will be provided at the opening of the
Session.
13. Tests and Measurements.
14. Methods, Observation and Practice.
(a) Principles of Methods.
(b) Elementary School Subjects.   First Term.
(c) High School Subjects. — English, History, Latin,
French, Mathematics, Biology, Chemistry, Physics,
Art, Physical Education.
Two hours a week in each course.  Second Term.
Two courses are required under (c), but students are
advised to attend a third course.
(d) Observation and Practice.
(1) First  Term:   At least forty   (40)   hours in the
elementary schools of the Province.
(2) Second Term:   At least sixty  (60)  hours in the
high schools of the Province.
Department of English
Professor: G. G. Sedgewick.
Professor:   W. L. MacDonald.
Associate Professor:   F. G. C. Wood.
Associate Professor: Thorleif Larsen.
Associate Professor:   F. C. Walker.
Assistant Professor:   M. L. Bollert.
Assistant Professor: H. C. Lewis.   (On leave of absence.)
Instructor:   Mrs. H. C. Lewis.
Assistant:   Dorothy Blakey.
Assistant: Geoffrey Riddehough.
First Year
1.  (a) Literature.—Elementary study of a number of literary
forms to be chosen from the short story, the play, the novel, the
essay, the simpler sorts of poetry. 104 Faculty of Arts and Science
Texts for 1934-35: Bates, Twentieth Century Short Stories,
Houghton Mifflin. Euripides, Bacchae, in Gilbert Murray's paraphrase. Shakspere, Julius Caesar. Sheridan, The School for
Scandal, Everyman. Ibsen, A Doll's House, Everyman. Monro,
Twentieth Century Poetry, Chatto and Windus.
Two hours a week.
(b) Composition.—Elementary forms and principles of composition.
Text: Foerster & Steadman, Writing and Thinking, Houghton
Mifflin.
Two hours a week. 3 units.
The work in composition consists of (i) themes and class
exercises, and (ii) of written examinations. Students will be
required to make a passing mark in each of these two parts of
the work.
Second Year
2. Literature.—Studies in the history of English Literature.
Lectures and texts illustrative of the chief authors and movements from Tottel's Miscellany to Shelley. Reynolds, English
Literature in Fact and Story, The Century Co.
Three hours a week. 3 units.
Third and Fourth Years
9. Shakspere.—This course may be taken for credit in two
successive years.  In 1934-35, 9 (b) will be given as follows:
i. A detailed study of the text of A Midsummer Night's
Dream, Henry IV  (part i), Othello, Antony and Cleopatra, The Tempest.
ii. Lectures   on   Shakspere's   development,   on   his   use   of
sources, and on his relation to the stage and the dramatic
practice of his time.
Students will provide themselves with annotated editions of the
five plays named above, and with The Facts About Shakespeare,
by Neilson and Thorndike, Macmillan. They are advised to get the
Cambridge Shakespeare, ed. Neilson, or the Oxford Shakespeare,
ed. Craig.
Three hours a week.  Mr. Sedgewick. 3 units.
9. (a)   (Given in 1935-36 and alternate years.)
10. The Drama to 1642.—The course begins with a study of the
Theban plays of Sophocles and of Aristotle's Theory of Tragedy.
The main subject of the course is Elizabethan Drama: (1) its
beginnings in the Miracle and Morality Plays and in the
Interludes; (2) its development in Shakspere's predecessors—
Lyly, Peele,  Greene,  Kyd and Marlowe;   (3)   its culmination in English 105
Shakspere; (4) and its decline in Jonson, Beaumont and Fletcher,
Middleton, Webster, Massinger, Shirley and Ford.
Texts: Lewis Campbell, Sophocles in English Verse, World's
Classics, Oxford; Everyman and Other Interludes, Dent; Chief
Elizabethan Dramatists, ed. Neilson, Houghton Mifflin; Shakespeare, ed. Craig, Oxford, or the Cambridge Shakespeare, ed. Neilson, Houghton Mifflin.
Three hours a week.  Mr. Larsen. 3 units.
13. The English Novel from Richardson to the present Time.—
The development of English fiction will be traced from Richardson,
Fielding, Smollett, and Sterne through Goldsmith, Mrs. Radcliffe,
Jane Austen, Scott, C. Bronte, Dickens, Thackeray, and George
Eliot to Trollope, Meredith, Stevenson, Hardy and a few representative novelists now living.
A fair knowledge of the works of Jane Austen, Scott, Dickens,
Thackeray and George Eliot is a prerequisite for those taking this
course.
Three hours a week.  Mr. Wood.y 3 units.
14. Eighteenth Century Literature.—This course aims to give
a view, as comprehensive as possible, of the main currents of
English thought and literature during the period 1660-1800. It is
mainly concerned with the work of such men as Dryden, Pope,
Swift, Addison, Steele, Johnson, Goldsmith, Burke and Burns.
Three hours a week.   Mr. MacDonald. 3 units.
16. Romantic Poetry, 1780-1830. — Studies in the beginnings
and progress of Romanticism, based chiefly on the work of Wordsworth, Coleridge, Byron, Keats, Shelley, Scott.
Text:   Bernbaum, Guide Through the Romantic Movement.
For reference:   Elton, A Survey of English Literature, 1780-
1830.
Three hours a week.  Mr. Walker. 3 units.
17. Victorian Poetry.—This course is concerned chiefly with
the work of Tennyson, Browning, and Arnold. A few weeks at the
close of the term will be devoted to a survey of the development
of later poetry.
Texts: Browning, Complete Poetical Works, Cambridge
Edition; Arnold, Poems, Oxford Edition; Tennyson, Poems, Globe
Edition; Pierce, Century Reading* in the Nineteenth Century
Poets, The Century Co.
For reference: Elton, A Survey of English Literature, 1830-
1880.
Three hours a week. 3 units.
(Not given in 1934-35.) 106 Faculty of Arts and Science
19. Contemporary Literature. — Some tendencies of English
Literature of the present generation, in poetry and the essay and
the novel, will be studied in this course.
Texts: Brown, Essays of Our Times, Scott, Foresman Company; Sanders and Nelson, Chief Modern Poets, Macmillan
Company.   Three novels, to be assigned.
Three hours a week.  Mr. Lewis. 3 units.
25. (a) Private Reading.—Students who are candidates for an
Honours degree in English may elect a course of private reading
in their Third Year. 3 units.
25. (b) Private Reading.—Students of the Fourth Year may
pursue, with the consent and under the direction of the Department, a course of private reading. 3 units.
In such courses examinations will be set, but no class instruction
will be given.
20. Chaucer and Middle English.— (a) Middle English grammar with the reading of representative texts. (6) The Canterbury
Tales.
Texts: A Middle English reader; Chaucer, The Cambridge
Poets, ed. Robinson, Houghton Mifflin; Manly, The Canterbury
Tales, Holt.
Three hours a week.   Mr. Sedgewick. 3 units.
(Given in 1934-35 and alternate years.)
21. (a) Anglo-Saxon.—Moore & Knott, The Elements of Old
English, George Wahr; Bright, Anglo-Saxon Reader, Holt.
Two hours a week.   Mr. MacDonald. 2 units.
21. (b) Anglo-Saxon.—Beowulf.
Two hours a week.   Second Term.  Mr. Walker. 1 unit.
22. Studies in Linguistic History.—Origins, growth, and development of the English language. A brief introduction to Germanic
philology; the Indo-European language group; Grimm's Law; the
Anglo-Saxon period; Norman, French, and Latin influences; study
of the gradual evolution of forms, sounds and meanings.
Two hours a week.  First Term. Mr. Walker. 1 unit.
24. Seminar.—In this class advanced students will get practice
in some of the simpler methods of criticism and investigation. The
subject for 1934-35 will be announced at the beginning of the
session.
Two hours a week. Mr. Larsen. 2 units.
Teacher Training Course
26. Methods in High Sclwol English. — This course does not
carry undergraduate credit.
Two hours a week.  Second Term.  Mr. Sedgewick. Geology 107
Department of Geology and Geography
Professor:   R. W. Brock.
Professor of Physical and Structural Geology: S. J. Schofield.
Professor of Palaentology and Stratigraphy: M. Y. Williams.
Lecturer in Mineralogy and Petrography: H. V. Warren.
Geology
1. General Geology.—This course serves as an introduction to
the science of Geology. The following subjects are treated in the
lectures and laboratory.
(a) Physical Geology, including weathering, the work of the
wind, ground water, streams, glaciers, the ocean and its work,
the structure of the earth, earthquakes, volcanoes, and igneous
intrusions, metamorphism, mountains and plateaus and ore
deposits.
Two lectures a week.  First Term.  Mr. Williams.
(b) Laboratory Exercises in Physical Geology, include the
study and identification of the most common minerals and rocks,
the interpretation of topographical and geological maps, and the
study of structures by the use of models.
Two hours laboratory a week. Mr. Schofield, Mr. Warren and
Mr. Williams.
(c) Historical Geology, including the earth before the Cambrian, the Palaeozoic, the Mesozoic, the Cenozoic and Quaternary
eras.
Two lectures a week.   Second Term.   Mr. Williams.
(d) Laboratory Exercises in Historical Geology, consist of
the general study of fossils, their characteristics and associations,
their evolution and migration as illustrated by their occurrence
in the strata. The principles of Palaeogeography are taken up and
illustrated by the study of Palaeogeography of North America.
Two hours laboratory a week.   Second Term.  Mr. Williams.
Field Work will replace laboratory occasionally, and will take
the form of excursions to localities, in the immediate neighborhood
of Vancouver, which illustrate the subject matter of the lectures.
Prerequisite: Matriculation Chemistry or Physics, or Chemistry 1 or Physics 1, taken either before or concurrently.
Text-book: Pirsson and Schuchert, Foundations of Geology,
Wiley.
Students will be required to make a passing mark in each of
the above subdivisions. 3 units.
2. (a) General Mineralogy. — A brief survey of the field of
Mineralogy.
Lectures take the form of a concise treatment of (1)
Crystallography,   (2)   Physical Mineralogy, and   (3)   Descriptive 108 Faculty of Arts and Science
Mineralogy of 40 of the most common mineral species, with special
reference to Canadian occurrences.
Laboratory Work consists of the study of the common crystal
forms and of 40 prescribed minerals, accompanied by a brief
outline of the principles and methods of Determinative Mineralogy
and Blowpipe Analysis.
Text-book: Dana, Text-book of Mineralogy, revised by Ford,
Wiley.
Prerequisite: Chemistry 1. Physics 1 or 2 should precede or
accompany this course.
Two lectures and two hours laboratory a week. First Term.
Mr. Warren. iy2 units.
2. (b) Descriptive and Determinative Mineralogy. —- This
course supplements 2 (a) and consists of a more complete survey
of Crystallography, Physical and Chemical Mineralogy, with a
critical study of about 50 of the less common minerals, special
emphasis being laid on their crystallography, origin, association
and alteration.
Text-book: Dana, Text-book of Mineralogy, revised bv Ford,
Wiley.
Prerequisite:   Geology 2 (a).
Two lectures and two hours laboratory a week. Second Term.
Mr. Warren. iy2 units.
4. Structural and Physiographical Geology. — The following
subjects are treated in the lectures: Fractures, faults, flowage,
structures common to both fracture and flow, mountains, major
units of structure, forces of deformation, the origin and development of land forms, with special reference to the physiography of
British Columbia.
Text-book:  Leith, Structural Geology, 2nd Ed., Holt.
Prerequisite:  Geology 1.
Three hours a week.  Mr. Schofield. 3 units.
5. (a) History of Geology.—A brief history of the study of the
earth and the development of the geological sciences.   Mr. Brock.
(b) Geology of Canada.—The salient features of the geology
and economic mine'rals of Canada. Mr. Williams, Mr. Schofield,
Mr. Brock.
(c) Regional Geology.—The main geological features of the
continents and oceanic segments of the earth's crust, and their
influence upon life.  Mr. Brock.
Prerequisite:  Geology 1.
Three lectures and one hour laboratory a week. 3 units. Geology 109
6. Palaeontology. — A study of invertebrate and vertebrate
fossils, their classification, identification and distribution, both
geological and geographical.
Reference books:   Grabau and Shimer, North American Index
Fossils; Zittel-Eastman, Text-book of Palaeontology.
Prerequisite:   Geology 1.
Two lectures and two hours laboratory a week.  Mr. Williams.
3 units.
7. Petrology.—This course consists of systematic studies of (i)
optical mineralogy and (ii) petrography, with an introduction to
petrogenesis.
The laboratory work deals with the determination of rocks, first
under the microscope and then in hand specimen.
Text-books: Harker, Petrology for Students, Cambridge
University Press; Johannsen, Essentials for the Microscopical
Determination of Rock-forming Minerals and Rocks, University of
Chicago Press; Dana, Text-book of Mineralogy, revised by Ford,
Wiley.
Prerequisites:  Geology 1 and 2.if
Two lectures and two laboratory periods of 2 hours a week.
Mr. Warren. 4 units.
8. Economic Geology.—A study of the occurrence, genesis, and
structure of the principal metallic and non-metallic mineral deposits with type illustrations; and a description of the ore deposits
of the British Empire, special stress being placed on those in
Canada.
Text-book:  Ries, Economic Geology (6th edition), Wiley.
Prerequisite: Geology 1. Geology 7 must precede or accompany this course.
Four hours a week. Mr. Brock, Mr. Williams, Mr. Schofield,
Mr. Warren. 4 units.
9. Mineralography. — Principally a laboratory course dealing
with the study and recognition of the opaque minerals by means
of the reflecting microscope.
The work consists of practice in cutting, grinding and polishing
of ore specimens, accompanied by training in mierochemical
methods of mineral determination.
During the second term each student is assigned a suite of ores
from some mining district for a critical examination and report.
Text-book: Davy and Farnham, Microscopic Examination of
the Ore Minerals, McGraw-Hill.
Prerequisite: Geology 7 and 8 must precede or accompany this
course.
Two hours laboratory a week.   Mr. Warren. 1 unit. 110 Faculty of Arts and Science
10. Field Geology.—The methods taught are the fundamental
ones used by professional geologists and by the officers of the
Geological Survey of Canada. The course is essentially practical,
and is designed to teach methods of observing, recording and
correlating geological facts in the field. The students construct
geological maps of selected areas in the vicinity of Vancouver which
require the use of the various methods and instruments employed
in field geology.
Text-books: Lahee, Field Geology; Hayes, Handbook for Field
Geologists; Spurr, Geology Applied to Mining.
Prerequisite: Geology 1. Geology 4, if not already taken, must
be taken concurrently.
Three hours a week. Mr. Schofield. 3 units.
12. Meteorology and Climatology. — A course covering in a
general way the whole field, with practice in using instruments,
constructing and using weather charts, and weather predicting.
Two lectures and one laboratory period of two hours a week.
Second Term.  Mr. Schofield. \y2 units.
14. Crystallography. — This course consists of a systematic
study of the morphology of crystals, with an introduction to
mathematical crystallography.
The practical work deals with the measurement of crystals and,
in the case of students in chemistry, a certain number of the
crystals measured will be grown in the laboratory.
Students are advised to consult with the instructor before
registering for this course.
Text-book: Tutton, Crystallography and Practical Crystal
Measurement, Macmillan.
Two lectures and six or eight hours laboratory work a week.
Mr. Warren.
5 or 6 units, dependent on amount of laboratory work.
(Not given in 1934-35.)
Geography
1. Principles of Geography.—This introductory course aims to
develop in the student the point of view of modern geography and
to furnish a foundation or background that will be useful not alone
to those who may intend to continue a study of geography or to
teach it in the schools but also to those who intend to study history,
economics and other subjects, or to enter business or professional
careers, into which geographical considerations enter.
Since geography is a study of the surface of the earth and its
relation to life, particularly to human life, physical geography
(fairly well covered by the prescribed text-book) must be mastered. History 111
The second fundamental is a study of man, to which the lectures
are to a large extent devoted. The characteristics of man and the
influence of geographical environment are most easily discerned
in primitive societies; consequently these are examined in some
detail. From these as a starting point the relationships between
man and his environment in complex western civilization is
investigated.
A knowledge of the main facts in the geography of Canada
is assumed so that if the student is not already familiar with them
he must become so by private study, for he is expected to be able to
give the principles brought out in class work Canadian applications and to be able to furnish Canadian illustrations.
Text-book:   Peattie, New College Geography, Ginn & Co.
An Atlas—failing a large, comprehensive atlas, one of the
following cheap ones will serve: Philip's Senior School Atlas, Geo.
Philip & Son; Canadian School Atlas, J. M. Dent; Goode's School
Atlas, Rand McNally Co.
Three hours a week.  Mr. Brock. 3 units.
Department of History
Professor:   W. N. Sage.
Associate Professor:   F. H. Soward.
Assistant Professor:  A. C. Cooke.
Students who intend to specialize in History are advised to
study one or more modern languages. A reading knowledge of at
least one foreign language will be required for Honours.
First and Second Years
1. Main Currents in Twentieth-Century History.—This course
completes the study of World history in the High Schools and
offers a background for contemporary World problems. The following topics are discussed: The Great Powers at the Opening of
the Century, Alliance and Entente, The Coming of the World War,
The World War, The Peace Treaties, The New Map of Europe,
Reparations and War Debts, Security and Disarmament, The
League of Nations, The Russian Revolution and the U.S.S.R., Italy
and Fascism, Germany from Empire to Third Reich, Post-War
Britain and Democratic Europe, The New Balkans, The Little
Entente and Poland, Nationalism and Imperialism in the Far East,
The United States and World Peace.
Text-books: Benns, Europe Since 1914; Langsam, The World
Since 1914; Cole, The Intelligent Man's Review of Europe Today.
Essays will be assigned throughout the Session.
Three hours a week. Mr. Soward. 3 units. 112 Faculty of Arts and Science
2. (a) Outlines of Canadian History. — Geographical factors;
exploration and early settlements; political and constitutional
development to Confederation; economic and social history; The
Dominion of Canada since 1867; Canada in the Empire; Canada
in the world.
(b) The History of British Columbia. — Early explorations,
Spanish, Russian and British; Maritime fur-trade; Overland fur-
trade; the North West Company; The Hudson's Bay Company in
Old Oregon; the Colonial Period; Confederation; the Province of
British Columbia.
Text-books: Lucas and Egerton, A Historical Geography of
Canada, Parts I and II; Skelton, The Canadian Dominion; New-
bigin, Canada; Wittke, A History of Canada; Howay, British
Columbia, the Making of a Province; Sage, Sir James Douglas and
British Columbia; Sage, Outline of British Columbia History.
Essays will be assigned throughout the session. 3 units.
(Not given in 1934-35.)
4. Medieval History.—A sketch of Medieval History from the
Council of Nicaea to the Fall of Constantinople. The following
subjects will be discussed: The triumph of Christianity; the breakdown of the Western Roman Empire, the Barbarian Invasions;
the earlier monastic movements; Mohammed and Islam; the rise
of the Papacy; the Franks and Charlemagne; the struggle between
Empire and Papacy; the Normans in Europe; the Crusades; the
Medieval Towns; the latest monastic movements; the rise of
the Universities; Frederick II; the later Medieval Empire; the
national kingdoms in France, Spain and England; the Turks and
the Byzantine Empire.
Text-books: Thompson, History of the Middle Ages; Munro
and Sontag, The Middle Ages; Scott, Hyma and Noyes, Readings
in Medieval History.
This course is intended primarily for Second Year students who
hope to specialize in history.
Essays will be assigned throughout the session.
Three hours a week.  Mr. Sage. 3 units.
Third and Fourth Years
History 10, 11, 12, 13 and 14 are intended for Third Year
students; History 15, 19 and 20 for Fourth Year. History 10 must
be taken by all candidates for Honours.
All Honours students (whether in History alone or in a combined course) must take the History Seminars in their Third and
Fourth Years. The Seminar is offered as a training in intensive
work and carries no credits.
If the graduating essay be written in History it will count
as 3 units. History 113
10. British History to the Revolution of 1688.—The geographic
factors; Roman Britain; character and institutions of the Anglo-
Saxons ; relations of Church and State; the Norman Conquest and
the Manorial System; royal supremacy under Normans and
Angevins; the Great Charter; the evolution of Parliament; social
conditions in the 14th Century; the Lancastrian Experiment; the
Tudor Monarchy and the Middle Class; the National Church;
agrarian and commercial development; struggle between King and
Parliament; the Puritan Rebellion; the Commonwealth; the
Restoration and the Revolution.
Text-books: Trevelyan, A History of England; Williamson,
The Evolution of England; Davis, England under the Normans
and Angevins; Trevelyan, England under the Stuarts; Lunt, History of England; Adams and Stephens, Documents of English
Constitutional History.
Essays will be assigned throughout the session.
Three hours a week.  Mr. Sage. 3 units.
11. Development of the British Empire and Commonwealth.—
The Age of Discovery; Colonization in North America; the Old
Colonial System; India under the Company; Colonization of Australia and New Zealand; Dutch and British in South Africa;
Responsible Government; Development of the Dominions; Victorian Imperialism; African Colonies and Protectorates; Indian
Nationalism and Reforms; the Dependent Empire; Mandates;
Evolution and Problems of the British Commonwealth of Nations.
Text-books: Robinson, Development of the British Empire;
or Williamson, Short History of British Expansion; Trotter, The
British Empire-Commonwealth; Elliott, The New British Empire.
Essay subjects will be assigned throughout the session.
Three hours a week. Mr. Cooke. 3 units.
12. History of the United States of America. — This course
begins with a sketch of the American colonies at the outbreak of
the Revolution and traces the history of the United States from the
commencement of the War of Independence to the close of the
World War.
Text-books: Charles and Mary Beard, The Rise of American
Civilisation; J. T. Adams, The Epic of America; H. Faulkner,
American Economic History; F. J. Turner, The Frontier in
American History.
Essays will be assigned throughout the session.
Three hours a week. 3 units.
(Not given in 1934-35.)
13. The Age of the Renaissance and Reformation.—The Cultural Development of Europe from the 14th to the 17th Centuries. 114 Faculty op Arts and Science
The transition from the medieval to the modern world; humanism;
renaissance art; overseas exploration and expansion; the rise of
modern capitalism and national states; the Reformation; the
counter-Reformation; the scientific revolution and intellectual
developments.
Text-books: Hulme, Renaissance and Reformation; Lucas, The
Renaissance and the Reformation.
Essays will be assigned throughout the session.
Three hours a week.   Mr. Cooke. 3 units.
14. The Age of Louis XIV; The Revolutionary and Napoleonic
Era.—Europe in the 17th Century; the establishment of absolutism;
the ascendancy of France; expansion and conflict overseas; the
enlightened despots; the age of reason; the French Revolution;
Napoleon; the Congress of Vienna.
Text-books: Benians, Renaissance to Revolution; Packard, The
Age of Louis XIV; Bruun, The Enlightened Despots; Gottschalk,
The Era of the French Revolution; or Rose, The Revolutionary and
Napoleonic Era; Fournier or Kircheisen, Napoleon.
Essays will be assigned throughout the session.
Three hours a week.  Mr. Cooke. 3 units.
15. Europe, 1815-1919. — The political, social and economic
history of the chief countries of continental Europe, with especial
attention to international relations.
Text-books: Schapiro, Modern and Contemporary European
History; Fueter, World History; Moon, Imperialism and World
Politics; Buell, International Relations.
Essays will be assigned throughout the session.
Three hours a week.   Mr. Soward. 3 units.
19. Great Britain Since 1688.—This course aims at an interpretation of the constitutional, political, economic and religious
development of the British Isles since 1688.
Text-books: Grant Robertson, England Under the Hanoverians;
Williamson, The Evolution of England; Fay, Life and Labour in
the Nineteenth Century; Trevelyan, British History in the
Nineteenth Century.
Essays will be assigned throughout the session.
Three hours a week. Mr. Sage. 3 units.
20. The Evolution of Canadian Self-Government.—A survey of
the period from the Peace of Utrecht to the present day. The
following subjects will be dealt with: French and British Colonial
Systems; British experience in Acadia; British policy after the
Treaty of Paris; the Quebec Act; the effect of the American Revolution ; the Constitutional Act; the opening of the West; the War
of 1812; the formation of parties and the struggle for Reform; Mathematics 115
Durham's Report; the achievement of Responsible Government;
Confederation and the completion of the Dominion, the development of Responsible Government and the growth of nationhood.
Text-books: Martin, Empire and Commonwealth; Kennedy,
The Constitution of Canada; Kennedy, Statutes, Treaties and
Documents of the Canadian Constitution, 1713-1929.
Essays will be assigned throughout the session.
Three hours a week. 3 units.
21. Methods in High School History.—This course is offered
primarily for students in the Teacher Training Course and does
not carry undergraduate credit.
Readings to be assigned.
Two hours a week in Spring term only.  Mr. Cooke.
22. Honours Seminars:
(a) Third Year: Historical Method. Mr. Soward.
(b) Fourth   Year:    The   Stuart   Constitutional   Problem,
1603-1660.   Mr. Sage.
Department of Mathematics
Professor:   Daniel Buchanan.
Professor:   F. S. Nowlan.
Associate Professor:   E. E. Jordan.
Associate Professor:   L. Richardson.
Assistant Professor:  Walter H. Gage.
Assistant Professor:   F. J. Brand.
Assistant:   May L. Barclay.
Mathematics 2 and 3 are Second Year Courses. Mathematics
2 is a prerequisite for all the Honour Courses.
Pass Courses
1. (a) Algebra.—An elementary course, including ratio, proportion, variation, interest and annuities, theory of quadratic equations, simple series, permutations, combinations, the binomial
theorem, logarithms.
