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The University of British Columbia Calendar Aug 30, 1937

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CALENDAR
TWENTY-THIRD  SESSION
1937-1938
H=
VANCOUVER,   BRITISH   COLUMBIA
1937
=H CHANGES IN CALENDAR REGULATIONS
Students are warned not to assume that regulations remain unchanged from year to year, and attention is called particularly to the following items in
this Calendar:
1. Opening and closing dates of session changed.   Pages 5 and 6.
2. Change made in Alma Mater fee.   Pages 32 to 36, 292.
3. Credits allowed in Music.    Page 62.
4. New courses given in Forestry. Pages 23, 61, 74 to 76, 155,
165 to 169.
5. Course for High School Teachers of Science added, provisionally.   Page 84.
6. Mathematics 1 (Arts and Science). There will be but one
examination paper in First Year Mathematics instead of three
papers, Algebra, Geometry, Trigonometry, as before.
7. Alterations made in standard of admission to Second Year
Applied Science. Not effective for admission, September, 1937.
Page 157.
8. Second Year Applied Science course revised.    Page 158.
9. Third Year Applied Science course revised.    Page 159. Wt)t ffltatasttp
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prttttff) Columbia
CALENDAR
TWENTY-THIRD  SESSION
1937-1938
VANCOUVER,   BRITISH  COLUMBIA
1937  CONTENTS
Page
Academic Year  5
Visitor     1
Chancellor  t
President  1
The Board of Governors  7
The Senate  7
Officers and Staff  8
Historical Sketch  15
The Constitution of the University _  17
Location and Buildings  18
Endowments and Donations _  20
General Information  _  23
Admission to the University  27
Registration  and  Attendance  29
Fees     32
Medals, Scholarships, Prizes, Bursaries and Loans  37
Faculty of Arts and Science
Time Table of Lectures     56
Regulations in Reference to Courses—
Courses Leading to the Degree of B.A  61
Courses Leading to the Degree of B.Com     73
Courses Leading to the Degree of M.A     76
Teacher Training Course     82
Course for High School Teachers of Science    84
Course Leading to the Social Service Diploma     84
Examinations  and  Advancement     86
Courses of Instruction—   \
Department of Bacteriology and Preventive Medicine    88
" " Botany     91
" " Chemistry     98
" " Classics    103
" " Economics, Political Science, Commerce and Sociology 107
" " Education  117
" " English  119
" " Geology and Geography  122
" " History   129
" Mathematics       135
" " Modern Languages   138
" " Philosophy and Psychology  142
" " Physics  145
" " Zoology  _  149
Faculty of Applied Science
Foreword     153
Regulations in Reference to Courses _  154
General Outline of Courses  157
Courses in—
Chemical Engineering  160
Chemistry      161
Civil Engineering  162
Electrical Engineering  ._  164
Forestry and Forest Engineering  165 The University of British Columbia
Page
Geological Engineering   169
Mechanical Engineering  171
Metallurgical Engineering   172
Mining Engineering  174
Nursing and Health  175
Double Courses for the Degrees of B.A. and B.A.Sc.  182
Courses Leading to the Degree of M.A.Sc  183
Examinations and Advancement  185
Courses of Instruction—
Department of Botany  187
" Chemistry  189
" " Civil Engineering     193
" " Economics     202
" " Forestry  202
" " Geology and Geography _  207
" " Mathematics     212
" " Mechanical and Electrical Engineering _  213
" " Mining and Metallurgy  219
" Physics     223
" " Nursing and Health   224
" Zoology  _  227
Faculty of Agriculture
Regulations in Reference to Courses— at
For the B.S.A. Degree  232
The Occupational Course  233
Short Courses  233
Extension Courses  „  233
Graduate Work  233, 235
Teacher Training Course  236
Examinations and Advancement _  237
Courses of Instruction—
Department of Agronomy     239
" " Animal Husbandry  241
" " Dairying  242
" " Horticulture    __  243
" Poultry Husbandry  _  245
Courses in Agriculture—
Agriculture       238
Agricultural Economics   247
Genetics    _  248
List of Students in Attendance, Session 1936-37  2-51
Degrees Conferred, 1936 _  272
Medals, Scholarships and Prizes Awarded, 1936  282
University Summer Session _  287
Canadian  Officers'  Training Corps  290
Student Organization    292
Inter-University  Exchange  of  Undergraduates  296
Affiliated Colleges—
Victoria College  297
Union College of British Columbia  299
The Anglican Theological College of British Columbia  299 Academic Year
5
August
2nd Monday
14th Saturday
19th Thursday      1
20th Friday J
September
1st Wednesday
6th Monday
7th Tuesfflay to 1
14th Tuesday ]
15th Wednesday
16th Thursday
17th Friday
20th Monday
22nd Wednesday
October
1st Friday
4th Monday
6th Wednesday
10th Saturday
13th Wednesday
15th Friday
15th Friday
20th Wednesday
27th Wednesday
29th Friday
November
llth Thursday
December
8th Wednesday
10th Friday
15th Wednesday
18th Saturday
25th Saturday
ACADEMIC YEAR
19 3 7
Last day for submission of applications for admission to Second Year Nursing.
Last day for submission of applications for Supplemental  Examinations.
Supplemental Examinations—Second Year Nursing.
ACADEMIC YEAR begins.
Last day for submission of applications for admission to Second Year Applied Science and to
the Teacher Training Course.
Labour Day. University closed September 4th-
Oth, inclusive.
Supplemental Examinations.
Last day for Registration of all First and Second
Year Students.   (See Aug. 2 arid Sept. 1, above.)
First and Second Year Arts and Science, Applied
Science, Agriculture, Organization.
Last day for Registration of all other undergraduates except students in Extra-Sessional
Classes  and Directed  Reading Courses.
Lectures begin at 9 a.m.
The opening addresses to the students of all the
Faculties at 3 p.m. in the Auditorium.
Last day for handing in graduation essays and
theses  (Autumn Congregation).
Last day for payment of First Term fees. Payment of first instalment of Scholarship money.
Thanksgiving Day.    University closed.
Last day for payment of fees for Autumn Graduation.
Last day for change in Students' courses.
Meeting of the Faculty of Arts and Science.
Last day for Registration and payment of fees
of Graduate Students and of Students in Extra-
Sessional Classes and Directed Reading Courses.
Meeting of the Faculty of Agriculture.
Meeting of the Senate.
Congregation.
Meeting of the Faculty Council.
Remembrance Day.    University closed
Meeting of the Faculty of Arts and Science.
Meeting of the Faculty of Agriculture.
Meeting of the Senate.
First Term ends.
Christmas Day.   University closed December 25th-
27th, inclusive. The University of British Columbia
19 3 8
January
1st Saturday
4th Tuesday
17th Monday
February
9th Wednesday
llth Friday
16th Wednesday
25th Friday
March
April
14th Thursday
14th Thursday
15th Fridav
16th Saturday  to 1
29th Friday J
28th Thursday
29th Friday
May
7th Saturday
9th Monday ■
llth Wednesday
12th Thursday
12th Thursday
24th Tuesday
June
9th Thursday
July
1st Friday
4th Monday
August
15th Monday
19th Friday
26th Friday
26th Friday
31st Wednesday
New Year's Day. University closed January 1st-
3rd, inclusive.
Second Term begins.
Last day for payment of Second Term fees. Payment of second instalment of Scholarship money.
Meeting of the Faculty of Arts and Science.
Meeting of the Faculty  of  Agriculture.
Meeting of the Senate.
Meeting of the Faculty Council.
Last day of Lectures. V
Last day for handing in graduation essays and
theses.
Good Friday.    University closed.
Sessional Examinations.
Field work in Applied Science begins immediately
at the close of the examinations.
Last day for payment of Graduation fees.
Last day for handing in applications for Scholarships.
Meeting of the Faculty of Agriculture.
Meeting of the Faculty of Arts and Science.
Meeting of the Senate.
Congregation.
Meeting of Convocation.
Victoria Day. University closed.
King's Birthday.   University closed.
Dominion Day.    University closed.
Summer session begins.
Last day for- submission of applications for Supplemental Examinations.
Summer Session ends.
Meeting of the Faculty of Arts and Science.
Meeting of the Senate.
ACADEMIC YEAR ends. THE UNIVERSITY OF BRITISH COLUMBIA
VISITOR
The Hon. Eric Werge Hamber, B.A., Lieutenant-Governor of
British Columbia.
CHANCELLOR
R. E. McKechnie, C.B.E., M.D., CM., LL.D., F.A.C.S., F.R.C.S.  (Can.)
PRESIDENT
L. S. Klinck, Esq., M.S.A., D.Sc, LL.D., Officier de l'Instruction Publique.
BOARD OF GOVERNORS
(a) Ex-officio:—■
R.  E.  McKechnie, C.B.E.,  M.D.,  CM.,  LL.D.,  F.A.C.S.,  F.R.C.S.
(Can.), (Chairman).
L.  S.  Klinck,  Esq.., M.S.A., D.Sc,  LL.D., Officier  de  l'Instruction
Publique.
(b) Elected by Senate:—
Mrs. Evlyn F. Farris, M.A., LL.D., Vancouver.
Miss A. B. Jamieson, B.A., Vancouver.
Sherwooh Lett, Esq., M.C, B.A., Vancouver.
(c) Appointed by the Lieutenant-Governor in Council:—
Brig.-Gen. Victor Wentworth Odlum, C.B., C.M.G., D.S.O., Vancouver.  Term expires 1937.
Samuel H. Shannon, Esa., Cloverdale.  Term expires 1937.
Joseph Badenoch Clearihue, Esa., B.A., M.A., B.C.L., K.C, Victoria.
Term expires 1939.
Percy R. Bengough, Esq., Vancouver. Term expires 1941.
George T. Cunningham, Esa., Vancouver. Term expires 1941.
SENATE
(a) The Chancellor, R. E. McKechnie, C.B.E., M.D., CM., LL.D., F.A.C.S.,
F.R.C.S. (Can.)
The   President   (Chairman),  L.  S.   Klinck,  Esq.,  M.S.A.,   D.Sc,  LL.D.,
Officier de l'Instruction Publique.
(b) Dean of the Faculty of Agriculture, F. M. Clement, Esq., B.S.A., M.A.
Dean of the Faculty of Applied Science, John Norison Finlayson, Esq.,
M.Sc, M.E.I.C, M.Am.Soc.CE.
Dean of the Faculty of Arts and Science, Daniel Buchanan, Esq., M.A.,
Ph.D., LL.D., F.R.S.C
Representatives of the Faculty of Agriculture:—
Blythe Eagles, Esq., B.A., Ph.D.; D. G. Laird, Esq., B.S.A., M.S.,
Ph.D.  Terms expire 1939.
Representatives of the Faculty of Applied Science:—
M. Y. Williams, Esq., B.Sc, Ph.D., F.G.S.A., F.R.S.C; A. H. Finlay,
Esq., B.A.Sc, M.S. in C.E.  Terms expire 1939.
Representatives of the Faculty of Arts and Science:—
H. F. Angus, Esq., M.A., B.C.L.; Ira Dilworth, Esa., B.A., A.M.
Terms expire 1939. The University of British Columbia
(c) Appointed by the Lieutenant-Governor in Council:—
H. N. MacCorkindale, Esa., B.A., Vancouver.  Term Expires 1939.
J. Newton Harvey, Esa., Vancouver. Term expires 1938.
Major H. C Holmes, M.A., Victoria. Term expires 1989.
(d) The Principal of Vancouver Normal School, A. R. Lord, Esa., B.A.
The Principal of Victoria Normal School, V. L. Denton, Esq., B.A.
(e) Representative of High School Principals and Assistants, J. Roy Sander
son, Esq., M.A., Ph.D.  Term expires 1937.
(f) Representatives of Affiliated Colleges:—
Victoria College, Victoria, P. H. Elliott, Esq., M.Sc.   Term expires
1939.
Union College  of British Columbia, Vancouver   (Theological),  Rev.
J. G. Brown, M.A., D.D.  Term expires 1939.
The  Anglican  Theological  College   of   British  Columbia,  Vancouver,
Rev. H. R. Trumpour, M.A., B.D., D.D.   Term expires 1939.
(g) Elected by Convocation:—
H. T. Logan, Esq., M.C, M.A., Cowichan Station.
G. G. Sedgewick, Esq., B.A., Ph.D., Vancouver.
Sherwood Lett, Esq., M.C, B.A., Vancouver.
Miss M. L. Bollert, M.A., A.M., Vancouver.
His Honour F. W. Howay, LL.B., LL.D., F.R.S.C, New Westminster.
A. E. Lord, Esq., B.A., Vancouver.
Miss A. B. Jamieson, B.A., Vancouver.
P. A. Boving, Esa., Cand. Ph., Cand. Agr., Vancouver.
John C Oliver, Esa., B.A., B.A.Sc, Vancouver.
Mrs. Evlyn F. Farms, M.A., LL.D., Vancouver.
Miss Isobel Harvey, M.A., Vancouver.
The Most Rev. A. U. de Pencier, M.A., D.D., Vancouver.
Sydney Anderson, Esa., B.A.Sc, Vancouver.
Arnold A. Webster, Esq., M.A., Vancouver.
His Honour J. D. Swanson, B.A., Kamloops.
Terms expire 1939.
(h) Representative of the British Columbia Teachers' Federation:—
O. J. Thomas, Esq., B.A., Vancouver.  Term expires 1939.
OFFICERS AND STAFF
L. S. Klinck, B.S.A.  (Toronto), M.S.A., D.Sc.  (Iowa State College), LL.D.
(Western Ontario), Officier de l'Instruction Publique, President.
Daniel Buchanan, M.A. (McMaster), Ph.D. (Chicago), LL.D. (McMaster),
F.R.S.C, Dean of the Faculty of Arts and Science.
John Norison Finlayson, M.Sc. (McGill), M.E.I.C, M.Am.Soc.CE., Dean of
the Faculty of Applied Science.
F. M. Clement, B.S.A. (Toronto), M.A. (Wisconsin), Dean of the Faculty of
Agriculture.
Miss M. L. Bollert, M.A. (Toronto), A.M. (Columbia), Dean of Women.
Lemuel Robertson, M.A. (McGill), Director of the Summer Session.
Stanley W. Mathews, M.A. (Queen's), Registrar.
Miss E. B. Abernethy, B.A. (Brit. Col.), Assistant Registrar.
Angus MacLucas, Bursar.
John Ridington, Librarian. Officers and Staff
FACULTY COUNCIL
The President (Chairman), L. S. Klinck, Esa., M.S.A., D.Sc, LL.D., Officier
de l'Instruction Publique.
Dean of the Faculty of Agriculture, F. M. Clement, Esa., B.S.A., M.A.
Dean of the Faculty of Applied Science, John Norison Finlayson, Esa., M.Sc,
M.E.I.C, M.Am.Soc.CE.
Dean of the Faculty of Arts and Science, Daniel Buchanan, Esq., M.A., Ph.D.,
LL.D., F.R.S.C
Representatives of the Faculties:  P. A. Boving, Esa., Cand. Ph., Cand. Agr.;
Lemuel Robertson, Esq., M.A.; A. Lighthall, Esq., B.Sc; J. G. Davidson,
Esq., B.A., Ph.D.; O. J. Todd, Esa., Ph.D.
Emeritus Professors
George E. Robinson, B.A. (Dal.), Emeritus Professor of Mathematics.
James Henderson, M.A. (Glasgow), Emeritus Professor of Philosophy.
Department of Agronomy
G. G. Moe., B.S.A., M.Sc. (McGill), Ph.D. (Cornell), Professor and Head of
the Department.
P. A. Boving, Cand. Ph. (Malmo, Sweden), Cand. Agr. (Alnarp, Agriculture,
Sweden), Professor.
D. G. Laird, B.S.A. (Toronto), M.S., Ph.D. (Wisconsin), Associate Professor.
Department of Animal Husbandry
H. M. King, B.S.A. (Toronto), M.S. (Oregon Agricultural College), Professor
and Head of the Department.
J. C Berry, B.S.A. (Brit. Col.), Instructor.
J. G. Jervis, V.S. (Ont. Vet. College), B.V.Sc (Toronto), Lecturer.
Department of Bacteriology and Preventive Medicine
C. E. Dolman, M.R.C.S. (England), M.B., B.S., M.R.C.P., D.P.H., Ph.D. (Lon
don), Professor and Head of the Department.
D. C. B. Duff, M.A., Ph.D. (Toronto), Assistant Professor.
Howard J. Horn, M.A. (Brit. CoL), Assistant.
Miss Ruth A. Stuart, M.S.A. (Brit. Col.), Assistant.
Miss Una Bligh, B.A. (Brit. Col.), Assistant.
Department of Botany
Andrew H. Hutchinson, M.A. (McMaster), Ph.D. (Chicago), F.R.S.C, Professor and Head of the Department.
Frank Dickson, B.A. (Queen's), Ph.D. (Cornell), Associate Professor.
John Davidson, F.L.S., F.B.S.E., Associate Professor.
Miss E. Miriam R. Ashton, B.Sc. (London), M.A. (Brit. Col.), Instructor.
Miss Norah Hughes, M.A. (Brit. Col.), Assistant.
Wilfred Jack, M.A. (Brit. Col.), Assistant.
Miss Charlotte Dill, B.A. (Brit. Col.), Assistant.
J. D. Menzies, B.S.A. (Brit. Col.), Assistant.
Miss Helen M. Farley, B.S.A. (Brit. Col.), Assistant.
Vernon C. Brink, M.S.A. (Brit. Col.), Assistant.
George P. Holland, M.A. (Brit. Col.), Assistant. 10 The University of British Columbia
Department of Chemistry
Robert H. Clark, M.A. (Toronto), Ph.D. (Leipzig), F.R.S.C, Professor and
Head of the Department.
E. H. Archibald, B.Sc. (Dal.), A.M., Ph.D. (Harvard), F.R.S.E.&C, Professor
of Analytical Chemistry.
W. F. Seyer, B.A., M.Sc. (Alberta), Ph.D. (McGill), Associate Professor.
M. J. Marshall, M.Sc. (McGill), Ph.D. (Mass. Inst, of Technology), Associate
Professor.
William Ure, M.A.Sc. (Brit. Col.), Ph.D. (Cal. Inst, of Technology), Assistant
Professor.
H. O. McMahon, M.A. (Brit. Col.), Assistant.
James J. Pyle, M.A. (Brit. Col.), Assistant.
William Ford, M.A. (Brit. Col.), Assistant.
Edwin Lovell, M.A. (Brit. Col.), Assistant.
Miss Frances Wright, B.A. (Brit. Col.), Assistant.
Francis Cook, B.A. (Brit. Col.), Assistant.
Herbert J. R. Bremner, B.A. (Brit. Col.), Assistant.
Miss Margery O. Scott, B.A. (Brit. Col.), Assistant.
J. Allen Harris, M.A. (Brit. Col.), Ph.D. (Illinois), Research Assistant.
Department of Civil Engineering
John Norison Finlayson, M.Sc (McGill), M.E.I.C, M.Am.Soc.CE., Professor
and Head of the Department.
F. A. Wilkin, B.A.Sc. (McGill), Associate Professor.
Allan H. Finlay, B.A.Sc. (Brit. Col.), M.S. in C.E. (Illinois), Associate Professor.
A. Lighthall, B.Sc. (McGill), Assistant Professor.
Edward S. Pretious, B.A.Sc. (Brit. Col.), Instructor.
Archie Peebles, B.A.Sc, B.A. (Brit. Col.), Instructor.
Alexander Hrennikoff, Grad., Inst, of Communication Engineering, Moscow,
Russia, M.A.Sc. (Brit. Col.), Instructor.
Stanley D. Lash, B.Sc, M.Sc. (London), Ph.D. (Birmingham), A.M.I.C.E.,
Instructor.
W. W. Pullinger, B.A.Sc. (Brit. Col.), Assistant.
J. B. Alexander, B.Sc. (New Brunswick), Honorary Lecturer.
Department of Classics
Lemuel Robertson, M.A. (McGill), Professor and Head of the Department.
O. J. Todd, Ph.D. (Harvard), Professor.
H. T. Logan, M.C,  B.A.   (McGill), M.A.   (Oxon.), Professor.    (On leave  of
absence.)
Patrick G. M. Guthrie, B.A. (Manitoba), M.A. (Toronto), Instructor.
Miss Jean M. Auld, B.A. (Colorado), M.A. (McGill), Assistant.
Geoffrey B. Riddehough, B.A. (Brit. Col.), M.A. (California), Assistant.
Leonard Grant, B.A. (Brit. Col.), Assistant.
Department of Dairying
Blythe Eagles, B.A. (Brit. Col.), Ph.D. (Toronto), Professor and Head of the
Department.
Miss Olga Okulitch, M.A. (Brit. Col.), Assistant. Officers and Staff 11
Department of Economics, Political Science, Commerce
and Sociology
Henry F. Angus, B.A. (McGill), B.C.L., M.A. (Oxon.), Professor and Head of
the Department.
W. A. Carrothers, D.F.C, B.A.  (Manitoba), Ph.D. (Edinburgh), Professor.
J.  Friend  Day,   B.A.   (Toronto),  M.A.   (Chicago),  Associate  Professor  of
Economics and Commerce.
C W. Topping, B.A. (Queen's), S.T.D. (Wesleyan Theol. College), A.M., Ph.D.
(Columbia), Associate Professor of Economics and Sociology.
G. F. Drummond, M.A.  (St. Andrew's), M.Sc. (Econ.), (London), Associate
Professor.