Wilson and Warren, Intermediate Algebra, Chapters I to XV,
Oxford.
Students intending to take Mathematics 2 or to enter Applied
Science should purchase the larger edition of The Intermediate
Algebra. Four hours a week.   First Term.
(b) Analytical Geometry. — Fundamental concepts, loci, the
straight line and circle.
Nowlan, Analytical Geometry, McGraw-Hill.
Two hours a week.   Second Term.
(c) Trigonometry.—An elementary course involving the use
of logarithms. 116 Faculty of Arts and Science
Playne and Fawdry, Practical Trigonometry, Copp Clark.
Wentworth and Hill, Tables, Ginn.
Two hours a week.    Second Term. 3 units.
2. (a) Algebra. — The binomial theorem, complex numbers,
induction, remainder theorem, Horner's method, exponential, logarithmic and other series, undetermined coefficients, partial fractions,
convergence and divergence, determinants.
Wilson and Warren, Intermediate Algebra (Larger Edition),
Oxford.
Two hours a week.   Mr. Gage. 2 units.
(b) Calculus. — An introductory course in differential and
integral calculus, with various applications.
Woods and Bailey, Elementary Calculus (Revised Edition),
Ginn.
One hour a week.   Mr. Buchanan. 1 unit.
3. The Mathematical Theory of Investments.—This course deals
with the exponential law, the power law, curve fitting, the theory
of interest, annuities, debentures, valuation of bonds, sinking funds,
depreciation, probability and its application to life insurance.
Bauer, Mathematics Preparatory to Statistics and Finance, Macmillan; Hart, Mathematics of Investment (Revised), Heath.
Three hours a Aveek.   Mr. Brand. 3 units.
Honour Courses
10. Calculus.—The elementary theory and applications of the
subject.
Granville, Differential and Integral Calculus, Ginn.
Three hours a week.   Mr. Buchanan. 3 units.
11. Plane and Spherical Trigonometry.—The work in plane
trigonometry will deal with the following: Identities and trigonometrical equations, the solution of triangles with various applications, circumscribed, inscribed and escribed circles, De Moivre's
theorem, expansions of sin n9, etc., hyperbolic and inverse functions. The work in spherical trigonometry will cover the solution
of triangles with various applications to astronomy and geodesy.
Loney, Plane Trigonometry, Parts I and II.
Two hours a week.   Mr. Richardson. 2 units.
(Given in 1935-36 and alternate years.)
13. Plane and Solid Analytical Geometry.—A general study
of the conies and systems of conies, and elementary work in three
dimensions.
Three hours a week.   Mr. Nowlan. 3 units. Mathematics 117
14. Theory of Equations and Determinants.—A course covering
the main theory and use of these subjects.
Dickson, Elementary Theory of Equations, Wiley.
Three hours a week.   Mr. Nowlan. 3 units.
15. Higher Algebra.—Selected topics in higher algebra, including infinite series, continued fractions, the theory of numbers,
probability.
Hall and Knight, Higher Algebra, Macmillan; Chrystal, Textbook of Algebra, Part II.
Two hours a week.   Mr. Jordan. 2 units.
(Given in 1935-36 and alternate years.)
16. Calculus and Differential Equations.—A continuation of
the previous course in calculus, treating partial differentiation,
expansions of functions of many variables, singular points, reduction formulae, successive integration, elliptic integrals, and Fourier
series.
Ordinary and partial differential equations, with various applications to geometry, mechanics, physics and chemistry.
Granville, Differential and Integral Calculus, Ginn. Murray,
Differential Equations, Longmans.
Three hours a week.    Mr. Buchanan. 3 units.
17. Applied Mathematics.-—A course dealing with the applications of mathematics to dynamics of a particle and of a rigid body,
and to the two body problem in celestial mechanics.
Prerequisite:   Physics 6.
Loney, A Treatise on Dynamics of a Particle and Rigid Bodies,
Cambridge.
Three hours a week.    Mr. Richardson. 3 units.
This course may be taken either as an undergraduate or a
graduate course.
(Given in 1934-35 and alternate years.)
18. History of Mathematics.—A reading course covering the
historical development of the elementary branches of mathematics
from the earliest times to the present.
Ball, History of Mathematics; Cajori, History of Elementary
Mathematics; Smith, History of Mathematics.     Mr. Gage.   1 unit.
19. Methods in High School Mathematics.
This course is offered primarily for students in the Teacher
Training Course and does not carry undergraduate credit.
Readings to be assigned.
Two hours a week.   Second Term.   Mr. Richardson. 118 Faculty of Arts and Science
Graduate Courses
20. Vector Analysis.—Weatherburn, Vector Analysis.
21. Theory of Functions of a Real Variable.—Goursat-Hedrick,
Mathematical Analysis, Vol. I.
22. Theory of Functions of a Complex Variable.—Townsend,
Functions of a Complex Variable.
23. Differential Geometry.—Eisenhart, Differential Geometry.
24. Projective Geometry.—Veblen and Young, Projective Geometry, Vol. I.
25. Celestial Mechanics.—Moulton, An Introduction to Celestial
Mechanics.
26. Advanced Differential Equations. — Moulton, Differential
Equations.
27. Theory of Numbers and Algebraic Numbers.—Reid, Elements of the Theory of Algebraic Numbers.
28. Hyper-complex Numbers.—Dickson, Algebras and Their
Arithmetics.
29. Modern Algebraic Theories. — Dickson, Modern Algebraic
Theories.
30. Elliptic and Bessel Functions.—Byerly, Integral Calculus,
Whittaker and Watson; Modern Analysis, Gray, Mathews and Mac-
Robert, Bessel Functions.
Department of Modern Languages
Profess'or: 	
Professor:   D. O. Evans.
Professor:   A. F. B. Clark.
Associate Professor:   Isabel Maclnnes.
Assistant Professor:  Janet T. Greig.
Instructor:  Joyce Hallamore.
Instructor:   Wessie Tipping.
Instructor:   Dorothy Dallas.
Instructor:   Madame G. Barry.
Instructor:   Madame D. Darlington.
With the consent of the Professor in charge of the course, a
student taking a Pass Degree may be admitted to any course in
the Third and Fourth years in addition to, but not in lieu of,
3 (a) and 4 (a). Students from other universities who have
already taken the work of 3 (a) and 4 (a) may be given special
permission by the Head of the Department to substitute other
courses.
French
1. Moliere, Le Bourgeois Gentilhomme, Didier; Victor Hugo,
Prose et Poesies (Wilson Green), Cambridge; Kastner and Marks,
French Composition, Pt. 1, Dent; Ashton, A Preface to Moliere, Modern Languages 119
Longmans, Toronto, (Chaps. I to VI, and VIII) ; Weekley, Tutorial
French Grammar, Clive.
Summer Reading: See the announcement after the Fourth Year
Courses. 3 units.
Prerequisite:   Junior matriculation French or its equivalent.
2. La Fontaine, Fables (Dent) ; Balzac, Gobseck (Oxford
University Press) ; Maupassant, Eight Short Stories (Macmillan).
Independent reading will be required.
Conversation in French on the above.    Written resumes.
Composition from Mills, Free Composition, Nelson.       3 units.
Summer Reading:   See the  announcement  after the  Fourth
Year Courses.
Prerequisite:  French 1 or its equivalent.
3. (a) The Literature of the Age of Louis XIV.—Lectures on
the history and social conditions of the period, and on the development of the literature. Careful reading and discussion of the
following texts: Schinz and King, Seventeenth Century French
Readings (Holt); Corneille, Le Cid (Didier); Racine, Iphigenie
(American Book Co.) or Phedre (Heath); Moliere, Le Misanthrope
(Didier), or L'Avare (Manchester Univ. Press); Le Tartuffe
(Heath).
Conversation and written resumes based on the above.
This course is obligatory for all students taking Third Year
French. French 2 is a prerequisite. Students who cannot write
French with some facility are advised not to attempt 3 (a).
Students who intend to take French throughout the four years
or who wish to teach this subject should also take 3(c).        3 units.
3. (b) The Literature of tlie XlXth Century (Verse and
Novel). Berthon, Nine French Poets (Macmillan); Hugo, Poemes
choisis (Manchester University Press) ; Balzac, Eugenie Grandet
(Oxford).    This course is intended for Honours students.
3. (c) French Composition and Phonetics. Kastner and Marks,
French Composition, Pt. 2. 3 units.
Summer Reading: See the announcement after the Fourth
Year Courses.
4. (a) The Romantic Drama.—Lectures on the evolution of
the drama during the 19th Century. Hugo, Hernani; Alfred de
Vigny, Chatterton (Oxford) ; Musset, Three Plays (Nelson) ;
Rostand, Cyrano de Bergerac (Holt) ; Stewart and Tilley, The
Romantic Movement in French Literature (Cambridge). Extensive independent reading will be expected. 3 units.
French 3 (a) is a prerequisite. Students who cannot write
accurate French with facility and understand spoken Freneh are
advised not to attempt 4 (a). 120 Faculty of Arts and Science
4. (b) The Literature of the Eighteenth Century.—Lectures
on the history and social conditions of the period, with special
emphasis on the philosophe movement, and the beginnings of
romanticism. The inter-relations of French and English thought
and literature will be touched upon. Careful reading and discussion of the following texts: Selections from Voltaire (Havens),
Century Co.; Rousseau, Morceaux choisis (Mornet), Didier; Diderot, Extraits (Fallex), Delagrave; Beaumarchais, Le Barbier de
Seville, Macmillan.
French 3 (a) and 3 (b) are prerequisites. The requirements
for entrance to 4 (6) are accurate written French and a sufficient
mastery of spoken French to permit conversation on a literary
subject.
4. (c) Composition and Oral French, and French Institutions.
—Book required: Kastner and Marks, French Composition, Pt. 3.
This course should be taken in conjunction with French 4 (a) and
French 4  (b). 3 units.
Prerequisite:  French 3 (c).
4. (d) The History of French Literary Criticism and Theory,
from the Pleiade to the Present Day.—Vial-Denise, Idees et Doctrines Litteraires du XVTle Siecle, Idees et Doctrines Litteraires du
XVIIIe Siecle, Idees et Doctrines Litteraires du XIXe Siecle (three
vols., Delagrave). ^^
French 3 (a) and 3 (b) are prerequisites. This course cannot
be substituted for French 4 (a) or French 4 (b). 3 units.
5. (a) Methods in High School.—Modern Languages. Phonetics
during First Term (1 hour a week). Methods during Spring Term
(1 hour a week). Texts for discussion: Hedgcock, Practical French
Teaching, Pitman; Modern Studies, 1918. This course is primarily
for students in the Teacher Training Course and does not carry
undergraduate credit.
5. (b) Old French and XVIth Century. Texts: Aucassin et
Nicolette (Classiques francais du Moyen Age) ; Rabelais, Gar-
gantua (Jouaust) ; Ronsard, Oeuvres choisies (Larousse) ; Montaigne Essais, (Gamier).    (For M.A. candidates only.)
5. (c) The French Novel.—A study of the evolution of the
French Novel with special reference to the Nineteenth Century.
Independent readings are required.
(Not given in 1934-35.) Modern Languages 121
Summer Reading
Upon entering the courses for the years stated, the student
must satisfy the instructor that he has read the books mentioned
below.
Second Year:
1. Balzac, Le Pere Goriot.
2. Saintine, Picciola; or Vigny, Poesies Choisies.
Third Year:
1. Chateaubriand, Atala.
2. Moliere, Les Femmes Savantes, Les Precieuses Ridicules.
3. Vigny, Servitude et Grandeur Militaires.
4. Musset, Poesies Choisies.
Fourth Year:
1. Marivaux, Le Jeu de I'Amour et du Hasard.
2. Voltaire, Contes.
3. Voltaire, Zaire.
4. Racine, Andromaque. ^k
5. Bernardin de Saint-Pierre, Paul et Virginie.
6. Musset, Fantasio.
7. Banville, Gringoire.
The above have all been chosen from the series Les Classiques
pour tons so as to lighten the cost of buying books for vacation
reading. At the present rate of exchange they can be bought at
the University Bookstore for ten or fifteen cents each. As these
books can be carried in the pocket and read at odd moments, no
excuse will be accepted for failure to do summer reading.
German
Beginners' Course.—Heffner, Brief German Grammar, Heath;
Koischwitz, Bilderlesebuch, Crofts. 3 units.
1. Completion and Revision of Zinnecker. Composition and
conversation based on texts read. Diamond and Uhlendorf, Mitten
im Leben, Holt; Bruns, Book of German Lyrics, Heath.
Science Section with alternate reading. 3 units.
Junior Matriculation or Beginners' German is prerequisite for
this course.
2. Whitney and Stroebe, Easy -German Composition, Holt.
Composition and conversation based on texts read.
Diamond and Schomaker, Lust und Leid, Holt; Keller, Romeo
und Julia auf dem Dorfe, Holt; Bruns, Book of German Lyrics.
3 units.
German 1, or its equivalent, is prerequisite for German 2. 122 Faculty of Arts and Science
3  (a) Introduction to the Classical Period.
Lectures on the development of Eighteenth Century literature.
Texts for special study: Lessing, Emilia Galotti, Heath; Goethe,
Faust I, Heath; Schiller, Die Jungfrau von Orleans, Holt. Composition text:  Whitney and Stroebe, German Composition, Holt.
3 units.
Summer Reading: Before entering German 3 students must
read: Fleissner, Deutsches Literatur-Lesebuch, Crofts, to page
92. (J. G. Robertson, The Literature of Germany, Home University Library, is also recommended.)
3. (b) Introduction to Modern Literature. — Texts: Lipzin,
From Novalis to Nietzsche, Prentice-Hall; Porterfield, Modern
German Stories, Heath; and other assigned reading.
4. (a) Nineteenth Century German Drama.—Text: Campbell,
German Plays of the Nineteenth Century, Crofts.
Department of Philosophy
Professor:   H. T. J. Coleman.
Associate Professor of Psychology and Education:
Jennie Wyman Pilcher.
Special Lecturer:  C. W. Topping.
1.  (a) Elementary Psychology.
Text-book: Warren, Elements of Human Psychology, (Revised
Edition), Houghton Mifflin.
Three hours a week.   Mrs. Pilcher 3 units.
1. (b) Introduction to Philosophy.—This course is intended
for two classes of students: First, those who contemplate specializing in Philosophy either as Honour or Pass students in their Third
and Fourth Years; and second, those who wish a single course
which will give in an untechnical way a statement and discussion
of fundamental philosophical problems and thus assist them in
their special studies in other departments.
Text:   Patrick, Introduction to Philosophy, Houghton Mifflin.
References: Brightman, An Introduction to Philosophy; Cunningham, Problems of Philosophy; Drake, An Invitation to Philosophy; Alexander, A Short History of Philosophy; Perry, The
Approach to Philosophy.
Three hours a week.   Mr. Coleman. 3 units.
2. Ethics.
Text-book:   Urban, Fundamentals of Ethics, Holt.
A special study will be made of selected portions of Aristotle's
Ethics, Mill's Utilitarianism, and Kant's Metaphysic of Morals.
Three hours a week. 3 units. Philosophy 123
3. History of Greek Philosophy from Thales to Plato (inclusive).
Text-books: Bakewell, Source Book in Ancient Philosophy,
Scribners. Burnet, Greek Philosophy (Part I), Macmillan. In
connection with this course a special study will be made of Plato's
Republic, Phaedo, and Philebus.
Three hours a week. 3 units.
(Given in 1934-35 and alternate years.)
4. The history of Philosophy from the Renaissance to the
Present Time.
Text-book: Alexander, A Short History of Philosophy, Macmillan.
References: Rand, Modern Classical Philosophers, and the various Histories of Philosophy.
Three hours a week. 3 units.
(Given in 1935-36 and alternate years.)
5. The Philosophy of Kant, with special study of the Critique
of Pure Reason.
Three hours a week. 3 units.
(Given in 1935-36 and alternate years.)
6. Philosophic Movements Since the Time of Kant. Post-
Kantian Idealism, Pragmatism, Modern Realism, Bergson and
others.
Three hours a week. 3 units.
(Given in 1934-35 and alternate years.)
7. Philosophy of Education.—A course of lectures and discussions dealing with educational movements since the beginning
of the 19th century, and with the theories of life and of mind
which are implicit in these movements.
Texts: Spencer, Education, Everyman Edition. Dewey, Democracy and Education, Macmillan.
References: Butler, The Meaning of Education; Rousseau,
Emile; Locke, The Conduct of the Understanding; Froebel, The
Education of Man; Dewey, The School and Society; Articles in the
Cyclopedia of Education, Macmillan.
Philosophy 1 (a) or Philosophy 1 (b) is recommended as preparatory to this course.
Three hours a week.   Mr. Coleman. 3 units.
8. Social Psychology.—A study of those particular phases of
mental life and development which are fundamental in social
organization and activity.
Texts: McDougall, Social Psychology, The Group Mind,
Methuen, London; Ginsberg, Psychology of Society, Methuen,
London.   Collateral reading will be prescribed from the following: 124 Faculty of Arts and Science
Hobhouse, Mind in Evolution, Morals in Evolution; Sutherland,
Origin and Growth of the Moral Instinct; Cooley, Human Nature
and the Social Order; Wallas, Human Nature in Politics, The Great
Society; Ross, Social Psychology; Trotter, Instincts of the Herd in
Peace and War; Bernard, Introduction to Social Psychology.
Philosophy 1 (a) or Philosophy 1 (6) is recommended as preparatory to this course.
Three hours a week.    Mr. Coleman. 3 units.
9. (1) A Study of the Concept of Intelligence.—Current theories of the nature and growth of intelligence. Its practical bearing in modern life. Principles and applications of the measurement of intelligence. History of the movement. The nature and
causes of mental defects and peculiarities.
(2) Principles of Experimental Procedure.—Method of Measurement. Practical training in the methods of group examinations.
Treatment of subnormal, normal and gifted children. Treatment
of problem cases.
Text:   Terman, Measurement of Intelligence, Houghton Mifflin.
Three hours a week.   Mrs. Pilcher. 3 units.
Department of Physics
Professor:   T. C.  Hebb.
Professor:   A. E. Hennings.
Associate Professor:  J. G. Davidson.
Associate Professor:   G. M. Shrum.
Assistant:   Rognvald T. Hamilton.
Assistant:   Patrick D. McTaggart-Cowan.
Assistant:   Donald K. Coles.
Assistant:   Gordon C. Danielson.
Assistant:   Thomas G. How.
Primarily for First and Second Year Students
1. Introduction to Physics.—A general study of the principles
of mechanics, properties of matter, heat, light, sound and electricity, both in the lecture room and in the laboratory. The course
has two objects: (1) to give the minimum acquaintance with
physical science requisite for a liberal education to those whose
studies will be mainly literary; (2) to be introductory to the
courses in Chemistry, Engineering and Advanced Physics. Students must reach the required standard in both theoretical and
practical work. Open only to students who have not matriculated
in Physics.
Text-book: Millikan, Gale and Edwards, A First Course in
Physics for Colleges.
Three lectures and two hours laboratory a week. 3 units. Physics 125
2. Elementary Physics.—This course consists of a general course
in Physics suitable for those students who have obtained standing
in Junior Matriculation Physics or its equivalent. It covers mechanics, properties of matter, heat, light, sound, electricity and
some of the more recent developments and theories.
Text-book: Chant and Burton, A Text-book of College Physics,
Copp Clark.
Prerequisite: High School Physics.
Three lectures and one two-hour laboratory period a week.
3 units.
References:  Watson, A Text-book of Physics, Longmans; Kaye
and Laby, Physical and Chemical Constants, Longmans.
3. Mechanics, Molecular Physics and Heat.—A study of statics
and dynamics of both a particle and a rigid body, the laws of
gases and vapors, temperature, hygrometry, capillarity, expansion,
and calorimetry.
Text-books:   Reynolds, Elementary Mechanics, Prentice-Hall;
Edser, Heat for Advanced Students, Macmillan.
Prerequisite:  Physics 1 or 2.
Two lectures and three hours laboratory a week. 3 units.
Primarily for Third Year Students
5. Electricity and Magnetism.—A study of the fundamentals
of magnetism and electricity, including alternating currents and
electron physics.
Text-book:   Zeleny, Elements of Electricity, McGraw-Hill.
Prerequisite:   Physics 1 or 2.
Two lectures and three hours laboratory a week. 3 units.
6. Theoretical Mechanics.—A selected course in statics, dynamics of a particle and of a rigid body.
Text-book:  Smith and Longley, Ginn.
Two lectures a week. 2 units.
7. Introduction to Theoretical Physics.—A course of lectures
upon selected topics, including elasticity, viscosity, and hydromechanics.
Two lectures a week. 2 units.
8. Physical Optics.—A course of lectures accompanied by laboratory work, covering optical instruments, interference, diffraction,
polarisation, the nature of light and experiments on ether drift.
Text-book:   Wood, Physical Optics, Macmillan.
Two lectures and one three-hour laboratory period a week.
3 units. 126 Faculty of Arts and Science
Primarily for Fourth Year Students
10. Light.—A short lecture course for students who have not
taken Physics 8. A study of optical instruments, light sources and
filters, spectroscopy, photometry, energy measurements, refrac-
tometers, interference, diffraction and polarised light.
Text-book: Robertson, Introduction to Physical Optics, Van
Nostrand.
One lecture a week. 1 unit.
11. Electricity and Magnetism.—In this course especial attention is given to the theoretical phases of Electricity and Magnetism.
Text-book:   Starling, Electricity and Magnetism.
Prerequisites: Physics 3 and 5 and Mathematics 10.
Two lectures a week. 2 units.
12. Introduction to Atomic Structure.—A course of lectures
dealing with the conduction of electricity through gases, cathode
and positive rays, elementary spectroscopy, X-rays, radioactivity
and other atomic phenomena.
Text-book: Richtmyer, Introduction to Modern Physics, McGraw-Hill.
Prerequisites: Courses 3 and 5, and Differential and Integral
Calculus.
Two lectures a week. 2 units.
13. Kinetic Theory of Gases.—A course of lectures giving an
exposition of the classical deductions and an outline of recent
experimental advances of the subject.
Text-book:   Loeb, Kinetic Theory of Gases.
Two lectures a week. 2 units.
14. Thermodynamics.—A course of lectures covering the fundamental principles of the subject.
Text-book:   Birtwistle, The Principles of Thermodynamics.
One lecture a week. 1 unit.
19. Experimental Physics.—This is chiefly a laboratory course
covering work in thermionics, spectroscopy, high vacua and general
laboratory technique.
Carefully prepared reports, abstracts and bibliographies will
constitute an essential part of the course.
Six hours laboratory a week. 2 to 3 units.
With the consent of the Head of the Department Fourth Year
students may select one or more units from the following graduate
courses: Physics 127
Primarily for Graduate Students
20. Spectroscopy.—A study of the methods of excitation and
observation of spectra, series in arc and spark spectra, multiplets,
Zeeman and Stark effects, and band spectra.
One lecture a week. 1 unit.
21. Radiation and Atomic Structure.—A study of the theories
of radiation and miscellaneous related topics selected from current
literature.
One lecture a week. 1 unit.
22. Advanced Electricity and Magnetism. — A study of the
Electromagnetic theory and its application, the theories of metallic
conduction, and electrical oscillations.
One lecture a week. 1 unit.
23. Vector Analysis.—A course of lectures upon the applications of Vector Analysis to problems in Physics.
One lecture a week. 1 unit.
24. X-rays and Crystal Structure.—A study of the modern
methods of production and observation of X-rays, the Compton
effect, X-ray analysis, and the structure of crystals.
One lecture a week. 1 unit.
25. The Theory of Sound.—A course of lectures covering the
propagation of sound, and the general phenomena associated with
vibrating systems.
One lecture a week. 1 unit.
26. The Theory of Potential.—A general course giving the
applications of the Theory of Potential to Physics.
One lecture a week. 1 unit.
27. The Theory of Relativity.—An introductory course to the
Theory of Relativity.
One lecture a week. 1 unit.
28. Quantum Mechanics.—An introduction to the theory of
Quantum Mechanics, and the application of Wave Mechanics to
atomic problems.
One lecture a week. 1 unit.
40. Methods in High School Physics.—This course is offered
primarily for students in the Teacher Training Course and does
not carry undergraduate credit.   Readings to be assigned.
Two hours a week.    Second Term. 128 Faculty of Arts and Science
Department of Zoology
Professor:   C. McLean Fraser.
Assistant Professor:   G. J. Spencer.
Assistant Professor:   Gertrude M. Smith.
Note:—Biology 1 is prerequisite to all courses in Zoology.
1. General Morphology.—General morphology of animals. Comparative anatomy. The relationships of animal groups. Comparative life-histories.
Text-book: Parker and Haswell, Manual of Zoology, Macmillan.
This course is prerequisite to other courses in Zoology.
Two lectures and two hours laboratory a week. 3 units.
2. Comparative Anatomy of Vertebrates.—A detailed comparative study of a member of each of the classes of Vertebrates.
Two lectures and four hours laboratory a week.   First Term.
2 units.
3. Comparative Anatomy of Invertebrates.—A detailed comparative study of a member of each of the main classes of Invertebrates.
Two lectures and four hours laboratory a week.    Second Term.
2 units.
4. Morphology of Insects.—General Entomology.
A collection of insects is required.
Two lectures and four hours laboratory a week.    First Term.
2 units.
This course is prerequisite to other courses in Entomology.
5. Histology.—Study of the structure and development of animal tissues.   Methods of histology.
Ten hours a week.   Second Term. 3 units.