Robert England, M.C, M.A. (Queen's), Director of University Extension and
Associate Professor of Economics.
Frederick Field, C.A., Lecturer in Accountancy.
R. H. Tupper, Lecturer in Commercial Law. (1936-37.)
F. K. Collins, B.A., LL.B., Lecturer in Commercial Law. (1937-38.)
C N. Brennan, B.Com. (Brit. Col.), Assistant.
Miss Helen R. Parker, B.Com. (Brit. CoL), Assistant. (1936-37.)
George Deacon, B.A., B.Com. (Brit. CoL), Assistant. (1936-37.)
J. M. Berrettoni, B.Com. (Brit. CoL), Assistant. (1936-37.)
Charles W. Brazier, B.A., Special Lecturer in Commercial Law.  (1936-37.)
George Cormack, B.A. (Brit. CoL), Assistant.   (1937-38.)
Department of Education
George M. Weir, B.A. (McGill), M.A. (Sask.), D.Paed. (Queen's), Professor
and Head of the Department. (On leave of absence.)
Daniel Buchanan, M.A. (McMaster), Ph.D. (Chicago), LL.D. (McMaster),
F.R.S.C, Acting Head of the Department.
Mrs. Jennie Wyman Pilcher, B.A., M.Sc (New Zealand), A.M., Ph.D. (Stanford), Associate Professor of Psychology and Education.
William G. Black, B.A. (Brit. CoL), M.A., Ph.D. (Chicago), Associate Professor.
C. B. Wood, A.M. (Columbia), Lecturer.
Department of English
G. G. Sedgewick, B.A. (Dal.), Ph.D. (Harvard), Professor and Head of the
Department.
W.  L.  MacDonald,  B.A.   (Toronto),  M.A.   (Wisconsin),  Ph.D.   (Harvard),
Professor.
Frederick G. C. Wood, B.A. (McGill), A.M. (Harvard), Professor.
Thorleif Larsen, M.A. (Toronto), B.A. (Oxon.), F.R.S.C, Professor.
Ira Dilworth, B.A. (McGill), A.M. (Harvard), Associate Professor.
Miss M. L. Bollert, M.A. (Toronto), A.M. (Columbia), Assistant Professor.
Hunter Campbell Lewis, M.A. (Brit. CoL), Assistant Professor.
Miss Dorothy Blakey, M.A. (Brit. CoL), M.A. (Toronto), Ph.D.  (London),
Instructor.
Robert W. Hewetson, B.A. (Brit. CoL), Assistant.
Department of Forestry
 , Professor and Head of the Department.
F. Malcolm Knapp, B.S.F. (Syracuse), M.S.F. (Wash.), Associate Professor
and Acting Head of the Department.
George S. Allen, B.A.Sc. (Brit. CoL), Instructor. 12 The University of British Columbia
Percy M. Barr, B.A.Sc. (Brit. CoL), M.F. (Yale), Ph.D., Special Lecturer.
(1936-37.)
R. M. Brown, B.Sc.F. (Toronto), Honorary Lecturer in Forest Products.
J. H. Jenkins, B.A.Sc. (Brit. CoL), Honorary Lecturer.
William Byers, Special Lecturer.
L. B. Dixon, Special Lecturer.
Department of Geology and Geography
M. Y. Williams, B.Sc. (Queen's), Ph.D. (Yale), F.G.S.A., F.R.S.C, Professor
and Head of the Department.
S. J. Schofield, M.A., B.Sc (Queen's), Ph.D. (Mass. Institute of Technology),
F.G.S.A., F.R.S.C, Professor of Physical and Structural Geology.
Clarence Otto Swanson, M.A.Sc. (Brit. Col.), Ph.D. (Wisconsin), Professor
of Mineralogy and Petrography.
H. V. Warren, B.A., B.A.Sc. (Brit. CoL), B.Sc, D.Phil. (Oxon.), Assistant
Professor of Mineralogy and Petrography.
Gordon Davis, B.A. (Manitoba), M.A. (Brit. CoL), Ph. D. (Princeton), Instructor.
Roy Graham, M.A.Sc. (Brit. CoL), Ph.D. (Chicago), Assistant.
Department of History
W. N. Sage, B.A. (Toronto), M.A. (Oxon.), Ph.D. (Toronto), F.R.Hist.S.,
Professor and Head of the Department. ~
F. H. Soward, B.A. (Toronto), B.Litt. (Oxon.), Professor.
A. C. Cooke, B.A. (Manitoba), M.A. (Oxon.), Assistant Professor.
Miss Sylvia Thrupp, M.A. (Brit. CoL), Ph.D. (London), F.R.Hist.S., Instructor.
Sydney G. Pettit, B.A. (Brit. Col.), Assistant.
Miss Patricia Johnson, B.A. (Brit. CoL), Assistant.
Department of Horticulture
F. M. Clement, B.S.A. (Toronto), M.A. (Wisconsin), Professor and Head of
the Department.
A. F. Barss, A.B. (Rochester), B.S. in Agr. (Cornell), M.S. (Oregon Agricultural College), Ph.D. (Chicago), Professor.
G. H. Harris, B.S.A. (Brit. Col.), M.S.  (Oregon State College), Ph.D.  (Cali
fornia), Associate Professor.
Frank E. Buck, B.S.A. (McGill), Lecturer.
Department of Mathematics
Daniel Buchanan, M.A. (McMaster), Ph.D.  (Chicago), LL.D. (McMaster),
F.R.S.C, Professor and Head of the Department.
F. S. Nowlan, B.A.  (Acadia), A.M.  (Harvard), Ph.D.  (Chicago), Professor.
L. Richardson, B.Sc (London), Professor.
Walter H. Gage, M.A. (Brit. CoL), Associate Professor.
Frederick J. Brand, B.A. (Brit. Col.), B.Sc. (Oxon.), Assistant Professor.
Miss May L. Barclay, M.A. (Brit. Col.), Instructor.
Morris Bloom, B.A. (Brit. Col.), Assistant.
Joseph L. Kadzielawa, B.A. (Brit. CoL), Assistant.
Gleb Goumeniouk, M.A.Sc. (Brit. CoL), Assistant.
Miss Margery E. Mellish, B.A. (Brit. CoL), Assistant.
Miss Muriel Wales, M.A. (Brit. CoL), Assistant.
William H. Simons, M.A. (Brit. CoL), Assistant.
Donald MacPhail, B.A.Sc. (Brit. CoL), Assistant.
Charles W. McLeish, B.A.Sc. (Brit. CoL), Assistant. Officers and Staff 13
Department of Mechanical and Electrical Engineering
Hector John MacLeod, B.Sc. (McGill), M.Sc. (Alberta), A.M., Ph.D. (Harvard), As.M.A.LE.E., M.E.I.C, F.A.A.A.S., Professor and Head of the
Department.
F. W. Vernon, B.Sc. Eng.  (London), Wh.Sch., A.M.I.Mech.E., A.F.R.A.S.,
Professor of Mechanical Engineering.
E. Geoffrey Cullwick, M.A. (Cantab.), A.M.I.E.E., Mem.A.I.E.E., Associate
Professor of Electrical Engineering.
W. B. Coulthard, B.Sc. (London), M.A.I.E.E., A.M.I.E.E., Assistant Professor
of Electrical Engineering.
John F. Bell, O.B.E., R.N., Eng. Capt., M.E.I.C, Assistant Professor of
Mechanical Engineering.
R. Rolleston West, D.S.O., B.A. (Cantab.), A.M.I.C.E. (England), Lecturer
in Mechanical Engineering.
H. P. Archibald, B.A.Sc. (McGill), Assistant in Drawing.
Walter J. Lind, B.A.Sc. (Brit. CoL), Assistant.
Richard A. Hamilton, B.A.Sc. (Brit. Col.), Assistant.
James S. Motherwell, B.A.Sc. (Brit. Col.), Assistant.
Department of Mining and Metallurgy
J. M. Turnbull, B.A.Sc. (McGill), Professor and Head of the Department.
George A. Gillies, M.Sc. (McGill), Professor of Metallurgy.
Frank A. Forward, B.A.Sc. (Toronto), Assistant Professor of Metallurgy. (On
leave of absence 1936-37.)
W. B. Bishop, Instructor in Metallurgy.
Basil Joseph  Walsh,  B.Sc.   (Queen's), Assistant  Professor of  Metallurgy.
(1936-37.)
Department of Modern Languages
David Owen Evans, M.A., D.Phil. (Oxon.), D.Lett. (Univ. of Paris), Professor
and Head of the Department.
A. F. B. Clark, B.A. (Toronto), Ph.D. (Harvard), Officier d'Academie, Professor of French.
Miss Isabel MacInnes, M.A. (Queen's), Ph.D. (California), Associate Professor
of German.
Miss Janet T. Greig, B.A. (Queen's), M.A.  (Brit. CoL), Officier d'Academie,
Assistant Professor of French.
Miss Dorothy Dallas, M.A.   (Brit. CoL), Docteur de l'Universite de  Paris,
Assistant Professor of French.
Miss  Wessie   Tipping,   M.A.   (Brit.   Col.),   Docteur   de   l'Universite   de   Paris,
Assistant Professor of French.
Miss  Joyce   Hallamore,   M.A.   (Brit.   CoL),   Ph.D.   (Munich),   Instructor   in
German.
W. T. E. Kennett, B.A. (Brit. CoL), M.A.  (Princeton), Instructor.
Madame D. Darlington, Assistant in French.
Mrs. Alice Roys, Assistant in German.
Department of Nursing and Health
C.  E.  Dolman,  M.R.C.S.   (England),  M.B.,  B.S., M.R.C.P.,  D.P.H.,  Ph.D.
(London), Acting Head of the Department.
Miss Mabel F. Gray, R.N., Cert.P.H.N.  (Simmons College), Assistant Professor of Nursing.
Miss Margaret E. Kerr, R.N., B.A.Sc. (Brit. Col.), M.A. (Columbia), Instructor.
G. F.  Amyot,   M.D.,  D.P.H.   (Toronto),  L.M.C.C,  Lecturer  in   Preventable
Diseases and Epidemiology. 14 The University of British Columbia
J. W. McIntosh, B.A., M.B., D.P.H. (Toronto), L.M.C.C, Lecturer in Public
Health.
Miss Fyvie Young, R.N., B.A.Sc. (Brit. CoL), M.A.  (Columbia), Instructor.
(Under the Rockefeller Foundation Grant.)
Department of Philosophy and Psychology
H. T. J. Coleman, B.A. (Toronto), Ph.D. (Columbia), Professor and Head of
the Department.
Mrs. Jennie Wyman Pilcher, B.A., M.Sc. (New Zealand), A.M., Ph.D. (Stanford), Associate Professor of Psychology and Education.
Joseph E. Morsh, B.A. (Brit. CoL), Ph.D. (Johns Hopkins), Lecturer.
Department of Physics
T. C. Hebb, M.A., B.Sc. (Dal.), Ph.D. (Chicago), Professor and Head of the
Department.
A. E. Hennings, M.A. (Lake Forest College, III.), Ph.D. (Chicago), Professor.
J. G. Davidson, B.A. (Toronto), Ph.D. (Calif.), Associate Professor. (On leave
of absence.)
Gordon Merritt Shrum, M.A., Ph.D. (Toronto), F.R.S.C., Associate Professor.
Robert Christy, B.A. (Brit. CoL), Assistant.
George Mossop, M.A. (Brit. CoL), Assistant.
Kenneth R. McKenzie, M.A. (Brit. CoL), Assistant.
Henry H. Clayton, B.A. (Brit. Col.), Assistant.
Morris Bloom, B.A. (Brit. Col), Assistant.
Gleb Goumeniouk, M.A.Sc. (Brit. CoL), Assistant.
Department of Poultry Husbandry
E. A. Lloyd, B.S.A.  (Sask.), M.S.A.  (Washington State College), Professor
and Head of the Department.
Jacob Biely, M.S.A. (Brit. CoL), M.S. (Kansas State College), Instructor.
Department of Zoology
C. McLean Fraser, M.A.  (Toronto), Ph.D.  (Iowa), F.R.S.C, Professor and
Head of the Department.
G. J. Spencer, B.S.A. (Toronto), M.S. (Illinois), Associate Professor.
Mrs. Gertrude M. Watney, M.A. (Brit. CoL), Ph.D. (California), Assistant
Professor.
J. Laurence McHugh, B.A. (Brit. CoL), Assistant.
Kenneth Jacob, B.A., B.A.Sc. (Brit. CoL), Assistant.
Department of University Extension
Robert England, M.C, M.A. (Queen's), Director.
University Health Service
J. W. McIntosh, B.A., M.B.,  D.P.H.   (Toronto), L.M.C.C,  Senior Medical
Health Officer, Metropolitan Health Committee—University Health Officer.
Kenneth F. Brandon, M.D., D.P.H. (Toronto), Director of Health Unit No. 3
of the Metropolitan Health Department of Vancouver,  and Director of
Students' Health Service.
Mrs. C. A. Lucas, R.N.  (B.C.), S.R.N.  (Eng. and Wales), C.M.B., R.F.N.
(Lond.),   C.S.M.M.G.   (National   Register),   Public   Health   Supervisor.
(On leave of absence.)
George T. Cunningham, Esq., University representative on the Metropolitan
Health Committee.
Physical Education
Miss Gertrude E. Moore, Instructor in Physical Education for Women.
Maurice Van Vliet, Instructor in Physical Education for Men. THE UNIVERSITY OF BRITISH COLUMBIA
HISTORICAL SKETCH
The creation of a University in British Columbia was first
advocated by Superintendent Jessop in 1877, but it was not until
1890 that the Provincial Legislature passed an Act establishing
a body politic and corporate named "The University of British
Columbia." In 1891 this Act was amended to require that a
meeting of the Senate be held within one month after the election
of the Senators by Convocation. The Senators were elected, but
a quorum did not assemble on the date fixed by the Chancellor,
Dr. I. ~W. Powell, of Victoria. Thus the first attempt to establish a
University in British Columbia failed.
However, some of the work normally done in a University was
begun in 1894, when an Act was passed which permitted the
affiliation of high schools in the Province with recognized Canadian
Universities. In 1899 Vancouver High School was affiliated with
McGill University in order to provide First Year work in Arts,
and took the name of Vancouver College. First Year work in
Arts was offered by Victoria High School when it became Victoria
College by affiliation with McGill University in 1902. In the same
year Vancouver College undertook the Second Year in Arts.
In 1906 an Act was passed incorporating the Royal Institution
for the Advancement of Learning of British Columbia, which, in
the same year, established at Vancouver the McGill University
College of British Columbia. The scope of the work undertaken
by this college was gradually increased until at the time it was
taken over by the University of British Columbia it was giving
three years in Arts and Science, and two years in Applied Science.
When the University of British Columbia opened in the autumn
of 1915, both the McGill University College of Vancouver and
Victoria College, which since 1907 had been a part of it, ceased to
exist.
Definite steps to establish the University were taken by Dr.
H.. E. Young, Minister of Education, in 1907, when he introduced
a "University Endowment Act," This Act was followed in 1908
by an Act establishing and incorporating the University of British
Columbia and repealing the old Act of 1890-1. This Act, with its
subsequent amendments, determines the present constitution of the
University.
As authorized by an Act passed by the Provincial Legislature
in 1910, the Lieutenant-Governor in Council appointed a Site
Commission to decide upon a site for the proposed University. The
Commission held its first meeting on May 25th, 1910, in Victoria, 16 The University of British Columbia
and after a thorough examination of the Province recommended
the vicinity of Vancouver. In the autumn the Executive Council
decided to place the University at Point Grey—the site which the
Commission had named as its first choice. In 1911 the Legislature
passed an Act authorizing the Lieutenant-Governor in Council to
grant this site to the University. The grant was increased in 1915,
so that it now consists of 548 acres at the extremity of Point Grey.
The waters of the Gulf of Georgia form more than half the
boundary of the University Campus. A tract of some 3,000 acres of
Government land immediately adjoining the site, and lying between
it and the City of Vancouver, has been set aside by the Government
in order that University revenue may be provided by its sale or
lease.
In February, 1912, the Hon. H. E. Young, Minister of Education, called for competitive plans which should include plans in
detail for four buildings to be erected immediately, and a block
plan showing all the proposed buildings on the Campus. Messrs.
Sharp and Thompson, of Vancouver, B. C, were the successful
competitors, and were appointed University Architects.
The first Convocation, held on August 21st, 1912, chose Mr.
F. L. Carter-Cotton as first Chancellor of the University. In March,
1913, the Lieutenant-Governor in Council appointed as President
of the University F. F. Wesbrook, M.A., M.D., CM., LL.D. On
April 4th, 1918, Dr. II. E. McKechnie was elected Chancellor.
Dr. McKechnie has been re-elected continuously since that date
and entered on his seventh term in May, 1936. On the death of
President Wesbrook, October 20th, 1918, L. S. Klinck, Dean of the
Faculty of Agriculture, was appointed acting President, and on
June 1st, 1919, President.
From its opening in 1915 till the Summer of 1925, the
University carried on its work in temporary quarters on part of
the site of the General Hospital in Fairview.
Construction work was commenced on the Science Building at
the permanent site in Point Grey in 1914, but was interrupted
because of war conditions. Work on this building was resumed in
1923, and in the Autumn of the same year the contract was let for
the Library. These two buildings, which are of stone and are
fireproof, conform closely to the original plans as prepared by
the architects in 1914. The initial units of these structures, as well
as nine other buildings which are of a less permanent character,
were completed in 1925, and at the beginning of Session 1925-26
the University commenced work in its new quarters.
The Inauguration of the new buildings was held on October
15th and 16th, 1925, on which occasion honorary degrees were
granted by the University for the first time. Historical Sketch 17
THE CONSTITUTION OF THE UNIVERSITY
The Constitution of the University is governed by the British
Columbia University Act, B.C.R.S. 1924, c. 265, and Amending
Acts, which provide
That the University shall consist of a Chancellor, Convocation,
Board of Governors, Senate, the Faculty Council, and the
Faculties; that the first Convocation shall consist of all
graduates of any university in His Majesty's dominions
resident in the Province two years prior to the date fixed
for the first meeting of Convocation, together with twenty-
five members selected by the Lieutenant-Governor in
Council. After the first Convocation it shall consist of the
Chancellor, Senate, members of the first Convocation, and
all graduates of the University; that the Chancellor shall
be elected by Convocation; that the Board of Governors
shall consist of the Chancellor, President, and nine persons
—three elected by the Senate and six appointed by the
Lieutenant-Governor in Council; that the Senate shall
consist of: (a) The Chancellor, and the President of
the University, who shall be chairman thereof; (b) the
deans and two professors of each of the Faculties elected
by members of the Faculty; (c) three members to be
appointed by the Lieutenant-Governor in Council; (d) the
principals of the normal schools; (e) one member elected
by the high-school principals and assistants who are actually
engaged in teaching; (/) one member to be elected by the
• governing body of every affiliated college or school in
this Province; (g) fifteen members to be elected by Convocation from the members thereof; (h) one member elected
by the British Columbia Teachers' Federation.
It is further provided that the University shall be non-sectarian.
The University Act gives the University full powers to grant
such degrees in the several Faculties and different branches of
knowledge as the Senate may from time to time determine. It
reserves for the University the sole right in this Province to confer
degrees, except in Theology, and it expressly enacts that '' No other
university having corporate powers capable of being exercised
within the Province shall be known by the same name, nor shall
any such university have power to grant degrees." LOCATION AND BUILDINGS
Location
The University is situated on the promontory which forms the
western extremity of the Point Grey Peninsula, On three sides it
is bounded by the Gulf of Georgia. The site comprises an area of
548 acres, of which approximately one-half is campus. In all
directions appear snow-capped mountains, strikingly rugged and
impressive.
Buildings
The buildings, planned to meet the requirements of fifteen
hundred students, are of two classes, permanent and semi-permanent. The former were designed by the University architects,
Messrs. Sharp and Thompson, the latter by architects of the
Department of Public Works of the Provincial Government. The
permanent buildings have been erected in the location originally
assigned for them; the others in the quadrangle designated as
"unassigned" in the original plan. By utilizing the "unassigned"
area for the semi-permanent buildings, all the locations intended
for future expansion have been left available.
The entire mechanical equipment of these buildings was
designed after a close study had been made not only of present
requirements, but of the ultimate development of the institution.
This consideration accounts for the fact that only a part of the
present equipment is permanent. After a careful survey of the whole
system, a forced hot water sj^stem was found to present advantages
that made its adoption advisable. Direct radiation with a system of
warmed air supply and extraction for ventilation is used to take care
of the heat losses in the buildings. A separate system of ventilation is
installed for all sanitary conveniences, and a specially constructed
system for fume closets. The various services throughout these
buildings, such as hot and cold water, distilled water, gas and steam
for laboratory purposes, compressed air, etc., with the necessary
apparatus, are all of a modern type. An attempt has been made to
reduce vibration and noise to a minimum by installing all moving
apparatus on floating slabs, with a further insulation of cork.
Library
The University Library contains 106,000 volumes and about
15,000 pamphlets. It includes representative works in all the courses
offered by the University, and a growing collection of works in other
subjects.
It is one of three Canadian Depositories of the Library of
Congress Catalogue, a collection of more than 1,500,000 printed
cards, valued at $65,000.00.   The Catalogue, housed in the main Location and Buildings 19
lobby of the Library building, is in process of classification—a work
which will take another year to complete.