6. Embryology.—A general survey of the principles of vertebrate embryology. Preparation and examination of embryological
sections.
Ten hours a week.   First Term. 3 units.
7. Economic Entomology.—A study of the insect pests of animals and plants; means of combating them.
Lecture and laboratory work, six hours a week.   Second Term.
2 units.
8. Private Reading.—A course of reading on Biological theories.
In this course examinations will be set, but no class instruction
will be given. 2 units. Zoology 129
9. Advanced Entomology.—A course in (a) Insect Morphology
and wing venation, or (b) Internal Anatomy and Histology, or
(c) Taxonomy.
Prerequisite:   Zoology 4.
Lecture and laboratory work seven hours a week.   First Term.
2 units.
Courses correlated with the work for the major thesis are given
to.graduate students.  THE
FACULTY
OF
APPLIED SCIENCE
(ENGINEERING, NURSING AND HEALTH)  FACULTY OF APPLIED SCIENCE
FOREWORD
The object of the courses in Applied Science is to train students
in exact and fertile thinking, and to give them a sound knowledge
of natural laws and of the means of utilizing natural forces and
natural products for the benefit of man and the advancement of
civilization. Experience shows that such a training is the best yet
devised for a large and increasing proportion of the administrative,
supervisory and technical positions.
The object, then, is to turn out, not finished engineers or
industrial leaders—these are the product of years of development
in the school of experience—but young men with a special capacity
and training for attaining these goals, and thus for helping to
develop the industries of the province. Consequently the undergraduate course is made broad and general rather than narrow
and highly specialized.
Furthermore, such a course is not only better suited to the
British Columbia conditions that the graduate will encounter in
his after-life, but also better for later specialization, for it furnishes
a more solid foundation, a better background, a broader outlook
and a more stimulating atmosphere, all necessary if the specialist
is to achieve the maximum results of which he is capable.
The student is offered a full undergraduate course and an
additional year of graduate study. The First Year is intended
to increase the student's general knowledge and to broaden his.
outlook. It is hoped that enough interest will be aroused to
encourage the student to continue some study of the humanities
as a hobby or recreation.
The Second and Third years in Applied Science are spent in a
general course that includes Mathematics and all the basic sciences.
This gives not only a broad training, but enables the student to
discover the work for which he has special liking or aptitude and
to select more intelligently the subjects in which to specialize
during the final two years. During these two years students
acquire more detailed knowledge and get practice in applying
scientific principles and knowledge, in solving problems, in doing
things; and there is also training in Economics, Law and Industrial
Management.
During the long period between sessions, the student is required
to engage in some industrial or professional work that will afford
practical experience not obtainable in the laboratory or field classes,
but that is a necessary supplement to academic study. 134 Faculty of Applied Science
An engineering degree in the Applied Science Course of the
University is accepted by the Association of Professional Engineers
of the Province of British Columbia in lieu of four of the six
years' practical experience required by the Engineering Act of
the Province for registration to practise engineering.
Students are advised to register with the Association of Professional Engineers of British Columbia in their third year; and
to associate themselves with the appropriate engineering societies.
FACILITIES FOR WORK
For laboratory and other Facilities see Pages 20-22.
ADMISSION
The general requirements for admission to the University are
given on Pages 27-32.
As for Arts, complete Junior Matriculation or its equivalent
is required for admission to Applied Science, and no student may
enter with any outstanding supplemental in Junior Matriculation.
Admission to the Second Year in Applied Science may be
granted to students who have fulfilled the requirements of the
First Year, as outlined below, by Senior Matriculation or similar
work taken outside of the University; but students who are considering entering Applied Science are recommended to take the
First Year at the University of British Columbia, if they can, for,
while they may master the required subject matter as well outside,
in the opinion of the Faculty it is highly desirable to have had a
year's experience at the University before entering Second Year
Applied Science.
This experience includes special orientation lectures, contact
with Arts students, with Applied Science senior students, with
specialists, with college organizations, and generally with the
University methods and adjustments which prepare him to attack
the difficult and heavy work of the Second Year efficiently from the
outset, or to select another University course, if desired, on the
basis of a year's experience and without loss of time.
DEGREES
The degrees offered students in this Faculty are:
Bachelor of Applied Science (B.A.Sc).    (See Page 135.)
Master of Applied Science (M.A.Sc).    (See Page 162.) Courses in Applied Science 135
COURSES LEADING TO THE DEGREE OF B.A.Sc.
The degree of Bachelor of Applied Science is granted on the
completion of the work in one of the courses! given below:
I. Chemical Engineering.
II. Chemistry.
III. Civil Engineering.
IV. Electrical Engineering.
V. Forest Engineering.
VI. Geological Engineering.
VII. Mechanical Engineering.
VIII. Metallurgical Engineering
IX. Mining Engineering.
X. Nursing and Health.
A double course in Arts and Science and in Applied Science is
offered, leading to the degrees of B.A., and B.A.Sc. (See Page
160.)
This course is strongly recommended to students who are
young enough to afford the time and to students wishing to enter
Applied Science, and who have to their credit some, but not all,
of the requirements of First Year Applied Science as set forth on
Page 137. The latter can select subjects in their Second Year Arts
that will satisfy the Arts requirements for the double degree, and
at the same time complete the work of First Year Applied Science.
Thus they may qualify for an Arts degree without expending any
more time than would be required to qualify them for entrance
into Second Year Applied Science.
PRACTICAL WORK OUTSIDE THE
UNIVERSITY
In order to master professional subjects it is very important
that the work done at the University should be supplemented by
practical experience in related work outside. Therefore students
are expected to spend their summers in employment that will give
such experience.
Before a degree will be granted, a candidate is required to
satisfy the Department concerned that he has done at least four
months' practical work related to his chosen profession. Fourth
and Fifth Year Essays (see Page 139) should be based, as far as
possible, upon the summer work.
tThe curriculum described in the following pages may be changed from
time to time as deemed advisable by the  Senate. 136 Faculty of Applied Science
Upon approval of the Dean and the head of the Department
concerned, University credit may be granted for work done outside
the University under the immediate supervision of the University
staff, during the University session.
Practical work such as Shop-work, Freehand Drawing, Mechanical Drawing, Surveying, etc., done outside the University, may
be accepted in lieu of laboratory or field work (but not in lieu of
lectures) in these subjects, on the recommendation of the Head
of the Department and approval of the Dean. Students seeking
exemption as above must make written application to the Dean,
accompanied by certificates indicating the character of the work
done and the time devoted to it.
OPENING OF SESSION
Lectures begin on Wednesday, September the 26th, and
it is essential to the success of the student that he should be in
attendance at the opening of the session, for, in order to allow as
much time as possible for practical work in the summer, the length
of the session has been reduced to the minimum consistent with the
ground to be covered. Consequently a student requires the full
session to master the work. A mere pass standing is a very unsatisfactory preparation for subsequent work or professional life.
Further, from this standpoint, the opening work is the most important of the whole session for the student, for in it are given the
general instructions necessary for the proper attack upon the work.
The only exception is when the summer employment affords
experience necessary for the course the student is specializing in,
which will lighten to some extent the work of the session (such
as in Geological Survey field work for geological students) and
then only when the nature of this work makes it impossible for
the student to reach the University on the opening day. Under
these circumstances, if the student furnishes a statement from his
employer showing it was impossible for him to release the student
earlier, the Dean may allow the student to enter without penalty.
The student must, however, register at the opening of the session
in accordance with the regulations in reference to registration.
SUPPLEMENTAL EXAMINATIONS
A student with supplementals must write them off at the
regular time for supplemental examinations before the opening of
the session, for he will need the entire session for the current year's
work. It is also necessary, for a successful year, to have a satisfactory knowledge of the foundational work of the preceding year.
No exceptions to the above rule will be granted except as under
Paragraph 4, Page 136. Courses in Applied Science 137
GENERAL OUTLINE OF UNIVERSITY COURSES
Students in Nursing and Health register directly in Applied
Science and take the special course outlined on Pages 153-160. All
other students of Applied Science have a general course common
to all for the first three years as under:
FIRST YEAR
The students register in Arts and take the following classes
as Arts students:
English 1 (a and b).
Mathematics 1  (Algebra, Geometry, Trigonometry).
Chemistry 1.
Physics 1 or 2.
Latin 1 or French 1 or *German B.
The passing grade is 50 per cent, for English, Chemistry,
Physics, German B, and each of the Mathematical subjects, but in
the others a mark of 40 per cent, will be accepted provided an
average of 60 per cent, has been obtained in the total work of the
year. No student with any supplemental outstanding will be admitted to Second Year Applied Science.
Biology 1, if taken as an optional extra subject, and passed
with a grade of at least 50 per cent,, need not be repeated in the
Second Year. Economics 1, taken in Arts, is accepted in lieu of
Economics in Applied Science.
A reading knowledge of French and German is desirable for
students in Engineering.
Students who have passed First Year Arts and Science, but
who have failed to make the necessary entrance requirements for
the Second Year Applied Science, may take the September Supplemental Examinations of Arts and Science.
First Year students are advised to attend the noon-hour talks
on the choice of a profession and on the life and work in various
callings likely to be selected by Applied Science graduates, as
these may assist the student in determining whether Applied
Science is the best course for him. If he finds it is not, he can
proceed in Arts without any loss of time.
The work of the Second and Third Years is the same in all
courses, except those in Nursing and Health.
•Applied Science students are advised to take  German B. 138
Faculty of Applied Science
SECOND YEAR
Subject
'3 a>
+J   St
First Term
>> c »
Second Term
5£
Math.  1  Trigonometry	
Math. 2 Solid Geometry	
Math. 3 Algebra	
Math. 4 Calculus	
C.E. 1 Descriptive Geom	
M.E. 1 Drawing 1	
Physics 3 Mechanics	
Physics 4 Heat	
Chem. 2a Qual. Analysis	
M.E. 2a Shop Practice	
Biology 1* Introductory	
C.E. 2 Surveying	
C.E. 30 Engineering Prob. 1
187
187
187
188
170
188
200
201
167
189
165
170
178
3
2
2
Field Work
4    I    ...
•Biology 1, Arts,  passed with a grade of at least 50 per cent,
accepted in lieu of this course.
will be
THIRD YEAR
No student with any supplemental outstanding will be admitted
to the Third Year of Applied Science.
Subject
OCh
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First Term
2£
5.x
Second Term
5S=
■§Q*
Math. 6 Calculus	
Math. 7 Anal. Geom.	
Chem. 2b Quan. Analysis	
CE. 4 Graphics	
M.E. 6a Elem. Theory	
Physics 5 Electricity	
Physics 6 Mechanics	
C.E. 5 Mapping	
C.E. 6 Surveying	
Geology 1 General	
tC.E. 7 Surveying	
CE. 31 Engineering Prob. 2 .
188
188
167
170
190
201
201
171
171
184
171
178
Field Work
..I      3    1.
tStudents entering Civil, Forest, Geological, Metallurgical, and Mining
Engineering are required to take Civil Engineering 7 (see Page 171) immediately after the spring examinations. Courses in Applied Science 139
FOURTH AND FIFTH YEARS
Essays
Essays are required of all students entering the Fourth and
Fifth Years, and must conform to the following:
1. The essay shall consist of not less than 2,000 words.
2. It must be a technical description of the engineering aspects
of the work on which the student was engaged during the
summer, or of any scientific or engineering work with which
he is familiar. In the preparation of the essay, advantage may
be taken of any source of information, but due acknowledgment
must be made of all authorities consulted. It should be suitably
illustrated by drawings, sketches, photographs or specimens.
3. It must be typewritten, or clearly written on paper of substantial quality, standard letter size (8^x11 inches), on one
side of the paper only, leaving a clear margin on top and
left-hand side. Every student must submit a duplicate copy
of his essay, for the correction of English. If typewritten,
essays must be "double-spaced." Students are recommended
to examine sample reports to be found in the departments.
4.   All essays must  be handed in to  the Dean not later than
November 15th.
All essays, when handed in, become the property of the Department concerned, and are filed for reference. Students may submit
duplicate copies of their essays in competition for the students'
prizes of the Engineering Institute of Canada, or the Canadian
Institute of Mining and Metallurgy.
Essays will be considered as final Christmas examinations. A
maximum of 100 marks is allowed, the value being based on
presentation, English, including spelling, and matter. In Fourth
Year essays, presentation, that is, the manner in which the material
is arranged and presented to the reader, is given most weight,
with English second and matter third. In Fifth Year essays, most
emphasis is placed on matter, but the other two are still rated
highly.
COURSES
I.    Chemical Engineering
The course in Chemical Engineering is designed to prepare the
student for the duties of managing engineer in a chemical manufacturing plant. As such he must be conversant not only with
the chemieal processes involved, but he must be prepared to design 140
Faculty of Applied Science
and to oversee the construction of new buildings and to direct the
installation and use of machinery. Hence the course of study
includes, especially in the first three years, a number of courses
in the older branches of engineering. In the fourth and fifth
years the maximum of chemical training, allowed by the time at
the disposal of the student, is given in inorganic, organic and
physical chemistry. Special emphasis is laid on such problems as
the operation of electrolytic cells and electric furnaces, the transportation of gases, liquids and solids, combustion, grinding, mixing,
drying, evaporation, distillation, condensation, filtration and
adsorption processes.
Fourth Year
V.
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Second Term
Subject
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139
179
198
184
167
168
168
193
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173
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3
3
9
2
3
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2
2
2
1
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Met.  1  Introductory	
Geol. 2 (a)  Mineralogy	
Chem. 3 Organic	
Chem. 4 Theoretical	
Chem. 5 Adv. Analysis	
E.E. 1 General    	
Physics 7 Light    	
C.E. 12 Hydraulics	
3
3
6
2
3
fifth Year
VI
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First Term
Second Term
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Essay  	
139
Chemistry 6 Industrial	
168
2
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Chem. 7  Physical „
169
2
3
2
3
Chem. 8 Electro	
169
2
3
2
3
Chem. 9 Adv. Organic	
169
2
3
2
3
Chem. 16 Engineering	
169
2
2
Met. 2 General	
199
2
2
Thesis 	
12
15 Courses in Applied Science
141
II.   Chemistry
The aim of this course is to train the students in the practice
of Chemistry, and to give a thorough knowledge in the fundamental
principles of this subject, that they may be prepared to assist in
the solution of problems of value to the industrial and agricultural
life of the Province. The course is arranged to give in the first
two years a knowledge of the fundamental principles of Chemistry
and Physics, with sufficient mathematics to enable the theoretical
parts of the subject to be understood.
In the Fourth Year, Analytical, Organic and Physical Chemistry are studied from the scientific side and in relation to technology; while in the Fifth Year a considerable amount of time is
devoted to a short piece of original work.
Fourth Year
Subject
Qft,
kFirst Term
2*
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b «
£ » 3
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5s
Second Term
38
Essay 	
Economics 1  (Arts)	
Chem. 3 Organic	
Chem.  4 Theoretical	
Chem. 5 Adv. Analysis...
Met.  1  Introductory	
Geol. 2 (a) Mineralogy.
Met. 5 Assaying.	
German B  (Arts)	
Physics 7 Light	
139
179
167
168
168
198
184
199
121
201
Fifth Year
For Details
See Page:
First Term
Second Term
Subject
a> v
J- 4>
ft
JS5
o.
Essay 	
Bacteriology 1   (Arts)	
Physics  12 Advanced	
Chem. 6 Industrial	
Chem. 7 Physical	
Chem. 8 Electro.	
Chem. 9 Adv. Organic	
Met. 2 General	
Thesis 	
139
81
201
168
169
169
169
199
2
2
2
2
2
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7
3
3
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9
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2
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2
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3
3
18 142 Faculty of Applied Science
III.   Civil Engineering
The broad field covered by Civil Engineering makes it an
adjunct of many other branches of engineering, yet the Civil
Engineer occupies a distinctive field and is intimately associated
with a wide group of undertakings vitally affecting the health,
comfort and prosperity of the commonwealth.
The various branches of Civil Engineering deal with problems
in water supply and water purification; in sewerage systems,
sewage disposal plants, and the handling of municipal and industrial wastes; in hydraulic power development; in irrigation and
drainage for agricultural activities; in all types of structures,
bridges and buildings, piers and docks, sea walls and protective
works; in transportation, canals, locks, highways, electric and
steam railways; and in the management and direction of public
works, public utilities, industrial and commercial enterprises.
The course in Civil Engineering is designed to provide, in so
far as time will permit, foundations for continued growth along
those lines which the student's interest and environment determine,
without compelling too early specialization. Training in pure and
applied science, in the humanities, in economics and engineering
law, and in the technical phases of professional work establishes
a broad basis for the stimulation of a sincere spirit of public
service and for the development of that capacity for reliable work
and judgment which makes safe the assumption of responsibilities.
The methods of instruction are planned with the view of
bringing out the powers and initiative of the students while training them in the habits of accurate analysis and careful work.
Students are encouraged to secure summer work which will give
them an insight into the various phases of the career upon which
they are about to enter, and the summer essays lay the foundation
for the ability to set forth, in clear and precise language, descriptions and analyses of projects and engineering activities. In the
Fifth Year thesis an opportunity is given for special investigation
and research under the supervision of experienced engineers. Courses in Applied Science
143
Fourth Year
Subject
Qft,
9 «
First Term
&
3
JB
Second Term
1*1
3b
CE. 8 Foundations	
CE. 9 Elementary Design	
CE. 10 a & b Strength of Mtls,
CE. 11 Railways	
CE. 12 a & b Hydraulics
C.E. 13 Mapping	
C.E. 14 Surveying	
C.E. 15 Drawing	
M.E. 6(b) Laboratory	
E.E. 1 General	
Economics 1  (Arts)	
CE. 16 Surveying	
CE. 21 Water Power	
CE. 28 Seminar	
139
171
172
17Z
173
173
173
173
174
190
193
179
174
175
177
Field Work
Fifth Year
Subject
Qft,
First Term
5s
Second Term
5s
Essay 	
C.E. 17 Structural Design	
CE. 18(a) Engineering Economics	
CE. 18(b)  Engineering Economics	
CE. 19 Law—Contracts	
CE. 20 Geodesy	
CE. 22 Municipal	
CE. 23 Transportation	
CE. 24(a) Mechanics of Mtls.	
C.E. 24(b) Reinforced Concrete Design.
CE. 25 Theory of Structures	
CE. 26 Trips	
CE. 27 Thesis	
CE. 28 Seminar	
C.E. 29 Hydraulic Machines	
139
174
174
174
174
175
175
176
176
177
177
177
177
177
178
2
1
1
2
2
2
1
3
2
6
Required Sat. A.M
3 144
Faculty of Applied Science
IV.   Electrical Engineering
This course is designed for those students who desire a general
training in the theory and practice of Electrical Engineering. The
Fourth Year of the course is devoted to the study of the basic
principles of Mechanical and Electrical Engineering, and is
intended to prepare the student for the more specialized courses
which are given in the Fifth Year. In the Fifth Year an intensive
course in all the important branches of Design, Transmission,
Electro-Technology, Radio and Electric Traction, is given, together
with thorough laboratory work in most of these subjects.
Fourth Year
♦Prerequisite  for Electrical  Students  entering  Fifth  Year.
tOptional.
la
U V
First Term
Second Term
Subject
►J s
Is*
8-8
2£
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5s
139
193
194
188
189
190
189
194
194
173
190
190
172
189
3
3
2
3
2
2
1
2
2
3
3
2
3
1
3
2
1
2
3
2
3
2
2
1
2
2
*E.E. 2 Direct Current Technology	
*E.E. 3 Elementary AC Technology
*Math. 8 or 9 (Adv. Calculus)	
3
*M.E. 3 Kinematics	
*M.E. 7 Heat Engines'	
*M.E. 4 Dynamics	
*E.E. 5 Electrical and Magnetic
Measurements  and  Instruments	
*E.E. 6 Electrical Problem Course	
3
2
*CE. 12 Hydraulics	
3
*M.E. 5 Machine Design	
M.E. 5(a) Problem Course in Strength
of Materials and Design	
C.E. 10 Strength of Materials	
1
3
fM.E. 2 b	
2 Courses in Applied Science
145
Fifth Year
Subject
B «
% B
Oft.
First Term
2*
fc"-
i§*
.jB
Second Term
3b
Essay 	
E.E. 7 Design of Electrical Machinery
E.E. 8 Electrical Traction	
E.E. 9 Transmission and Distribution
of Electrical Energy	
M.E. 15 Prime Movers	
M.E. 14 Mechanical Design	
E.E. 10 Electrical Problem Course	
E.E. 11 Radio Telegraphy and
Radio Telephony 	
Math. 8 or 9 (Differential Equa.
or Adv. Calculus	
E.E. 12 Electro-technology	
E.E. 13 Transient Phenomena and
Oscillations 	
M.E. 8 Steam Turbines	
139
194
195
195
192
192
195
195
188
196
197
191
2
3
2
3
1
1
2
2
2
2
1
1
2
2
2
4
2
4
3
3
2
4
2
4
1
1
1
1
V.   Forest Engineering
In British Columbia the forest industries, including logging
and the manufacture of lumber, pulp and paper, lead all others.
They must always play a very important part in the economy of
the Province, because seven-eighths of the productive land is
absolute forest soil, that will grow good timber but no other crop
of value; and because over half the remaining stand of saw-timber
— the last big reserve — of Canada is here. The development
of these industries is requiring more and more the services of
engineers, and especially is this true in logging. Furthermore,
most of the forest land is owned by the public, and the management of these vast estates is a task that will require constant
growth on the part of the government forest services.
This indicates very briefly the various fields of service open
to Forest Engineers, and for which the course of studies is
designed. Primarily the course is planned for the lumber industry,
and a major part of the time—apart from the preliminary foundation work—is devoted to the branches of engineering most used
by it. In addition, the fundamental subjects of forestry are
covered. As in other engineering courses, the students are expected
to obtain practical experience during the summer vacations, this
being an essential supplement to the studies at the University.
Vancouver contains large sawmills, wood-working plants, and
plants for seasoning and preserving wood—more, in fact, than any
other place in the Province. Pulp mills, logging operations and
extensive forests are within easy reach.  The advantages of location 146
Faculty of Applied Science
are therefore exceptional. A special feature is the affiliation of
the Forest Products Laboratory of Canada, maintained at the
University by a co-operative arrangement with the Dominion
Forestry Branch. A description of the laboratory and its activities
is given on Page 182. It affords opportunities for instruction in
testing the mechanical properties of timber and other structural
materials, and facilities are now provided for experimental and
demonstration work in wood seasoning.
The University Forest
A great asset to the University site is the forest, a small
remnant of the luxurious stand that once covered the whole
peninsula. Not only does it add very much to the beauty of the
surroundings, but it is valuable as a shelter belt, a place of
recreation, and a convenient demonstration and field study area
for the departments of Forestry, Botany and Zoology.
The forest is in the form of a long narrow belt on the western
side of the site, flanking Marine Drive for nearly a mile, and
containing over 85 acres. In composition it is typical of the lowland stands of the southern coast, and all the principal species of
trees and shrubs of the region are represented, including specimens
of the old trees as well as a large amount of young growth of
different ages.
A small forest nursery is being developed and used for experimental and demonstration work in silviculture and also to provide
planting stock for the forest. ^ ~
Fourth Year
Subject
Qft.
O s
First Term
In   0>
5
Second Term
b «
■ig*
Essay 	
F.E. 1 General Forestry	
F.E. 2 (a) Mensuration*	
F.E. 3 Protection	
F.E. 6 (a) Management 1	
F.E. 9 Lumbering	
Bot. 1 General Botany	
Bot. 5b Dendrology	
Economics 1   (Arts)	
CE. 8 (a) Foundations	
CE. 9 Structural Design.....	
CE.  10  Strength Materials.
C.E. 11 Railways	
C.E. 12 Hydraulics	
C.E. 13 Mapping	
C.E. 14 Surveying	
139
179
1
1
179
1
3
1
180
1
180
1
1
181
2
1
165
2
2
2
166
1
2
1
179
3
3
171
1
3
172
1 1
172
2
3
2 1
173
2
2 1
173
1
1
1 1
173
  I
173
2
  1
*Also 1 'week Field Work immediately after spring examinations. Courses in Applied Science
147
Fifth Year
Subject
<0 B
Oft.
fc.cn
First Term
t$   B>   OJ
$S
Second Term
0)  t,
ft.
5b
Essay .!	
F.E. 2 (b) Mensuration	
F.E. 5 Wood Technology	
F.E. 6 (a) Management 1	
F.E. 7 History	
F.E. 8 Silviculture*	
F.E. 10 Logging Engineering*...
F.E. 11 Milling*	
F.E. 13 Lumber Grading	
Economics 1   (Arts)	
Bot. 6b Pathology     1
Zool. 7 Entomology   j 	
Bot. 7a Ecology	
C.E. 17 Structural Design	
C.E. 18 Engineering Economics
C.E. 19 Engineering Law	
M.E. 6b Steam Lab	
139
180
180
180
181
181
181
182
182
179
166
205
166
174
174
174
190
2
1
1
2
1}
•Field trips are  required in  these  courses and  students  should be  prepared for a total expense which should not exceed $20 each.
VI.    Geological Engineering
This course is designed to meet the requirements of students
who intend to enter Geology as a profession, and such students are
strongly advised to take this particular course of training.
It gives a broad training not only in Geology, but also in the
sciences of Biology, Chemistry, Physics, and Mathematics, which
are extensively applied in the solution of geological problems. The
engineering subjects are useful not only to the Mining and Consulting Geologist and the Geological Surveyor, but to the Geologist
engaged in original research in any branch of the science.