The Library also possesses a College Art Teaching Equipment
Set, organized and presented by the Carnegie Corporation of New
York. This consists of about 185 specially selected works covering
the fine and applied arts, and of more than 2,000 reproductions,
photographed or coloured, illustrating these.
The Library receives regularly about 680 magazines and
periodical publications.
The book collection is classified throughout on the Congressional
system.
Books to which the teaching staff have specially referred their
students are placed in a " Reserved'' class. These are shelved apart
from the main collection, and are loaned only for use in the building,
and for a limited period.
Unbound periodicals are not loaned. Bound periodicals, and books
that are costly, rare, or unsuitable for general circulation, are loaned
only under special conditions.
While the Library is primarily for the staff and students of the
University, its resources are available to those of the general public
engaged in research or special study, and who make personal application to the Librarian for the privilege of its use. Such persons are
known as "extra-mural Readers". By order of the Board of Governors a fee of $1.00 per calendar year is charged such readers. In
addition, they pay necessary mailing costs, a deposit being required
from those unable to call personally for books loaned.
The University is deeply indebted to all who have made gifts to
the Library. These have been both valuable and numerous. Their
number prevents detailed acknowledgment, but recognition should
be made of a number of sets of transactions, and complete or partial
sets of scientific periodicals, given by societies and friends of the
University. The most interesting and valuable of these gifts are listed
in the annual report of the Library to the Senate.
Gymnasium
This building was completed in 1929 and presented to the
University by the Alma Mater Society. It is situated adjacent to
the tennis courts and conveniently close to the playing fields. The
style of architecture and exterior finish harmonizes well with that
of the other buildings on the campus. The playing floor has an
area of 6,000 square feet, and is surrounded on three sides by tiers
of benches which will accommodate 1,400 persons. In the space
behind these seats are located the dressing rooms, drying rooms,
locker rooms and shower baths. Approximately one-third of this
space  has  been   set  aside   for  the   exclusive   use  of  the  women 20 The University op British Columbia
students. In addition there are four large rooms. Three of these
have been assigned to undergraduate clubs; the fourth is a well-
equipped kitchen. Equipment suitable for general gymnasium and
indoor athletic work has been provided.
Playing  Field
In accordance with the original landscape plan prepared by
Mawson in 1913, the playing fields area, consisting of about 16
acres, is situated east of the East Mall and north of the University
Boulevard. Development work was started early in January, 1931,
as an aid to the acute unemployment situation, and was made
possible by funds provided chiefly by subscriptions from the
Faculty, students, and friends of the University. Much of the
labour was obtained through the courtesy of the Relief Department
of the City of Vancouver. Twenty thousand cubic yards of soil
and gravel were used to bring the track and field to grade. The
total cost to date has been approximately $20,000.
The grass field is full-sized and is surrounded by a quarter-mile
cinder track. The area is enclosed by an eight-foot board fence.
It is hoped that in the near future some provision may be made
for either temporary or permanent seating accommodation.
Forest Products Laboratories
The Forest Products Laboratories of Canada, Vancouver
Laboratory, which is maintained by the Forest Service of the
Department of the Interior, Canada, occupies three buildings
provided and kept up through a co-operative agreement between
the University and the Dominion Government.
Plan of Campus
The plan at the back of the Calendar shows the buildings
which have been erected and indicates the nature of their construction. It also shows their relation to the other groups of buildings
which are to be erected in the future.
ENDOWMENTS AND DONATIONS
In March, 1937, the Carnegie Corporation allocated to the
University of British Columbia one of its Music Sets. This gift
consists of the following:
Nine hundred and forty-five phonograph records, 81 buckram
record albums, a walnut cabinet, and an electric phonograph of
special two-cabinet design.
One hundred and fifty-one bound scores (miniature or octavo)
for all completely recorded works in the set.
One four-drawer cabinet of printed card indexes of all records
in the set, classified by composer, title, medium, form; approximately
3,900 cards in all. Endowments and Donations 21
One hundred books on music (79 titles).
It has become a tradition for each Graduating Class to make a
gift to the University. That of the Class of 1936 took the form of
a donation to the Brock Memorial Union Building Fund.
A list of the other most important gifts received during last year
is given below under the various departments.
Department of Botany
(For Herbarium and Botanical Gardens)
SEEDS
CANADA Miss Jean Bostock, Monte Creek, B. C.
Mr. V. C. Brink, (Kamloops, B.C.).
Mrs. D. Fowler, Winnipeg.
Mrs. S. Stoker, Duncan, B. C.
Miss M. C. Stoner, Penticton, B. C.
Mr. P. L. Tait, Vancouver, B. C.
E. W. Tisdale, Kamloops, B. C.
University of Toronto.
Prof. G. J.  Spencer,   (Kamloops, B. C).
UNITED  STATES Brooklyn Botanic Garden, Brooklyn, N. Y.
Morris Arboretum, Chestnut Hill, Pa.
Seed Laboratory, College Park, Maryland.
Mr. D. H. Snowberger, Payette, Idaho.
GREAT BRITAIN Royal  Botanic  Garden,  Edinburgh,   Scotland.
Botanic Gardens, Glasgow, Scotland.
Botanic Gardens, Glasnevin, Dublin.
Royal Botanic Gardens, Kew, England.
Royal Horticultural Gardens, Surrey, England.
FRANCE Jardin Botanique, Ville de Nantes, Museum d'Historie
Naturelle, Paris.
HOLLAND Botanical Garden, l'Universite Technique, Holland.
SWEDEN Botanical  Garden,  Lund.
GERMANY Botanischen Gartens, Bremen.
Botanical Gardens, Koln am Rhein.
AUSTRIA Dr. F. Lemperg, Hatzendorf, Steirmark.
ITALY University of Rome.
ROUMANIA University Botanic Garden, Cernauti.
LITHUANIA Botanical Gardens, Kaunas.
CHINA Botanical Garden, The Sun Yat-Sen Tomb and Mem
orial Commission, Nanking.
HERBARIUM AND GARDEN SPECIMENS
Mrs. H. J. Chaster, Gower Point, B. C.
R. A. Cummings, (Horse Lake, Cariboo, B. C).
Mrs. E. C. MacKenzie, Victoria, B. C.
R. Pillsbury, Cougar Lake, Surf Inlet, B. C.
D. H. Snowberger, Payette, Idaho.
Department of Forestry
An outstanding gift, deserving particular mention, is a new Diesel, 40 H.P.
Caterpillar Tractor of the latest design, which was loaned for an indefinite
period to the Department of Forestry by the Caterpillar Tractor Company of
Peoria, 111., through the co-operation of Mr. J. G. G. Morgan and Mr. E. B. Finning of the Finning Tractor and Equipment Company Ltd., Vancouver. Under
the terms of the loan the tractor is for student demonstration and for use in
the University Forest. The intention of the Company is to replace the machine
from time to time with a later model.
B.C. Lumber Manufacturers' Association, Vancouver, B. C.—A complete set of
panels illustrating patterns into which British Columbia lumber is sawn.
Textbook on "Lumber Grading Practice".
Government of British Columbia through B. C. Forest Service.—A dozen young
men under the Young Men's Forestry Training Plan were assigned to the
University Project and were employed for four months in improvement and
reforestation work in the University Forest.
United States Forest Service, Washington, D.C.—A set of two hundred and
sixty bulletins and pamphlets on forestry subjects translated into English
from foreign languages. Additions to the set are being made as new translations are printed. 22 The University op British Columbia
Dominion Forest Service, Vancouver, B. C.—Tree seeds.
Pacific Northwest Forest Experiment Station, Portland—Maps: Douglas fir seed.
The Department is particularly Indebted to the Dominion and Provincial
Governments under whose auspices the Forest Development Project was begun
in December, 1936. One hundred men were assigned to Project No. 3 and are
being employed in improvement and reforestation work in the University
Forest and in the forest nursery.
Department of Geology and Geography
Wolverine skull from Mrs. Sinclair Taynton, Invermere, B. C.
Chilcotin basket from Mrs. Norman Lee, Hanceville, B. C, per Prof. G. J.
Spencer.
Indian Battle Axe from northern India—obtained 1905; donor, G. J. Spencer.
Pair of Coast Deer antlers from Vancouver Island;  donor,  J.  E.  Harris,
Vancouver, B. C.
Specimens of phosphate rock from Ocean Island, South Pacific Ocean, with
pamphlet describing the occurrence by F. Danvers Power; donor, Prof. G. A.
Gillies.
New Guinea lime gourd and lime stick. Collector and donor, Diamond Jen-
ness, National Museum, Ottawa, Ontario.
Cobalt Ores from B. W. Hartley of Haileybury, Ontario through kindness
of His Grace Archbishop De Pencier.
The collection of beautifully mounted game heads donated by Mr. G. L.
Pop includes Wapiti, Moose, Osborne's and Mountain Caribou; Mule, Coast and
White-tailed Deer; Mountain Goat; Big-horn Sheep; Grizzly, Black and Cinnamon Bear—twelve in all. Framed, enlarged and coloured photographs accompany the heads. Mr. Pop plans on obtaining four other heads, which
will complete the collection of "Big Game of British Columbia".
The collection is being hung in Applied Science Lecture Room 100.
Dr. Warren reports suites of ore from the management of the following
mining properties:
Reno Goodenough Pioneer
Kootenay Belle Ymir Consolidated Vidette
Sheep Creek Relief Arlington Windpass
Gold Belt Wesko Nicola
Minto Ymir Yankee Girl Gold Mountain
Congress Waterloo Gold Hill
Savona Loughborough Morris
Mill product samples from: Minto, Bralorne, Ymir Yankee Girl, Ymir Consolidated, Goodenough, Reno.
Specimens from V. Dolmage, R. G. McLeod, K. G. MacKenzie.
Dr.  Schofield — A suite of rocks and ores from the Perrier Mine, East
Kootenay, B. C.
Department of Nursing and Health
The sum of $7,500.00 has been donated by the International Health Division
of the Rockefeller Foundation to the University for the Department of Nursing and Health for the three-year period Septembr 1st, 1937, to August 31st,
1940. This sum will be expended in three equal annual amounts, and will provide
for the salary of a Field Work Supervisor. The appropriation will also cover
a transportation allowance and stenographic assistance for the person appointed
to this post.
Department of Zoology
Mr. Bert Brink, U.B.C.—Rattlesnake.
Mr. G. Clifford Carl and Mr. G. Morley Neal, University of Toronto—Spadefoot
toad larvae. Slides of bladder worm from Rana catesbiana. Slides of fresh
water plankton. Ground squirrel skeleton. Amphipods, mosquitoes and
ticks from Kamloops district.
Mr, F. Woodrow, Rosebery, B. C—Nine mammal skulls.
Mr. G. Van Wilby, University of Alberta—Collection of typical specimens of
several of the marine species of fishes of British Columbia.
Mr. E. R. Buckell, Vernon.—Collection of Egyptian-Sudanese desert beetles.
Mr. W. Downes, Victoria—Fine mounted head of Upland Caribou taken at
Revelstoke.
Mr. J. W. Eastham, Vancouver—Valuable collection of reference publications
in Entomology.
Mr. W. Gibson, Oxford University—Neurological (histological) slides from the
laboratory of Professor Sherrington.
Mr. G. Holland, Kamloops—Mounted collection of local birds and small mammals, skulls, study skins and ectoparasites. General Information 23
Mr. G. Hori, University of South Dakota—Two volumes on Animal Histology.
Mr. M. Neal, University of Toronto—Named collection of mosquitoes from the
Interior, B. C.
Mr. H. F. Olds, Vancouver—Collection of Insects affecting stored products.
Provincial Game Board, Kamloops—Ectoparasites of White Pelican from Paul
Lake, Kamloops, B. C.
Dr.  J.  Wagner,  Belgrade,  Yugo-Slavla—Very   valuable   reference   collection,
mounted and named, of representative Nearctic and Oriental fleas; other
ectoparasites from these regions. Types of B. C. fleas new to science.
Mr. H. Wearne, Quick, B. C-—Two coyote skulls.
Mr. F. C. Whitehouse, Vancouver—Mounted   and   named   collection   of   B. C.
Dragonflies.   Paratypes of new species.
An outstanding and most valuable contribution to the Department was
made by Mr. P. G. Patterson of Guayaquil, Ecuador, of the extensive Aphid
collections of the late Alice McDougall Patterson, graduate of this University,
who died in Vancouver on November 5th, 1935. The collection consists of some
211 species of Aphids mounted on nearly 1200 microscope slides, a large number of mounted unclassified slides, nearly 700 vials of bulk collections in alcohol,
an extensive card index system and library of books, bulletins and separates
on Aphids, and much general laboratory equipment.
The Department is particularly indebted to the following Specialists who
have gratuitously identified series of British Columbia insects:
Dr. F. C. Bishopp, Bureau of Entomology, Washington, D. C.—Ectoparasites of
birds and mammals.
Mr. W. Downes, Victoria—Hemiptera and Homoptera  (True Bugs).
Dr. H. E. Ewing, Bureau of Entomology, Washington, D. C.—Acarina (Mites).
Dr. D. G. Hall, Savannah, Ga.—Metopiidae  (Sarcophaga, Flesh Flies).
Dr. Elmo Hardy, Brigham Young University, Utah—Bibionidae (March Flies).
Mr. Ralph Hopping, Vernon—Coleoptera (Beetles).
Dr. E. F. Knipling, Bureau of Entomology, Washington, D. C.—Larvae of Proto-
calliphora (Flesh Flies).
Dr. C. F. W. Meusebeck, Bureau of Entomology, Washington, D. C.—Alysiidae
(Parasitic wasps).
Dr.  J. Wagner, Belgrade,  Yugo-Slavia—Aphaniptera   (Fleas).
GENERAL   INFORMATION
The Session
The academic year begins on the First of September and ends
on the last day of August. The Winter Session is divided into two
terms—the first, September to December; the second, January to
May. The Summer Session consists of seven weeks' instruction in
July and August, for which preparatory reading is required except
in certain cases. For "Admission to the University," see Page 27,
and for '' Registration and Attendance'' see Page 29.
Courses of Study
For the Session of 1937-38 the University offers instruction in
each of the three Faculties, Arts and Science, Applied Science
(including Nursing), and Agriculture, leading to the degrees of
Bachelor of Arts, Bachelor of Commerce, Bachelor of Applied
Science, Bachelor of Science in Forestry and Bachelor of Science in
Agriculture. A course is given in the Faculty of Arts and Science
leading to a Diploma of Social Service, and a Teacher Training
Course is given for graduates. Advanced courses of instruction
and facilities for research leading to a Master's degree are offered
in each Faculty.   Admission to these advanced courses, or to the 24 The University of British Columbia
privileges   of   research,   does   not   in   itself   imply   admission   to
candidacy for a higher degree.
Academic Dress
The undergraduate's gown is black in colour and of the
ordinary stuff material, of ankle length, and with long sleeves
and the yoke edged with khaki cord. The graduate's gown is the
same, without cord. The Bachelor's hood is of the Cambridge
pattern, black bordered with the distinctive colour of the particular
Faculty, the Bachelor of Commerce hood being differentiated by
the addition of a white cord; the Master's hood is the same, lined
with the distinctive colour. The colours are, for Arts and Science, the
University blue; for Applied Science, red; for Agriculture, maize.
Department of University Extension
The systematic effort made last year to carry on extension work
has been continued. The new Director assumed his duties in
September, 1936.
Extension lectures have been given by members of the staff in
many centres throughout the Province and assistance rendered
to a number of study-groups. Co-operation with Provincial and
Dominion bodies interested in adult education activities has been
maintained, and study is being given to the co-ordination of the
work of the University with that of other bodies. In the Session
1937-38 there will be available a library of lantern slides for loan
on a rental basis, and a limited library service to study-groups.
Several evening courses at the University have been carried on
successfully during the Session 1936-37 and this suggests the
possibility of extension of this service to those who wish to pursue
non-credit courses, if sufficient registration and public support are
forthcoming.
University Health Service
This service was begun in 1925 when the Lieutenant-Governor
in Council, upon the recommendation of the Provincial Health
Officer, appointed a Medical Health Officer for the University Area.
In the Fall of 1927, the Provincial Health Officer added to the
University Health Service a Public Health Nurse, thus commencing
the continuous operation of a full-time local Health Department
on the Campus and University Endowment Area.
In November, 1936, the University Endowment Area became
part of the Metropolitan Health Area under the direction of the
Metropolitan Health Board, thus affording the University the extra
services and facilities enjoyed by the larger organization, which
provides through its Health Units a Public Health Service to the
entire Greater Vancouver Area. The University is now included
in Health Unit No. 3 of the Greater Vancouver Area. General Information 25
The offices of the University Health Service are located in the
Auditorium Building. The first aid furniture and supplies for this
office were the generous gift of the Graduating Class of 1927.
Purposes of the University Health Service
The first purpose of the Health Service for Students is to supervise the physical and mental health of the student from the time
of his admission to University until he graduates, so that as he
takes his place in the outside world he will not be handicapped by
physical defects or mental breakdown during the period in which
he is adjusting himself to his career.
On admission to University each student is given a complete
physical examination; later the medical officer has a personal
conference during the Fall term with all those who received
examination upon entrance. This conference is for the purpose of
individualizing the previous examination and for the rechecking
and '' following-up'' of any physical defects which were found at the
time. Students are checked as to physical fitness for participation
in strenuous athletics.
Preventive vaccinations and inoculations are given by the
Health Service. The Medical Officer is available at specified hours
for consultation with students on health problems, and personal
and emotional problems, worries, etc.
One of the most important tasks of the Health Service is the
control of communicable disease. Much valuable time can be saved
the Student body by the prompt and immediate application of
preventive measures in checking the spread of communicable disease.
Tuberculosis Control
Because Tuberculosis occupies first place as a cause of death of
persons of college age, it is to be given special attention in the
future. The University Health Service is, therefore, hoping to give
to each new student at the time of his entrance examination a
tuberculin skin test and an X-ray of the chest of every student
who shows a reaction to tuberculin. This project will be of
tremendous value, for when Tuberculosis can be diagnosed and
treatment instituted before physical breakdown occurs, the patient
is saved from years of invalidism and perhaps death, and his fellow
students can be protected from infection.
Rules Governing Communicable and Other Illnesses
Students developing any illness or suffering from any injury
while on the Campus should apply for first aid to the University
Health Service. This is particularly required if the student develops
any illness of any communicable nature, including the Common
Cold. Provision is made also for the diagnosis of the infectious
cases and their safe removal to suitable quarters. 26 The University of British Columbia
Students developing any illness or suffering any injury while
at home, boarding house, fraternity house, etc., are required to
report the same to the University Health Service. The development
of any infectious disease in a University student or any person
living in the same house, must be reported by the student to the
University Health Service without delay.
Students exposed to any communicable disease must immediately
report to the University Health Service. Such persons may be permitted, by special order of the Medical Health Officer, to attend
the University for a prescribed period, despite the exposure.
Such students shall report daily (or oftener, at the discretion
of the Medical Health Officer) to the University Health Service for
such prescribed period. Failure to so report will result in immediate
exclusion from the University.
Students absent on account of illness must present Medical
Certificates. If the absence occurs during the session, the student
must appear in person, with the certificate, at the University
Health Service immediately on return to the University, and before
attendance upon class work. The University Health Service will
examine the person concerned and will immediately forward the
certificate, with report thereon, to the Dean of the Faculty. // the
absence occurs during the examinations, the medical certificate must
be sent to the Dean of the Faculty within two days after the termination of the examination period. A medical certificate must show
the nature and the period of the disability. Medical report forms may
be obtained from the Dean's office.
The Health Service is a preventive service and can not provide
treatment for sick students.
Physical Education
Physical Education was organized at the University during
the session 1935-36 in response to the need of the student body for a
systematic physical activity programme. The University aims,
primarily, to prescribe, under competent supervision, the essential
physical training for corrective and developmental purposes, and
to stimulate interest in the greatest possible variety of athletics for
both men and women.
The work for the present is under the general supervision of a
committee appointed by the President of the University. There are
divisions for both men and women.
The work is on a voluntary basis and carries no University
credit. The activities are limited by the accommodation at the
gymnasium, but include for men: gymnastics, basketball, boxing,
track and field, volleyball, and cross-country running. The
women's activities include: archery, basketball, folk dancing, badminton and gymnastics. Admission to the University 27
The geographical location of the University precludes the possibility of any extensive inter-collegiate athletic competition and
consequently great emphasis is placed upon intramural athletics.
University Employment Bureau
The objects of the Employment Bureau are to provide students
with summer employment, to provide part-time work for students
during the Winter Session, and to help students in obtaining
positions after graduation. This service is for employers seeking
help and for students desiring employment. Those who know of
positions vacant are requested to notify the Bureau. Correspondence
should be addressed to the Employment Bureau, Registrar's Office.
Dean of Women
During the session the Dean of Women may be consulted by
parents and students on matters pertaining to living conditions,
vocational guidance, and other questions that directly affect the
social and intellectual life of the women students.
Board and Residence
A list of boarding-houses, which receive men or women students,
but not both, may be obtained from the Registrar. Men and women
students are not permitted to lodge in the same house, unless they
are members of the same family, or receive special permission from
the Senate. Women students under twenty-five years of age are
permitted to occupy suites in apartment houses only when accompanied by some older person. Any such arrangement must be made
in consultation with the Dean of Women. The Dean of Women also
undertakes the inspection and approval of the boarding houses listed
for women. The cost of good board and lodging is from $25 per
month upwards; of a room alone, $8 to $12 per month. A grill is
operated under the supervision of the University, and lunch, afternoon tea and light supper may be obtained there at very reasonable
prices.  Refreshments at social functions are also supplied.
General Conduct
The University authorities do not assume responsibilities which
naturally rest with parents. This being so, it is the policy of the
University to rely on the good sense and on the home training of
students for the preservation of good moral standards.
ADMISSION   TO  THE UNIVERSITY
All enquiries relating to admission to the University should be
addressed to the Registrar.
The accommodation for students in the University is limited. The University, therefore, reserves the right to limit the
attendance. 28 The University Of British Columbia
For the session 1937-38 the number of First Year students in
the Faculty of Arts and Science and the Faculty of Agriculture
will be limited to 500, in the Second Year of the course in Applied
Science to 120, in the Second Year of the course in Nursing to 20,
and in the Teacher Training course to 60.
1. Except under special circumstances, no student under the
age of sixteen is admitted to the University. For admission to the
course in Nursing a student must be seventeen years of age, and for
admission to any course in Social Service, twenty-one years of age.
2. Candidates for admission to the courses in the First Year
of the Faculty of Arts and Science or the Faculty of Agriculture
and to the course in Nursing in Applied Science are required to
pass the Junior Matriculation Examination of the Province of
British Columbia or to submit certificates showing that they have
passed an equivalent examination elsewhere. Students over 18
years of age with full "Normal Entrance" standing, who hold
Normal School certificates, are admitted to the University as having
full Junior Matriculation standing. Special regulations are prescribed for admission to courses in Applied Science, and are given
under the heading of "Admission" in the Applied Science Section
of the Calendar.
3. Students who have passed the Senior Matriculation Examination are admitted to the courses of the Second Year in the
Faculty of Arts and Science. Students who have partial Senior
Matriculation standing, obtained in 1927 or subsequently, will be
granted credit in the First Year in each subject in which they have
made 50 per cent, or over, or in each paper in which they have made
50 per cent, or over, in so far as these papers correspond with those of
the First Year.
4. A student who has a failure in a subject of the Junior
Matriculation examination standing against him will not be
admitted to the University.
5. The Junior and Senior Matriculation Examinations of the
Province of British Columbia are conducted by the High School
and University Matriculation Board of the Province. This Board
consists of members appointed by the Department of Education and
by the University. The requirements for Matriculation are stated
in the publication, "Requirements for Matriculation," issued by
the University. The courses of study for the various grades in the
high schools are given in the "Programme of Studies for the High
Schools," issued by the Department of Education.
6. Certificates or diplomas showing that a candidate has passed
the Matriculation Examination of another University will be
accepted in lieu of the Junior or Senior Matriculation Examinations
if the Faculty concerned considers that the examination has covered Registration and Attendance 29
the same subjects and required the same standards. If, however, the
examinations covers some but not all of the necessary subjects,
the candidate will be required to pass the Matriculation Examination
in the subjects not covered.
7. A candidate who wishes to enter by certificates other than a
Matriculation certificate issued in British Columbia should submit
to the Registrar the original certificates. If he wishes these returned
to him, he must present also a copy of each certificate for record at
the University. He should under no circumstances come to the
University without having first obtained from the Registrar a
statement of the value of the certificates he holds, as these may
lack one or more essential subjects, or the work done in a subject
may not be adequate, or, again, the percentage gained may not be
sufficiently high. Moreover, it must be remembered that a certificate
may admit to one Faculty and not to another. When an applicant's
diploma or certificate does not show the marks obtained, in the
several subjects of the examination, he must arrange to have a
statement of his marks sent to the Registrar by the Education
Department or University issuing such diploma or certificate. The
fee for examination of certificates is $2.00. This fee must accompany
the application.
8. A student of another University applying for exemption
from any subject or subjects which he has already studied is
required to submit with his application a Calendar of the University in which he has previously studied, together with a complete
statement of the course he has followed and a certificate of the
standing gained in the several subjects.* The Faculty concerned
will determine the standing of such a student in this University.
The fee for the examination of certificates is $2.00. This fee must
accompany the application.
REGISTRATION AND ATTENDANCE
Those who intend to register as students of the University are
required to make application to the Registrar, on forms to be
obtained from the Registrar's Office. This application should be
made in person or by mail early in August, or as soon as the results
of the Matriculation examinations are known, and must be accompanied by the Registration Fee of $5.00. (See regulations in reference to "Admission to the University," Page 27.)
Registration for the Teacher Training Course is limited to sixty,
for the Second Year of the Course in Applied Science to one hundred and twenty and for the Second Year of the Course in Nursing
to twenty. Application for admission to these courses, on forms to be
•For the conditions under which exemption is granted in the Faculty of
Arts and Science, see "Courses Deading to the Degree of B.A." 30 The University of British Columbia
obtained from the Registrar's Office, must be made to the Registrar
on or before September 1st. A selection of candidates will be made
immediately after September 1st on the basis of qualifications.
The last days for Registration are: for First and Second Year
students, Wednesday, September 15th; for other Undergraduate
students of the regular Winter Session, Friday, September 17th;
for Graduate students, and for students in Extra-Sessional Classes
and Directed Reading Courses, Friday, October 15th.
1. There are four classes of students:—
(a) Graduate students—Students who are pursuing courses of
study in a Faculty in which they hold a degree, whether
they are proceeding to a Master's degree or not. Students,
however, who are proceeding to a Bachelor's degree in
another course in the same Faculty in which they hold a
degree, or in another Faculty, will register as undergraduates.
(b) Full undergraduates—Students proceeding to a degree in
any Faculty who have passed all the examinations precedent to the year in which they are registered.
(c) Conditioned undergraduates — Students proceeding to a
degree with defects in their standing which do not prevent
their entering a higher year under the regulations governing "Examinations and Advancement" of the Faculty in
which they are registered.
(d) Partial students—Students not belonging to one of the
three preceding classes.   (See 7, Page 31.)
2. All students are required to register at the office of the
Registrar on or before the last day for registration, to furnish
the information necessary for the University records, to enroll
for the particular classes which they wish to attend, and to sign the
following declaration:
"I hereby accept and submit myself to the statutes, rules,
regulations, and ordinances of The University of British Columbia,
and of the Faculty or Faculties in which I am registered, and to
any amendments thereto which may be made while I am a student
of the University, and I promise to observe the same.''
In the information furnished for the University records,
students are requested to state what church they propose to
make their place of worship. This information is available for any
of the city churches desiring it.
3. A late registration fee of $2.00 will be charged all students
who register after the above dates.
No registration after Wednesday, October 6th (two weeks
beyond the date when lectures begin) will be accepted without the
special permission of the Faculty concerned, and a candidate so Registration and Attendance 31
accepted for registration may be required to take fewer courses than
the regular year's work.
4. Students registering for the first time must present the
certificates which constitute their qualification for admission to
the course of study for which they wish to register. The Registrar
is empowered to register all duly qualified students. Doubtful cases
will be dealt with by the Faculty concerned.
5. Students doing work in two academic years will register in
the lower year and fill out their course cards in such a way as to
make clear which courses are required to complete the lower year.
6. Students desiring to make a change in the course for which
they have registered must apply to the Registrar on the proper
form for a "change of course." Except in special circumstances,
no change will be allowed after the fifteenth day of the session.
If the application is approved by the Faculty concerned, the
Registrar will give the necessary notifications.
7. Partial students, who are not proceeding to a degree, are
not normally required to pass an examination for admission, but
before registering they must produce a certificate showing that
they have satisfied the Dean and the Heads of the Departments
concerned that they are qualified to pursue with advantage the
course of study which they propose to undertake.
8. Students are required to attend at least seven-eighths of the
lectures in each course that they take. Lectures will commence
on the hour, and admission to a lecture or laboratory and credit
for attendance may be refused by the Instructor for lateness,
misconduct, inattention or neglect of duty. Absence consequent on
illness or domestic affliction may be excused only by the Dean of
the Faculty concerned, and medical certificates or other evidence
must be presented. If the absence occurs during the session,
the student must appear in person, with the certificate, at the
University Health Service immediately on return to the University,
and before attendance upon class work. The University Health
Service will examine the person concerned and will immediately
forward the certificate, with report thereon, to the Dean of the
Faculty. If the absence occurs during the examinations, the certificate must be sent to the Dean of the Faculty within two days
after the termination of the examination period. A medical certificate must show the nature and the period of the disability.
Medical report forms may be obtained from the Dean's office. In
cases of deficient attendance students may (with the sanction of
the Dean and the Head of the Department concerned) be excluded
from the Christmas or the final examinations in a course; but, in
the case of a final examination, unless the unexcused absences
exceed one-fourth of the total number of lectures in a course, such 32 The University of British Columbia
student may be permitted to sit for supplemental examination.
(See regulation in each Faculty in reference to "Examinations and
Advancement.")
9. All candidates for a degree must make formal application
for graduation at least one month previous to the Congregation at
which they expect to obtain the degree. Special forms for this
purpose may be obtained from the Registrar's office.
FEES
All cheques must be certified and made payable to "The
University of British Columbia."
The Registration Fee is not returnable.
Fees are not transferrable from one session to another.
A request for a REFUND OF FEES must be made by the
student to the BURSAR within FOUR WEEKS after the student
has discontinued his work; and fees for which a refund has not
been so requested WILL NOT BE RETURNED.
The Sessional Fees are as follows:—
For Full and Conditioned Undergraduates
in arts and science	
Registration—Payable before registration $    5.00
First Term—Payable on or before October 4th:
Sessional Fee $65.00
Alma Mater Fee    13.00
Caution Money     5.00
 ■    83.00
Second Term—Payable on or before January 17th      60.00
$148.00
IN SOCIAL SERVICE COURSE	
Registration—Payable before registration $    5.00
First Term—Payable on or before October 4th :
Sessional Fee $65.00
Alma Mater Fee    13.00
Caution Money      5.00
      83.00
Second Term—Payable on or before January 17th      60.00
$148.00
NOTE:—Social Service Workers taking any of Courses 1-13, and these
courses only, are relieved from paying the Alma Mater fee. Fees 33
IN TEACHER TRAINING COURSE	
Registration—Payable before registration $   5.00
First Term—Payable on or before October 4th:
Sessional Fee $65.00
Alma Mater Fee   13.00
Caution Money     5.00
     83.00
Second Term—Payable on or before January 17th      60.00
$148.00
IN APPLIED SCIENCE—
Registration—Payable before registration $    5.00
First Term—Payable on or before October 4th:
Sessional Fee $90.00
Alma Mater Fee   13.00
Caution Money     5.00
—,  108.00
Second Term—Payable on or before January 17th     85.00
$198.00
EST NURSING AND PUBLIC HEALTH	
Registration—Payable before registration $   5.00
First Term—Payable on or before October 4th:
Sessional Fee $65.00
Alma Mater Fee :   13.00
Caution Money     5.00
     83.00
Second Term—Payable on or before January 17th      60.00
$148.00
NOTE:—For Third and Fourth Year students in Nursing the Sessional
fee Is $1.00, payable with an Alma Mater fee of $8.00, on or before October
4th.
Students admitted to a One-year Course for Graduate Nurses and proceeding to the Certificate on a basis of part-time attendance over two or more years,
will pay $7.50 per unit.
IN AGRICULTURE	
Registration—Payable before registration $   5.00
First Term—Payable on or before October 4th:
Sessional Fee $65.00
Alma Mater Fee   13.00
Caution Money     5.00
     83.00
Second Term—Payable on or before January 17th      60.00
$148.00 34 The University of British Columbia
occupational course	
Registration—Payable before registration $   5.00
First Term—Payable on or before October 4th:
Sessional Fee $25.00
Alma Mater Fee    13.00
Caution Money     5.00
     43.00
Second Term—Payable on or before January 17th     25.00
$ 73.00
For Partial Students
Fees per "Unit" $10.00
Registration—Payable before registration—
For 6 units or less     2.00
For over 6 units     5.00
First half payable on or before October 4th, along
with—
Alma Mater Fee    13.00
Caution Money     5.00
Second half payable on or before January 17th.
For Students in Extra Sessional Classes and
Directed Reading Courses
Registration—Payable before registration $ 2.00
Fees per 3-Unit Course    30.00
First Half Unit Fees payable on or before October 4th.
Second Half Unit Fees payable on or before January 17th.
For Graduates*
Registration—Payable before registration $    5.00
Class Fees—Payable on or before October 4th:
First Registration $75.00
Caution Money      5.00
     80.00
$ 85.00
Each subsequent Session Registration $5.00
Caution Money..      5.00
Registration—Payable before registration      5.00
 $ 15.00
♦For Registration fee for Graduates taking 6 units or less see "Registration fee for Partial Students." Fees 35
Late Registration
See Page 30 $ 2.00
After the dates given above and up to and including October
25th and February 7th an additional fee of $2.00 will be exacted
of all students in default.
The Alma Mater Fee is a fee exacted from all students for the
support of the Alma Mater Society. It was authorized by the Board
of Governors at the request of the students themselves.
The Caution Money is a deposit from which deductions will be
made to cover breakages, wastage, and use of special materials in
laboratories, Library, etc. If the balance to the credit of a student
falls below $1.50, a further deposit of $5.00 may be required.
Caution Money will be refunded after the 30th day of April.
Immediately after the last day for the payment of fees, students
whose fees have not been paid will have their registrations cancelled,
and will be excluded from classes. Such students will not be permitted to register again during the term until they obtain the
consent of the Dean, pay all fees, and present to the Registrar a
statement from the Bursar certifying that fees have been'paid.
Students registering after October 4th shall pay their fees at
the time of registration, failing which they become subject to the
provisions of the preceding Regulation.
Students borrowing books from the University Library for
Preparatory Reading courses will be required to make the usual
deposit of two dollars ($2.00) with the Librarian to cover mailing
cost.
For Summer Session Students
Fees are payable on registration, otherwise an additional fee of
$2.00 will be exacted.
Registration—Payable before registration  $ 2.00
Minimum Class Fee   25.00
Per "Unit"     10.00
Summer Session Association      2.00
Special Fees
Regular supplemental examination, per paper $ 5.00
Special examination  (Applied Science and Agriculture), per paper     7.50
Re-reading, per paper      2.00
Graduation   15.00 36 The University of British Columbia
Supplemental examination fees must be paid by August 14th
when application for examination is made. Special examination fees
and fees for re-reading are payable with application.
Graduation fees must be paid two weeks before Congregation.
(See regulation in reference to application for a degree, Page 32.)
If fees are not paid when due an additional fee of $2.00 will be
charged. Medals, Scholarships and Prizes 37
MEDALS,   SCHOLARSHIPS,  PRIZES,  BURSARIES
AND LOANS FOR 1937-38
GENERAL  REGULATIONS
1. Scholarships, prizes and bursaries which are not based solely
on academic standing are indicated by an asterisk. Unless other
instructions are given in the Calendar notice, intending candidates
must make application to the Registrar not later than the last day
of the final examinations on forms provided for the purpose.
2. All awards of medals, scholarships, prizes and bursaries are
made by Senate, unless otherwise provided for by special resolution
of Senate.
The award of a medal, prize, scholarship or bursary is final when
announced by the University.
3. Medals, scholarships, prizes, bursaries and loans are open to
winter session students only, unless otherwise stated, and marks
obtained in summer session courses are not taken into account in
awarding them.
4. If the award of a medal, scholarship, or prize is based on an
examination, no award will be made to a candidate who obtains
less than 75 per cent, of the possible marks.
5. To be eligible for a General Proficiency Scholarship a student
must take the full year's course, which must include the required
courses for the year in which he is registered, except that in the
Faculty of Arts and Science and in Agriculture, other subjects may
be substituted for the required courses if credit for these has already
been obtained.
The standing of students taking more than the required number
of units shall be determined on the basis of the required number of
units to be chosen in a manner most advantageous to the students.
6. Unless otherwise specified in the Calendar notice, no student
may enjoy the proceeds of more than one scholarship in the same
academic year, and the scholarships thus relinquished will be awarded
to the candidates next in order of merit. Winners of more than one
scholarship will be given recognition in the published lists.
7. Winners of scholarships who desire to do so may resign the
monetary value. Nevertheless, their names will appear as winners
in the University lists. Any funds thus made available will be used
for additional scholarships, bursaries, or student loans.
8. Scholarships under the jurisdiction of the University are
payable in two instalments — on the last day for the payment of
fees in each term.   Undergraduate winners must continue their 38 The University of British Columbia
courses to the satisfaction of the Faculty concerned during the
session following the award. The payment for the second term
may be withheld in the case of an undergraduate scholarship
holder whose work in the first term has been unsatisfactory. A
Faculty is authorized to permit a scholarship to be reserved for
one year, provided the student shows satisfactory reasons for
postponing attendance. In the case of Matriculation Scholarships,
postponement will be granted on medical grounds only. Application
for reservation should be made to the Registrar.
9. In awarding bursaries consideration will be given to the
financial need of applicants.
10. Endowed scholarships and bursaries will be paid provided
the invested funds produce the necessary revenue.
11. The University does not guarantee the payment of any prizes
or scholarships other than those from the funds of the University.
With respect to prizes or scholarships based upon the gifts of individuals or associations other than the University, no award will
be made unless the funds required for the same have been actually
received from the private donor or donors.
12. The Senate of the University of British Columbia reserves
the right so to change the terms under which any exhibition,
scholarship or prize may be established at the University of British
Columbia that the terms may better meet new conditions as they
arise and may more fully carry out the intentions of the donor
and maintain the usefulness of the benefaction. The right so
reserved shall be exercised by a resolution of the Senate duly confirmed by the Board of Governors, provided always that a year's
notice shall be given in Senate of any proposed change and that the
donor or his representatives, if living, shall be consulted about
the proposed change.
13. Limited funds are provided from which loans, not to exceed
$100, may be made to undergraduate students who have completed
satisfactorily two years' University work and who can show they
are in need of pecuniary assistance. Interest at the rate of 5 per
cent, per annum is charged on these loans. They must be secured
by approved joint promissory note given for a definite term and
signed by the applicant and his parent or guardian. Loans are not
granted to graduate students, to students in the Teacher Training
Course, nor to students in diploma courses. Applications for loans
should be addressed to the Bursar of the University.
14. The University is in possession of a great deal of information
regarding post-graduate scholarships, fellowships and assistantships
which other Universities and various research bodies make available.
This information may be obtained from the Registrar. Medals, Scholarships and Prizes 39
MEDALS
The Governor-General's Gold Medal
A gold medal, presented by His Excellency the Governor-General
of Canada, will be awarded to the student standing at the head of
the graduating class for the B.A. degree. Honour and General
Course students are eligible for this medal.
The Kiwanis Club Gold Medal
A gold medal, given by the Kiwanis Club of Vancouver, will be
awarded to the student standing at the head of the graduating class
for the B.Com. degree.
The medal will normally be awarded to an Honours student,
but if there is no outstanding Honours student, this medal may be
awarded to a General Course student, i
The French Government Medal
A bronze medal, offered by the French Consul for Western
Canada on behalf of the French Government, will be awarded to a
student of the French language on the recommendation of the Head
of the Department of Modern Languages.
The United Empire Loyalists' Association Medal*
The Vancouver Branch of the United Empire Loyalists' Association of Canada is offering a silver medal for the best essay
received during the Session 1937-38 on any topic dealing with the
history of the United Empire Loyalists and their influence on the
development of Canada.
The award will be made on the recommendation of the Department of History. The competition is open to all undergraduates
of the University, but preference is given to students enrolled in a
Canadian History course.
The Lefevre Gold Medal and Scholarship
Out of funds provided by Mrs. Lefevre in memory of her late
husband, Dr. J. M. Lefevre, a gold medal and scholarship will be
awarded annually to the student standing highest in general proficiency and research ability in one of the following courses: (a)
Honours in Chemistry in the Faculty of Arts and Science; (b)
Chemistry, or (c) Chemical Engineering in the Faculty of Applied
Science. The award will be based upon the work of the last two
years in these courses. The value of the scholarship is approximately $150. The winning of this scholarship will not preclude
the holder from enjoying the proceeds of a further award.
•See Paragraph 1, Page 37. 40 The University of British Columbia
SCHOLARSHIPS FOR GRADUATES
University Graduate Scholarship*
A scholarship of $200 may be awarded to a student of the
graduating class who shows special aptitude for post-graduate
studies and who is proceeding in the following year to postgraduate study in this or any other approved University.
The Anne Wesbrook Scholarship*
This scholarship of $125, given by the Faculty Women's Club
of the University, is open to a student of the graduating class of
this University who is proceeding in the following year to postgraduate study in this or any other approved University.
The French Government Scholarship*
A scholarship of 10,000 francs is donated by the French Government for one year's post-graduate study in France. It is tenable
for one year and is contingent upon the voting of the credits for
the year by the French Chambers. As this contingency applies to
every item of the French budget, the scholarship may be considered
as permanent.
The award is made by the French Consul for Western Canada,
residing in Vancouver, on the recommendation of the Head of the
Department of French in the University.
The Exhibition of 1851 Scholarship*
Under the revised conditions for the award of the Exhibition
of 1851 Scholarship in Science, the University of British Columbia
is included in the list of Universities from which nominations for
scholarships allotted to Canada may be made. These scholarships
of £250 per annum are tenable, ordinarily, for two years. Scholarship winners with special needs may receive additional money
grants during the year of their tenure. They are granted only to
British subjects of not more than 26 years of age who have already
completed a full University course and given evidence of capacity
for scientific investigation. The scholarships are open to graduates
of any University who have spent not less than three years in the
study of Science.