The course therefore furnishes a foundation for the professions
of Mineralogist, Geological Surveyor, Mining Geologist, Consulting Geologist, Palaeontologist, Geographer, etc., and is useful for
thosie who will be in any way connected with the discovery or
development of the natural resources of the country.
As a supplement to the work in the classroom, laboratory and
field during the session, the student is expected to obtain practical
experience during the summer vacation.
Students are advised to become student members of the
Canadian Institute of Mining and Metallurgy. 148
Faculty of Applied Science
Fourth Year
'Either Chem.   5 or Met.  6 must be taken
Fifth Year
Qft,
First Term
Second Term
Subject
I. V
2*
u
ft.
so*
SC a, 4J
5b
8»
^ft<
h1-
o a .
|E8
JB
139
184
185
185
168
197
199
198
199
205
173
168
199
2
3
3
2
2
1
2
1
2
1
2
1
3
5
2
6
3
2
3
3
2
2
2
1
2
1
2
Geol. 4 Structural	
Geol.  5  Regional	
Chem. 4  Theoretical	
Min. 1 Metal Mining	
Met. 5 Fire Assaying	
Met. 1 General	
Ore Dressing 1 General	
Zool. 1 	
1
3
2
C.E.  13 Mapping	
3
Chem. 5* Adv. Analysis'.	
6
Met. 6* Wet Assaying	
3
Subject
■sa
o w
First Term
it
2*
i. ii a
Second Term
2%
SssS
JB
Essay 	
Geol. 6 Palaeontology	
Geol. 7 Petrology	
Geol. 8 Economics	
C.E. 18 Engr. Economics	
Geol. 9 Mineralography	
Geol. 10 Field	
Min. 2 Coal and Placer	
Min. 3 Metal Mining	
Min. 5 Surveying.	
Met. 2 Smelting.	
Ore Dressing 1	
Ore Dressing 2 Laboratory
Thesis 	
139
186
186
186
174
186
187
197
198
198
199
199
200 Courses in Applied Science
149
VII.    Mechanical Engineering
The course in Mechanical Engineering has been designed to
give the student a thorough knowledge of the theory and application of those basic subjects which are essential in this branch of
Engineering.
With this in view, stress has been laid upon such subjects as
Mathematics, Physics, Applied Mechanics, Strength of Materials,
Applied Thermodynamics and Hydraulics. Graduates of this
course are therefore qualified to enter upon any of the many
specialized branches of this profession, especially in British
Columbia, whose rapid industrial development demands Mechanical
Engineers prepared to attack a great diversity of problems.
Although fundamentally general in character, the course
embodies design of prime movers; mechanical and hydraulic machinery design; power plant operation and design; and the testing
of engines and power plants, thus giving sufficient specialized
training in Mechanical Engineering to enable students to enter
the field of design or research should they so desire.
Students following this course are given-a general course in
the fundamentals of Electrical Engineering.
Fourth Year
Subject
Qft.
First Term
2*
2 a*
Second Term
*CE. 10 Strength of Materials	
•M.E. 3 Kinematics	
*M.E. 4 Dynamics of Machines	
*M.E. 5 Machine Design	
M.E. 5 (a) Problems in Materials'
and Design 	
*M.E. 7 Heat Engines	
*M.E. 13 Physical Treatment of Metals
E.E. 2 and 3 Electrical DC and
AC Technology 	
*C.E. 12 Hydraulics	
*Math. 8 Advanced Calculus or  |
Math. 9 Differential Equations j
tM.E. 2 (b) Shop	
•Essay 	
172
189
189
190
190
190
192
193
173
188
189
139
"■Prerequisite for Mechanical students entering the Fifth Year.
tOptional. 150
Faculty of Applied Science
Fifth Year
03   .,
q£
First Term
Second Term
Subject
si
% u
ml «'
0-
u u
O & ^'
B   rt,   4>
>- £v
5b
<&i
2*
i: >>
B ™, 4)
is*
M.E. 8 Steam Turbines	
191
191
191
191
191
192
192
192
192
192
197
188
139
189
!}
i
i
2
2
1
1
2
3
5
3
5
2
4
2
1}
1
1
2
2
1
1
2
3
M.E. 9 Internal Combustion Eng.	
5
M.E. 10 Refrigeration	
fM.E. 11 Heating and Ventilation	
M.E. 12 Power Plant Design	
3
M.E. 15 Prime Movers             	
M.E. 16 Machine Design	
5
M.E. 17 Applied Mechanics	
fM.E. 18 Aeronautics            	
M.E. 19 Problems in Mech. and
Elec. Eng	
2
E.E. 14 General	
4
Math. 9 Differential Equations' or
Math. 8 Adv. Calculus
Essay	
*M.E.  (2b)  Shop  .
2
tAlternative subjects.
*Optional.
VIII.-IX.    Metallurgical and Mining Engineering
Modern Mining and Metallurgy cover too large a field to cover
in detail in a University course, therefore the courses given are
intended to give the students a broad training and knowledge of
the fundamental, technical, economic and social principles involved,
to serve as a sufficient foundation for advancement in any branch
of the work that the student may enter after graduation. Sufficient
specialized training is given in draughting, assaying and mine
surveying to equip the student for the actual job which he is likely
to enter upon graduating.
Laboratory equipment is sufficient to give a thorough laboratory
drilling in Assaying, Ore Dressing, Pyrometry and Metallurgical
Analysis.
. Coal, Iron and Steel are covered in general courses and
specialization is chiefly in non-ferrous mining and metallurgy, with
particular reference to British Columbia conditions.
Students are expected to spend their vacations in practical
work in connection with mining or metallurgy and are required
to do so between the fourth and fifth year as an essential part of
their course, without which a degree will not be granted.
Vancouver is conveniently located in proximity to coal and
metal mining districts, and is an important mining centre. Students Courses in Applied Science
151
and graduates have normally little trouble in getting positions,
through the generous co-operation of the mining companies in the
Province.
Students   are   advised   to   become   student   members   of   the
Canadian Institute of Mining and Metallurgy.
VIII.    Metallurgical Engineering
Fourth Year
First Term     j
Second Term
Subject
ft.
Mft<
n*
139
179
172
172
173
173
190
184
193
►   197
199
198
199
199
3
2
1
2
2
2
1
2
1
3
3
3
2
2
5
3
3
1
2
1
2
2
2
1
2
C.E. 9 Elem. Design	
3
C.E. 10 Str. of Materials	
3
C.E. 12 Hydraulics 	
3
CE. 13 Mapping	
M.E. 6  (b) Laboratory	
3
3
2
E.E. 1 General	
2
Ore Dressing 1 General	
Met. 1 General	
Met. 6 Wet Assay	
3
Fifth Year
Subject
s ■■
31
First Term
Second Term
Si
2£
!S*'
ge,s
4
2&
8B,8
SM
8*
■SSI*
jB
^B
Essay 	
139
Geol. 9 Mineralography	
186
2
2
Geol. 8 Economics'	
186
3
1
3
1
C.E. 18 Engr. Economics	
174
2
2
Chem. 8 Electro.	
169
2
3
2
3
Ore Dressing 2 Laboratory	
200
9
9
Min. 3 Metal Mining	
198
2
2
Met. 2 Smelting	
199
2
2
Met. 3 Calculations	
199
2
2
Met. 4 Analysis	
199
9
9
Ore Dressing 1	
199
1
1
! 152
Faculty of Applied Science
IX.    Mining Engineering
Fourth Year
As in Metallurgical Engineering.    (See Page 151.)
Fifth Year
Subject
re
First Term
Second Term
'3 *>
ii
2*
&5
lQ*
1|
1-1 p.
^B
ft.
5b
139
186
2
4
2
4
186
3
1
3
1
174
2
2
199
2
2
200
9
9
197
2
2
198
2
2
198
2
2
198
1
198
1
198
3
3
199
1
1
Essay 	
Geol. 7 Petrology	
Geol. 8 Economics	
C.E. 18 Engr. Economics
Met. 2 Smelting
Ore Dressing 2 Laboratory
Min. 2 Coal and Placer
Min. 3 Metal Mining	
Min. 4 Machinery	
Min. 5 Surveying	
Min. 7 Methods	
Min. 6 Design	
Ore Dressing 1	
Short Courses in Mining
In place of the short daytime courses in Mining given at the
University in previous years, Short Courses in Mining Subjects
will be given each year as night classes in connection with the
British Columbia Chamber of Mines and the Vancouver School
Board. Classes are held on Monday and Thursday evenings and
include lectures on Mining, Smelting, Ore Dressing, Geology
and Mineralogy, with practical laboratory work in Mineralogy.
These courses usually begin about November 15th and continue
until the end of February.
The classes are open to prospectors, business men and any
others interested. A fee of $5.00 is charged for the full courses,
and registration should be made at the office of the Chamber of
Mines, 402 Pender St. W., Vancouver, B. C. Correspondence in
regard to the courses and applications for registration, accompanied by fee, should be addressed to the Chamber of Mines. Courses in Applied Science 153
X.    Nursing and Health
1. Nursing A.—An undergraduate course, combining academic
and professional courses.   (See below.)
2. Nursing B.—A graduate course of one academic year in
Public Health Nursing.   (See Page 157.)
3. Nursing C.—A graduate course of one academic year in
Teaching and Supervision in Schools of Nursing.    (See Page 158.)
4. A double course for the combined degrees of B.A. and
B.A.Sc. (Nursing).    (See Page 160.)
Eegistration for these courses will be subject to the general
University Regulations (see Pages 29-32) and to the special
requirements of the Department.
All regulations are subject to change from year to year, and
subjects or courses may be modified during the year as the Faculty
may deem advisable.
Nursing A (Combined Undergraduate Course)
This is a five-year Combined Course leading to the Degree of
B.A.Sc. (Nursing) and to the Diploma in Nursing of an associated
hospital. It is given by the University in co-operation with the
Schools of Nursing of associated hospitals, which means those
hospitals that have signified their willingness to supply the professional part of the course, and have received the approval of
the University Senate for that purpose. Up to the present time the
Vancouver General Hospital is the only hospital which has entered
into association with the University to this end.
The course is open to applicants who meet the general requirements mentioned above, and who, in the opinion of the Department,
are personally fitted for the profession of nursing. In addition
they must satisfy the entrance requirements of the associated
Hospital Schools of Nursing; the individual applicant must make
her arrangements for admission to the associated hospital directly
with the Superintendent of Nurses and in advance of the opening
of the University term.
Nurses who have graduated from a hospital that is in affiliation
with this University or otherwise approved by the Senate, may
be awarded the degree on complying with the following conditions:
1. They shall have matriculated.
2. They shall take, or shall have taken, the full academic training laid down for this course. At least one year of such
training shall be, or shall have been, taken in the University
of British Columbia. 154
Faculty of Applied Science
3. Except under special circumstances, the course shall be
entered upon within two years of the time of graduating
as a nurse.
The aim of the Combined Course is to afford a broader education than can be given by the Hospital Schools of Nursing alone,
and thus to build a sound foundation for those who desire to fit
themselves for Teaching and Supervision in Schools of Nursing
or for Public Health Nursing Service.
The First and Second Years (of the Combined Course), or the
First, Second and Third Years (of the Double Course), which are
academic, give the students an introduction to general cultural
subjects and a foundation in the sciences underlying the practice
of nursing. Following these academic, or pre-clinical years, the
student enters an associated Hospital School of Nursing for a
period of thirty-two months. The first four months is a probationary period; upon acceptance by the School of Nursing the
student remains for a period of twenty-eight months. This period
of professional training is planned to afford a wide experience and
training in the care of the sick, and to develop the skill, observation and judgment necessary to the efficient practice of nursing.
The Final Year (which is the same for the Five-Year and the
Double Course) affords two alternative courses, one in Public
Health Nursing (Nursing B) and the second in Teaching and
Supervision in Schools of Nursing  (Nursing C).
First Year (Academic)
Subject
Qft,
First Term
ft
Sftj,
•Sgi*
Second Term
 ft.
■Si*
English 1   (a)	
English 1  (b)	
Choice of Mathematics 1
or Latin 1	
or French 1	
or History 1, 2 or 4	
Economics 1 	
Chemistry 1  	
Biology  1  	
History of Nursing	
103
104
115
92
118
111
94
87
82
202 Courses in Applied Science
155
Second Year (Academic)
Subject
53 t>
B bb
First Term
>»t-
9 ».
b ""^
i§*
5B
Second Term
tH   4)
1§*
=?B
English 2	
Zoology 1  	
Physics 1 or 2.	
Philosophy 1   (a)	
Bacteriology 1 	
Bacteriology 2 	
Elementary Organic Chemistry
104
128
124
122
81
81
202
Probationary Period (Hospital)
It has been arranged that the students of both the Combined
Course and the Double Course will enter the associated Hospital
along with the regular class of probationers entering the
Hospital in September. The midsummer vacation period was
formerly used for the probationary term, but it is believed that
it will be of benefit to the student to have a vacation before entering
the Hospital, and also an advantage to enter at the same time
as the regular class. The students must meet all admission requirements of the associated Hospital Schools of Nursing; among other
requirements, they must have attained such age as is fixed by the
School—in the Vancouver General Hospital School of Nursing the
student must have reached her nineteenth birthday before she may
enter the Hospital.
During this probationary period the student will undergo rigid
examination as to fitness in physique, temperament and character
for the practice of nursing. This will afford the Hospital School
of Nursing information upon which to judge the student's qualifications for the profession of nursing. It also enables the student
to determine whether she feels herself personally fitted or inclined
to proceed in the course. The Hospital Schools of Nursing reserve
the right to reject candidates who do not reach the required
standards.
Third and Fourth Years (Professional)
The Third and Fourth Years of the Combined Course (or
the Fourth and Fifth Years of the Double Course) will be spent
in practical training in an associated Hospital School of Nursing.
Students in these years are required to register with the University
even though during this portion of the course they are in residence 156 Faculty of Applied Science
at the Hospital. During these professional years students are
subject to the authority and are under the direction of the officers
of the associated Hospital Schools of Nursing. The required professional period is thirty-two months, in which is included the
probationary period of four months. The professional period has
been extended to thirty-two months in order to include periods of
special training in certain affiliated institutions without shortening
the period of general training in the associated Hospital. Full
maintenance and such allowance as the associated Hospital
authorities may designate are provided, and a yearly vacation is
granted at the convenience of the Superintendent of the School
of Nursing. A registration fee may be required by the associated
Hospital.
The following is an outline of the course as given in the
Vancouver General Hospital, which is the only Hospital at present
associated with the University in giving the Combined Course.
Instruction in the following Nursing subjects is given by
members of the medical staff and by qualified nurse instructors:
Introductory Ethics of Nursing; Practical Nursing Procedures;
Personal Hygiene; Anatomy and Physiology; Psychology; Elementary Nutrition and Cookery; Drugs and Solutions; Materia Medica;
Surgical Nursing; Medical Nursing (including charting); Gynecological Nursing; Nursing of Communicable Diseases; Obstetrical
Nursing; Diet in Disease; Pediatric Nursing and Infant Feeding;
Nursing in Diseases of the Eye, Ear, Nose and Throat; Nursing in
Tuberculosis; Urinalysis; Introduction to Anaesthesia; Introduction to Physiotherapy and X-Kay.
This schedule is open to change at any time, at the discretion
of the associated Hospital School of Nursing.
The period of Hospital service includes actual nursing experience in the following departments:
Medical Operating Room
Surgical Eye, Ear, Nose and Throat
Gynecological Obstetrical
Pediatric and Orthopaedic        Communicable   Diseases    (in-
Observation and Neurological     eluding Tuberculosis)
Infants Diet Kitchen
Out-Patient
In order to give the student an understanding of the tuberculosis situation in the Province, and of the value of sanatorium
treatment, an arrangement has been made between the Vancouver
General Hospital and the Provincial Sanatorium at Tranquille,
and an opportunity will be given to as many of the students as
possible to receive instruction in the nursing care of tuberculosis
in this latter institution, in lieu of the course in the tuberculosis Courses in Applied Science
157
department of the Hospital. Experience in the care of acute infectious diseases will be given when possible.
The Social Service Department of the Hospital offers opportunity for a four weeks' service to a limited number of students.
Selection will be made by the Superintendent of Nurses from the
students desirous of receiving this course.
The diploma of the Hospital School of Nursing will be granted
at the completion of this period.
Final Year (Academic and Professional)
The Final Year will be spent in either Nursing B or Nursing C,
at the option of the student. The selection between these courses
need not be made until registering with the University for the
Final Year.
Nursing B (Public Health Nursing)
A graduate course of one academic year, including work in
the University and appropriate field work under the supervision
of the various associated Public Health organizations. This course
leads to a Certificate in Public Health Nursing.
Nursing B
Subject
For Details
See Page:
Total Hours
Lectures
Total Hours
Laboratory
202
202
202
202
202
203
203
203
203
203
203
203
203
203
204
204
204
124
103
204
204
204
17
17
8
9
11
17
4
4
16
51
2
34
17
13
6
2
51
51
18
18
To run c<
with    the
work.
*
Infant Welfare	
Public Health  	
Principles and Practice of Public
Urban Visiting Nursing Programme
Contemporary Nursing Problems	
School Hvsriene 	
Social Case Work	
Philosophy  9  	
School Administration and Law	
Public Speaking and Parliamentary
Procedure 	
Sociology 	
Motor Mechanics ...	
10
Field  Work 	
mcurrently
*Hours to be arranged. 158
Faculty of Applied Science
Nursing C (Teaching and Supervision)
A graduate course of one academic year, including work in
the University, and opportunity for practice teaching and for the
observation of Training School administration and ward supervision in associated Hospitals. This course leads to a Certificate
in Teaching and Supervision in Schools of Nursing.
Nuesing C
Subject
For Details
See Page:
Total Hours
Lectures
Total Hours
Laboratory
Preventable   Diseases  	
Mental Hygiene 	
Bacteriology 	
Contemporary Nursing Problems	
Teaching in Schools' of Nursing	
Principles of Supervision in Schools
of Nursing 	
Educational Psychology	
Introduction to the Study of Education
Education   	
Public Speaking and Parliamentary
Procedure 	
Sociology 	
Social Case  Work	
Electives from Nursing B or from
related Science Courses (to make
up three units)	
Field Work 	
202
202
202
203
204
204
102
102
204
204
204
17
9
17
51
34
51
51
18
18
Below
♦Hours to be arranged.
Field Work in Nursing B and C
The academic work and *field work will run concurrently
throughout the two University terms, with the exception of the
last weeks of the Second Term, which, in Nursing B, will be
devoted entirely to field work under the supervision of the Provincial Rural Public Health Nursing organizations and, in Nursing
C. to such Hospital Service as may be arranged by the associated
Hospitals. Field work for some students may have to be delayed
until after the close of the University year.
During the period spent in the Hospital, or with a Public
Health or Social "Welfare organization, all students will be subject
•That students may have some idea of the probable expenses of the
course, they are reminded that in addition to the usual expenses of a University course, there will be additional expenses in connection -with the term
of approximately eight weeks' field work. The sum of one hundred dollars Is
mentioned as probably the maximum amount required to cover the expense
of board and lodging while with the rural nursing organization, and of
transportation. Courses in Applied Science 159
to the authority, and under the direction, of the officers of the
associated Hospital School of Nursing or of the Organization.
Through the courtesy and co-operation of the following
agencies, arrangements have been made for supervised field work
or observation:
FOR NURSING B
Vancouver General Hospital.—The Social Service Department;
Mrs. Laura B. Gordon, Director.
The Provincial Department of Health.—Dr. H. E. Young, Provincial Health Officer.
The Victorian Order of Nurses.—Miss M. Duffield, District
Superintendent.
The Medical Department of the Vancouver Public Schools.—
Dr. H. White, Medical Director; Miss E. Breeze, Director, Department of School Hygiene.
The Department of Child Hygiene, City of Vancouver.—Dr.
J. W. Mcintosh, City Health Officer; Miss L. Sanders, Supervisor,
Department of Child Hygiene.
The Children's Aid Society of Vancouver.—Miss Zella Collins,
Manager.
The Family Welfare Bureau of Greater Vancouver. — Miss
Mary McPhedran, Director.
The Government Venereal Disease Clinic.—Dr. J. Ewart Campbell, Director; Miss E. V. Cameron, Nurse in charge.
The Provincial Mental Hospital, Essondale.—Dr. A. L. Crease,
Medical Superintendent; Miss Hicks, Superintendent of Nurses.
FOR NURSING C
The Vancouver General Hospital.—Dr. A. K. Haywood, Superintendent; Miss Grace Fairley, Superintendent of Nurses.
Admission to Nursing B and C
The courses are open to students of the Combined Course and
of the Double Course, also to nurses who have graduated from
recognized Schools of Nursing, who are eligible for registration in
British Columbia and who are personally fitted for their proposed
work. For Nursing B, applicants shall have received adequate
instruction and practical experience in the nursing care of communicable diseases and of diseases of infancy and childhood. For
Nursing C, it is required that applicants shall fulfil the University
educational requirement of Junior Matriculation.
The enrolment of graduate nurses for the certificate course,
Nursing B, may have to be restricted temporarily owing to the
fact that opportunities for Field Work are at present limited.
In the selection of candidates consideration will be given firstly to
residents of the Province, and secondly to those whose preparation
(academic and professional) best fits them for the special branch 160 Faculty of Applied Science
for which they wish to register. The certificate course, Nursing C,
will be offered to graduate nurses only when at least two candidates
enrol.
Applications for admission to the courses of Nursing B or C
should be sent to the Department of Nursing and Health not later
than July 15th of the current year. A certificate of good health
and physical condition, signed by a regular practising physician,
must be presented with the applications.
As a preparation for Nursing B, nurses without previous
Public Health Nursing service are advised to obtain at least one
month's experience in a visiting nursing agency, or other public
health or social agency approved by the Department. While not
obligatory, this month is most important, and various Field
Agencies—the Provincial Board of Health, the Vancouver General
Hospital Social Service Department and the Victorian Order of
Nurses, have each agreed to receive nurses for this month in so far
as it can be arranged. Inquiry should be made at as early a date
as possible to the Department of Nursing and Health, that arrangement may be made with the Field Agencies; the nurses will be
responsible for their own maintenance, and will receive no
remuneration during this period.
Nurses registering for Nursing C who have had no experience
in family ease-work, social service or visiting nursing, are also
advised to secure this month's experience with one of the Public
Health organizations if possible.
For the convenience of graduate nurses already engaged in
nursing, who wish to take Nursing B or C, but are unable to take
a year off, provision is made that either one may be taken as a
part-time course over a period of two or more years. Nurses
registering in this way must fulfil the same requirements as the
regular-course students.
DOUBLE COURSES FOR THE DEGREES OF
B.A. and B.A.Sc.
I.   Arts and Science, and Nursing:
First Year Second Year
English 1
English 2
Mathematics 1
Language 2
Language 1
Chemistry 1 or
Physics 1 or 2 or
Physics 1 or 2
Chemistry 1
Zoology 1
Biology 1
Economics 1 or
History of Nursing
History 1 or
Philosophy 1 Courses in Applied Science 161
Third Year
Bacteriology 1 and 2 4 units
Sociology or Public Health 3 units
Elementary Organic Chemistry 1 unit
Nine additional units to be chosen in accordance with Calendar
regulations, not more than three of which may be chosen from
First and Second Year Subjects. 9 units
Fourth and Fifth Years (Professional)
The degree of B.A. is granted upon completion of the professional years. The diploma from the Hospital School of Nursing
is also awarded.
Final Year
As in the Combined Course—i.e., a choice between the two
courses, Nursing B and Nursing C. The degree of B.A.Sc.
(Nursing) is granted upon completion of the Final Year.
II.    Arts and Science, and Engineering
Two complete years in Arts and Science and four complete
years in Applied Science are required for a Double Degree. Consequently students must not select courses in Arts and Science
that are included in the Applied Science years, on account of
time-table difficulties. *
The requirements for the first and second years are as set
forth in the Calendar for the first and second years of Arts (Pages
58-60) except as follows:
1. Physics 1 or 2 and Chemistry 1 must be taken. The passing
grade for each of these subjects and for Algebra, Geometry
and Trigonometry is fifty per cent. (See also, admission to
Applied Science, Page 134.) Students are recommended to
take Mathematics 2 (c)  (calculus).
2. Biology 1, Chemistry 2, Geology 1, Mathematics 2 (a) and
2 (b), and Physics 3 or 5 or 6 may not be taken. These
subjects are covered later in Applied Science.
3. A course in German is recommended (and, for those intending to enter Geological or Civil Engineering, French
also). Two years in the language elected is necessary to
count towards a degree.
The third, fourth, fifth and sixth years of the Double Course
correspond to the second, third, fourth and fifth years of Applied
Science. The degree of B.A. is conferred on completing the fifth
year of this course. 162 Faculty of Applied Science
COURSES LEADING TO THE DEGREE OF
M.A.Sc.
1. Candidates for the degree of Master of Applied Science
must hold a B.A.Sc. degree from this University, or its equivalent.
2. A graduate of another university applying for permission
to enter as a graduate student is required to submit with his
application an official statement of his graduation, together with
a certificate of the standing gained in the several subjects of his
course. The Faculty will determine the standing of such a student
in this University.  The fee for examination of certificates is $2.00.
3. Candidates with approved  degrees and academic  records
who proceed to the Master's degree shall be required:
(a) To spend one year in resident graduate study; or
(b) (At the discretion of the Faculty concerned):
(i.) To do two or more years of private work under
the supervision of the University, such work to
be equivalent to one year of graduate study; or
(ii.) To do one year of private work under University supervision and one term of resident
graduate study, the total of such work to be
equivalent to one year of resident graduate
study.