The Dr. F. J. Nicholson Scholarships*
Out of the proceeds of a fund donated by Dr. Francis John
Nicholson, the following scholarships will be awarded annually
for the purpose of enabling students to do graduate study in the
University of British Columbia or in any other approved University: (1) One scholarship of the value of $500.00 for graduate
work in Chemistry.   Applicants must be Honours Graduates in
•See Paragraph 1, Page 37. Medals, Scholarships and Prizes 41
Chemistry of the Faculty of Arts and Science, with the degree of
B.A. or M.A., or graduates in Chemistry or Chemical Engineering
of the Faculty of Applied Science, with the degree of B.A.Sc. or
M.A.Sc. (2) One scholarship of the value of $500.00 for graduate
work in Geology. Applicants must be graduates of the Faculty of
Applied Science in Geological or Mining Engineering, with the
degree of B.A.Sc. or M.A.Sc.
Normally the scholarships will be payable in two instalments
of $250.00 each to provide for two years of graduate work. The
payment of the second instalment will be subject to approval by
the University of British Columbia of the first year's graduate
work. In exceptional circumstances the full sum of $500.00 may be
made available for work to be completed in a single year.
Recipients must be qualified to undertake graduate and research
work, in respect of scholarship, ability, character and health.
These scholarships will be granted with due consideration for the
financial status of the candidate. The spirit of the endowment is
to aid those to whom financial help is necessary or of material
assistance in furthering their studies.
Applicants must be graduates of the University of British
Columbia, have British citizenship and be not more than 30 years
of age on the last day for receiving applications. Preference will be
given in making awards to native-born British Columbians.
The John and Annie Southcott Memorial
Scholarship*
A scholarship of the value of $100, given annually by Mrs.
Thomas H. Kirk, will be awarded to that student, who, possessing
exceptional aptitude for research, either intends to pursue, or is
already pursuing some approved investigation in the field of
British Columbia history. The award will be made on the recommendation of the Head of the Department of History.
The scholarship will normally be awarded to a Fourth Year
student or to a graduate proceeding to a higher degree, but may be
awarded to a student of the Third Year.
The Native Daughters of Canada Scholarship*
A scholarship of $50.00 is given by the Native Daughters of
Canada to a Canadian-born graduate student for research work
in the early history of British Columbia, such work to be carried
on in the Provincial Archives in Victoria, B. C. The award will be
made on the recommendation of the Head of the Department of
History.
•See Paragraph 1, Page 37. 42 The University of British Columbia
SCHOLARSHIPS   FOR   UNDERGRADUATES
1. IN ALL FACULTIES
The Rhodes Scholarship*
A Rhodes Scholarship is tenable at the University of Oxford
and may be held for three years. Since, however, the majority
of Rhodes Scholars obtain standing which enables them to take a
degree in two years, appointments are made for two years in the
first instance, and a Rhodes Scholar who may wish to remain for
a third year will be expected to present a definite plan of study for
that period satisfactory to his College and to the Rhodes Trustees.
Rhodes Scholars may be allowed, if the conditions are approved
by their own College and by the Oxford Secretary to the Rhodes
Trustees, either to postpone their third year, returning to Oxford
for it after a period of work in their own countries, or to spend
their third year in post-graduate work at any University of Great
Britain, and in special cases at any University on the continent of
Europe, the overseas Dominions, or in the United States, but not
in the country of their origin.
The stipend of a Rhodes Scholarship is fixed at £400 per year.
At most colleges, and for most men, this sum is not sufficient to
meet a Rhodes Scholar's necessary expenses for Term-time and
Vacations, and Scholars who can afford to supplement it by, say,
£50 per year from their own resources will find it advantageous
to do so.
A candidate to be eligible must:
1. Be a British subject, with at least five years' domicile in
Canada and unmarried. He must have passed his nineteenth, but not have passed his twenty-fifth birthday on
October 1st of the year for which he is elected.
2. Have reached such a stage in his course at one of the
Universities of Canada that he will have completed at least
two years at the University in question by October 1st of
the year for which he is elected.
Candidates may apply either for the Province in which they
have their ordinary private domicile, home, or residence, or for
any Province in which they have received at least two years of their
college education before applying.
In that section of the will in which he defined the general type
of scholar he desired, Mr. Rhodes wrote as follows:
"My desire being that the students who shall be elected to
the Scholarships shall not be merely bookworms, I direct that in the
election of a student to a Scholarship regard shall be had to:
•See Paragraph 1, Page 37. Medals, Scholarships and Prizes 43
1. His literary and scholastic attainments.
2. His fondness for and success in manly outdoor sports such
as cricket, football and the like.
3. His qualities of manhood, truth, courage, devotion to duty,
sympathy for and protection of the weak, kindliness, unselfishness and fellowship, and
4. His exhibition during school days of moral force of character
and of instincts to lead and to take an interest in his schoolmates, for those latter attributes will be likely in after life
to guide him to esteem the performance of public duties as
his highest aim.''
Full particulars can be obtained from W. Tom Brown, Esq.,
470 Granville Street, Vancouver, B. C, Secretary of the Selection
Committee for the Province of British Columbia.
The selection for any year is made in the previous December,
and each candidate for a scholarship is required to make application
to the Secretary of the Committee of Selection of the Province in
which he wishes to compete not later than October 31st. Application
forms may be obtained from the Registrar's Office or from the
Secretary of the Selection Committee.
University Great War Scholarships*
Two scholarships of $150 each may be awarded, on the basis of
the work of the First Year, to returned soldiers, their dependents
and the children of deceased soldiers proceeding to a higher year.
2.    IN ARTS AND SCIENCE
University Scholarships in Arts and Science
Two scholarships in Arts and Science of $150 each will be
awarded to students proceeding to the Fourth Year, the award
to be based on the work of the Third Year. These scholarships will
be awarded respectively: 1. To the student standing highest with
majors in group (a). (See Page 65.) 2. To the student standing
highest with majors in group (b). (See Page 65.) Students taking
full honours in Mathematics will be classified in group (a).
Two scholarships in Arts and Science of $150 each will be
awarded on the basis of the work of the Second Year to students
proceeding to a higher year.
The Shaw Memorial Scholarshipt
This scholarship of $125, founded by friends of the late James
Curtis Shaw, Principal of Vancouver College, and afterwards of
•See Paragraph 1, Page 37.
tOriginally donated to the Royal Institution (See Historical Sketch), this
has been transferred by that body, with the consent of the donors, to the
University of British Columbia. 44 The University of British Columbia
McGill University College, Vancouver, will be awarded upon the
results of the examination of the Second Year in Arts and Science
to the undergraduate student standing highest in any two of three
courses, English 2, Latin 2, Greek (Beginners' Greek, Greek 1 or
Greek 2), and proceeding to a higher year.
The McGill Graduates' Scholarshipt
A scholarship of $125, founded by the McGill Graduates' Society
of British Columbia, will be awarded to the student standing highest
in English and French of the Second Year in Arts and Science and
proceeding to a higher year.
The Terminal City Club Memorial Scholarship
This scholarship of $100, founded by the members of the Terminal
City Club as a memorial to those members of the Club who lost their
lives in the Great War, will be awarded to the student standing
highest in English 2 and Economics 2 in the Second Year in Arts
and Science and proceeding to a higher year.
The Imperial Order Daughters of the Empire
Scott Memorial Scholarship*
This scholarship of $100, derived from an endowment founded
by the Imperial Order Daughters of the Empire of the City of Vancouver, in memory of Captain Robert Falcon Scott, R.N., the Antarctic explorer, who sacrificed his life in the cause of Science, will be
awarded for general proficiency in biological subjects to the student
who has completed his Second Year in Arts and Science, and who is
proceeding in the Third Year to an Honours Course in Biology,
single or combined. (The terms of the award of this scholarship
are under consideration and may be altered before the award is
made.)
Royal Institution Scholarship in Arts and Science
A scholarship of $150 will be awarded to the student taking first
place in the examinations of the First Year in Arts and Science,
and proceeding to a higher year.
University Scholarships in Arts and Science
Two scholarships of $150 each will be awarded to the students
taking second and third places in the examinations of the First
Year in Arts and Science, and proceeding to a higher year.
tOriginally donated to the Royal Institution (See Historical Sketch), this
has been transferred by that body, with the consent of the donors, to the
University of British Columbia.
•See Paragraph 1, Page 37. Medals, Scholarships and Prizes 45
The Beverley Cayley Scholarship
A scholarship of $100, in memory of Beverley Cayley, Arts '18,
given under the terms of the will of his mother, the late Mrs. Cayley,
will be awarded to the male student standing highest in English 1
in the First Year of the Faculty of Arts and Science.
The N. Leo Klein Memorial Scholarship
This annual scholarship of $100, given by I. J. Klein, Esq.,
Vancouver, B. C, for ten years, beginning in May, 1930, will be
awarded to the student obtaining first place in ttie examinations
of the Third Year of the course in Commerce.
The Vancouver Women's Canadian Club Scholarship
A scholarship of $100, the proceeds of a fund created by the
Vancouver Women's Canadian Club, will be awarded to the undergraduate obtaining first place in Canadian History (History 2,
or 3, or 20).
The Ahepa Scholarship
A scholarship of $75, given by the Gladstone Chapter No. 6, C.J.,
Order of Ahepa, will be awarded on the recommendation of the
Head of the Department of Classics to the student of the third or
fourth year who has shown the greatest promise in Greek studies.
If possible, the award will be made to an Honour student, but
if there is no outstanding Honour student the scholarship may be
given to a Pass student.
The John and Annie Southcott Memorial
Scholarship*
As on Page 41.
The Summer Session Students' Association
Scholarship*
A scholarship of $30, given by the Summer Session Students'
Association, will be awarded at the close of the Summer Session to
the Summer Session student who in that session completes the
second year with the highest standing. To be eligible a student must
have taken his entire second year in The University of British
Columbia Summer Session, Extra-sessional classes or Reading
courses, and must be proceeding to a higher year in The University
of British Columbia. Application must be made to the Registrar
not later than the last day of the Summer Session examinations.
•See Paragraph 1, Page 37. 46 The University of British Columbia
The British Columbia Teachers' Federation
Scholarship*
A scholarship of $50 given by the British Columbia Teachers'
Federation will be awarded at the close of the Summer Session to
the Summer Session student who, having been an active member
of the British Columbia Teachers' Federation for the three years
previous to the granting of the scholarship, completes, in that
session, the third year of his University work with the highest standing in that year. To be eligible a student must have taken his entire
third year in The University of British Columbia Summer Session,
Extra-sessional classes or Reading courses, and must continue in
his fourth year at The University of British Columbia. Application
must be made to the Registrar not later than the last day of the
Summer Session examinations.
3.    IN APPLIED SCIENCE
University Scholarship in Nursing and Health*
A scholarship of $150 will be awarded for general proficiency
in previous work of University grade (which must include a
minimum of two years' work in the Province of British Columbia),
to a student proceeding to the Third Year (or in the double course,
proceeding to the Fourth Year) of the Course in Nursing and Health
and having successfully completed the hospital probationary
period. Applications shall be made to the Registrar not later than
December 1st.
The Vancouver Women's Canadian Club Scholarship
A scholarship of $100, given by the Vancouver Women's Canadian Club, will be awarded to the student who attains the highest
standing in the first four years' training, academic and practical
(or in the first five years' training, acadamic and practical, in the
double course) of the Nursing and Health course.
The Dunsmuir Scholarshipt
A scholarship of $150, founded by the Hon. James Dunsmuir,
will be awarded to the undergraduate student standing highest in
the Mining Engineering Course of the Fourth Year in Applied
Science, and proceeding to the Fifth Year.
•See Paragraph 1, Page 37.
tOriginally donated to the Royal Institution (See Historical Sketch), this
has been transferred by that body, with the consent of the donors, to the
University of British Columbia. Medals, Scholarships and Prizes 47
University Scholarship in Applied Science
A scholarship of $150 will be awarded to the student who
obtains the highest marks in the Third Year in Applied Science
and who is proceeding to the Fourth Year in that Faculty.
Royal Institution Scholarship in Applied Science
A scholarship of $150 will be awarded for general proficiency in
the work of the Second Year in Applied Science to a student who
is proceeding to the Third Year in that Faculty.
The Phil Wilson Forestry Scholarship*
A scholarship of $225, given by the British Columbia Loggers'
Association, will be awarded to a student registered in Fourth
Year Forestry. To be eligible for the award a student must be a
resident of British Columbia, and in addition to scholastic attainment, he must give evidence of sterling character and physical
vigour.
The award will be made tenable for two years, but the winner
must forfeit the scholarship in his Fifth Year if his Fourth Year
work is unsatisfactory.
Applications on forms available in the Registrar's Office must
be received by the Registrar not later than October 5th.
The G. M. Dawson Scholarship
A scholarship of $50 will be awarded to the undergraduate
student standing highest in the Geological Engineering course, in
Geological subjects, in the Fourth Year of the Faculty of Applied
Science, and proceeding to the Fifth Year.
The B'nai B'rith Auxiliary No. 77 Scholarship
A scholarship of $50, given by the Women's Auxiliary No. 77 of
the B'nai B'rith, will be awarded to the student in Fourth Year
Applied Science standing highest in the class of Chemical Engineering or Chemistry and proceeding to the Fifth Year.
4.    IN  AGRICULTURE
University Scholarship in Agriculture
A scholarship in Agriculture of $150 will be awarded to a
student proceeding to a higher year, the award to be based on the
work of the First Year.
The David Thom Scholarship
A scholarship in Agriculture of $100 will be awarded to a
student proceeding to a higher year in that Faculty, the award to
be based on the work of the Second year.
•See Paragraph 1, Page 37. 48 The University of British Columbia
MATRICULATION   SCHOLARSHIPS
University Senior Matriculation Scholarship
One scholarship of $150 will be awarded upon the results of
the Senior Matriculation Examination to the candidate of highest
standing in the Province.
Royal  Institution Senior Matriculation  Scholarships
Scholarships of the value of $150 each will be awarded to
two other students upon the results of the Senior Matriculation
examinations. One of these scholarships will be for open competition
throughout the Province; the other will be for open competition in
all school districts of the Province other than the City of Vancouver,
the City of North Vancouver, the District Municipalities of North
Vancouver, West Vancouver, and Burnaby, and the City of New
Westminster,
Royal Institution Junior Matriculation Scholarships
Eight General Proficiency scholarships will be awarded on
the result of the Junior Matriculation examinations: (a) $150 to the
candidate of highest standing in the Province, and (b) $150 to
the candidate of next highest standing in each of the following
districts: (1) Victoria District, (2) Vancouver Island (exclusive
of Victoria District), and Northern Mainland (exclusive of North
Vancouver and West Vancouver), (3) Vancouver Central District
(comprising the former limits of the City of Vancouver), together
with West Vancouver and North Vancouver, (4) Part of the Lower
Mainland in the Fraser Harbour area, (5) The Fraser Valley, (6)
Yale, (7) Kootenays.
These scholarships will be paid only to students in attendance
at the University of British Columbia, with the exception that the
Victoria District Junior Matriculation Scholarship will be paid to
any winner of that scholarship in attendance at Victoria College.
Winners of all Matriculation Scholarships must notify the
Registrar before September 1st of their intention of attending the
University (or Victoria College in the case of the Victoria District
Junior Matriculation Scholarship) during the following session;
failing such notification, the winner's rights will lapse.
Postponement of Matriculation Scholarships will be granted
only on medical grounds. Medals, Scholarships and Prizes 49
PRIZES
1.    IN   ALL   FACULTIES
The University Essay Prize*
A book prize of the value of $25 will be awarded to a Fourth
Year student for the best essay presented in any of the courses
regularly given by the Department of- English. The award will
be made on the recommendation of the Head of the Department of
English.
The Players' Club Prize*
A prize of $50, given by the Players' Club, is offered for an
original play suitable for the Club's Christmas performance. The
award will be made on the recommendation of the Faculty members
of the Advisory Board of the Players' Club. All entries for this
prize must be in the hands of the Honorary President of the Players'
Club not later than September 30th, 1937.
2.    IN  ARTS  AND  SCIENCE
The French Government Book Prize
A book prize, offered by the French Consul for Western Canada
on behalf of the French Government, will be awarded to a student
of the French language on the recommendation of the Head of the
Department of Modern Languages.
The John Marr Memorial Prize*
A prize of $25, given by J. F. K. English, Esq., known as the
John Marr Memorial Prize, will be awarded to the student, enrolled
in the Education class or pursuing graduate work for the M.A.
degree with Education as a Minor, who presents the best essay on
some phase of Secondary Education in this Province. The essay
may be prepared especially for the Prize Competition or it may be
submitted as part of a Course Requirement. It must be submitted
to the Head of the Department of Education not later than the last
day of the sessional examinations.
The University Graduate Historical Society Prize
A book prize of the value of $25, given by the University
Graduate Historical Society, will be awarded to the student of the
final year who has done the most outstanding work in History
during the third and fourth years. The award will be made on the
recommendation of the Head of the Department of History.
If in any year no student reaches the required standard, the
award will be withheld and may be given as an additional prize
the following year. Both Honour and Pass students are eligible
for the award.
•See Paragraph 1, Page 37. 50 The University of British Columbia
3.    IN   APPLIED   SCIENCE
The Convocation Prize
A prize of $50, given by Convocation of The University of British
Columbia, will be awarded to the student in the Fifth Year of
Applied Science whose record, in the opinion of the Faculty, is the
most outstanding.
The Walter Moberly Memorial Prize
A book prize of the value of $25, given by the Vancouver
Branch of the Engineering Institute of Canada in memory of the
late Walter Moberly, will be awarded for the best engineering thesis
submitted by any Fifth Year student in the Faculty of Applied
Science.
The Association of Professional Engineers' Prizes
Five book prizes, each of the value of $25, are offered by the
Engineering profession in British Columbia (The Association of
Professional Engineers of the Province of B. C.) for competition
by those students in the Fourth Year of the Faculty of Applied
Science who are enrolled as engineering pupils according to the
by-laws of the Association.
One of these prizes is awarded for the best summer essay in
each of any five branches of engineering, to be selected and specified
by the Faculty.
The five successful essays may be made available by the Faculty
to the Council of the Engineering Profession and, through the
Council, may be referred to or quoted in the literature of the
Profession.
The Provincial Board of Health Prizes
The Provincial Board of Health of the Province of British
Columbia offers the sum of $100 to be given as prizes in the Public
Health Nursing Course.
The Engineering Institute of Canada Prize
The Engineering Institute of Canada offers an annual prize of
$25 to each of eleven Canadian Universities of which the University
of British Columbia is one.
The prize will be awarded to a student of the Fourth Year in
Applied Science on the basis of the marks made in his academic work
in that year. His activities in the students' engineering organization or in the local branch of a recognized engineering society will
also be considered. Medals, Scholarships and Prizes 51
BURSARIES
The Captain LeRoy Memorial Bursary*
This bursary of the annual value of $250 was given by the
Universities Service Club in memory of their comrades who fell
in the Great War. It is named after Captain 0. E. LeRoy, who
commanded the overseas contingent from this University and who
was killed at Passchendaele in 1917.
It will be awarded to a student, or students, requiring financial
assistance to enable him, or them, to attend the University. For
this purpose it may be awarded to a matriculant, to a student of
any year or to a graduate student of the University proceeding to
post-graduate work in this or any approved university. In making
the award preference will be given first to returned soldiers, then
to the dependents of soldiers, and finally to suitable candidates
from the student body at large.
Application must contain a statement of the academic record
and special circumstances of the applicant, with two supporting
references, and, in the case of the preferred categories, of the war
record of the soldier.
The award will be made by the Senate upon the recommendation
of the Faculties acting in consultation with the Executive or
accredited representatives of the Universities Service Club.
The Khaki University and Young Men's Christian
Association Memorial Fund Bursaries*
A sum of money given to the University by the administrators
of the Khaki University of Canada provides a fund from which are
awarded annually ten bursaries of the value of $100 each, known
as the Khaki University and Young Men's Christian Association
Memorial Bursaries.
Under conditions specified by the donors these bursaries may
be used for undergraduate purposes only, and in making the awards
a preference is given to the sons and daughters of soldiers of
the Great War. The financial necessities of candidates are also taken
into account.
To be eligible for an award a soldier's dependent must obtain
at least second class standing, i.e., 65 per cent.; for all others 75
per cent, is required.
Dependents of soldiers and others who have expectations of
attaining standing as stated above and who are in need of financial
assistance should apply to the Registrar not later than the last day
of the final examinations.
These bursaries are open to students from Victoria College
proceeding to a course of study in this University.
Application forms may be obtained in the Registrar's Office.
•See Paragraph 1, Page 37. 52 The University of British Columbia
The American Woman's Club Bursary*
A bursary of $125, given by the American Woman's Club of
Vancouver, will be available for 1937-38 to assist a woman undergraduate who has completed at least one year in Arts and Science
with satisfactory standing, and who could not otherwise continue
her course. Application must be made to the Registrar not later than
September 1st.
The University Women's Club Bursary*
A bursary of $100 given by the University Women's Club of
Vancouver will be available for a woman student of high scholastic
standing in the Third Year of the Faculty of Arts and Science who
is proceeding to the Fourth Year.
The David Thom Bursaries
From the funds of the David Thom Estate a sum of $235 is
available annually for the following bursaries:
1. A sum of $100 to be awarded to the junior or senior matriculant with the highest standing who is registering for the first
time in the Faculty of Agriculture. In the awarding of this
bursary Regulation 9 under General Regulations for Medals,
Scholarships and Prizes does not apply.