4. One major and one minor shall be required and a thesis
must be prepared on some approved topic in the major subject.
(Two typewritten copies of each thesis shall be submitted. See
special circular of "Instructions for the Preparation of Masters'
Theses.")
The work shall be of post graduate nature and equivalent in
quantity to at least that of the final year. About one-quarter of
the time should be devoted to the minor and the remainder to the
major subject and thesis.
The choice of and relationship between major and minor
subjects, and the amount of work in each, or of tutorial work,
must be approved by each of the departments concerned, by the
Committee on graduate studies, and by the Dean.
In the case of students who have completed the Teacher
Training Course, First or Second Class standing in each of (1)
History and Principles of Education, and in (2) Educational
Psychology, is accepted as equivalent to a Minor for an M.A.Sc.
degree, subject in each case to the consent of the Head of the
Department in which the student wishes to take his Major.
5. Examinations, written or oral, or both, shall be required,
and standing equivalent to at least 75 per cent, in the major
subjects and 65 per cent, in the minor. Examinations and Advancement 163
6. Application for admission as a graduate student shall be
made to the Registrar by October 1st,   For fees see Pages 32-36.
EXAMINATIONS AND ADVANCEMENT
1. Examinations are held in December and in April. December
examinations will be held in all subjects of the Second and Third
Years, and are obligatory for all students of these. December
examinations in subjects of the Fourth and Fifth Years, excepting
those subjects that are completed before Christmas, shall be
optional with the Departments concerned. Applications for special
consideration on account of illness or domestic affliction must be
submitted to the Dean not later than two days after the close of
the examination period. In cases where illness is the plea for
absence from examinations, a medical certificate must be presented
on the appropriate form which may be obtained from the Dean's
office, or if the illness occurs at the University the student may
report to the Nurse, Auditorium Building, who may furnish the
necessary certificate.
2. Candidates, in order to pass, must obtain at least 50 per
cent, in each subject (for First Year see Page 137). The grades are
as follows: First Class, an average of 80 per cent, or over; Second
Class, 65 to 80 per cent.; Passed, 50 to 65 per cent. (See Paras.
12 and 13.) But in the First and Second Years of the course in
Nursing and Health the requirements for passing are the same
as those for the First and Second Years in Arts and Science,
namely: -^
(a) 50 per cent, or over in each paper, or
(b) 60 per cent, on the total with a minimum of 40 per cent,
in each paper, provided the whole examination is taken at
one time.
3. If a student's general standing in the final examinations of
any year is sufficiently high, the Faculty may grant him supplemental examinations in the subject or subjects in which he has
failed. Notice will be sent to all students to whom such examinations have been granted.
A request for the re-reading of an answer paper must be
forwarded to the Registrar WITHIN FOUR WEEKS after the
results of the examinations are announced. Each applicant must
state clearly his reasons for making such a request in view of the
fact that the paper of a candidate who makes less than a passing
mark in a subject is read at least a second time before results are
tabulated and announced. A re-reading of an examination paper
will be granted only with the consent of the Head of the Department concerned.   The fee for re-reading is $2.00. 164 Faculty of Applied Science
4. Supplemental examinations will be held on September 19th,
20th, 21st and 22nd. Special examinations will not be granted,
except by special permission* of the Faculty and on payment of
a fee of $7.50 per paper, and then only during the third week in
October or the second week of January.
5. Applications for supplemental examinations, accompanied
by the necessary fees (see Schedule of Fees, Pages 32-36) must be
in the hands of the Registrar at least two weeks before the date
set for the examinations.
6. No student may enter the fourth or higher year with supplemental examinations still outstanding in respect of more than
4 units of the preceding year, or with any supplemental examination outstanding in respect of the work of an earlier year unless
special permission* to do so is granted by Faculty. Students in
Nursing A must remove all outstanding supplemental examinations
before entering their third year.
7. No student will be allowed to take any subject unless he
has previously passed, or secured exemption, in all pre-requisite
subjects. If any subject has another which is concurrent with it,
both must be taken in the same session.
8. A student who is required to repeat his year will not be
allowed to take any work in a higher year excepting that a student
who has taken the Field Work of Civil 2 or 7 of the preceding
summer may take Civil 5 or Civil 13 the following session. A
student repeating his year need not repeat, however, any of the
following subjects in which he has made 65 per cent. -. Civil Engineering 2, 5, 7, 13, or Mechanical Engineering 1, 2a, 6b or 7 Lab.
9. A student who fails twice in the work of the same year may,
upon the recommendation of the Faculty, be required by the Senate
to withdraw from the University.
10. Any student whose academic record, as determined by the
tests and examinations of the first term of the Second or Third
Year, is found to be unsatisfactory, may, upon the recommendation
of the Faculty, be required by the Senate to discontinue attendance
at the University for the remainder of the session. Such a student
will not be re-admitted to the University as long as any supplemental examinations are outstanding.
11. Term essays and examination papers will be refused as
passing mark if they are noticeably deficient in English.
12. Honours will be granted in any one of the last four years
to students who obtain at least 50 per cent, in each subject and
80 per cent, on the whole at the annual examinations of that year.
•Special permission of the Faculty is granted only under exceptional
circumstances, such as illness, or as outlined on Page 136. Botany 165
13. Honour graduate standing will be granted to those who
obtain honours in the final year and who have passed any one of
the three preceding years with at least 50 per cent, in each subject
and 75 per cent, on the whole.
DEPARTMENTS IN APPLIED SCIENCE
N.B.—The following subjects may be modified during the year
as the Senate may deem advisable.
Department of Botany-
Professor: A. H. Hutchinson.
Associate Professor: Frank Dickson.
Associate Professor: John Davidson.
Biology
1. Introductory Biology.—The course is introductory to more
advanced work in Botany or Zoology; also to courses closely related
to Biological Science, such as Agriculture, Forestry, Medicine.
The fundamental principles of Biology; the interrelationships
of plants and animals; life processes; the cell and division of
labour; life-histories; relation to environment.
The course is prerequisite to all other courses in Biology.
One lecture and one period of two hours laboratory per week.
2. Principles of Genetics.—As in*Arts.   See Page 83.
3. General Physiology.—As in Arts.   See Page 83.
Botany
1. General Botany.—A course including a general survey of
the several fields of Botany and introductory to more specialized
courses in Botany.
Prerequisite: Biology 1.
Text-book: Coulter, Barnes & Cowles, Text-book of Botany.
Vol. I., University of Chicago Press.
This course is prerequisite to all courses in Botany except the
Evening Course. Partial credit (2 units) toward Botany may be
obtained through the Evening Course.    (-See Page 86.)
Two lectures and one period of two hours laboratory per week.
2. Morphology.—As in Arts.    See Page 83.
3. Plant Physiology.—As in Arts.   See Page 84.
4. Histology.—A study of the structure and development of
plants; methods of killing, fixing, embedding, sectioning, staining,
mounting, drawing, reconstructing. Use of microscope, camera
lucida; photo-micrographic apparatus. 16') Faculty of Applied Science
Text-book:  W. C. Stevens, Plant Anatomy, P. Blakiston.
Prerequisite:   Botany 1.
One lecture and two periods of three hours laboratory per
week.   Second Term.
5. Systematic Botany.
5. (a) Economic Flora.—An introduction to the classification
of plants through a study of selected families of economic plants of
British Columbia; useful for food, fodder, medicine and industrial
arts; harmful to crops and stock. Weeds and poisonous plants.
Methods of control.
Prerequisite:   Botany 1.
Text-books: Jepson, Economic Plants of California, Jepson,
University of California. Thomas and Sifton, Poisonous Plants and
Weed Seeds, University of Toronto Press.
Two lectures and two hours laboratory per week.   First Term.
5. (6) Dendrology.—A study of the forest trees of Canada,
the common shrubs of British Columbia, the important trees of the
United States which are not native to Canada. Emphasis on
the species of economic importance. Identification, distribution,
relative importance, construction of keys.
Prerequisite:   Botany 1.
Text-books: Mortan & Lewis, Native Trees of Canada, Dominion Forestry Branch, Ottawa. Sudworth, Forest Trees of the
Pacific Slope, Superintendent of Documents, Washington, D. C.;
Davidson and Abercrombie, Conifers, Junipers and Yew, T. F.
Unwin.
One lecture and one period of two or three hours laboratory
or field work per week.
5. (c)  Descriptive Taxonomy.—As in Arts.    See Page 85.
6. (6) Forest Pathology.—Nature, identification and control of
the more important tree-destroying fungi and other plant parasites
of forests.
Text-book:   Rankin, Manual of Tree Diseases, Macmillan.
One lecture and one period of two hours laboratory per week
during one-half of one term.
6. (c) Plant Pathology (Elementary).—A course similar to
6 (a), but including more details concerning the diseases studied.
Text-book:  Heald, Manual of Plant Diseases, McGraw-Hill.
Prerequisite:   Botany 1.
Two lectures and four hours laboratory a week.   Second Term.
7. (a) Forest Ecology and Geography—The inter-relations of
forests and their environment; the biological characteristics of
important forest trees; forest associations; types and regions;
physiography. Chemistry 167
Reference books: Whitford and Craig, Forests of British
Columbia, Ottawa; Zon and Sparhawk, Forests of the World,
McGraw-Hill; Hardy, The Geography of Plants, Oxford University
Press.
One lecture per week during term. Field trips and laboratory
work during the session amounting to thirty hours, one period per
week.
Department of Chemistry
Professor: R. H. Clark.
Professor of Analytical Chemistry: B. H. Archibald.
Associate Professor: W. F. Seyer.
Associate Professor: M. J. Marshall.
Assistant Professor: William Ure.
1. General Chemistry.—The course comprises a general survey
of the whole field of Chemistry and is designed on the one hand
to provide a thorough groundwork for further study in the
sciences and on the other to give an insight into the methods of
chemical investigation, the fundamental theories and some important applications, such as are suitable to the needs of a cultural
education. Students must reach the required standard in both
lecture and laboratory work.
Text: Smith's College Chemistry, revised by Kendall, 1929
Edition, The Century Co. For the Laboratory. Harris and Ure,
Experimental Chemistry for Colleges, McGraw-Hill.
Three lectures and two and one-half hours laboratory a week.
3 units
2. Qualitative and Quantitative Analysis.
(a) Qualitative Analysis.—During the first six weeks of the
term an additional lecture may be substituted for a part of the
laboratory work.
Text-book:   A. A. Noyes, Qualitative Analysis, Macmillan.
For reference:  F. W. Millar, Elementary Theory of Qualitative
Analysis, Century Co.
Prerequisite:   Chemistry 1.
One lecture and one period of three hours laboratory per week.
(b) Quantitative Analysis.—This course embraces the more
important methods of gravimetric and volumetric analysis.
Text-book: Engelder, Elementary Quantitative Analysis, John
Wiley & Sons.
Prerequisite:   Chemistry 1.
One lecture and one period of three hours laboratory per week.
Course (b) must be preceded by Course (a)'.
3. Organic Chemistry.—This introduction to the study of the
compounds of earbon will include the method of preparation and a 168 Faculty op Applied Science
description of the more important groups of compounds in both
the fatty and the aromatic series.
Text-books: Holleman-Walker, Text-book of Organic Chemistry, Wiley; Gattermann-Wieland, Laboratory Methods of Organic
Chemistry, Macmillan.
Two lectures and one period of three hours laboratory per week.
4. (a) Theoretical Chemistry.—An introductory course in the
development of modern theoretical chemistry, including a study
of gases, liquids and solids, solutions, ionization and electrical
conductivity, chemical equilibrium, kinetics of reactions, thermochemistry and thermodynamics, colloids.
Text-book: Millard, Physical Chemistry for Colleges, McGraw-
Hill.
References: Noyes and Sherrill, Chemical Principles, Macmillan. For laboratory use: Findlay, Practical Physical Chemistry,
Longmans; and Sherrill, Laboratory Experiments on Physical-
Chemical Principles, Macmillan.
Prerequisites: Chemistry 2 (except for students majoring in
Physics). Honor students majoring in Chemistry should take
Mathematics 10 concurrently.
Two lectures and three hours laboratory per week. 3 units.
4. (b) This course is the same as Chemistry 4 (a) with the
omission of the laboratory, and is open only to students not majoring in Chemistry. 2 units.
5. Advanced Qualitative and Quantitative Analysis.
(a) Qualitative Analysis.—The work of this course will include
the detection and separation of the less common metals, particularly those that are important industrially, together with the
analysis of somewhat complex substances occurring in nature.
One lecture and two periods of three hours laboratory per week.
First Term.
(o) Quantitative Analysis. — The determinations made will
include the more difficult estimations in the analysis of rocks, as
well as certain constituents of steel and alloys. The principles
on which analytical chemistry is based will receive a more minute
consideration than was possible in the elementary course.
Prerequisite:   Chemistry 2.
One lecture and two periods of three hours laboratory per week.
Second Term.
6. Industrial Chemistry.—Those industries which are dependent on the facts and principles of Chemistry will be considered
in as much detail as time will permit. The lectures will be supplemented by visits to manufacturing establishments in the neigh- Chemistry 169
bourhood, and it is hoped that some lectures will be given by
specialists in their respective fields.
Prerequisite:   Chemistry 2, 3 and 4.
Two lectures per week.
7. Physical Chemistry.—This course is a continuation of Chemistry 4 and treats in more detail the kinetic theory of gases,
properties of liquids and solids, elementary thermodynamics and
thermochemistry, properties of solutions, theoretical electrochemistry, chemical equilibrium, kinetics of reactions, radioactivity.
Books recommended: Getman, Outlines of Theoretical Chemistry, Wiley; Noyes and Sherrill, Chemical Principles, Macmillan;
for Laboratory: Sherrill, Laboratory Experiments on Physico-
Chemical Principles, Macmillan; Findlay, Practical Physical
Chemistry, Longmans.
Prerequisites:   Chemistry 2, 3 and 4.
Two lectures and three hours laboratory per week. 3 units.
8. Electrochemistry.—
(a) As in Arts.    (See Page 89.) ^^
(b) Electric furnaces,  electrolytic  refining  and deposition of
metals will be studied in detail.
Text-book: Thompson, Theoretical and Applied Electrochemistry, Macmillan. ^
Prerequisites:  Chemistry 4.
Two lectures and three hours laboratory per week. Second
Term. IV2 units.
9. Advanced Organic Chemistry.—As in Arts.    (See Page 89.)
11. Physical Organic Chemistry.—As in Arts.    (See Page 90.)
(Given in 1935-36 and alternate years.)
12. Colloid Chemistry.—As in Arts.    (See Page 90.)
(Given in 1933-34 and alternate years.)
16. Chemical Engineering. — Theory and design of fractionating columns, condensers, multiple effect evaporators; chamber, tunnel, drum, rotary and spray driers. Theory and practice
of technical filtration; calculation of capacity of box filters, filter
presses, centrifugals, etc.   Principles of counter current extraction.
Prerequisites:   Chemistry 3 and 4.
Text-book: Walter, Lewis & McAdams, Principles of Chemical
Engineering, McGraw-Hill.
Reference books: Liddell, Handbook of Chemical Engineering,
McGraw-Hill; Badger, Elements of Chemical Engineering, McGraw-Hill.
Two lectures per week. 170 Faculty of Applied Science
The following firms have kindly permitted the students in
Chemical Engineering to work one day a week in their plants as
part of their practical training:
British Columbia Electric Railway Co. (Gas Department).
Sherwin-Williams Co. of Canada, Limited.
Royal Crown Soaps, Limited.
Imperial Oil Company, Limited.
B. C. Refractories, Limited.
Triangle Chemical Company, Limited.
Westminster Paper Mills.
Canadian Carbonate, Limited.
17. Chemical Thermodynamics.—As in Arts.    (See Page 90.)
(Given in 1935-36 and alternate years.)
18. Advanced Inorganic Chemistry.—As in Arts. (See Page
90.)
(Given in 1934-35 and alternate years.)
21. Chemical Kinetics.—As in Arts.    (See Page 91.)
(Given in 1934-35 and alternate years.)
Department of Civil Engineering
Professor: 	
Associate Professor: E. G. Matheson.
Assistant Professor: F. A. Wilkin.
Assistant Professor: A. H. Finlay.
Assistant Professor: A. Lighthall.
Instructor: E. S. Pretious.
Instructor: Archie Peebles.
Instructor: A. Hrennikoff.
1. Descriptive Geometry.—Geometrical drawing, orthographic,
isometric and axometric projections.
Text-book: Armstrong, Descriptive Geometry, second edition,
Wiley.
One three-hour period per week.
Mr. Matheson, Mr. Wilkin, Mr. Peebles, Mr. Pretious, Mr.
Hrennikoff.
2. Field Work 1.—Elementary surveying. Practical problems
involving the use of the chain, telemeter, compass, transit and
level. Traverses, closed circuits, contour and detail surveys. Levels
for profiles, benches and contours.
Work commences immediately upon the close of spring examinations, and consists of field work, eight hours per day for twenty
days, or equivalent.
Mr. Pretious, Mr. Peebles, Mr. Hrennikoff.
4. Graphical Statics.—Elementary theory of structures; composition   of   forces;   general   methods   involving   the   force   and Civil Engineering 171
equilibrium polygons; determination of resultants, reactions,
centres of gravity, bending moments; stress in framed structures,
cranes, towers, roof-trusses and bridge-trusses. Algebraic check
methods will be used throughout.
Text-book: Hudson and Squire, Elements of Graphic Statics,
McGraw-Hill.
Prerequisites: Physics 6 must either precede or accompany
Civil 4.
One two-hour period per week.   Mr. Peebles, Mr. Pretious.
5. Mapping 1.—Draughting from notes obtained in Civil 2.
Maps of telemeter, compass and transit surveys. Contour and
topographical maps in convention or color.
Prerequisite:  Civil 2.
One three-hour period per week.   Mr. Pretious.
6. Surveying 1.—Chain and angular surveying; the construction, adjustment and use of the transit, level, compass, stadia,
minor field instruments, planimeter, and pantograph; levelling;
topography; contour surveying; stadia; railway curves; vertical
curves; transition curves.
Prerequisite:   Civil 2, Math. 1.        'I
Text-books: Breed and Hosmer, Elementary Surveying, Vol. I.,
Wiley.  Field Office Tables, Allen.
References: Allen, Curves and Earthwork; Sullivan, Spiral
Tables, McGraw-Hill.
Two lectures per week.   Mr. Lighthall.
7. Field Work 2.— (a) Railway surveys, reconnaissance, preliminary and location surveys, methods of taking topography,
cross-sectioning; estimating quantities; running in easement and
vertical curves, etc. The notes secured will be used in class work
for mapping and for estimating quantities and costs.
(b) Hydrographie surveys, topography of a section of riverbed by sounding and fixing position by transits and sextants; the
three-point problem; steam-gauging by surface and deep floats and
by the current meter.
(c) Solar and stellar observations for latitude and azimuth;
adjustments of instruments; the use of plane table, sextant and
minor instruments.
Prerequisite:   Civil 2 and Civil 6.
Time, same as for Civil 2.
Mr. Wilkin, Mr. Lighthall, Mr. Finlay, Mr. Matheson.
8. Foundations and Masonry.— (a) Borings; bearing power of
soils; pile and other foundations; cofferdams; caissons; open dredging; pneumatic and freezing processes; retaining walls; estimates
of quantities and costs. 172 Faculty of Applied Science
Prerequisite: Civil 4; Civil 10 must either precede or be taken
concurrently.
Text-book: Jacoby and Davis, Foundations of Bridges and
Buildings, McGraw-Hill.
One lecture and one three-hour period per week   First Term.
Mr. Matheson.
(b) Theory of Earth Pressure; combined stresses, ellipse of
stress, principal and conjugate axes, as applied to the determination of earth pressures; Rankine's, Coulomb's, Weyrauch's, Cain's
and Rebhann's theories and solutions for earth pressure; retaining
walls; dams.
Prerequisite: Civil 4; Civil 8 (a) must be taken with 8 (b)
during the First Term.
References: Ketchum, Walls, Bins and Grain Elevators; Howe,
Retaining Walls for Earth; Cain, Earth Pressure, Walls and Bins;
Morley, Theory of Structures.
One lecture per week each term. Mr. Matheson.
9. Structural Design 1.—Problems in draughting, illustrating
designs in structural engineering; estimates of quantities and
costs; preparation of plans.
Text-books:   Conklin, Structural Draughting and Elementary
Design, Wiley; Carnegie, Pocket Companion, Carnegie Steel Co.
Prerequisite:   First Term of Civil 10.
One lecture and one three-hour period.   Second Term.
Mr. Matheson.
10. Strength of Materials.—(a) A thorough introduction to
the fundamental principles dealing with the strength of materials;
stress, deformation, elasticity and resilience; the application of
the laws of derived curves to the construction of load, shear,
moment, inclination and deflection diagrams, fibre stress, deflection
of simple, cantilever, and continuous beams under any loading;
riveted joints; torsion; columns; combined stresses; longitudinal
shear; reinforced concrete; special beams.
(b) Laboratory.—-Proportioning of concrete and testing of
cement, concrete, timber and steel specimens to determine the
strength and elasticity of these materials.
About one-half of the laboratory time will be set aside for the
solution of problems in investigation and design.
Text-book:  Maurer and Withey, Strength of Materials, Wiley.
References: Swain, Strength of Materials; Morley, Strength of
Materials.
Prerequisites:   Physics 6, Civil 4 and 31. Civil Engineering 173
Two lectures and one three-hour period per week.
Mr. Lighthall, Mr. Hrennikoff.
Note-.—The laboratory testing is performed in the Forest
Products Laboratories, under the supervision of Superintendent
Brown and Mr. Lighthall.
11. Transportation 1. Railways. — The inception of railway
projects; reconnaissance, preliminary and location; grade problems; grades, curvature and distance and their effects upon
operating costs and revenue; velocity and pusher grades; adjustment of grades for unbalanced traffic; construction; railway
economics, traffic, revenue, branch lines.
Prerequisite:  Civil 6 and 7.
Text-book: Williams, Design of Railway Location, Wiley.
References: Allen, Railroads, Curves and Earthwork, McGraw-
Hill; Wellington, Economic Theory of the Location of Railways,
Wiley.
Two lectures per week.  Mr. Wilkin. 4
12. Hydraulic Engineering 1.— (a) Fundamental principles
and their application. Problems on gauges, pressure on surfaces.
Bernouilli's theorem, flow through orifices, short tubes, weirs, pipes,
and open channels, and the dynamic action of jets.
(b) Laboratory period includes experimental work on gauges,
pipes, weirs, orifices, short tubes and stream measurements.
Prerequisite:   Physics 6.
Text-book:   Russell, Hydraulics, Holt, 3rd edition.
One lecture and one three-hour period per week.
Mr. Wilkin, Mr. Pretious.
13. Mapping 2.—Draughting from notes obtained in Civil 7;
railway location and hydrographie surveys; topographic maps
from photographic plates.
One three-hour period per week.  Mr. Pretious.
14. Surveying 2.— (a) A continuation of Civil 6. Theory and
use of aneroid, sextant, plane-table and precise instruments; plane-
table surveying; mine, hydrographie and photo-topographic surveying; Dominion and Provincial surveys.  First Term.
(b)  Field Astronomy.   Second Term.
Text-book:   Breed and Hosmer, Surveying, Vol. II., Wiley.
References: Johnson and Smith, Theory and Practice of
Surveying, Wiley; Wilson, Topographic, Trigonometric and
Geodetic Surveying, Wiley; Green's Practical and Spherical
Astronomy, Ginn and Co.; Manual of Surveys of Dominion Lands;
Instructions for B. C. Land Surveyors.
Prerequisite:   Civil 6.
Two lectures per week.   Mr. Lighthall. 174 Faculty of Applied Science
15. Perspective Drawing and Map Projections.—(a) Mathematical perspective; perspective drawings of buildings and structures.  First Term.
(b)  Map Projections.   Second Term.
Prerequisite:   Civil 1.
Text-books:   Crosskey, Elementary Perspective, Blackie & Son;
Armstrong, Descriptive Geometry, Second Edition, Wiley.
One two-hour period per week.  Mr. Lighthall.
16. Field Work 3.—Problems in geodetic and precise surveying ; determination of latitude, azimuth and time by solar and
stellar observations; baseline measurements; precise levelling.
Prerequisite:   Civil 7.
Time, same as for Civil 2.  Mr. Lighthall.
17. Structural Design 2.—Selection of types of bridges; determination of loadings; stresses; choice of cross-sectional forms
and areas; design of combination wood and steel trusses, steel
trusses; design of connections; masonry structures, dams and
retaining walls; complete drawings.
Text-books: Kuntz, Design of Steel Bridges, McGraw-Hill;
Jacoby and Davis, Timber Design and Construction, Wiley & Sons.
References: Johnson, Bryan and Turneaure, Modern Framed
Structures, Vol. III., Wiley; Kirkham, Structural Engineering,
McGraw-Hill; Carnegie, Pocket Companion.
Prerequisites:   Civil 8, 9 and 10.
One lecture and two one-hour periods per week.  First Term.
One lecture and two three-hour periods per week. Second
Term.
Mr. Matheson.
18. Engineering Economics. — (a) A general treatment of
sinking funds; yearly cost of service; collecting data; estimating;
economic selection, reports.
Text-book: Fish, Engineering Economics, 2nd Edition, McGraw-Hill.
Prerequisites:   Economics 1.
Two lectures per week.   First Term.   Mr. Wilkin.
(b) Principles of financing; forms of business enterprises;
stocks; bonds; operating and fixed charges; business finance;
capital and interpretation of financial statements.
References: Fish, Engineering Economics, 2nd Edition;
Anger, Digest of Canadian Mercantile Law; Lough, Business
Finance.
Two lectures per week.   Second Term.   Mr. Wilkin.
19. Engineering Law.—The engineer's status; fees; salary; as
a witness; responsibility; engineering contracts; tenders; specifi- Civil Engineering 175
cations; plans; extras and alterations; time; payments and
certificates; penalty, bonus or liquidated damages; maintenance
and defects; subcontractors; agents; arbitration and awards;
specification and contract writing.
Text-book: Kirby, Elements of Specification Writing, Wiley
& Sons.
References: Anger, Digest of Canadian Mercantile Law of
Canada, W. H. Anger; Ball, Law Affecting Engineers, Constable
& Co.
One lecture per week.   Mr. Pretious.
20. Surveying 3. — Geodesy; the determination of azimuth,
longitude, latitude, time, the figure of the earth; measurement of
baselines; triangulation systems; adjustments and reductions
of observations; precise levelling.
References:   Hosmer, Geodesy, Wiley; Cary, Geodetic Surveying, Wiley; Publications of Geodetic Survey, Ottawa.
Prerequisite:   Civil 14.
One lecture per week.   Mr. Lighthall.
21. Hydraulic Engineering 2.—Waterpower engineering; rainfall, run-off, stream flow; investigation of power problems; selection
of hydraulic machines; hydrographs; auxiliary power; mass
curves, load factors and characteristics; impulse and reaction
wheels; methods of control and operation of various forms of
machines; transmission of hydraulic power.
Text-book: Mead, Water-poiver Engineering, McGraw-Hill.
References: Gibson, Hydroelectric Engineering, Vol. I.,
Blackie; Mead, Hydrology, McGraw-Hill.
Prerequisites: Civil 12 must either precede or be taken concurrently.
One lecture per week both terms, and fifteen hours in laboratory
second term.   Mr. Wilkin.
22. Municipal Engineering.—Sewerage and Sewage Disposal.
General methods and economic consideration; quantity and runoff; design of sewers, man-holes, flush tanks, etc.; construction
methods, materials and costs; estimate, design, maintenance and
management.
Sewage Disposal: Physical, chemical, biological and economical
aspects of sewage treatment; dilution; screening, sedimentation,
filtration; disinfection; maintenance and management costs.
References: Metcalf and Eddy, Sewerage and Sewage Disposal,
3 Vols., McGraw-Hill.
Water Supply, Rainfall; evaporation; run-off; quantity,
quality and pressure required; pumping machinery; storage;
aqueducts, pipe lines and distribution systems; purification systems; valves, hydrants and fire service; materials, estimates and 176 Faculty of Applied Science
designs; construction methods and costs.
Reference: Flinn, Westbrook, Bogart, Waterworks Handbook,
McGraw-Hill.
Town Planning; covering the economical and artistic development of a city, city management. Street cleaning and disposal of
waste; composition and quantity of city wastes; collection, dumping and disposal; land treatment; incineration and reduction;
costs and returns.
Reference:   Lewis, City Planning, Wiley.
Prerequisite:   Civil 12.
Two lectures and one two-hour period per week.  Mr. Matheson.
23. Transportation 2.— (a) Railways. Organization and rules
of maintenance-of-way; roadway; ballast; ties; lumber preservation; rails and appurtenances; turnouts, tracks, accessories; structures and their design; stresses in track; track tools; track work;
work-train service; maintenance-of-way records and accounts;
expenditures; betterments; improvements of old lines, yards and
terminals; maximum capacity of single track.
Prerequisite:   Civil 11.
Two lectures per week.  First Term.   Mr. Peebles.
(b) Highways.—Highway economics, surveys and locations;
grades; cross-sections; paving materials; construction methods;
designs and estimates.
Streets and pavements; materials, design, construction, maintenance and repairs.
Text-book: Agg, Construction of Roads and Pavements,
McGraw-Hill.
Reference: Harger and Bonney, Highway Engineer's Handbook.
Prerequisite:   Civil 11.
Two lectures per week, Second Term.   Mr. Peebles.
24. (a) Mechanics of Materials.—A continuation of Civil 10,
Strength of Materials; the application of the Principle of Least
Work to the determination of statically indeterminate forces in
beams and rigid frames; stress and deflection of unsymmetrical
sections and beams with variable moment of inertia; analysis and
design of reinforced concrete rigid frames and arches.
Text-book: Cross & Morgan, Continuous Frames of Reinforced
Concrete, Wiley.
References: Ketchum, Steel Mill Buildings; Hool, Reinforced
Concrete, Vol. III.; Urquhart and 0 'Rourke, Design of Concrete
Structures, McGraw-Hill.
Prerequisite:   Civil 10.
Two lectures and one three-hour period per week.
Mr.  Finlay. Civil Engineering 177
24. (b) Reinforced Concrete Design.—Intended to familiarize
the student with the basic principles involved in the design of
reinforced concrete structures, including beam's, columns, continuous girders and flat slabs, and to form a foundation for the
more advanced work encountered in C.E. 24.
Text-book: Turneaure and Maurer, Principles of Reinforced
Concrete Construction, 4th Edition, John Wiley.
References: Taylor, Thompson and Smulski, Concrete, Plain
and Reinforced, Vol. I., Wiley, 4th Edition.
Prerequisite:  C.E. 10.
One lecture and one two-hour period per week.   First Term.
Mr. Finlay.
25. Theory of Structures.—The analysis of framed structures
under dead and live loads; distortion of framed structures; the
use of influence lines for analysis of stresses; hinged and hingeless
arches; secondary stresses and redundant members.
Text-book:   Kuntz, Design of Steel Bridges, McGraw-Hill.
References: Johnson, Bryan and Turneaure, Modern Framed
Structures, Vols. I. and II., Wiley; Hool and Kinne, Framed Structures, McGraw-Hill; Morley, Theory of Structures, Longmans,
Green & Co.
Prerequisite:   Civil 10.
One lecture and two three-hour periods per week.
Mr. Finlay.
26. Class Excursions.—Members of the Fifth Year class in
Civil Engineering, under the supervision of an instructor, will
visit such factories, industrial developments, public works, docks,
shipyards and important examples of engineering construction as
are calculated to assist the student best to grasp the application
and scope of the studies pursued and to broaden his vision of the
engineering field.   Written reports of trips are required.
Note :—In periods where no trips are taken, tests of hydraulic
machines will be made in the Hydraulic Laboratory. (See Civil
29.)
27. Civil Engineering Thesis.—Original research on selected
topics; analysis of engineering projects; experimental or theoretical
investigations. Topics may be selected from divisions of the Civil
Engineering Course: Geodetics, Railways, Hydraulics, Municipal,
Highways, Economic and Business Engineering, Structures. Copy
of thesis in regular form and binder must be filed with the Department.
28. Seminar.—Written and oral discussion of articles appearing in the current Transactions and Proceedings of the various
engineering societies, also reviews of important papers in engineering periodicals; reports on local engineering projects visited 178 Faculty of Applied Science
in Civil 26; written outlines must be prepared for all oral reports;
training in technical writing and public speaking.
Required of all Fourth and Fifth Year students in Civil
Engineering.
Reference:   Rickard, Technical Writing, McGraw-Hill.
One hour per week.
29. Hydraulic Engineering 3. — Theory, investigation and
design of hydraulic motors and machinery. Turbines, Pelton
and impulse wheels, centrifugal pumps, hydro-electric installations,
plant design and operation.
Laboratory work, testing hydraulic machines, arranged for
periods when no trips are taken.   (See Civil 26.)
Prerequisite:   Civil 12.
Text-book: Daugherty, Hydraulic Turbines, 3rd Edition, McGraw-Hill.
References: Gibson, Hydro-electric Engineering, Vol. I.;
Gibson, Hydraulics and Its Application, Van Nostrand; Mead,
Water Power Engineering, 2nd Edition, McGraw-Hill.
One lecture per week.  Mr. Wilkin.
30. Engineering Problems 1.—Training in methods of attacking, analyzing and solving engineering problems. Coaching in
proper methods of work and study, including drill in systematic
arrangement and workmanship in calculations. The content is
based upon the application of mathematics to problems in physics
and engineering.
Prerequisite:   First Year Arts, or Senior Matriculation.
Text-book: Duckering, Notes and Problems, 2nd Edition,
McGraw-Hill.
Two two-hour periods per week.
Mr. Wilkin, Mr. Finlay, Mr. Lighthall, Mr. Pretious, Mr.
Peebles, Mr. Hrennikoff.
31. Engineering Problems 2.—A continuation of Engineering
Problems 1, involving a thorough drill in problems in the principal
divisions of Mathematics given in the Second and Third Years of
Applied Science, drawn from the field of mechanics, surveying,
draughting and engineering.
Prerequisites:   Civil 30, Math. 1, 2, 3 and 4.
Text-book: Duckering, Notes and Problems, 2nd Edition,
McGraw-Hill.
One three-hour period per week.
Mr. Lighthall, Mr. Finlay, Mr. Hrennikoff.
50. Elementary problems in rural engineering, dealing with
drainage, water supply, sewerage and sewage disposal, ventilation,
simple structures and surveying. Adapted to the needs of students
in Agriculture.
One lecture per week.  Mr. Lighthall. Forestry 179
Department of Economics
Professor: H. F. Angus.
Professor: W. A. Carrothers.   (On leave of absence.)
Associate Professor: J. Friend Day.
Associate Professor: C. W. Topping.
Associate Professor: G. F. Drummond.
1. Principles of Economics.—An introductory study of general
economic theory, including a survey of the principles of value,
prices, money and banking, international trade, tariffs, monopoly,
taxation, labour and wages, socialism, the control of railways and
trusts, etc.
Text-books: Slichter, Modern Economic Society, Holt; Cole,
Intelligent Man's Guide Through World Chaos, Ryerson; The
Canada Year Book, 1934.
Three lectures per week.
Department of Forestry
Professor: 	
Assistant Professor: F. Malcolm Knapp.
Assistant: George S. Allen.
Honorary Lecturers:
R, M. Brown.
William Byers.
Edward W. Bassett.
1. General Forestry.—Economics of forestry; forest distribution, influences and uses.   A general survey of forestry.
Text-book: Moon and Brown, Elements of Forestry, Wiley,
2nd Edition.
Reference books: Whitford and Craig, Forests of British
Columbia, Commission of Conservation, Ottawa; Zon and Sparhawk, Forest Resources of the World, McGraw-Hill; A National
Plan for American Forestry, Superintendent of Documents, Washington, D. C.    Various government publications.
2. Mensuration.— (a) Scaling and measurement of felled
timber products; cruising and stumpage appraisal.
Text-book:   Chapman, Forest Mensuration, Wiley, 3rd Edition.
Reference books: Rapraeger, Log Scaling and Grading Practice in the Douglas Fir Region, Pacific Northwest Forest Experiment Station, Portland, Oregon. Instructions for Forest Surveys,
King's Printer, Victoria, B. C. Instructions for Appraising
Stumpage on National Forests, Superintendent of Documents,
Washington, D. C. Carey, Manual for Woodsmen, Harvard Press,
4th Edition.
One lecture and one period of three hours field or laboratory
work per week. One week field work immediately after April
examinations.    Fourth Year. 180 Faculty of Applied Science
(b) Measurement of growth of trees and forests. Preparation
of volume, growth, and yield tables.
Reference books: Winkenwerder and Clark Problems in Forest
Mensuration, Wiley, 2nd Edition. Graves, Forest Mensuration,
Wiley.    Various government publications.
Two hours lecture or laboratory period per week.   Fifth year.
3. Forest Protection.—The fire problem, legislation, organization for prevention and control.
Text-book: Western Fire Fighters' Manual, Western Forestry
and Conservation Association, Portland.
Reference books:  Various government publications.
One lecture per week.   Second Term.
5. Wood Technology.—The structure of wood; the identification
of different woods and their qualities and uses; wood seasoning;
wood preservation; emphasis on the Canadian woods of commercial
importance.
Text-books: Record, Economic Woods of the United States,
Wiley, 2nd Edition. Forsaith, The Technology of New York State
Timbers, Technical Publication No. 18, New York State College
of Forestry, Syracuse, New York.
Reference books: Koehler, The Properties and Uses of Wood,
McGraw-Hill. Koehler and Thelen, Kiln Drying of Lumber, McGraw-Hill. Snow, Wood and Other Organic Structural Materials,
McGraw-Hill. Roth, Timber, U. S. Forest Service, Bui. 10, Superintendent of Documents, Washington, D. C.
Two lectures and one period of three hours laboratory per week,
First Term; one lecture and one period of two hours laboratory
per week, Second Term.
6. (a) Forest Management 1.—The principles and methods of
organizing forest areas for sustained yield management on an
economic basis. Normal forest, increment, rotation, regulation of
cut, theory of working plans.
Text-book: Woolsey, American Forest Regulation, Tuttle,
Morehouse and Taylor.
Reference books: Roth, Forest Regulation, Roth, Ann Arbor,
Michigan. Recknagel, Bentley and Guise, Forest Working Plans,
Wiley, 2nd Edition. Schlich, Forest Management, Bradbury
Agnew.
One lecture per week. Fourth Year.
6. (b) Forest Management 2.—The practical application of the
principles of forest management. Methods of developing working
plans in Europe, in America, and in British Columbia.
Reference books: Roth, Forest Regulation, Roth, Ann Arbor,
Michigan.    Instructions for Forest Surveys, King's Printer, Vic- Forestry 181
toria, B. C.    Trevor and Smythies, Practical Forest Management,
Government Press, Allahabad.    Various government publications.
One lecture per week.   Fifth Year.
7. History of Forestry and Forest Administration.—The development of forestry in different parts of the world; forest resources
and industries; policy, legislation and education.
Reference books: Fernow, History of Forestry, University of
Toronto Press, 2nd Edition. Schlich, Forest Policy in the British
Empire, Bradbury Agnew. Ise, The United States Forest Policy,
Yale University Press.   Various government publications.
One lecture per week.
8. Silviculture.—The principles and methods of caring for
forests and of growing timber crops. Seed testing, nursery practice, planting, thinning and improvement cuttings, slash disposal.
Text-books: Hawley, Practice of Silviculture, Wiley, 2nd
Edition. Tourney and Korstian, Seeding and Planting in the Practice of Forestry, Wiley. Troup, Silvicultural Systems, Oxford
University Press. ^$
Reference books: Schlich, Silviculture, Bradbury Agnew.
Various government publications.
Two lectures per week during the year, and one period of three
hours field or laboratory work during the Second Term.
9. General Lumbering.—A general study of the principles and
practice of logging and milling in the chief timber regions of North
America.
Text-book:   Bryant, Logging, Wiley, 2nd Edition.
Reference books: Gibbons, Logging in the Douglas Fir Region,
U. S. D. A. Bui. 711, Superintendent of Documents, Washington,
D. C. Berry, Lumbering in the Sugar and Yellow Pine Region of
California, U. S. D. A. Bui. 440, Superintendent of Documents,
Washington, D. C.   Various government publications.
Two lectures per week.   First Term.
One lecture per week.  Second Term.
10. Logging Engineering.—An intensive study of logging
systems and operations in the forests of western North America.
Text-book: Brandstrom, Analysis of Logging Costs and Operating Methods in the Douglas Fir Region, Charles Lathrop Pack
Forestry Foundation, Washington, D. C.
Reference books: Various articles in The Timberman, B. C.
Lumberman, and other trade journals and government publications.
One lecture per week.   First Term.
Two lectures per week.  Second Term.
One period of four hours laboratory or field work per week,
alternating with Forestry 11 and 12. 182 Faculty op Applied Science
11. Milling.—A study of the sawmilling and allied woodworking industries of western North America.
Text-book:   Bryant, Lumber, Wiley.
Reference books: Oakleaf, Lumber Manufacture in the Douglas
Fir Region, Commercial Journal Co. Brown, American Lumber
Industry, Wiley. Berry, Lumbering in the Sugar and Yellow Pine
Region of California, U. S. D. A. Bui. 440, Superintendent of
Documents, Washington, D. C. Seeley, Small Sawmills, U. S. D. A.
Bui. 718, Superintendent of Documents, Washington, D. C.
Two lectures per week; one period of four hours laboratory or
field work per week, alternating with Forestry 10.  First Term.
12. Forest Products and Marketing.—A study of marketing
methods and problems of the lumber trade—domestic consumption
and export—markets in foreign countries; also of other forest
industries, including pulp and paper, shingles, veneers, boxes.
Text-books: Brown, Forest Products, Their Manufacture and
Use, Wiley, 2nd Edition.    Bryant, Lumber, Wiley.
Reference books: Brown, The American Lumber Industry,
Wiley. Joint authorship, The Manufacture of Pulp and Paper,
Vols. III. to V., McGraw-Hill. Knight and Wulpi, Veneers and
Plywood, Ronald Press Co.
Two lectures per week; one period of four hours laboratory or
field work per week, alternating with Forestry 10. Second Term.
(Not given in 1934-35.)
13. Lumber Grading.—An intensive study of the grading, tallying and shipping of Pacific Coast lumber products for domestic
and export markets.
Text-book: Beaulieu and Barton, Lumber Grading Practice,
B. C. Lumber and Shingle Manufacturers' Association, Vancouver, B. C.
One lecture and one period of three hours field work per week.
Second Term.
Vancouver Laboratory
Forest Products Laboratories of Canada,
Forest Service,
Department of the Interior, Canada
R. M. Brown, B.Sc.F. (Toronto), Superintendent.
R. S. Perry, B.Sc. (McGill), Assistant Engineer.
Division of Timber Mechanics
J.  B.  Alexander,  B.Sc.   (New   Brunswick),  Chief,  Timber  Mechanics'
Division.
J. T. Lee, Timber Tester.
D. S. Wright, Timber Tester.
W. W. Davidson, Assistant Timber Tester.
R. J. Eades, Assistant Timber Tester. Forestry 183
Division of Timber Products
J. H. Jenkins, B.A.Sc.  (Brit. Col.), Chief, Timber Products Division.
H. W. Eades, B.Sc.F. (Washington), Assistant Timber Pathologist.
F. W. Guernsey, B.A.Sc. (Brit. Col.), Assistant in Timber Products.
The Forest Products Laboratories of Canada is a research
organization maintained by the Forest Service of the Department
of the Interior, Canada. Research in forest products is carried
on in two laboratories, one in Ottawa and the other in Vancouver,
while all questions relating to pulp and paper research are dealt
with by a co-operative laboratory established at McGill University,
Montreal, through an arrangement between the Forest Products
Laboratories of Canada, the Canadian Pulp and Paper Association,
and McGill University.
The Vancouver laboratory was established in 1918 and has
been maintained in association with the University of British
Columbia since that time. Originally equipped only for the
mechanical testing of western woods, the organization has shown
a rapid expansion and now includes research in all branches of
timber mechanics, lumber seasoning investigations, timber decay
problems, mill studies, waste utilization, wood identification, etc.
One of the most important phases of the work of the laboratory
is its technical service to all branches of the timber industry in the
dissemination of information on a wide variety of subjects having
to do with forest products. While research in wood preservation,
wood distillation, container tests, pulp and paper, etc., is at present
confined to the Ottawa and Montreal laboratories, the close contact
maintained between the three organizations permits the extension
of this technical service to include such subjects as wood utilization of all kinds, wood preservation, wood distillation, pulp and
paper, new industries, etc.
A mutually beneficial scheme of co-operation is maintained,
between the Laboratory and the University, whereby students of
the University in Engineering and Forestry have access to the
Laboratory to watch the work being carried on and to use the
apparatus at times in testing strength of materials. The staff of
the Laboratory also has the benefit of the University library
and the advice and assistance of University specialists in related
work. 184 Faculty of Applied Science
Department of Geology and Geography
Professor: R. W. Brock.
Professor of Physical and Structural Geology: S. J. Schofield.
Professor of Palaeontology and Stratigraphy: M. Y. Williams.
Lecturer in Mineralogy and Petrography: H. V. Warren.
Geology
1. General Geology.—This course serves as an introduction to
the science of Geology. The following subjects are treated in the
lectures and laboratory:
(a) Physical Geology, including weathering, work of the wind,
ground water, streams, glaciers, the ocean and its work, the structures of the earth, earthquakes, volcanoes and igneous intrusions,
metamorphism, mountains and plateaus, and ore-deposits.
Two lectures per week.   First Term.   Mr. Williams.
(b) Laboratory Exercises in Physical Geology, including the
study and identification of the most common minerals and rocks,
the interpretation of topographical and geological maps, and the
study of structures by the use of models.
Two hours laboratory per week. First Term. Mr. Schofield
and Mr. Williams.
(c) Historical Geology, including the earth before the Cambrian, the Palaeozoic, the Mesozoic, the Cenozoic and Quaternary
eras.
Two lectures per week.   Second Term.   Mr. Williams.
(d) Laboratory Exercises in Historical Geology, consisting of
the general study of fossils, their characteristics and associations,
their evolution and migration as illustrated by their occurrence in
the strata. The principles of Palaeogeography will be taken up
and illustrated by the study of the palaeogeography of North
America.
Two hours laboratory per week.   Second Term.   Mr. Williams.
Field Work will replace laboratory occasionally, and will take
the form of excursions to localities, in the immediate neighbourhood of Vancouver, which illustrate the subject matter of the
lectures:
Prerequisite: Matriculation Chemistry or Physics, or Chemistry 1 or Physics 1 or 2 taken either before or concurrently.
Text-book: Pirsson and Schuchert, Foundations of Geology,
Wiley.
Students will be required to make a passing mark in each of
the above subdivisions. ' 3 units.
2. (a) General Mineralogy.—A brief survey of the field of
mineralogy. Geology 185
Lectures take the form of a concise treatment of (1) Crystallography, (2) Physical Mineralogy, and (3) Descriptive Mineralogy of 40 of the more common mineral species, with special
reference to Canadian occurrences.
Laboratory Work consists of the study of the common crystal
forms and of 40 prescribed minerals, accompanied by a brief outline of the principles and methods of Determinative Mineralogy
and Blowpipe Analysis.
Text-book: Dana, Text-book of Mineralogy, revised bv Ford,
Wiley.
Prerequisite:   Chemistry 1.
Two lectures and one laboratory period of two hours per week.
First Term. Mr. Warren.
2. (6) Descriptive and Determinative Mineralogy.—This course
supplements 2 (a) and consists of a more complete survey of
Crystallography, Physical and Chemical Mineralogy, with a critical
study of about 60 of the less common minerals, special emphasis
being laid on their crystallography, origin, association and alteration.
Text-book: Dana, Text-book of Mineralogy, revised by Ford,
Wiley.
Prerequisite:  Geology 2 (a).
Two lectures and one laboratory period of two hours per week.
Second Term.   Mr. Warren.
4. Structural and Physiographical Geology.—The following
subjects are treated in the lectures: Fractures, faults, flowage,
structures common to both fracture and flow, mountains, major
units of structures, forces of deformation, the origin and development of land forms with special reference to the physiography of
British Columbia.
Text-book:  Leith, Structural Geology, Holt.
Prerequisite:   Geology 1.
Three lectures per week.   Mr. Schofield. 3 units.
5. (a) History of Geology.—A brief history of the study of
the earth and the development of the geological sciences. Mr.
Brock.
(b) Geology of Canada.—The salient features of the geology
and economic minerals of Canada. Mr. Williams, Mr. Schofield,
Mr. Brock.
(c) Regional Geology.—The main geological features of the
continents and oceanic segments of the earth's crust, and their
influences upon life.   Mr. Brock.
Prerequisite:   Geology 1.
Three lectures and one hour laboratory per week. 186 Faculty of Applied Science
6. Palaentology.—A study of invertebrate and vertebrate
fossils, their classification, identification and distribution both
geological and geographical.
Reference books: Grabau and Shimer, North American Index
Fossils. Zitter-Eastman, Text-book of Palaeontology. Berry,
Palaeontology.
Prerequisite:   Geology 1.
Two lectures and two hours laboratory per week. Mr. Williams.
7. Petrology.—This course consists of systematic studies of (i)
optical mineralogy, and (ii) petrography, with an introduction to
petrogenesis.
The laboratory work deals with the determination of rocks,
first under the microscope and then in hand specimens.
Text-books: Harker, Petrology for Students, Cambridge
University Press. Johannsen, Essentials for the Microscopic
Determination of Rock Forming Minerals and Rocks, University
of Chicago Press. Dana, Text-book of Mineralogy, revised by Ford,
Wiley.
Prerequisites:   Geology 1 and 2.
Two lectures and two laboratory periods of two hours per week.
Mr. Warren. 4 units.
8. Economic Geology.—A study of the occurrence, genesis, and
structure of the principal metallic and non^metallic mineral
deposits with type illustrations; and a description of the ore
deposits of the British Empire, special stress being placed on those
in Canada.
Text-book:   Ries, Economic Geology, 6th Edition, Wiley.
Prerequisite:   Geology 1.   Geology 7 must precede or accompany this course.
Four hours per week.
Mr. Brock, Mr. Williams, Mr. Schofield, Mr. Warren.
9. Mineralography.—Principally a laboratory course dealing
with the study and recognition of the opaque minerals by means
of the reflecting microscope.
The work consists of practice in the cutting, grinding and
polishing of ore specimens, accompanied by training in micro-
chemical methods of mineral determination.
During the second term each student is assigned a suite of ores
from some mining district for a critical examination and report.
Text-book: Davy and Farnham, Microscopic Examination of
the Ore Minerals, McGraw-Hill.
Prerequisite: Geology 7 and 8 must precede or accompany this
course.