*2. A sum of $60 to be awarded to a student who has satisfactorily
completed the work of the First Year in Agriculture and is
proceeding to a high year in that Faculty. Application must
be made to the Registrar not later than September 15th.
*3. A sum of $75 to be awarded to a student who has satisfactorily
completed the work of the Third Year in Agriculture and is
proceeding to the Fourth Year in that Faculty. Application
must be made to the Registrar not later than September 15th.
The Inter-Sorority Alumnae Club Bursary*
A bursary of $150, given by the Inter-Sorority Alumnae Club
of Vancouver, will be awarded to a woman student of satisfactory
academic standing, proceeding to her Third Year or any higher
year or to the Educational Class, or, if a graduate, to the Social
Service Diploma Course. The award will be made on the recommendation of the Dean of Women, to whom applications should be
sent not later than September 1st on forms available in the
Registrar's Office.
The Mildred Brock Memorial Bursary*
A bursary of $75, given by the Delta Gamma Fraternity, will
be  available  for a  woman  student  of  high   scholastic   standing
•See Paragraph 1, Page 37. Medals, Scholarships and Prizes 53
proceeding to the Third or Fourth Year of her undergraduate
studies; or, if a graduate, to the Teacher Training Course, or to the
course leading to the Social Service Diploma. Application must be
made to the Registrar not later than September 1st.
The Frances Milburn Bursary*
A bursary of $150, given by the Vancouver Chapters of the
P. E. O. Sisterhood in memory of the late Frances Milburn, will
be available for 1937-38 to assist a woman undergraduate who has
completed at least one year in Arts and Science with high standing
in English, and who could not otherwise continue her course. Application must be made to the Registrar not later than September 1st,
and the award will be made on the recommendation of the Dean
of Women.
Special Bursaries Fund*
For the Session 1937-38 a Special Bursaries Fund has been made
available by the Board of Governors to enable students to attend
the University who would not otherwise be able to do so. To be
eligible for an award from this fund a student must have attained
at least Second Class standing in the examinations last written, and
must give evidence of need.
Applications for these bursaries must be in the hands of the
Registrar not later than October 1st, 1937. Application forms may
be obtained in the Registrar's Office.
LOANS
General Loan Fund
The General Loan Fund is maintained by annual grants made
by the Board of Governors. Its operation is described in paragraph
13 under General Regulations for Medals, Scholarships, Prizes, etc.
The Canadian Institute of Mining and Metallurgy,
B. C. Division, Fund
This is a fund of $100, given by the Canadian Institute of
Mining and Metallurgy to the University as a trust to be used for
loans to students taking the mining course. Applicants for loans
must be recommended by the Departments of Geology and of Mining
and Metallurgy.
•See Paragraph 1, Page 37. 54 The University of British Columbia
The David Thom Fund
From the David Thom Estate funds a sum of $1500 has been
set aside for loans to students in Agriculture who have been unable
to borrow from the General Loan Fund or who have obtained loans
from that fund insufficient for their needs; of this amount, $300 is
available for students in the Occupational Course and the balance
for Third and Fourth Year students.
The Alma Mater Loan Fund
Established by the Class of 1937.
This fund was established by the Graduating Classes of 1937 as a
trust to be used for loans to undergraduates who have completed at
least one year at University and who have attained satisfactory
academic standing. The fund is administered by the University and
distributed by the Joint Faculty Committee on Prizes and Scholarships. Applications for assistance under this fund must be made to
the Registrar. THE
faculty!©
OF
ARTS AND SCIENCE TIME TABLE
FACULTY OF ARTS
KEY TO BUILDINGS:  A, Arts; Ag, Agr
Mornings
Monday
Room
Tuesday
Room
Wednesday
Room
Ap 101
Ap 101
Ap 101
Ap 101
S 300
Ap 100
Ap204
A 100
106, 205,
206
A 108
A 101,
104, 105,
207
Apl02
A 203
A 201
A 204
A 103
A 102
A 208
S200
Ap 214
Ap 101
Ap 101
Biology 2	
Biology 3	
Botany 6 e ....
Chemistry 12	
Economics 6	
Education	
English 1	
Ap 101
Biology 3	
Botany 6 e	
Chemistry 12	
Economics a	
Education	
English 1	
Botany 4	
AplOl
Ap 101
S300
Ap204
A 103,
106, 208,
206
A 100
Education	
S 300
English 1	
Ap 204
English 21 a	
A 103,
106, 203,
206
French 2,
A 100
English 21 b and 22
French 2,
English 21 b and 22
French 2,
9
A 104,
105, 108
Ap 102
A 207
A 205
A 101
A 204
A 208
A 201
Ap 100
S200
A 102
S 418
Geology 5 and 12	
German 1, Sec. a	
i 104,105,
Geology 4	
Greek 9	
History 10.....	
Latin 1, Sec. a	
Mathematics 3	
Mathematics 10	
Mathematics 16	
Psychology 1, See. 1	
Physics 1     	
Social Science 1	
Geology 4	
Greek 9	
History 10	
Latin 1, Sec. a	
Mathematics 8	
Mathematics 10	
Mathematics 16	
Psychology 1, Sec. 1	
physics 1	
Bocial Science 1	
Social Service 12
108
Ap 102
History 3	
A 207
A 205
A 101
A 204
A 208
A 201
Zoology 2 1
Ap 100
S 200
A 102
AplOl
S 300
S 400
A 201
A 108
A 204
A 100
A 104
A 105
Apl02
Ap 100
A 101
A 106
203, 205,
206
A 102
S 210
A 103
A 207
Ap 101
Ap 101
S 417
A 100
A 103
Ap202
A 204
A 104
Ap 102
A 203
A 208
A 108
A 206
A 201
A 105,
106, 205
A 207
S200
Botany 6 c   	
Chemistry 9	
Economics 1, Sec. 3	
Econonu'cs 4	
Education	
English 10	
French 4 a	
Geologj' 2	
German 1, Sec. b	
German 3	
Government 1	
History 20	
Latin 2 b	
Mathematics 1,
Sees. 5,6, 7	
Botany 6 b and d	
Chemistry 3	
Economics 1, Sec. 1	
Economics 9	
Economics 11	
Education	
English 9 	
French 3 b..._	
French 4 b	
Geography 3	
Geology 1	
Geology 7	
Ap 101
Economics 1, See. 1
S300
S 400
A 201
A 108
English 9	
A 204
French 3 b      	
A 100
A 104
A 105
10
Ap 102
Ap 100
Mathematics 1,
Sees. 1, 2, 3, 4 ■
Ap 106
A 101
Mathematics 1,
A 106,
203, 205,
206
Psychology 3, Sec. 1
A 102
S210
Psychology 3, Sec. 1
A 103
A 207
Agricultural
Economics	
Bacteriology 2	
Biology 1	
Botany 5 a and c	
Chemistry 7	
Economics 1, Sec. 2	
Economics 5 	
Education	
English 14	
French 1,
Ag 104
Bacteriology 1	
Botany 1 	
Botany 6 b	
Chemistry 1, Sec. 2	
Chemistry 4 	
Economics 10	
Education	
English 19	
French 1,
Sees, d, e	
French 3 a	
Geography 5 	
Geology 6	
Government 2	
History 13	
History 17	
Latin 1, Sec. b 	
Mathematics 2 a.
Sec. 2     	
Philosophy 6 	
Psychology 3, Sec. 2	
Social Service 1	
Zoology 7	
Agricultural
Ap 101
Ap235
S300
S417
A 100
A 206
S 200
A 104,
105
A106.208
A 100
Ap 102
A 201
A 207
A 203
A 103
A 204
A 101
A 205
A 102
Ap 101
Ag 104
Bacteriology 9 & 10
Biology 1	
Botany 6 b	
Chemistry 7	
Economics 1, Sec. 2	
Economics 5 _	
Education	
English 14	
French 1,
Sees, a, b, e	
French 3 c	
Geology 8	
German, Beg.,
Sees, a, b	
Government 4	
History 4	
History 11	
History 19	
Mathematics 2 a.
Sec. 1    	
Philosophy 4	
Physics 5	
Psychology 1, Sec. 2
Ap 100
AplOO
S417
S 400
S 200
A 106
A 103
A104.105
108
A 206
Ap 102
A 205,207
A 208
A 100
A 203
A 101
A 204
A 102
S 210
Ap202
AplOl
S417
S 400
S 200
A 106
A 103
A 104,
105, 108
A 206
11
German, Beg.,
Sees, a, b	
\ 205,207
A 208
A 100
A 203
History 19	
A 101
Mathematics 2 a,
Sec. 1 ....         	
A 204
A 102
S 210
Psychology 1, Sec. 2
Ap 202
Ap 101
CONSULT DEPARTMENT HEADS FOR -- 1937-38
AND SCIENCE
iculture; Ap, Applied Science; S, Science.
Mornings
Thursday
Room
Friday
Room
Saturday
Room
Botany 2	
AplOl
AplOl
S 300
Ap204
A 103,
106, 203,
206
A 100
4104,105.
108
Ap 102
A 207
A 205
A 101
A 204
A 208
A 201
AplOO
S200
A 102
S300
Ap 100
Ap 204
A 100,
106, 205,
206
A 108
A 101,
104, 105,
207
Ap 102
A 203
A 201
A 204
A 103
A 102
A 208
S200
Ap214
Ap 101
Ap 101
S300
AplOO
Ap 204
A 100,
106, 205,
206
A 101,
104, 105,
207
Economics 17 _..
English 1	
English 1        	
English 1 _	
English 13	
French 2,
French 2,
Geology 4	
Greek 9 	
History 10	
Latin 1, Sec. a	
Mathematics 3	
Mathematics 10	
Mathematics 16	
Psychology 1, Sec. 1	
Physics 1	
Social Science 1	
Geology 5 and 12	
German 1. Sec. a	
A 208
A 201
A 204
A 103
A 102
A 208
S 200
9
German 4	
History 3	
Latin 2 a	
Physics 2	
Social Service 2	
Zoology 2	
Zoology 3	
Botany 3 _.._	
Ap 101
Ap 101
S417
A 100
A 103
Ap202
A 204
A 104
Ap 102
A 203
A 208
A 108
A 206
A 201
A 105,  I
106, 205
A 207  i
S 200  '
Chemistry 2	
Economics 1, See. 1
S300
S400
■ A 201   .
A 108
A 204
A 100
A 104
A 105
Ap 102
kAp 106
1 A 101
'A 106,
203, 205,
206
A 102
A 103
A 207
Economics 1, Sec. 3	
A 100
A 108
Ap 202
A 204
A 104
English 9	
English 10      _
French 3 b	
German 1, Sec. b _
German 3 	
Government 1  _
History 20	
Latin 2 b 	
Mathematics 1,
Sees. 5, 6, 7	
A 203
A 208
A 108
A 206
A 201
A 105,
106, 205
A 207
S200
10
Mathematics 1,
Sees. 1, 2, 3, 4	
History 20	
Latin 2 b  	
Psychology 3, Sec. i
Botany 1	
Chemistry 1, Sec. 2	
Ap 101
S 300
S 417
A 100
A 206
S 200
A 104,
105
A106, 208
A 100
Apl02
A 201
A 207
A 203
A 103
A 204
A 101
A 205
A 102
Ap 101
Agricultural
Economics „	
Ag 104
Chemistry 1, Sec. 2	
S 800
A 100
A 206
S200
A 104,
A 105
A106,208
A 100
Economics 1, Sec. 2	
S400
S200
A 106
A 103
\ 104,105,
108
A 206
Apl02
A 205,207
A 208
A 100
A 203
A 101
A 204
A 102
S210
Ap 202
Ap 101
Ap 101
English 19	
English 19	
French 1,
Sees, d, e	
French l,
French 3 a _..
Geography 5	
Geology 10	
Government 2	
History 13	
History 17	
Latin 1, Sec. b	
Mathematics 2 b.
Sec. 2    	
Psychology 3, Sec. 2
Philosophy 6	
French 3 c	
Geology 6	
A 201
A 207
A 203
A 103
A 204
A 205
A 101
German, Beg.,
History 13	
11
History 17	
Sec. 2	
Mathematics 2 b.
Sec. 1	
Psychology 8, Sec. 2	
Psychology 1, Sec. 2
SUBJECTS NOT IN THIS TIME TABLE TIME TABLE
Afternoons
Monday
Room
Tuesday
Room
Wednesday
Room
Bacteriology 1	
Botany 2	
Botany 4	
Botany 6 e 	
Chemistry 9 Lab.	
Education 1	
English 20	
A 100
A 104
A 105
A 103
Bacteriology 9 and 10
Botany 5 a and c	
Chemistry 1, See. 1
Chemistry 1 Lab.,
S 800
Chemistry 1, Sec. 1	
Education	
English 2 a	
SSOO
A 108
Education	
English 2 a	
A 103
A 100
AplOO
A 104,
105, 204
A 208
A 207
A 201
Ap202
S210
A 100,
French 3 c	
French 4 c	
Geology 1 Lab	
Geology 7 Lab.	
Mathematics 1,
Sees. 1,2, 3, 4	
Physics 3 Lab., Sec. 1
Economics 13	
French 1,
Sees. t, g, h	
Ap 100
1.30
French 1,
Sees, f, g, h	
A 104,
105, 204
Ap 106
A 106,
203, 205,
206
Ap 106
History 18	
Latin 4  	
Philosophy 7	
Psychology 4	
Statistics 1	
Zoology 5 Lab	
History 18	
Latin 4	
Philosophy 7	
Psychology 4	
Statistics 1	
Zoology 5 Lab.
A 208
A 207
A 201
Ap 202
Ap "T"
A 102
Ap208
Bacteriology 3 and 5 .
'Ai06
A 204
A104,105
A 203
Ap 100
A108,205
A 207
A 100
A 101
S210
Bacteriology 9 and 10
Botany 8 Lab.	
Botany 6 c Lab.	
Education      _	
English 17    	
French 2, Sees, h, i
French 4 c    	
Geology 7 Lab	
Geography 1
German, Beg.,
Chemistry 7 Lab	
A 106
A 204
Chemistry 4 Lab m
Chemistry 9 Lab.
A104,105
French 2, Sees, h, i
A 208
A 104
A 100,
106, 205,
206
Ap 106
English 1	
Ap 100
2.30
German, Beg.,
Sees, c, d	
German 2	
History 1	
History 14	
Philosophy 1 	
Physics 5 Lab.	
Sociology 1	
Zoology 5 Lab.	
Geology 1 Lab	
Geology 7 Lab.	
Latin 8 b	
Mathematics 4	
Physics 3 Lab., Sec. 1
A108.205
German 2	
History 1 	
History 14
Philosophy 1	
Sociology 1	
Statistics 1	
Zoology 5 Lab	
A 207
Ap 106
A 203
A 101
A 100
A 101
S210
A 103
A 103
Ap 208
Bacteriology 3 and 5 ...
Bacteriology 9 and 10
Biology 1, Sec. 1	
Botany 2 Lab	
Botany 4 Lab.	
Chemistry 2 Lab. b	
Chemistry 4 Lab.	
Chemistry 9 Lab. 	
Education 2	
Geology 6 Lab	
Greek, Beg.   ....
Physics 3 Lab., Sec. 1
A 100
A'iii
3.30
Chemistry 1 Lab.,
Sees, a, b	
Chemistry 2 Lab. a
Chemistry 7 Lab	
Economics 15	
Education ^
French 3 c	
Geology 5	
Physics 5 Lab.	
Zoology 5 Lab..	
Zoology 6 Lab	
Ap 120
. A 100
A 208
Apl02
A 208
Social Service 11	
Social Service 13	
A 101
A 102
Bacteriology 3 and 5	
Botany 1 Lab	
Chemistry 1 Lab.,
Sees, a, b	
Chemistry 2 Lab. a
Chemistry 7 Lab	
Economics 15	
Geology 5 Lab.	
Physics 5 Lab.	
Social Service 7	
Zoology 5 Lab.	
Ap 120
"A 102
Chemistry 2 Lab. b
4.30
Chemistry 9 Lab. 	
Chemistry 1 Lab.,
Sees, a, b	
Chemistry 2 Lab. a
5.30
Botany 4 Lab	
Chemistry 2 Lab. b
Chemistry 9 Lab.	
CONSULT DEPARTMENT HEADS FOR —Continued
Afternoons
Thursday
Room
Friday
Room
Bacteriology 1	
Biology 1, Sec. 3	
Botany 4
Botany 6 c and e Lab.
Chemistry 3 Lab	
A 100
A 104
A 103
Ap 112
A 105,
106, 205
Biology 1, Sec. 5	
Biology 8   	
Botany 5 a and c
Botany 6 d Lab	
Chemistry 1, Sec. 1
Chemistry 3 Lab. a
S 300
English 20   	
French 4 c 	
Geology 1 Lab.	
A 103
A 100,
Ap 100
A 104,
105, 204
English 2 a.	
French 1,
Sees, f, g, h	
Geology 2 Lab.	
History 18	
Latin 4
Philosophy 7 	
Psychology 4	
1.30
Mathematics 1,
A 208
A 207
A 201
Ap 202
Ap "T"
Ap 212
Bacteriology 1	
Biology 1, Sec. 3
Botany 4    	
Botany 6 c and e Lab.
Botany 7	
Chemistry 3 Lab. b
Education	
A 104
A 103,
106, 203,
206
A 106
Bacteriology 3	
Biology 2, Sec. 5  	
Biology 3   	
Botany 5 a and c	
Botany 6 d Lai).    	
Chemistry 3 Lab. a
Chemistry 4 Lab.
Education	
English 17	
French 2, Sees, h, i
A 106
A 204 ^
A 104,105
A 203
AplOO
2.30
A 205
Ap'""T"
Ap 212
A 101
Physics 3 Lab., Sec. 2
German Beg., Sees, c, d
A 108,205
A 207
A 100
A 101
S210
A 103
History 1   	
History 14	
Philosophy 1	
Sociology 1	
Zoology 7 Lab	
Bacteriology 3 	
Biology 1, Sec. 6
Biology 3   	
Botany 6 d Lab.
Chemistry 1 Lab.,
Sees, d, e	
Chemistry 2 Lab. a
Chemistry 3 Lab. a
Chemistry 4 Lab.
Education 2
English 24	
French 3 c	
Zoology 7 Lab.  	
A 100
A 104
A 208
Chemistry 1 Lab.,
3.30
A 100
Biology 1, Sec. 6
Biology 3	
Botany 6 d Lab	
Chemistry 1 Lab.,
Sees, d, e	
Chemistry 2 Lab. a
Chemistry 3 Lab. a
Chemistry 4 Lab	
English 24 	
A io*
Chemistry 3 Lab. b
4.30
Chemistry 1 Lab.,
Chemistry 2 Lab. a	
5.30
SUBJECTS NOT IN THIS TIME TABLE  FACULTY OF ARTS AND SCIENCE
The degrees offered in this Faculty are Bachelor of Arts (B.A.),
Bachelor of Commerce (B.Com.), and Master of Arts (M.A.).
Courses which do not lead to degrees are offered in Teacher
Training and Social Service.
^COURSES LEADING TO THE DEGREE OF B.A.
The degree of B.A. is granted with Honours or as a General
Course degree. A General Course degree will be granted on completion of courses amounting to 60 units chosen in conformity with
Calendar regulations. No distinction is made between General
Course and Honour students in the First and Second Years, except
as regards prerequisites for later work, but in the Third and Fourth
Years there are special requirements for Honour students.
Students holding the degree of B.Com. from this University
may proceed to the degree of B.A. in one year by completing 15
additional units of work open to students in their Third and Fourth
Years, provided that their additional units are chosen so as to
complete the requirements for the B.A. degree.
It is possible to obtain the B.A. and B.Com. degrees concurrently
in five years on completion of 75 units chosen so as to cover the
requirements for both degrees.
Double courses are offered in Arts and Science and Applied
Science leading to the degrees of B.A. and B.A.Sc., B.A. and B.A.Sc.
(in Nursing), B.A. and B.S.F. and B.Com. and B.S.F.
It is possible to obtain the B.A. and B.S.F. degrees in five years
on completion of the required units.
Credit will not be given for more than 15 units in the First or
Second Year of the Winter Session; nor for more than 18 units in the
Third or Fourth Years. (See regulations under "First and Second
Years" and "Third and Fourth Years.")
Credits obtained at the Summer Session (see "University
Summer Session") may be combined with Winter Session credits
to complete the 60 units required for the degree of B.A.; but not
more than 30 units of credit may be obtained in the two academic
years subsequent to Junior Matriculation nor more than 15 in the
academic year subsequent to Senior Matriculation. The degree of
B.A. will not be granted within three years from Senior Matriculation nor within four years from Junior Matriculation.
•The University reserves the right to limit the registration in, or to cancel,
any of the courses listed in this Faculty. Limitation may be imposed if the
numbers desiring any course are found to be too large for the lecture rooms
and laboratories available for that course, or for the number of Instructors In
the Department concerned, or for the equipment and supplies which can be
obtained. Certain courses may be cancelled if the numbers of instructors in
the Departments concerned prove to be inadequate to offer all the courses listed. 62 Faculty of Arts and Science
The maximum credit for Summer Session work in any one
Calendar year is 6 units; and the maximum credit for work other
than that of the regular Summer and Winter Sessions is 3 units
in each academic year, and 15 units in all subsequent to Senior
Matriculation or First Year Arts.