One laboratory period of two hours per week. Mr. Warren and
Mr. Schofield. Mathematics 187
10. Field Geology.—The methods taught are the fundamental
ones used by professional geologists and by the officers of the
Geological Survey of Canada, This course is essentially practical
and is designed to teach methods of observing, recording and
correlating geological facts in the field. The students construct
geological maps of selected areas in the vicinity of Vancouver
which require the use of the various methods and instruments
employed in field geology.
Text-books: Lahee, Field, Geology. Hayes, Handbook for Field
Geologists.   Spurr, Geology Applied to Mining.
Prerequisite: Geology 1. Geology 4, if not already taken, must
be taken concurrently.
One period of three hours per week.   Mr. Schofield.
14. Crystallography.—This course consists of a systematic
study of the morphology of crystals, with an introduction to
mathematical crystallography.
The practical work deals with the measurement of crystals,
and, in the case of students in chemistry, a certain number of the
crystals measured will be grown in the laboratory.
Students are advised to consult with the instructor before
registering for this course.
Text-book: Tutton, Crystallography and Practical Crystal
Measurement, Macmillan.
Two lectures and six or eight hours laboratory per week. Mr.
Warren.      5 or 6 units, depending on amount of laboratory work.
Department of Mathematics
Professor: Daniel Buchanan.
Professor: F. S. Nowlan.
Associate Professor: E. E. Jordan.
Associate Professor: L. Richardson
Assistant Professor: Walter H. Gage.
Asisstant Professor: F. J. Brand.
1. Plane Trigonometry.—Review of elementary work, projection, inverse functions, hyperbolic functions, power series, finite
series, complex numbers, De Moivre's Theorem and applications,
elimination.
Text-book:   To be announced.
Two lectures per week.   First Term.
2. Solid Geometry.—A study of the three-faced corner, the
various polyhedra and solid figures, and the theorems of Pappus.
Text-book:   To be announced.
Two lectures per week.   Second Term.
3. Algebra.—A review of simple series, permutations, combinations and the binomial theorem, and a study of exponential and 188 Faculty of Applied Science
other series, undetermined coefficients, partial and continued fractions, graphical algebra.
Two lectures per week.
Text-book: Wilson and Warren, Intermediate Algebra (Larger
Edition), Oxford.
4. Calculus.—An introductory study of the differential and
integral calculus will be made, and some of the simpler applications considered.
Text-book:   Woods and Bailey, Elementary Calculus, Ginn.
Two lectures per week.
6. Calcidus.—Differential and integral calculus with various
applications.
Text-book: Woods and Bailey, Elementary Calcidus (Revised
Edition), Ginn.
Three lectures per week.
7. Analytical Geometry.—A study of the" conies and other
curves occurring in engineering practice, and elementary work
in three dimensions.
Text-book:   Fawdry, Co-ordinate Geometry, Bell.
Two lectures per week.
8. Applied Calculus.—The applications of calculus to various
problems in engineering.
Three lectures per week.
(Given in 1934-35 and alternate years.)
9. Differential Equations.—A study of ordinary and partial
differential equations and their applications.
Three lectures per week.
(Given in 1935-36 and alternate years.)
Department of ^Mechanical and Electrical
►     Engineering
Professor: Herbert Vickers.    (On leave of absence.)
Professor: F. Creedy.    (Substitute for Dr. Vickers.)
Associate Professor of Mechanical Engineering: F. W. Vernon.
Associate Professor of Mechanical Engineering: H. F. G. Letson.
Assistant Professor of Electrical Engineering: E. G. Cullwick.
Assistant Professor of Electrical Engineering: W. B. Coulthard.
Lecturer in Mechanical Engineering: John F. Bell.
Lecturer in Mechanical Engineering: R. Rolleston West.
Assistant: Walter J. Lind.
Mechanical Engineering
1. Mechanical Drawing. — Practice in freehand lettering in
accordance with common practice. Geometrical Drawing, to give
facility in the use of drawing instruments. Freehand sketching of
machine parts and structures from which drawings are made to Mechanical and Electrical Engineering 189
scale.   Drawing to scale of simple machine parts.  Making of assembly  drawings from  detail drawings,  and  detail  drawings  from
assembly drawings.   Tracing and blueprinting.
Two three-hour periods per week.
2. (a) Shop Work.—This work is intended to supplement the
manual training given in the high schools, and also to give
the student some knowledge of the more common machine shop
methods and processes as employed commercially. The object is
to provide some basis for the intelligent design of machines and
structural parts.
Lectures.—Physical properties of the materials used in machine
construction. Modern methods of handling and finishing wood.
Forging and hammering of metals. Annealing and tempering.
Making of patterns and cores.   Cupola practice.
Soldering and brazing, tinning, electroplating. Drilling and
tapping, turning and boring, calipering and fitting, milling and
milling cutters, reaming and reamers, screw cutting. Grinding
and abrasive wheels. Lapping. Punching and shearing. Drop
forging and die-casting. Metal spinning. Torch and electric welding. Cold sawing and torch cutting. Tool-making and dressing.
Use of jigs. Machine shop standards, including wire and sheet
metal gauges, threads, etc.
Text-book: Colvin & Stanley, American Machinists' Handbook, McGraw-Hill.
One lecture per week.
Practice in Metal-working.—Bench work, including marking
off, chipping, filing, scraping, tapping, and fitting; lathe work,
including turning and boring, screw-cutting and finishing; lathe
adjustments; shaping; milling; gear-cutting; tool-dressing.
One two-hour period per week.
2. (h) Machine Shop Practice.—-A continuation of Mechanical
Engineering 2.
Two hours laboratory per week, First Term, and two hours,
Second Term.
3. Kinematics of Machines.—Velocity and Acceleration diagrams of mechanisms. Instantaneous centre of Rotation. Slider
Crank and Quadric-crank chain; quick return mechanisms; inversion; straight-line motions; epi-cyclic trains; valve-gears and
miscellaneous mechanisms.
Text-book: McKay, Theory of Machines, Longmans Green &
Co.
One two-hour lecture period per week.
4. Dynamics of Machines.—Diagrams of crank effort, piston
velocity   and    acceleration;    flywheel;   balancing,    rotating   and 190 Faculty of Applied Science
reciprocating masses; secondary balancing; governors; brakes and
dynamometers; belt-drives; dynamics of the gyroscope; friction
and friction-clutches; impulsive forces in mechanisms.
Text-book:   Low, Applied Mechanics, Longmans Green & Co.
Two lectures per week.
Prerequisite subject for Fifth Year.
5. Machine Design.—A study of the theory of the properties
of materials as applied to the design and construction of machines.
Reference books: Case, Strength of Materials, Arnold; Kimball
and Bar, Elements of Machine Design, Wiley; Spooner, Machine
Design Construction and Drawing, Longmans Green.
Two lectures per week.
Prerequisite subject for Fifth Year.
5. (a) Problem Course in Materials and. Design.—Examples
and problems illustrating the lectures of M.E. 5 and including
the solution under supervision of actual design problems.
Text-book: L. S. Marks, Mechanical Engineers' Handbook,
McGraw-Hill.
Reference book:   As in M.E. 5.
One one-hour period per week.
6. Elementary Thermodynamics.— (a) Fuels and combustion.
General principles underlying the construction and operation of
steam boilers. Elementary theory of the steam engine. Measurement of power. Performance of various types of steam engines.
Elementary theory of internal combustion engines. Design and
operation of isolated power plants to give the best economic results.
Theory of air compressors, transmission and use of compressed air.
Elementary theory and practical operation of producer gas plants.
Prerequisite subject for Fifth Year.
Text-book: Inchley's Heat Engines, Longmans Green; or Allen
& Bursley, Heat Engines, McGraw-Hill.
Reference books: Ewing, Thermodynamics, Cambridge Press.
Callendar, Steam Power, Longmans Green. Simmons, Compressed
Air, McGraw-Hill. Marks and Davis, Steam Tables and Diagrams,
Longmans Green. Gebhardt, Steam Poiver Plant Engineering,
Wiley. Kent, Mechanical Engineer's Pocket Book, Wiley. Fernald
& Orrok, Engineering of Power Plants, McGraw-Hill. Low, Heat
Engines, Longmans Green.
Two lectures per week.
(b) Laboratory.—Testing of boilers, steam engines and internal
combustion engines.  Analysis and calorimetry of fuels.
One three-hour laboratory period per week.
7. Heat Engines.—A more precise study of the thermodynamic
theory, construction and performance of steam boilers, air com- Mechanical and Electrical Engineering 191
pressors, reciprocating steam engines, steam turbines and internal
combustion engines.
Text-book:   Robinson, Applied Thermodynamics, Pitman.
Reference books: As under M.E. 6.
Three lectures and one three-hour laboratory period per week.
Prerequisite subject for Fifth Year.
8. Steam Turbines.—A more advanced course in the thermodynamic theory, design and performance of steam turbines, both
marine and stationary.
Reference books: Goudie, Steam Turbines, Longmans Green;
Stodola, Steam and Gas Turbines, McGraw-Hill; Moyer, Steam
Turbines, Wiley.
One lecture per week.
9. Internal Combustion Engines.—A more advanced course in
the thermodynamic theory, design and performance of petrol, gas
and oil engines.
Reference   books:   Wimperis,   Internal   Combustion  Engines,
Constable; Bird, Oil Engines.
One lecture per week.
10. Refrigeration.—A course in the thermodynamic theory,
design and performance of refrigerating machines as used for
commercial and domestic purposes.
Reference books:  Ewing, Mechanical Production of Cold, Cambridge; Moyer and Fittz, Refrigeration, McGraw-Hill.
One lecture per week.
8, 9, 10. Laboratory.—The work carried out embodies the
operation and testing of the laboratory machines, illustrating
the theory covered in the lectures. Weekly written reports are
required on the tests carried out.
One five-hour period per week.
11. Heating and Ventilation.—Design of steam, hot water and
hot air systems of heating. Heaters for steam and water systems.
Use of exhaust steam for heating. Central heating plants. Loss
of heat from buildings.   Refrigerating systems.
Reference book:  Harding & Willard, Mechanical Equipment of
Buildings (Vols. I. and II.), Wiley.
One lecture per week.
12. Design of Power Plants.—A study of the function, construction and performance of the various machines and appliances
which enter into the design of industrial plants. Special attention
is given to the economic results to be expected from various combinations. 192 Faculty of Applied Science
Reference books: Harding & Willard, Mechanical Equipment
of Buildings (Vols. I and II.), Wiley. Fernald & Orrok, Engineering of Power Plants, McGraw-Hill.
One lecture per week, and one three-hour laboratory period per
week.
13. Physical Treatment of Metals. — A study of the various
metals used in commercial work, with special reference to the
treatment applied to get the physical properties and qualities
required for specific purposes.
Reference books: Colvin and Juthe, The Working of Steel,
McGraw-Hill; Bullen, Steel and Its Heat Treatment, Wiley;
Dalby, Strength and Structure of Steel and Other Metals, Arnold.
One lecture and one two-hour laboratory period per week.
Prerequisite subject for Fifth Year.
14. Mechanical Design.—Design of shafts and high-speed bearings; critical speeds of shafts; machine frames; strength of
armature cores and discs; torsional oscillations; transmission
towers and supports; catenary suspensions; guy ropes; revolving
field magnets; turbo-rotors, etc.
One lecture per week.
15. Prime Movers.—Theory and design of all types of hydroelectric machinery from the mechanical standpoint.
Reference book: Gibson, Hydro-Electric Engineering, Vol. I.,
Blackie.
Two lectures per week.
16. Machine Design.—The design of machine and structural
parts, including parts of engines of all types; design of wheel
teeth, belt, rope, and chain gearing, flywheels, cams, clutches,
couplings, machine frames, etc.
Text-book:  Spooner, Machine Design, Longmans.
Two lectures and one five-hour drawing office period per week.
17. Applied Mechanics. — A more advanced study of the
mechanics of materials and of rigid bodies involving the use of
the calculus.
One lecture per week.
18. Aeronautics.—General theory of flight; aerofoils, lift, drag,
distribution of pressure, aspect ratio, effect of variation of camber;
stream lines, airscrews, performance curves; general principles of
design and methods of construction; theory of stability.
Text-book:   Warner, Aeronautics, McGraw-Hill.
One lecture per week.
19. Problems in Mechanical and Electrical Engineering.-—The
solution under supervision of problems arising from the lecture
courses.
One two-hour period per week. Mechanical and Electrical Engineering 193
Electrical Engineering
1. Theory and Operation of Electrical Machines.—A practical
course for students not specializing in Electrical or Mechanical
Engineering, designed to introduce to the student the principal
factors in electrical machinery. Enough theory is given to explain
fully the'characteristics of the apparatus studied.
Introductory: Magnetic and electrical circuits, magnetic and
electric measurements, electro-magnetic induction, EMF equation,
motor law.
Direct Current Machines: The generator; simplex armature
windings; EMF equation. Armature reaction; commutation.
Methods of excitation, load characteristics. Conditions for self-
excitation. The motor—types, speed equation, armature reaction,
commutation, load characteristics, speed control, applications.
Efficiency, rating, parallel operation of generators.
Alternating Current: Generation; wave form; vector representation; maximum, effective and average values. Resistance,
inductance and capacitance in AC circuits—vector, impedance and
admittance—solution of simple net works. Resonance, Polyphase
circuits, power and its measurement.   Polyphase loads.
Alternating Current Machines.—Alternator: EMF equation;
armature winding; magneto-motive forces and fluxes; armature
reaction; leakage reactance; regulation; efficiency; parallel operation of alternators. Synchronous Motors: Principle; vector
diagram; output; power factor; synchronizing; hunting. Transformer: Constant potential; vector diagrams; leakage reactance;
constant current; losses; efficiency; connections; phase transformation; auto and booster transformers. Induction Motor:
Revolving field; slip; characteristics; circle diagram; variable
speed; wound rotor induction motor; choice of type; starting.
Rotary Converters:   Description of operation.
Text-book: MacCall, Continuous Current and Alternating
Current Engineering, Tutorial Press.  Junior Lab. Manual.
Prerequisite:   Physics 5.
Two lectures and one two-hour laboratory period per week.
2. Elementary DC Technology. — Elementary electro-magnetic
theory. Theory and use of direct current generators and motors.
Direct current transmission. Secondary batteries, Illumination,
etc.
Text-books: Langsdorf, Principles of Direct Current Machines,
McGraw-Hill; MacCall, Electrical Engineering Continuous Currents, University Tutorial Press Ltd.; Smith, Testing Dynamos and
Motors, Scientific Publishing Co.; Maclean, Electrical Laboratory
Course for Junior Students, Blackie and Sons; Bennett and
Crothers,  Electro-Dynamics,  McGraw-Hill;   Morecroft  &  Hehre, 194 Faculty of Applied Science
Electrical Circuits and Machinery, Vol. I., Direct Currents, John
Wiley & Son; Junior Lab. Manual.
For Fourth Year Electrical and Mechanical students only.
Prerequisites: Physics 3.
First Term: Three lectures and one four-hour laboratory
period per week.
Second Term:   One lecture per week.
Prerequisite subject for Fifth Year.
3. Elementary Alternating Current Technology.—A thorough
treatment of alternating current theory and calculations, with an
introduction to the principles of the chief alternating current
machines.
Text-books: Lawrence, Principles of Alternating Currents, McGraw-Hill ; Morecroft & Hehre, Electrical Circuits and Machinery,
Vol. II., John Wiley & Son. MacCall, Electrical Engineering
Alternating Currents, University Tutorial Press, Ltd.; Smith,
Practical Alternating Currents, Scientific Publishing Co. Junior
Lab. Manual.
For Fourth Year Electrical and Mechanical students only.
Prerequisite:  Physics 3.
Second Term: Two lectures and one four-hour laboratory
period per week.
Prerequisite for Fifth Year.
5. Electrical and Mechanical Measurements and Instruments.—
A study of the units and quantities of magnetism and electricity,
developing therefrom a detailed treatment of measurements and
measuring instruments of all kinds, in theory and practice.
Brief Summary: Absolute instruments, secondary instruments;
measurements of current, resistance, potential difference and
power; measurement of inductance and capacity; watt-hour
meters, recording instruments, phase, power-factor, and frequency
measurements; instrument transformers; determination of wave
form; calibration of instruments, etc.
Text-books:   Laws, Electrical Measurements, McGraw-Hill.
Reference book: Drysdale and Jolly, Electrical Measuring
Instruments, London: E. Benn, Ltd.
For Fourth Year Electrical students only.
Prerequisite:   Physics 5.
Two lectures per week.
Prerequisite subject for Fifth Year.
6. Problems in Direct Current and Alternating Current
Technology.
Two hours per week.
7. Design of Electrical Machinery.—In this course, the design
of slow and high-speed alternators, transformers and induction Mechanical and Electrical Engineering 195
motors, and rotary converters will be covered. In each case the
design of a machine of each type, together with the underlying
principles, will be taught.
Text-books: Gray, Design of Electrical Machinery, McGraw-
Hill; Slichter, Design of Electrical Machinery, Wiley & Son;
Vickers, The Induction Motor, Sir Isaac Pitman & Sons; Kuhlman,
Design of Electrical Machinery, Wiley & Son.
Two lectures per week each term.
Three hours laboratory period.
8. Electric Traction.—In this course will be considered the
various DC and AC systems; speed-time curves, energy consumption curves; train resistance; characteristics of railway motors;
control and control systems; regenerative braking; equipment and
rolling stock; overhead construction and rail construction; feeder
systems and their design. Substation equipment. Corrosion and
its prevention.
Text-books: A. T. Dover, Electric Traction, Sir Isaac Pitman
&.Sons; Harding, Electric Traction, McGraw-Hill.
Reference book: Wilson & Lydall, Electric Traction, Long-
mans Green & Co.
One lecture per week each term.
9. Transmission and Distribution of Electrical Energy. — In
this course will be considered the following: Inductance and
capacity calculations for short and long lines, voltage drops on
short and long lines; charging currents of long lines; voltage rises
on AC systems; automatic protective gear; high-tension cables
and their design; lightning arresters; design of feeders and distributors; Kelvin's law; switehgear and busbar layout; high-
tension insulators; Corona, its laws and losses; voltage and
power-factor control of transmission lines; stability.
Text-books: Loew, Electric Power Transmission, McGraw-Hill;
Still, Overhead Power Transmission, McGraw-Hill; Woodruff,
Transmission, Wiley & Son.
Two lectures per week each term.
10. Electrical Problem Course.—In this course problems in
electro-technology and transmission and traction will be covered.
Two hours per week each term. 1 unit.
11. Radio-Telegraphy and Telephony. — In this course will
be considered: Generation of oscillations by spark, arc, high-
frequency alternators, and thermionic vacuum tubes. Open and
closed circuit oscillators. Resonance; coupled circuits and their
characteristics; forced and free vibrations; waves on coils and
wires; propagation of electro-magnetic waves; methods of reception ; direction finding; the use of the valve as generator, amplifier
and detector. 196 Faculty of Applied Science
Wireless Telephony microphones; transmitting circuits, receiving circuits, tuning.
Text-books: Everett, Communication Engineering, McGraw-
Hill; Morecroft, Principles of Radio Communication, Wiley &
Son; L. B. Turner, Outlines of Wireless, Cambridge Press; Duncan & Drew, Radio Telegraphy and Telephony, Wiley & Son;
Radio Lab. Manual.
Two lectures per week.
One laboratory period of four hours.
12. Electro-Technology.—Theory of the Transformer. Core and
Shell types. Vector diagrams. Magnetizing current, Regulation,
Current Rush on suddenly switching on. Systems of Connection.
Methods of Cooling.   Testing.
The Alternator. Salient and non-salient pole types. Alternator
windings. EMF equation. Breadth Factor, Form Factor, Coil-
span Factor. Method of obtaining pure sine wave form. Regulation. Calculation of Regulation. Synchronous Impedance. Short
Circuit Currents. Method of calculating excitation on loads of
various power factors. Synchronizing of Alternators. Synchroscopes.   Parallel Operation of Alternators.
The Synchronous Motor. Single and Polyphase types. Vector
diagram. Variation of power factor with excitation. Calculation
of excitation necessary for power factor improvement. Damping
windings.   Hunting and its cure.  Methods of starting.
The Induction Motor. Windings. Production of Rotating field,
Circle diagram. Slip, torque and other characteristics. Squirrel
Cage and Slip Ring types. Effect of rotor resistance. Torque slip
curves. Starting methods of Squirrel Cage machines. Calculation
of steps of starting resistances for wound rotor machines. Crawling
of Induction motors. Leakage fluxes in Induction motors. Pole
changing. Cascade Connection and its characteristics. Speed Control by rotor resistance, by change of frequency, by use of AC
commutating motors. Hunt Cascade motor.
Efficiency Tests. Stroboscopic method of slip measurement.
Single Phase Induction Motor Theory.
The Rotary Converter. EMF and current relations. Heating of
Rotaries. Methods of changing voltage ratios. Starting and Synchronizing.
The Three Phase Commutator Motor. Shunt and Series types;
Vector diagrams and characteristics.
Reference books: McCall, Alternating Currents, University
Tutorial Press. Lawrence, Alternating Currents, McGraw-Hill.
Steinmetz, Theory and Calculation of Electric Apparatus, McGraw-
Hill. Russell, Alternating Currents, Cambridge University Press.
Steinmetz, Alternating Current Phenomena, McGraw-Hill.    Miles Mining and Metallurgy 197
Walker, Induction Motor. Blondel, Synchronous Motors and Converters, McGraw-Hill. H. Vickers, The Induction Motor, Sir Isaac
Pitman & Sons. Senior Lab. Manual.
Two lectures per week.
One laboratory period of four hours.
13. Transient Phenomena and Oscillations.—In this course will
be considered the transient phenomena which occur in switching
electric circuits, long transmission lines; standing and travelling
waves; the penetration of current and flux into magnetic materials
at high frequency; the effective resistance, inductance and capacity
of high frequency circuits; abnormal voltage rises in AC circuits;
transients in radio circuits-; waves and impulses, etc.
Text-book:   Steinmetz, Transient Phenomena, McGraw-Hill.
One lecture per week.
14. A general course in electrical engineering for Mechanical
Students.
Text?book: Lawrence, Principles of Alternating Current Machines, McGraw-Hill.  Senior Lab. Manual.
Two lectures per week "
One laboratory period of four hours.
Department of Mining and Metallurgy
Professor of Mining: J. M. Turnbull.
Professor of Metallurgy: H. N. Thomson.
Associate Professor of Mining i Geo. A. Gillies.
Assistant in Metallurgy: W. B. Bishop.
Mining
1. Metal Mining.—An introductory course in metal mining,
covering the following subjects:
Ores and economic minerals; economic basis of mining; ordinary
prospecting; mineral belts; conditions in British Columbia;
preliminary development of mines; timbering and framing;
tunnelling; shaft sinking,; transportation and haulage; drainage;
ventilation.
Two lectures per week.  Mr. Turnbull.
2. Coal and Placer Mining. — A general course in coal and
placer mining, covering the following subjects:
(a) Classification of coals; prospecting; mine development;
mining methods; ventilation; transportation and haulage; drainage; tipples; coal mines acts and laws.
(6) Gravel deposits; nature and origin of paystreaks; prospecting; examination and testing of deposits; ordinary mining
methods; hydraulic and dredging methods; plant and equipment;
placer mines acts and laws.
Two lectures per week.   Mr. Turnbull. 198 Faculty of Applied Science
3. Metal Mining. — An advanced course in metal mining,
covering the following subjects:
Scientific prospecting; geophysical methods; development work
in mines; blasting and explosives; examination of mines and
prospects; methods of ore sampling; mine valuation; accounting
and costs; administration; welfare and safety work; mining
laws and contracts; economies; ethics.
Prerequisite:   Mining 1.
Two lectures per week.  Mr. Turnbull.
4. Mining Machinery.—A special course covering the structural
and mechanical features of Mining Engineering, as follows:
Mine structures; mining plant and machinery; core and churn
drills; tramways, etc.
Prerequisites: Mining 1; Mechanical Engineering 3, 6; Civil
Engineering 3 and 10.
Two lectures per week. Mr. Gillies.
5. Mine Surveying.—A practical course covering the work of
the surveyor and staff in metal mines.
Methods   and   practice   in   mine   surveying;   geological   work
underground; maps, plans and models; notes and records.
Prerequisites:   Civil Engineering 2 and 6.
One lecture per week.   First Term.  Mr. Turnbull.
6. Mining Design.—A laboratory draughting course covering
the special requirements of Mining Students in regard to design
of the layout and details of mining plant, structures, and mine
survey plans.
One three-hour period per week.   Mr. Gillies.
7. Mining Methods.-—A special course covering the principles
and practice of mining methods.
Prerequisite:   Mining 1.
Concurrent Courses:   Mining 2, 3 and 4.
One lecture per week.   Second Term.   Mr. Turnbull.
Metallurgy
1. General Metallurgy. — This course covers the fundamental
principles underlying metallurgical operations in general, and is
introductory to subsequent more specialized study.
The lectures follow in general the subject as taken up in
Principles of Metallurgy, by Chas. H. Fulton, including the
following main subjects:
Physical mixtures and thermal analysis; physical properties of
metals; alloys; measurement of high temperatures; typical metallurgical operations; electro-metallurgy; slags; matte; refractory
materials; fuels; combustion; furnaces. Mining and Metallurgy 199
Reference books:   Hofman, General Metallurgy, McGraw-Hill.
Current Mining and Metallurgical Journals.  Trade Catalogues.
Prerequisites:  Chemistry 1 and Physics 1 and 2.
Two lectures per week.  Mr. Thomson.
2. Smelting and Leaching.—A general course covering principles and practice of Pyrometallurgy and Hydrometallurgy as
applied to gold, silver, copper, iron, lead and zinc.
Prerequisite:   Metallurgy 1.
Two lectures per week.   Mr. Thomson.
3. Metallurgical Calculations. — A special course covering
Thermochemistry; Metallurgical Calculations; Furnace Design
and Efficiency; Special Processes.
A large portion of the time will be given to the study of heat
balances of typical smelting operations.
Reference book:   Richards, Metallurgical Calculations.
Prerequisites:  Metallurgy 1, Chemistry 1.
Two hours per week.  Mr. Thomson.
4. Metallurgical Analysis.—Advanced course in Metallurgical
Analysis of Ores and Furnace Products, Pyrometry and Refractories.
Special attention will be given to analytical methods used by
smelting plants in purchase of ores and control of furnace
operations.
Prerequisites:   Metallurgy 1, Metallurgy 6.
Nine hours laboratory work per week.   Mr. Thomson.
5. Fire Assaying.—Quantitative determination of gold, silver
and other metals by fire assaying methods, with underlying principles.
Text-book:  Bugbee, Fire Assaying, Wiley.
One lecture and one five-hour laboratory period per week.
First Term.   Mr. Thomson, Mr. Bishop.
6. Wet Assaying.—An introductory course in metallurgical
analysis of ores and concentrates.
Most of the time will be given to the technical determination
of zinc, copper and lead.
One three-hour laboratory period per week. Mr. Thomson,
Mr. Bishop.
Ore Dressing
1. Ore Dressing.—A general course covering the concentration
of ores by mechanical means.
Most of the time is spent in considering fundamental principles,
typical machines, and their general operations and relations in
modern milling practice, emphasizing the economic and practical
aspects. 200 Faculty of Applied Science
Students are taught the commercial and technical characteristics of true concentrating ores, the general principles on which
the size, character, site, and other features of a mill are designed.
The general layout of crushing, handling, and separating machinery. The laws of crushing and of various classifying and
separating actions, and the design, operation and comparative
efficiency of typical machines, such as crushers, rolls, stamps, ball
and tube mills, jigs, tables, screens, classifiers, and slime handling
devices.
Attention is paid to pneumatic, magnetic, electrostatic, flotation
and other special processes, including coal-washing.
Reference books: F. Taggart, A Manual of Flotation Processes,
Wiley; S. J. Truscott, Text-book of Ore Dressing; Richards and
Locke, Text-book of Ore Dressing.
One lecture per week for two years.  Mr. Gillies.
2. Ore Dressing Laboratory. — A variety of crushing, sizing,
classifying and separating operations are carried out by the
students and studied quantitatively on appropriate machines,
singly and in combination. Special attention is paid to flotation
processes, several types of machines being used.
Ores from British Columbia mines are usually chosen, so that
the work of the students is along practical lines in comparison with
actual work in operating plants.
Prerequisite:  Ore Dressing 1.
Nine hours laboratory per week.  Mr. Gillies.
Note.—All students in Mining and Metallurgy are advised to provide
themselves with a copy of Peele's Mining Engineer's Handbook (Wiley), which
is used for reference in many of the courses in which no special text-book is
required. ■
Department of Physics
Professor:  T. C. Hebb.
Professor:  A. E. Hennings.
Associate Professor: J. G. Davidson.
Associate Professor: G. M. Shrum.
The instruction includes lectures on the general principles of
Physics, accompanied by courses of practical work in the
laboratory.
1. Introduction to Physics.—See Physics 1, Arts and Science,
Page 124.
2. Elementary Physics. — See Physics 2, Arts and Science,
Page 125.
3. Mechanics. — An elementary treatment of the subject of
statics, dynamics and hydrostatics, with particular emphasis on
the working of problems.. The course: is given in the first half of the
Second Year of Applied Science. Nursing and Health 201
Text-book:  Reynolds, Elementary Mechanics, Prentice-Hall.
Prerequisite:  Physics 1 or 2.
Three lectures and one three-hour laboratory period per week.
4. Heat.—This course is begun when Physics 3 is finished, and
the six hours devoted to it are divided in the same manner. The
course is based on the supposition that the student is already
familiar with the elementary principles of heat.
Text-book:  Edser, Heat for Advanced Students, Macmillan.
5. Electricity and Magnetism.—A quantitative study of fundamental principles of electricity and magnetism, with special
reference to the fact that the student is to be an engineer.
The course includes a short treatment of the elements of
alternating currents.
Text-book:   Zeleny, Elements of Electricity, McGraw-Hill.
Two lectures and one three-hour laboratory period per week.
6. Mechanics.—The subject-matter consists of an extension of
the statics and dynamics of Mechanics 1, but with the use of the
differential and integral calculus.
Prerequisite:  Physics 3.
Text-book:   Poorman, Applied Mechanics, McGraw-Hill.
Two lectures per week.
7. Light.—A short lecture course for engineering students. A
study of optical instruments, light sources and filters, spectroscopy,
photometry, energy measurements, refractometers, interference,
diffraction and polarized light.
Text-book: Robertson, Introduction to Physical Optics, Van
Nostrand. .  ^
One lecture per week.
12. Introduction to Atomic Structure.—See Physics 12, as in
Arts and Science, Page 126.
Department of Nursing and Health
Professor: Hibbert Winslow Hill. (On leave of absence.)
Assistant Professor:  Mabel F. Gray.
Instructor:  Margaret E. Kerr.
Lecturer:   G. F. Amyot.
Lecturer: J. W. Mcintosh.
Part-time Lecturers:
W. John Allardyce, M.A. (Brit. Col.), Ph.D. (McGill).
Miss Elizabeth Gertrude Breeze, R.N., Cert. P.H.N.  (University of California).
Miss Anne Cavers, R.N., Cert. School for Graduate Nurses (McGill).
Arthur L. Crease, M.D., C.M. (McGill).
Miss Margaret Duffield, R.N., Cert. P.H.N.  (University of Toronto).
Miss Laura Holland, R.N., Cert. School of Social Work (Simmons).
Mrs. Laura B. Gordon, R.N., Cert. P.H.N.  (British Columbia).
Miss Ruby Adeline Kerr. 202 Faculty of Applied Science
Miss Josephine F. Kilburn, R.N.
Miss Agnes McLeod, R.N., B.Sc. (Alberta), M.A. (Columbia).
Miss Laura M. Sanders, R.N.
Alfred Howard Spohn, M.B. (Toronto).
Charles Harvey Vrooman, M.D., C.M. (Manitoba).
Harold White, M.D. (McGill), D.P.H. (Toronto), L.M.C.C.
Henry Esson Young, B.A.  (Queen's)  M.D., C.M.  (McGill), LL.D.  (Toronto), LL.D.  (McGill), LL.D.  (British Columbia), L.M.C.C.
Subjects of Nursing A
(Combined Undergraduate Course and
Double Course)
1. History of Nursing.—A series of lectures dealing with the
origin and history of nursing.
One hour a week, First Year.   Both Terms.  Miss Gray.
3. Public Health (Introductory).— (See Page 203, Social Service 4 and Social Service 8.)
Three hours a week. Both Terms. Dr. Hill, Miss Gray, Miss
Kerr.
4. Elementary Organic Chemistry, as applied to Physiology
and Biochemistry.
Second Term. Twenty hours. One lecture and one laboratory
period per week for ten weeks.  Dr. Allardyce.
Nursing B (Public Health Nursing)
and Nursing C (Teaching and Supervision)
Preventive Medicine in the Public Health Nursing Programme
1. Preventable Diseases.—Brief sketches of the more important
of the preventable diseases; immunology; vaccine therapy.
One hour a week.  Both Terms.  Dr. Amyot.
2. Epidemiology. — Principles and practice in the control of
disease.
One hour a week.  Both Terms.  Dr. Amyot.
3. Tuberculosis.—A study of tuberculosis, its prevention and
cure.
Eight lectures.   Second Term.   Dr. Vrooman.
5. Mental Hygiene.—An introduction to the study of mental
illness, with emphasis upon its cure and prevention. Child
guidance clinics and the psychiatric social history.
Nine lectures.   First Term.   Dr. Crease, Miss Kilburn.
6. Bacteriology. — A short laboratory course to familiarize
students with the practical application of laboratory technique in
Public Health measures.
Hours to be arranged.  Miss Mathews. Nursing and Health 203
Child Welfare
7. (a) Infant Welfare.—A series of lectures and clinics dealing with pre-natal care, and the normal development of the infant;
also dealing with the disorders of infancy, their prevention and
cure.
Nine hours.  First Term.  Dr. Spohn.
(b) Child Hygiene.—An outline of the work of the City Child
Hygiene Department preparatory to Field Work.
Two lectures.  Miss Sanders.
Public Health, Hygiene and Sanitation
9. Public Health.—A series of lectures covering the fields of
general hygiene and sanitation.
One hour a week. Both Terms. Seventeen lectures. Dr.
Mcintosh.
10. Public Health Administration. — A study of the official
relation of the Public Health Nurse to the Department of Health.
Four lectures.   Dr. Mcintosh, Dr. Young.
11. Public Health Organizations.—A series of single lectures
dealing with special aspects of their work.
(a) Diagnostic Clinics for Tuberculosis.  Dr. Lamb.
(b) The Hospital's Relation to the Community Health Programme.  Dr. Haywood.
(c) The Workmen's Compensation Act.  Dr. Bastin.
12. Vital Statistics. — The general principles governing the
collection and arrangement of statistical facts and their application
in Public Health Nursing.
One hour a week.   Both Terms.   Seventeen lectures.   Dr. Duff.
Nursing
13. Principles and Practice of Public Health Nursing.—A study
of the principles and practice of public health nursing.
Three hours a week.  Both Terms.   Miss Kerr.
15. Urban Visiting Nursing Programme.
Two lectures.   Miss Duffield.
16. Health Education.—A consideration of the material to be
presented in the teaching of personal hygiene and home nursing,
and the method of presentation.
Two hours a week.   Both Terms.   Miss Kerr.
17. Contemporary Nursing Problems.—Consideration of recent
developments in the nursing field.
One lecture a week.   Both Terms.   Miss Gray. 204 Faculty of Applied Science
18. Teaching in Schools of Nursing. — A study of the Curriculum ; the selection of subjects, content of each, and methods of
presentation. Demonstrations and supervised practice in classroom and ward teaching.
Three lectures a week. Both Terms. Miss Gray, Miss Cavers,
Miss McLeod.
19. Principles of Supervision in Schools of Nursing.—A study
of the organization of the School of Nursing; its relation to the
various departments of the Hospital; and the problems of training
and record keeping.
Two lectures a week. Both Terms.   Miss Gray.
20. School Hygiene.—A series of thirteen lectures given by
members of the staff of the Medical Department of the Vancouver
School Board, dealing with the specific problems of this division
of Public Health.
Thirteen lectures. First Term. Miss Breeze, Miss Kerr, Dr.
White.
21. Social Case Work. — Its relationship to Public Health
Nursing.
Six lectures.   Miss Holland.
22. Hospital Social Service.—A presentation of the principles
underlying Medical Social Service.
Two lectures.  Mrs. Gordon.
24. Educational Psychology.
(See Page 102.)
25. School Administration and Laiv.
(See Page|tf)3.^'*
26. Public Speaking and Parliamentary Procedure.—Principles
and practice, fitting students for giving addresses and conducting
meetings.
One hour a week.   Both Terms.   Seventeen hours.   Miss Kerr.
27. Sociology. — The Family. An approach to the study of
society by way of a basic institution.
Two hours a week.  First Term.  Dr. Topping.
Text-book:  Groves, Social Problems of the Family, Lippincott,
1927.
29. Motor Mechanics. ■—• Practical instruction in the structure
and operation of automobiles.
One hour a week.   One Term.  Mr. Bell.
30. Philosophy 9.
(See Page 124.) Zoology 205
Department of Zoology
Professor: C. McLean Fraser.
Assistant Professor: G. J. Spencer.
Assistant Professor:   Gertrude M. Smith.
Note:—Biology 1 is prerequisite to all courses in Zoology.
1. General Morphology. — General morphology of animals.
Comparative anatomy. The relationships of animal groups. Comparative life-histories.
Text-book: T. J. Parker and W. A. Haswell, Manual of
Zoology, Macmillan.
This course is prerequisite to other courses in Zoology.
Two lectures and two hours laboratory per week.
7. Economic Entomology (in part).—The portion of the course
in Economic Entomology that deals with forest insects.
One lecture and two hours laboratory work per week for half
of Second Term.
-3DS-  THE
FACULTY
OF
AGRICULTURE TIME TABLE
Faculty of Agriculture—First and Second Years
FIRST AND SECOND TERMS
Monday
Room
Tuesday
Room
Wednesday
Room
Thursday         Room
Friday
Room
Saturday
Room
9-10
Physics 1 _...
S200
Agriculture 2  .
English lb	
Agl02
100
Physics 1	
S200
Agriculture 2	
English lb	
German Beg. a	
Agl02
A 100
Ap 108
S200
Agl02
English la
Agriculture 2
Lab.	
Agriculture 1
A 108
10-11
Mathematics 1
Geology 1	
A
Ap 100
Agriculture 1
Lab	
AglOO
Mathematics 1
A. 106
Agriculture 1
Lab	
AglOO
Mathematics 1.
Chemistry 2	
S300
Agriculture 2
Lab.	
11-12
Biology 1   	
German Beg. a
Ap 100
A 205
Chemistry 1
Botany 1	
Agriculture 1
Lab	
Biology 1_
Ap 100
Chemistry 1
Agriculture 1
Lab	
Economics 1
Section 4   	
S300
Ap 100
German Beg. a
A 205
Chemistry 1
Economics 1
Section 4    ...
S 300
Ap 100
12-1
1-2
English 2b
A 100
Bacteriology 1
Geology 1	
S400
Ap
Chemistry la .
English 2a,....	
S 300
A 100
Mathematics 1....
Zoology 1 Lab.	
Bacteriology 1
Lab.	
A
Ap
S400
Chemistry la	
2-3
Bacteriology 1
S 400
English la
Geology 1 Lab.
Ap
Agriculture 2
Biology 1 Lab.	
Bacteriology 1
Lab....... _
A 100
S 400
Agriculture 1
Lab	
AglOO
3-4
Bacteriology 1
Lab	
S400
Ap
Bacteriology 1
S
Agriculture 2
Lab..
Chemistry 1 Lab.
Chemistry 2 Lab.
Agriculture 1
AglOO
Botany 1 Lab...
Chemistry 2
Lab	
4-5
Bacteriology 1
Lab.....	
Botany 1 Lab...
S 400
Ap
Bacteriology
Lab. 1	
s
Chemiatry 1 Lab.
Chemistry 2 Lab.
Biology 1 Lab.
Ap
Chemistry i
Lab...	
5-6
Chemistry 1    .
s
Ap
Chemistry 2
s
Chemistry 1 Lab.
Biology 1 Lab.
Ap
Botany 1 Lab...
1 FACULTY OF AGRICULTURE
INFORMATION FOR STUDENTS IN
AGRICULTURE
The primary object of a University education is to develop in
men and women the power of logical, exact and independent thinking. The teaching of the Science of Agriculture has an additional
aim—viz., giving to the student an understanding of the principles
of life, both plant and animal, and knowledge of the application
of these principles to Agriculture and allied industries.
The particular course of study* selected by any student is
determined by his previous training and by the use he intends
to make of his University work, whether for farming, district
agricultural work, teaching, research, or other vocation.
The first two years of work leading to the degree in Agriculture
are devoted largely to acquiring a knowledge of the basic sciences,
in adding to the student's knowledge of language and in laying
a foundation for more advanced studies in the practical and scientific phases of Agriculture and of allied subjects.
During the first two years, the student who is not yet clear as
to what special phase of Agriculture he may care to follow is given
an opportunity of becoming acquainted with the general field of
Agriculture and of its various branches, through the medium
of an Orientation Course (Agriculture 1 and 2), which includes a
survey of the History and Development of Agriculture. This
introductory course is given by the applied departments.
During the last two years of the course the student is
permitted, in consultation with the Dean and the Head of the
Department, to select from a wide list of subjects either a
generalized course in Agriculture or a specialized course in
some one phase of Agriculture, as in Agronomy, Animal Husbandry, Dairying, Horticulture, Poultry Husbandry, Agricultural
Economics; or a still further specialized course within these or
closely allied fields, such as in Soils, Animal or Plant Nutrition,
Animal or Plant Pathology, Applied Genetics, Bacteriology,
Entomology, Physiology and similar fields of study.
The extent of the course, whether for a few weeks or for
several years, and the nature of the course, whether generalized
or specialized, scientific or practical, is to be decided by each
individual on the advice of the Dean and a Department Head.
•The curriculum described in the following pages may be changed from
time to time as deemed advisable by the Senate. 210 Faculty of Agriculture
In advising on the selection of courses or vocation, the student's
personal preference and his adaptability are given careful consideration.
For those interested in continuing their University training
beyond the work of the four years leading to the Bachelor's degree,
excellent opportunity is afforded in many of the fields mentioned
above for further work leading to the Master's degree.
A judicious selection of courses permits of the completion of
the required work for both the B.S.A. and the B.A. degrees in
five years.
(For further information regarding the various courses, see
statements which follow the "Outline of Courses"; also description of courses as listed under the separate Departments.)
Facilities for Work
For statement regarding buildings, laboratories, equipment
and other facilities, see pages 20-22.
Admission, Registration, Etc.
For statement as to general requirements for admission, registration, etc., to the University, see pages 27-32.
Degrees
The degrees offered in this Faculty are:
Bachelor of Science in Agriculture (B.S.A.).
Master of Science in Agriculture (M.S.A.).
Courses of Study
Five distinct lines of study are offered, as follows:
(1) Four-year courses leading to the degree of Bachelor of
Science in Agriculture (B.S.A.).
(2) A One-year Occupational Course leading to a Diploma in
Agriculture.
(3) A Winter Course at the University, consisting of a Short
Course in one or more of the agricultural subjects: Poultry,
Horticulture, etc.
(4) Extension Courses at different points in the Province.
(5) Graduate work in agriculture leading to the degree of
Master of Science in Agriculture (M.S.A.).
Courses Leading to the Degree of B.S.A.
These courses are planned for students who wish to obtain
practical and scientific knowledge of agriculture, or closely allied
subjects, either as a basis for demonstration, teaching or research,
or as an aid to successful farming. Courses in Agriculture 211
Students are required to have Junior Matriculation or its
equivalent before entering upon these courses (see "Matriculation
Requirements ").
The Occupational Course
The Occupational Course is planned for those students whose
academic qualifications are not high, but whose practical qualifications are satisfactory. The course permits of work in Agronomy,
Animal Husbandry, Poultry Husbandry, Dairying, Horticulture,
Farm Management and Marketing on the part of those who wish
to extend their practical knowledge. A successful completion of
the course leads to a Diploma in Agriculture. Matriculation
standing for entrance is not required.
Short Courses
The Short Courses are planned for those men and women who
are unable to take advantage of the longer courses, but who desire
to extend their knowledge of agriculture in one or more of those
branches in which they are particularly interested. The work
throughout is intensely practical. Illustrative material and periods
devoted to demonstration and judging work are features of the
course. No entrance examination is required, nor are students
asked to write an examination at the conclusion of the course.
Special announcements giving details of the various divisions
of the course are issued in December of each year, and may be
obtained from the Eegistrar on application.
Extension Courses
In order to reach those engaged in Agriculture who are not able
to avail themselves of the Winter Courses given at the University,
the Faculty of Agriculture offers extension short courses in various
centres throughout the Province. These courses are of at least
four days' duration, are proceeded with according to a definite
time-table, and include lectures and demonstrations in connection
with the work of each department of the Faculty. Detailed programmes are prepared to suit the specific centres, and requests for
such courses may be addressed to the Registrar.
(Not offered in 1934-35.)
Graduate Work
For regulations, see pages 213, 214.
Curriculum
Courses are described in terms of units. A unit normally consists of one lecture hour (or one continuous laboratory period of
not less than two or more than three hours) per week throughout 212 Faculty of Agriculture
the session, or two lecture hours (or equivalent laboratory periods)
throughout a single term.
Outline of Courses
First Year
Agriculture 1.
Biology 1.
Chemistry 1.
English 1.
Mathematics 1.
To assist students who contemplate proceeding to the Normal
School after taking one year of the course in Agriculture, a first
year course in the language taken on Junior Matriculation may
be substituted for either Chemistry 1 or Biology 1; but any such
student who later registers for a second year in the Faculty of
Agriculture must complete the regular course of studies for the
first year.
Second Year
Agriculture 2.
English 2.
Physics 1, if Physics was not taken as a Junior Matriculation
subject, and any of the following subjects as approved by the
Dean and the Committee on Students' Courses, up to a total of
not less than 15 units:
Bacteriology 1.
Bacteriology 2.
Botany 1.
Chemistry 2.
Economics 1.
Geology 1.
Mathematics 2 or 3.
Matriculation Language 1.
Matriculation Language 2.
Beginners' German.
Philosophy 1.
Physics 2.
Zoology 1.
Subject to the approval of the Dean and a Head of a Department, other subjects from the Faculty of Arts and Science, or
from the Faculty of Applied Science, may be accepted for credit
in the Faculty of Agriculture, also, but for First Year only, from
Senior Matriculation; further, any two of the elective subjects in
the Second Year not taken in that year, subject to approval, may
be taken in the Third Year.   A student may take in his Fourth Courses in Agriculture 213
Year an elective of the Second Year subject to the approval of
the Faculty.
Third and Fourth Years
Prior to registration, and preferably before the close of the
Second Year, all students are required to discuss with the Dean
and the Head of a Department all courses which they intend to
take.
There are no specific subjects which must be taken by all
students; students are required, however, to elect up to a total
of 36 units, essay included, in the Third and Fourth Years.
A student completing credits for the Bachelor's degree may
also do work toward the Master's degree, provided that not more
than six units of credit are required to complete his undergraduate
courses.
A student who, before completing work for the Bachelor's
degree, has done work towards the Master's degree, may have six
units of credit applied towards his Master's degree, provided these
six units of credit are secured in courses for which graduate credit
may be allowed. These units may be applied toward the Master's
degree only after the student has completed his undergraduate
requirements.
An essay shall be prepared by each student on some topic, the
subject of which shall be selected, with the approval of the Heads
of the Departments concerned, before the end of the Third Year's
work.
Two typewritten copies of each essay on standard-sized paper
(8V2 xll in.) shall be submitted on or before the 1st of April in
the graduating year.
The particular course or courses to be taken by any student
must be approved by the Dean and a Head of a Department.
Courses Leading to the Degree of M.S.A.
1. Candidates for the degree of Master of Science in Agriculture (M.S.A.) must hold a Bachelor's degree from this
University, or its equivalent. (See also Curriculum of Third and
Fourth Years, paragraphs 3 and 4 above.)
2. A graduate of another university applying for permission
to enter as a graduate student is required to submit with his
application an official statement of his graduation, together with
a certificate of the standing gained in the several subjects of his
course. The Faculty will determine the standing of such a student
in this University.   The fee for examination of certificates is $2.00.
3. Candidates with approved degrees and academic records who
proceed to the Master's degree shall be required: 214 Faculty of Agriculture
(a) To spend at least one year in resident graduate study; or
(b) (At the discretion of the Faculty concerned).
(i) To do two or more years of private work under the
supervision of the University, such work to be
equivalent to one year of graduate study; or
(ii) To do one year of private work under University
supervision and one term of resident graduate
study, the total of such work to be equivalent to
one year of resident graduate study.
4. Students doing tutorial work shall not be allowed to come
up for final examination in less than two academic years after
registration as M.S.A. students.
5. One major and one minor shall be required. Candidates may
select their minor in another Faculty.
At least second class standing is required in the subjects of the
minor.
6. A candidate presenting himself for the degree of M.S.A.
may be required by the Head of the Department in which he is
majoring to have a reading knowledge of French or German.
7. (a) A thesis must be prepared on some approved topic in
the major subject,
(b) Examinations, written or oral, or both, shall be required.
8. Two typewritten copies of each thesis, on standard-sized
thesis paper, shall be submitted. (See special circular of "Instructions for the Preparation of Masters' Theses.")
9. Application for admission as a graduate student shall be
made to the Registrar by October 1st.   (See schedule of fees.)
Examinations and Advancement
1. Examinations in all subjects, obligatory for all students, are
held in April. In the ease of subjects which are final at Christmas
and in the case of courses of the First and Second Years, examinations will be held in December as well. Applications for special
consideration on account of illness or domestic affliction must be
submitted to the Dean not later than two days after the close of
the examination period. In cases where illness is the plea for
absence from examinations, a medical certificate must be presented
on the appropriate form, which may be obtained from the Dean's
office.
2. In the First and Second Years, candidates taking a full
course will not be considered as having passed unless they obtain
(a) 50 per cent, or more in each subject, or (b) at least 40 per
cent, on each subject and 60 per cent, on the aggregate taken at Examinations and Advancement 215
one time. In the Third and Fourth Years, candidates will not be
considered as having passed unless they obtain at least 50 per cent,
on each subject. Candidates taking less than a full course (15
units) must obtain at least 50 per cent, on each subject of the First
and Second Years, and at least 60 per cent, on each subject of the
Third and Fourth Years. Students taking work in the Summer
Session will not be considered as having passed unless they obtain
50 per cent, or more in each subject.
3. Successful candidates will be graded as follows: First Class,
an average of 80 per cent, or over; Second Class, 65 to 80 p