No credit will be granted for work done at other universities in
the same academic year in which work has been attempted at this
University, whether in the Summer Session or in the Winter Session
or otherwise. Extra-mural work done at other universities prior to
registration at this University may be accepted, if approved by the
Faculty, but may not exceed 3 units in respect of any one academic
year or 15 units in all subsequent to Senior Matriculation. If a
student is granted credit for extra-mural work taken elsewhere, the
number of units which he may take at this University without attendance at a Winter or Summer Session will be correspondingly reduced.
Pending the establishment of a department of Music in the University of British Columbia, six units of undergraduate credit towards
a B.A. degree may be granted for music to a student who holds at
the time of graduation any one of the following diplomas: Associate
of the Toronto Conservatory of Music (A.T.C.M.), Licentiate of
McGill Conservatorium (L.Mus.), Licentiate of the Koyal Schools of
Music, London, (L.R.S.M.), Licentiate of Trinity College of Music,
London, (L.T.C.L.), or an equivalent diploma or certificate from
other schools of Music which may be accepted by the University of
British Columbia. If the student's work in music is done concurrently with the usual University work of the Third and Fourth Years
the credit will be assigned in the Fourth Year; if a student enters
Third Year University having already acquired the diploma, the
credits will normally be assigned evenly between the Third and
Fourth Years. No credits for music will be granted in the First and
Second Years and no student can get credit for music until the other
requirements have been satisfied.
Candidates for the degree of B.A. are advised to attend at least
one Winter Session, preferably that of the Fourth Year.
Courses are described in terms of units. A unit normally consists
of one lecture hour (or one continuous laboratory period of not less
than two or more than three hours) each week throughout the session,
or two lecture hours (or equivalent laboratory periods) throughout
a single term.
Note 1:—Students in any of the affiliated Theological Colleges
who file with the Registrar a written statement expressing their
intention of graduating in Theology will be allowed to offer in each
year of their Arts course, in place of optional subjects set down in
the Calendar for the Year and the course in which they are registered,
Religious Knowledge options, to the extent of three units taken from
the following list: Hebrew, Biblical Literature, New Testament
Greek, Church History, Christian Ethics and Apologetics. First and Second Years 63
Note 2:—Students who intend to enter Normal School at any
time before or after graduation are reminded they will have to meet
the requirements for Normal Entrance in Health IV, Geography II,
Arithmetic II and Art I.
First and Second Years
1. The requirements of the first two years consist of 30 units,
15 of which must be taken in each year. Courses must be chosen in
conformity with the requirements that follow. Details of courses are
given under the various departments.
*Each student must take: Units
(a)  English I in the First Year and English 2 in the
Second Year      6
~\(b)  The first two courses in a language offered for
Matriculation, one course in each year     6
(c) Mathematics 1, in the First Year     3
(d) Economics 1 or 2, or History 1 or 2 or 3 or 4, or
Social Science 1, or Psychology 1, or Philosophy 1    3
(e) Biology 1, or Chemistry 1, or Geology 1, or Physics
1, or Physics 2, or General Forest Botany (General
Dendrology)   ..^Fl.     3
(/) Three courses—not already chosen—selected from
the following:
Bacteriology 1, Biology 1, Botany 1, Chemistry
1, Chemistry 2, Economics 1, Economics 2, Economics 10, French 1, French 2, Geography 1,
Geology 1, Geology 2, JBeginners' German, German 1, German 2, JBeginners' Greek, Greek 1,
Greek 2, History 1, History 2, History 3, History 4, JBeginners' Latin, Latin 1, Latin 2 (a),
Latin 2 (b), Mathematics 2, Mathematics 3,
Mathematics 4, Psychology 1, Philosophy 1,
Physics 1 or Physics 2, Physics 3, Social Science 1,
Zoology 1, General Forest Botany (General Dendrology)      9
Note:—Bacteriology 1, Botany 1, Zoology 1, Geology 1
and 2, Geography 1, Economics 1, Economics 10,
History 4 and Philosophy 1 are not open to First
Year students. Psychology 1 is open to First Year
Year students only if the permission of the Head
of the Department is obtained. History 2 is open
to First Year students only if they are preparing
♦For credit that can be given for Senior Matriculation standing, complete
or partial, see Page 28.
tSee Regulation "2".
tSee Regulations "3" and "4". 64 Faculty of Arts and Science
for entrance to the Normal School. Geography 1,
Geology 1, and Philosophy 1 are normally Third
Year subjects, but may be taken by Second Year
students (Full Undergraduate and Conditioned) . Geology 1 must be taken in the Second
Year by students intending to take the Honour
course in Geology. General Forest Botany (General Dendrology) (and Civil Engineering 2, additional) is required of students intending to take
the double degree B.A., B.S.F., except students
taking Major or Honours in Biology (Forestry
option) for whom Botany 1 (a) is required.
2. Students who have not matriculated in German or Greek or
Latin may fulfil the language requirements for the degree by taking
Beginners' German or Beginners' Greek or Beginners' Latin, to be
followed by German 1 and German 2 or Greek 1 and Greek 2 or
Latin 1 and Latin 2 to complete 63 units. The extra three units may
be taken in any year.
3. No student in his First Year may elect more than one beginners' course in a language, and no beginners' course in a language
will count towards a degree unless followed by a second year's work
in that language. ^
4. Except in the case of beginners' courses, no course in a
language may be taken by a student who has not offered that language
at Matriculation. A beginners' course in a language may not be
taken for credit by a student who has obtained credit for that
language at Matriculation.
5. A student taking three languages in the first two years (18
units) may defer the course selected under Section 1 (e) to the Third
or Fourth Year, and a student taking four science courses (12 units)
may defer the course selected under Section 1 (d) to the Third or
Fourth Year.
6. Students who intend to enter the Teacher Training Course'
are advised to take Psychology 1 in the First or Second Year.
Note:—Students thinking of entering Applied Science are
referred to the list of subjects required to be taken by them in First
Year Arts and to the regulations in reference to these, given under
"Admission" and "General Outline of Courses" in Applied Science.
They are advised to attend the noon hour talks on the choice of a
profession and on the life and work in vocations likely to appeal to
Applied Science graduates. Third and Fourth Years 65
To ensure the conformity of their courses to Calendar regulations, all students in their Second Year are advised to submit to the
Dean of the Faculty, on or before March 31st of each year, a
scheme of the courses ttvey propose to take during the last two
years.
Third and Fourth Years
The requirements of the Third and Fourth Years consist of 30
units, of which students must take, in their Third Year, not less
than 15 units. The graduation standing is determined by the results
of the Third and Fourth Years combined.
General Course Curriculum
1. A minimum of 15 units must be taken in two Major subjects,
not less than 6 units in either, and a minimum of 6 units in some
other subject or subjects of the Third and Fourth Years. Work
in the First or Second Year is required in each of the Major subjects,
except Education. Both Major subjects must be chosen from one of
the following groups:
(a) Bacteriology, Botany, Chemistry, Geology, Mathematics,
Physics, Zoology.
(b) Economics, Education (not more than six units and only
for those who have completed their Normal Training),
English, French, German, Government, Greek, History,
Latin, Mathematics, Philosophy (including Psychology).
2. Details of courses available in the Third and Fourth Years
are given under the various departments.
3. Only two subjects (6 units) of the First or Second Year
courses may be taken in the combined Third and Fourth Years. In
a number of these courses extra reading will be required of Third
and Fourth Year students.
When two First or Second Year subjects, other than a Beginners' Language or Language 1, are taken in the Third and Fourth
Years, not more than one of these subjects may be outside the departments in which the student is doing his major work.
For the purpose of this regulation the following subjects are
considered Third and Fourth Year subjects: Philosophy 1, Geography 1, Geology 1, Geology 2, German 2 if preceded by Beginners'
German and German 1, Greek 2 if preceded by Beginners' Greek
and Greek 1, Latin 2 if preceded by Beginners' Latin and Latin 1,
Mathematics 4, and Botany 1 or Zoology 1 if both are taken.
4. No credit will be given for a language course normally taken
in the First Year unless it is taken in the Third Year and continued
in the Fourth Year. Some courses, however, are intended for Honour
students only. 66 Faculty of Arts and Science
5. Students in the Third and Fourth Years may, with the consent
of the departments concerned, take one or two courses of private
reading (each to count not more than 3 units), provided that:
1. (a)  The candidate for a reading course shall have completed
his First and Second Years and shall have taken at least
6 units either of Second or Third Year work or of Second
and Third Year work in the subject in which the reading
course is taken; and
(ft) shall have made an average of at least Second Class in
the 6 units in question.
2. Both reading courses shall not be chosen in the same subject.
3. A reading course shall not be taken concurrently with Extra-
Sessional or with Summer Session courses except by a student
in the Fourth Year.
Credit for a course of private reading is part of the maximum
of 15 units which may be taken in addition to the regular work of
Winter and Summer Sessions; and no other additional work may
be taken in the same academic year.
Honours Curriculum
1. Students whose proposed scheme of work involves Honour
courses must obtain the consent of the departments concerned and
of the Dean before entering on these courses; and this consent will
normally be granted only to those students who have a clear academic
record at the end of their Second Year with at least Second Class
standing in the subject or subjects of specialization. (Cards of application for admission to Honour courses may be obtained at the
Registrar's office.)
2. Certain departments offer Honour courses either alone or in
combination with other departments. For Honours in a single department, at least 18 of the requisite 30 units must be taken in the
department concerned, and at least 6 outside it. For Honours in
combined courses, at least 12 units are required in each of two subjects. Particulars of these courses are given below.
3. Candidates for Honours may, with the consent of the department concerned, offer a special reading course (to count not more
than 3 units) in addition to the reading courses offered on page 66,
section 5.
4. All candidates for Honours may, at the option of the department or departments concerned, be required to present a graduating
essay embodying the results of some investigation that they have
made independently. Credit for the graduating essay will be not less
than 3 or more than 6 units. The latest date for receiving graduating
essays in the Spring Term shall be the last day of lectures; and the
corresponding date for the Autumn Congregation shall be October 1. Honour Courses 67
5. Candidates for Honours are required, at the end of their
Fourth Year, to take a general examination, oral or written, or both,
as the department or departments concerned shall decide. This
examination is designed to test the student's knowledge of his chosen
subject or subjects as a whole, and is in addition to the ordinary
class examinations of the Third and Fourth Years.
6. Honours are of two grades—First Class and Second Class,
Students who, in the opinion of the department concerned, have not
attained a sufficiently high ranking, may be awarded a General
Course degree. If a combined Honour course is taken, First Class
Honours will be given only if both the departments concerned agree;
and an Honour degree will be withheld if either department refuses
a sufficiently high grade.
7. It is hoped to offer the following Honour Courses during the
session 1937-38. But if, for the reasons stated in the footnote to
page 61, it is found impossible to do so, the University reserves the
right to refuse new registrations in any of them.
HONOUR COURSES IN SINGLE DEPARTMENTS
Bacteriology
Prerequisites: Chemistry 1 and Biology 1.
Required Courses: Bacteriology 2. Candidates must select the
remaining 15 units required in consultation with the Head of the
Department.
Biology (Botany Option)
Prerequisites: Biology 1, Chemistry 1, Botany 1.
Chemistry 2 and 3, Physics 1 or 2, and Zoology 1 are required
before completion of the course and should be taken as early as
possible.
Required Courses: Botany 3 (a), 4, 5 (a), and 6 (c), or 6 (e).
Optional Courses: Biology 2 and 3; courses in Botany not specifically required; and courses in Zoology. Optional courses should be
selected in consultation with the department.
Biology  (Zoology Option)
Prerequisites: Biology 1, Chemistry 1, Zoology 1.
Physics 1 or 2, Botany 1, Chemistry 2 and 3 are required before
completion of the course and should be taken as early as possible.
Required Courses: Zoology 2, 3, 5, 6.
Students specializing in Entomology may substitute Zoology 9
for one of the required courses given above. 68 Faculty op Arts and Science
Optional Courses: Zoology 4, 7, 8, 9; courses in Botany; Geology
6. These optional courses should be selected in consultation with
the Head of the department.
Biology (Forestry Option)
Prerequisites: Biology 1, Botany 1, Zoology 1, Physics 1 or 2,
Chemistry 1, 2, 3 (to be taken as early as possible).
Required Courses: Botany 3 (a), Botany 5 (a), Botany 5 (ft),
Botany 6 (c) or 6 (e), Botany 6 (6), Botany 7, Zoology 4, Forest
Economics 1, General Forestry, (Civil Engineering 2 and 6, additional).
Chemistry
Prerequisites: Chemistry 1; Physics 1 or 2 and Mathematics 2.
Course: Candidates are required to complete the following
courses: Chemistry 2, 3, 4, 5, 7, 9 and 10.
Classics      ^^^
Course: Any three of Greek 3, 5, 6, 7; any three of Latin 3, 4,
5, 6; and either Greek 9 or Latin 7.
As proof of ability to write Greek and Latin prose, candidates
must attain not less than Second Class standing in Greek 8 and
Latin 8. During the candidate's Fourth Year, papers will be set
in sight translation, and the candidate is advised to pursue a course
of private reading under the supervision of the department.
There will also be a general paper on Antiquities, Literature,
and History.
Economics
Prerequisites: A reading knowledge of French or German. A
paper in translation to be written at the end of the Fourth Year
will be required to ensure that this knowledge has been kept up.
Course: Social Science 1, if not already taken (for students
matriculating in or after 1937), Economics 2, if not already taken,
any 15 further units in the department, to include Economics 4,
Economics 9, and Statistics 1, and two from the following group :
Economics 3, Economics 5, Economics 6, Economics 7, Economics
11, Statistics 2, Government 1, Sociology 1. Also a graduating essay
which will count 3 units. (Tutorial instruction will be arranged in
connection with the essay).
Students must pass an oral examination, and, if required,
address a general audience on a designated subject.
Attendance at the Seminar in Economics is required in the Third
and Fourth Years. Honour Courses 69
Economics and Political Science
Prerequisites: A reading knowledge of French or German. A
paper in translation to be written at the end of the Fourth Year will
be required to ensure that this knowledge has been kept up.
Course: Social Science 1, if not already taken (for students
matriculating in or after 1937), Economics 2, if not already taken,
any 15 further units in the department, to include Government 1,
Statistics 1, and three from the following group:
Sociology 1, Sociology 2, Government 2, Government 3, Government 4, Economics 3, Economics 4, Economies 5, Economics 6, Economics 7, Economics 9, Statistics 2.
Also a graduating essay which will count 3 units. (Tutorial
instruction will be arranged in connection with the essay.)
Students must pass an oral examination and, if required, address
a general audience on a designated subject.
Attendance at the Seminar in Economies is required in the Third
and Fourth Years.
English Language and Literature
Prerequisites: 1. A First Class or high Second Class in English
2. Ordinarily, special work is required of students who intend to
take Honours. Such work, if required, is announced at the beginning
of the session.
2. A reading knowledge of French or German. The Department
may require candidates to write a paper in translation at the end
of the Fourth Year.
Students who intend to take Honours must have the permission
of the Department before beginning the course.
Course: English 25 (involving an examination on the life, times,
and complete works of some major English author), 20, 21 (a) (in
the third year), 22 (in the fourth year), 24 (the Seminar, which must
be attended in both years, though credit will be given only for the
work of the final year), and a graduating essay which will count
3 units.
Candidates will be required to take the following final Honours
examinations on the History of English Literature:
1. From the beginning to 1500.
2. From 1500 to 1660.
3. From 1660 to 1780.
4. From 1780 to 1890.
One of these examinations will be oral.
In the award of Honours special importance will be attached to
the graduating essay and to the final Honours examinations.
If the candidate's work outside the department does not include
a course in English History, he must take an examination in that
subject. 70 Faculty op Arts and Science
Geology
Prerequisites: Geology 1. If possible Geology 2 also should be
taken in the Second Year. Chemistry 1 and if possible Physics 1 or 2
should be taken in the First Year, as these are required for Geology
2 and 7 and are of great value in Geology 1. Biology 1 is recommended in the Second Year, as it is prerequisite to Zoology 1, which
should be taken in the Third Year as a valuable preparation for
Geology 6.
Course: Eighteen units to be chosen from Geology 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9,
10, and 23a. If Geology 2 has not been taken in the Second Year it
must be taken in the Third Year, as it is prerequisite to Geology
7 and 8.
History
Prerequisites: (1) A First Class or high Second Class average
in the History course or courses taken in the First and Second Years.
(2) A reading knowledge of French or German.
Students whose standing in Honour History during the Third
Year is inadequate will, at the discretion of the Department, be
required to discontinue the Honour Course.
Course: Social Science 1, if not already taken, (for students
matriculating in or after 1937), History 10 and twelve other units
which normally must be chosen from courses offered in the Third
and Fourth Years plus a graduating essay which will count three
units. The Seminar (which carries no credit) must be attended in
the Third and Fourth. Years.
An Honours paper will be set at the end of the Fourth Year on
the work of the Seminar and of the courses studied in the Third and
Fourth Years. The oral examination will be on the field covered in
the graduating essay.
French
Course-. French 3 (a), 3 (ft), 3 (c) in the Third Year.
French 4 (a), 4 (6), 4 (c) in the Fourth Year.
A graduating essay (in French) which will count 3 units.
Latin
Course: Latin 3, 4, 5, 6 and 7 and Greek 9. The candidate must
also take Latin 8 in both years, obtaining at least Second Class standing. His general knowledge will be tested by papers on Antiquities,
Literature, and History at the end of the Fourth Year.
Mathematics
Prerequisites: Mathematics 2, Physics 1 or 2.
Course: Any 18 units in Mathematics, and Physics 3 and 5. A
final Honours examination is required. Honour Courses 71
Physics
Prerequisites: Mathematics 2, Physics 1 or 2, Chemistry 1.
Course -. Mathematics 10,16,17. Physics 3 and 5, and 15 additional
units. Students are advised to take Chemistry 4 and 7, if possible.
COMBINED HONOUR COURSES
(a)   Biology (Botany and Zoology) and Bacteriology
and Preventive Medicine
Prerequisites: Chemistry 1 and 2; Biology 1; Botany 1, or
Zoology 1.
Course: Bacteriology 1, 2 and 5; the required courses for either
the Botany option or the Zoology option of the Honour course in
Biology.
(b)  Biology (Botany and Zoology) and Geology
Prerequisites: Chemistry 1; Biology 1; Geology 1.
Course: Geology 2 and 6; the required courses for either the
Botany option or the Zoology option of the Honour course in Biology.
(c)   Chemistry and Biology (Botany and Zoology)
Prerequisites: Chemistry 1 and 2; Physics 1 or 2; Biology 1.
Course: Chemistry 3, 4, 5, 7 and 9; the required courses for either
the Botany option or the Zoology option of the Honour course in
Biology. 4
(d)   Chemistry and Physics
Prerequisites: Chemistry 1; Physics 1 or 2; and Mathematics 2.
Course: Chemistry 2, 3, 4, 5 and 7, and Physics 3, 5, 8 or 19, and
two units from 7, 10, 12, 13 or 14. Candidates are advised to take
Mathematics 10.
(e)   Chemistry and Geology
Prerequisites: Chemistry 1; Physics 1 or 2; and Geology 1.
Course: Chemistry 2, 3, 4, 5 and 7, and at least 12 units in
Geology.
(f)   Chemistry and Mathematics
Prerequisites -. Chemistry 1; Physics 1 or 2; and Mathematics 2.
Course -. Chemistry 2, 3, 4, 5, 7, and at least 12 units in Mathematics, including Mathematics 10. 72 Faculty of Arts and Science
(g)   Mathematics and Physics
Prerequisites: Mathematics 2; Physics 1 or 2.
Course: Mathematics, at least 12 units, including Mathematics
10, 12 and 17.
Physics 3, 5, 8, and six additional units.
(h)   Any Two of
Economics or Economics and Political Science, English, French,
History, Latin, Philosophy.
Economics or Economics and Political Science
Prerequisites: Social Science 1 (for students matriculating in or
after 1937). A reading knowledge of French or German. A paper
in translation to be written at the end of the Fourth Year will be
required to ensure that this knowledge has been kept up.
Course in Economics: Twelve units, including Economics 4, Economics 9, Statistics 1, and Economics 2, if not already taken.
Course in Economics and Political Science: Twelve units, including Government 1, and Economics 2, if not already taken.
English
Prerequisites:
1. A First Class or high Second Class in English 2. Ordinarily
special work is required of students who intend to take Honours.
Such work, if required, is announced at the beginning of the session.
2. A reading knowledge of French or German. The Department
may require candidates to write a paper in translation at the end
of the Fourth Year.
Students who intend to take Honours must have the permission
of the Department before beginning the course.
Course: English 20 and 24, and any three of the English courses
specified for the Third and Fourth Years. The Seminar must be
attended during both the final years, but credits which count for
the B.A. degree will be given only for the work of the Fourth Year.
Candidates will be required to take the following final Honours
examinations on the History of English Literature:
1. From 1500 to 1660.
2. From 1660 to 1780.
3. From 1780 to 1890.
In the award of Honours special importance will be attached to
these examinations. One of them will be oral. Course Leading to the Degree of B.Com. 73
French
Course: If the graduating essay is written on a French subject,
3 (a) and 3 (c), 4 (a) and 4 (o) ; otherwise either these courses or
3 (a) and 3 (ft), 4 (a) and 4 (ft).
Courses 3 (6) and 4 (ft) are intended primarily for Honour
students and should be taken whenever possible, even if they are
not required to make up the minimum number of units.
History
Prerequisites: (1) First Class or high Second Class average in
the History course or courses taken in the First and Second Years,
including Social Science, if taken; (2) A reading knowledge of
French or German.
Students whose standing in Honour History during the Third
Year is inadequate will, at the discretion of the Department, be
required to discontinue the Honour Course.
Course: Social Science 1, if not already taken (for students
matriculating in or after 1937), History 10 and any nine additional
units, of which the graduating essay, if written in History, will count
three units. The Seminar (which carries no credit) must be attended
in the Third and Fourth Years.
An Honours paper will be set at the end of the Fourth Year on
the work of the Seminar and of the courses studied in the Third
and Fourth Years. The oral examination will be on the field covered
by the graduating essay. W
Latin
Course: Latin 8 and any four of 3, 4, 5, 6, 7. In the final year can
didates must pass an examination (a) in sight translation, and (6)
in Latin Literature, History, and Antiquities. Private reading under
the direction of the department is recommended.
Philosophy and Psychology
Course: Any 12 units besides Philosophy 1, six units in each year.
COURSE LEADING TO THE DEGREE OF B.Com.
The degree of B.Com. is granted with Honours or as a General
Course degree. A General Course degree will be granted on completion of courses amounting to 60 units chosen in conformity with
Calendar regulations.
It is also possible to obtain the B.A. and B.Com. degrees concurrently in five years on completion of 75 units chosen so as to cover
the requirements for both degrees.
No distinction is made  between  General  Course and Honour 74 Faculty of Arts and Science
students in the First and Second Years; but a student will not be
accepted as a candidate for Honours in the Third Year unless he has
obtained an average of second class on the courses required to be
taken in the Second Year.
While the B.A. degree may be completed in one year by students
holding the B.Com. degree, the converse is not true, as work in two
consecutive years is required for the B.Com. degree in both Accountancy and Commercial Law. It is, however, possible for students who
are taking the combined degree in five years to qualify for the B.A.
degree at the end of four years by taking additional courses either
in Winter or Summer Session to make up for the six units of
Accountancy and Commercial Law 1 which do not count towards
the B.A. degree.
Options in Forestry have been added in the Second, Third and
Fourth years of the B.Com. course for the benefit of students who
look forward to work with the Forest Industries. Students completing the work for the B.Com. degree with these options and who take
the field work incidental to them may qualify for the degree of
B.S.F. in one further year.
The regulations as to Summer Session credits, number of units
to be taken in any academic year, etc., apply to courses leading to
the degree of B.Com. in the same way as to courses leading to the
degree of B.A.
During the summer vacations students are advised to obtain as
much business experience as possible.
First Year
The following courses comprising 15 units are required:
English 1.
The first course in a language offered for matriculation (Latin
or French or German or Greek).
Mathematics 1.
Economics 2.
One course selected from the following: Biology 1, Chemistry 1,
Economics 10, Physics 1 or Physics 2.
Second Year
The following courses comprising 15 units are required:
English 2.
A continuation course in the language taken in the First Year.
Mathematics 2 or 3.
Economics 1 or 2, whichever has not been already taken.
Economics 10 if not already taken.
General Forest Botany (General Dendrology), (and Civil Engineering 2 additional), if Economics 10 has already been taken or,
in the case of students entering by Senior Matriculation, if Economics 10 is carried as an extra subject. Course Leading to the Degree of B.Com. 75
A clear academic record at the end of the Second Year will be
required of students proceeding to the Third Year.
In view of the importance which rightly attaches to the capacity
for adequate and clear expression in writing, regulation 13, on page
88 of the Calendar, will be rigidly enforced at the end of the Second
Year, and reasonable legibility in handwriting will be insisted on.
To ensure the conformity of their courses to Calendar regulations,
all students in their Second Year are advised to submit to the Dean
of the Faculty, on or before March 31 of each year, a scheme of the
courses they propose to take during their last two years.
Third and Fourth Years
The requirements of the Third and Fourth Years comprise 30
units, of which students must take, in their Third Year, not less thaD
15 units. The graduation standing is determined by the results of
the Third and Fourth Years combined. Courses must be chosen in
conformity with the requirements that follow.
Each student must take:
(a) An additional course in a language already taken for
credit in the first two years, that is French, German or
Latin (to be taken in the Third Year) or an additional
course in English. 3 units
(ft)  The following seven courses:
Economics 4.    (Money and Banking.)
Economics 6.    (Foreign Trade.)
Economics 17.  (Commercial Law 1.)
Economics 18.  (Commercial Law 2.)
Economics 14.  (Accountancy 1.)
Economics 12.  (Statistics 1.)
Economics 15 or 16. (Accountancy 2 or 3.)   21 units
(c) One of the following courses:
Economics 19.   (Marketing.)
Economics 13.  (Statistics 2.)
Economics 11.  (Transportation.)
Forest Economics 1. 3 units
(d) One course — not already chosen — selected from the
following:
Economics 15 or 16.  (Accountancy 2 or 3.)
Economics 13.  (Statistics 2.)
Economics 11.  (Transportation.)
Government 1.
Government 4.
Economics 5.  (Taxation.)
Mathematics 2 or 3. 76 Faculty of Arts and Science
Education (3 units.)
English (3 units.)
Additional course in Latin, French or German.
Geography 3.
Geology(3 units.)
General Forestry.
Mining (3 units.)
Agricultural Economics 1.
Biology (3 units.) 3 units
In the Fourth Year satisfactory work must be done in connection
with a discussion class of one hour a week.
Honours (B.Com.)
1. Candidates for Honours are required to take Statistics 2 and
to present a graduating essay embodying the results of some investigation that they have made independently. Credit for the graduating
essay will be 3 units. These requirements take the place of the options
offered to General Course students under (c) and (d) above.
2. Candidates for Honours are required at the end of their
Fourth Year to take a general examination, oral or written or both.
This examination is designed to test the student's knowledge of his
chosen subject as a whole and is in addition to the ordinary class
examinations of the Third and Fourth Years.
3. Honours are of two grades—First Class and Second Class.
First Class Honours will not be given unless the Graduating Essay
is First Class nor will Second Class Honours be given unless the
Graduating Essay is at least Second Class. Students who, in the
opinion of the department, have not attained a sufficiently high
ranking for Honours may be awarded a General Course degree.
COURSES LEADING TO THE DEGREE OF M.A.
1. Candidates for the M.A. degree must hold the B.A. degree
from this University, or its equivalent. Students, however, who
have not more than six units of the undergraduate course to complete will be allowed to take courses counting toward a graduate
degree; but these courses will not be counted as graduate credits
until the students have registered as graduate students.
2. A graduate of another university applying for permission
to enter as a graduate student is required to submit with his application, on or before September 1, an official statement of his graduation
together with a certificate of the standing gained in the several subjects of his course. The Faculty will determine the standing of such
a student in this University. The fee for examination of certificates
is $2.00. This fee must accompany the application. Courses Leading to the Degree of M.A. 77
3. Candidates with approved degrees and academic records who
proceed to the Master's degree shall be required:
To spend one year in resident graduate study; or
(i) To do two or more years of private work under the supervision of the University, such work to be equivalent to
one year of graduate study; or
(ii) To do one year of private work under University supervision and one term of resident graduate study, the total
of such work to be equivalent to one year of resident
graduate study.
4. A major, including a thesis, and a minor shall be required. In
general the minor shall be taken outside the Department in which
the student is taking his major, but special permission may be given
to take both major and minor in the same Department, provided the
subjects are different and are under different professors. The major
or the minor may, with the consent of the Department or the Departments concerned, be extended to include work in an allied subject.
Candidates must have their courses approved by the Heads of
the Departments concerned, by the Committee on Graduate Studies,
and by the Dean. Special forms of "Application for a Course Leading to the Master's Degree" may be obtained from the Registrar's
office.
5. Two typewritten copies of each thesis, on standardized thesis
paper, shall be submitted. (See special circular of "Instructions for
the Preparation of Masters' Theses.") The latest date for receiving
Masters' theses in the Spring Term shall be the last day of lectures;
and the corresponding date for the Autumn Congregation shall be
October 1.
6. Application for admission as a graduate student shall be made
to the Registrar on or before October 1.
7. The following minimum requirements apply to all Departments. For the details of the special requirements of the various
Departments see pages 78-82.
Prerequisites:
For a minor at least six units and for a major at least eight units
of courses regularly offered in the Third and Fourth Years.
A standing of at least Second Class must have been obtained in
each course.
Students who have not fulfilled the requirements outlined above
during their undergraduate course may fulfil them by devoting
more than one academic year's study to the M.A. work.
M.A. Courses:
For a minor five or six units and for a major nine or ten units of
courses regularly offered in the Third and Fourth Years, or of Graduate courses or of equivalents in reading courses. 78 Faculty of Arts and Science
The thesis shall count from three to six units.
A total of at least fifteen units is required with at least Second
Class standing in the work of the major and in the work of the minor.
There shall be a general examination on the major field.
Examinations may be written or oral or both.
Languages: No candidate shall receive the degree of M.A. who
has not satisfied the Head of the Department in which he is majoring, of his ability to read technical articles either in French or in
German, except a candidate majoring in certain subjects, where a
knowledge of Latin may be accepted in lieu of French or German.
To fulfil the language requirement for the M.A. degree, a candidate who elects a language not taken in his undergraduate work to
conform with Calendar regulations, shall be required to have, as a
basis, French 1 or Beginners' German, as the case may be, or the
equivalent of this.
In any case, during the period in which he is preparing for the
degree, he shall be required to read articles in the accepted language
so as to make use of them, either in his course work, or in the preparation of his thesis.
No formal examination shall be required at the end of the preparatory period.
8. Philosophy 7 and Psychology 4 will be accepted as prerequisites for a minor in Education, if these subjects have not already
been counted as prerequisites towards a major or a minor in
Philosophy.
Graduate students, who are Assistants, giving not more than four
hours a week of tutorial instruction, are permitted to qualify for the
M.A. degree after one regular winter session of University attendance, provided they have done, in the summer vacation, research
work of a nature and extent satisfactory to the Head of the Department concerned. Such students must be registered as graduate
students and must have secured the approval of the Head of the
Department concerned and of the Faculty before entering upon the
research in question. Other graduate students doing tutorial work
shall not be allowed to come up for final examination in less than two
academic years after registration as M.A. students.
The following special requirements are prescribed by different
departments:
Bacteriology and Preventive Medicine
Prerequisites:
Minor: A minimum of six units in the Department, among which
Bacteriology 2 must be included.
Major: Bacteriology 2, and six additional units in the Department. Courses Leading to the Degree of M.A. 79
M.A. Course -.
Minor: A minimum of five units chosen in consultation with the
Department.
Major: Thesis, three to six units, and other courses to complete
the required units.
Biology (Botany Option)
Prerequisites:
Minor: Biology 1,  and  six  additional units  in Botany and
Zoology.
Major: Biology 1, Botany 1, and eight additional units, including Zoology 1.
M.A. Course:
Minor: A minimum of five units chosen in consultation with the
Department.
Major: Thesis, at least five units, and other courses to complete
the required units.
Biology (Zoology Option)
Prerequisites:
Minor: Biology  1,   and  six additional  units in  Botany  and
Zoology.
Major: Biology 1, Zoology 1, and eight additional units, includ-
Botany 1.
M.A. Course:
Minor: A minimum of five units chosen in consultation with the
Department.
Major: Thesis, at least five units, and other courses to complete
the required number of units.
Chemistry
Prerequisites:
Minor: Six units of work regularly offered in the Third and
Fourth Years.
Major: Honour standing in Chemistry.
M.A. Course:
Minor: At least six units of work regularly offered in the Third
and Fourth Years.
Major: Nine or ten units in advanced   courses  in   Chemistry,
including a thesis.
Economics
Prerequisites:
Minor: A minimum of fifteen units of work in subjects in the
Department, or an equivalent. The fifteen units must
include Economics 4, Economics 9, and Statistics 1. 80 Faculty of Arts and Science
Major: Honours in Economics; or in Economics in combination
with some other subject; or an equivalent.
Economics and Political Science
Prerequisites:
Minor: A minimum of fifteen units in the Department (or an
equivalent), including Government 1.
Major: Honours in Economics and Political Science; or in Economics ; or in Economics in combination with some other
subject; or an equivalent.
M.A. Course -.
All candidates for the Master's degree in this Department must
attend the Honour Seminar.
Education
Prerequisites:
Minor: Six  units chosen from the  following:   Education  10,
Education 11, Education 12, Philosophy 7, Psychology 4.
Major: Teacher Training Course or its equivalent and Philosophy 7.
M.A. Course:
Minor: (a) With the consent of the Head of the Department
in which the candidate is taking his major, the
Teacher Training Course with at least second class
standing in Education 10,11 and 12 will be accepted
for both the prerequisites and the course; or (b)
any six units chosen from Education 10, 11, 12, 20,
21, 22, 23 ; Philosophy 7, Psychology 4.
Major: Any three of the graduate courses and a thesis (3 units).
Note:—The Teacher Training Course may not be counted as a
minor if Education is taken as the major.
English
Prerequisites:
Minor: At least nine units of credit for English courses elective
in the Third and Fourth Years of the undergraduate
curriculum.
Major: At least fifteen units of credit for courses elective in the
Third and Fourth Years.
M.A. Course:
Minor: Six units of credit in advanced courses in English not
already taken.
Major:   (a)  Twelve units   of   credit   in   advanced courses not
already taken, one of which courses must be English
21 (a), or its equivalent, if this has not been previously offered for credit. Courses Leading to the Degree of M.A. 81
(ft) A graduating essay which will count as an advanced
course involving three units of credit.
(c) Oral examinations on the history of English
Literature.
(d) A reading knowledge of either French or German.
A student who offers both languages will be allowed
three units of credit towards the M.A. degree.
French
Prerequisites:
Minor: Six units of work in Third and Fourth Year French.
Major: Twelve units of work in Third and Fourth Year French.
M.A. Course:
Minor: Six units of credit in advanced courses in French not
already chosen for undergraduate credit.
Major: At least nine units of credit for advanced courses, which
must include:
(a) A thesis in French on a subject approved by the
Head of the Department (3 units) ;
(6) A detailed study of the Medieval and Renaissance
authors listed under French 5(6);
(c)  The study of some special subject not related to the
subject matter of the candidate's thesis.
For this purpose candidates are advised to select French
5. (c), History of French Literary Criticism (3 units).
Note:—A sound general knowledge of French literary history
is an essential part of a candidate's qualifications for the M.A. degree
in French, and none will be recommended for that degree who has
not satisfied the Department that he possesses it.
It is further desirable that candidates for this degree acquire
a reading knowledge of another foreign language, preferably
German.
History
Prerequisites:
Minor: Three courses (nine units) to be chosen from History 10
to 20 inclusive.
Major: Four courses (twelve units) to be chosen from History
10 to 20 inclusive.
M.A. Course:
Minor: Two courses (six units) to be chosen from History 10 to
20 inclusive, or the equivalent in Reading Courses.
Major: Two related courses (six units) to be chosen from History
10 to 20 inclusive, or the equivalent in Reading Courses,
and a thesis embodying original work to which 3 units of
credit are given. All candidates for a major in History 82 Faculty of Arts and Science
who have not already done so must attend the Honours
Seminar in Historical Method, and the M.A. Seminar,
History 23, or submit ta an examination on a parallel
Reading Course approved by the Department.
Mathematics
Prerequisites:
Minor: Mathematics 10 and at least two other Honour Courses.
Major: Candidates must have completed the Honour Course in
Mathematics, or its equivalent.
In advanced work a reading knowledge of French and German
is desirable.
M.A. Course:
Minor: Six units chosen from the Honour Courses and including
Mathematics 16.
Major: Any four of the graduate courses and a thesis.
Physics
Prerequisites:
Minor: Physics 3 and 5 and at least two more units of work
regularly offered in the Third or Fourth Year.
Major: At least eight units of work regularly offered in the Third
and Fourth Years.
M.A. Course -.
Minor: Six units of work in advanced courses in Physics not
already taken.
Major:  (a) At least six units of work in the graduate courses.
(ft) A thesis.
TEACHER TRAINING COURSE
Candidates qualifying for the "Academic Certificate" (given
by the Provincial Department of Education, Victoria, on the completion of the Teacher Training Course) take the courses prescribed
on pages 117, 118.
Registration for the Teacher Training Course is limited to sixty
(60). Applications for admission, on forms to be obtained from the
Registrar's office, should be made to the Registrar on or before
September 1.
1. Registration
Documentary evidence of graduation in Arts or Science, Applied
Science or Agriculture from a recognized university must be submitted to the Registrar by all candidates other than graduates of
the University of British Columbia. All correspondence in connection with the Teacher Training Course should be addressed to the
Registrar. Teacher Training Course 83
2. Certificates and Standing
At the close of the University session successful candidates in the
Teacher Training Course will be recommended to the Faculty of Arts
and Science for the University Diploma in Education and to the
Provincial Department of Education for the Academic Certificate.
Successful candidates will be graded as follows: First Class, an
average of 80 per cent, or over; Second Class, 65 to 80 per cent.;
Passed, 50 to 65 per cent.
All students registered in the Teacher Training Course at the
University are entitled to the privileges accorded to students in the
various faculties, and are also subject to the regulations of the University regarding discipline and attendance at lectures.
In the case of students who have completed the Teacher Training Course, First or Second Class standing in each of Education 10,
11, and 12 is accepted as equivalent to a minor for an M.A. degree,
subject in each case to the consent of the Head of the Department in
which the student wishes to take his major.
3. Preparatory Courses
Students who intend to proceed to the Teacher Training Course
are required to take Psychology 1 as prerequisite to Educational
Psychology.
Candidates entering courses in High School Methods must have
obtained at least nine (9) units of credit in each of the corresponding
subjects from the academic courses normally offered in the Third and
Fourth Years. [The academic courses referred to above are Biology
(including Botany and Zoology), Chemistry, Latin (including
Greek), English, History, Mathematics, French, German, Physics,
Agriculture.] Candidates offering History may substitute six units
of Economics for three units of History, subject to the approval of
their courses by the Heads of the Departments of History and
Economics. Two courses at least in High School Methods are required,
but students are advised to attend a third course.
In addition to the above, prospective candidates for the Teacher
Training Course are required to select undergraduate courses in
such a way that, in addition to English 1 and 2, they will have obtained either six units of credit in one, or three units of credit in
each of two of the following: English, Mathematics, Matriculation
Language, Social Sciences (History, Economics, Political Science,
and Sociology).
Students planning to enter the Teacher Training Course through
Agriculture must have obtained at least nine (9) units of credit in
Agriculture in addition to Agriculture 1 and 2, and at least nine
(9) units of credit in any one of the following subjects: Chemistry,
Physics or Biology (including Botany and Zoology) in addition to
Chemistry 1, Physics 1 or 2, and Biology 1.
A description of the courses offered is given under Department
of Education. 84 Faculty of Arts and Science
COURSE FOR HIGH SCHOOL TEACHERS OF
SCIENCE
The following course has been designed especially for High
School Teachers of Science:
First and Second Years: Units.
1. English 1 and 2. 6
2. Language 1 and 2. 6
3. Mathematics 1 and 2. 6
4. Biology 1, Chemistry 1, and Physics lor 2. 9
5. A second course in one of the sciences named in 4. 3
—30
Third and Fourth Years:
6. Three courses in the science taken under 5. 9
7. One course in each of the sciences named in 4 and not
taken under 5 and 6, to be followed by a general course
in each of these two sciences, namely, two of Biology 4,
Chemistry 23, and Physics 9. 12
8. Psychology 1. 3
9. Two electives from Third and Fourth Year subjects. 6
—30
Total 60
German may be taken under the language option in 2, with 63
units for graduation, if Beginners' German is taken in the First
Year.
Candidates will be admitted to the Teacher Training Course,
however, who have Honours in Biology, Chemistry, or Physics, or
who have to their credit 9 units of Third and Fourth Year courses
in any two of these sciences.
COURSE LEADING TO THE SOCIAL
SERVICE DIPLOMA
The Diploma in Social Service will be granted on the completion of courses amounting to 45 units chosen in conformity with
the following outline:
First Year:
Biology 1 (Introductory Biology) 3 units
Economics 1 (General Economics) 3 units
English 1 (Literature and Composition) 3 units
Mathematics 1 (Introductory Mathematics) 3 units
The first course in a language offered for matriculation
(Latin or French or German or Greek) 3 units
Note :—Chemistry 1 or Physics 1 or 2 may be substituted for
Biology 1 by permission of Faculty. Course Leading to Social Service Diploma 85
Second Year:
Psychology 1 (Elementary Psychology) 3 units
Sociology 1 (Introduction to Sociology) 3 units
Nursing 27 (The Family) 1 unit
Social Service 1  (Introductory and Historical) 2 units
Social Service 2  (Case Work) 1 unit
Social Service 3  (Child Welfare) 1 unit
Social Service 7  (Group Work) 1 unit
Social Service 4, 8 (Hygiene and Public Health) 2 units
Social Service 9 (Field Work Seminar) 1 unit
Third Year:
Psychology 4 (Child Psychology) 3 units
Economics 3 (Labour Problems) or
Sociology 3 (Urban Community) 3 units
Nursing B 5 (Mental Hygiene) 1 unit
*Social Service   5 (Advanced Case Work) 2 units
*Social Service    6  (Advanced Child Welfare) 1 unit
Social Service 10 (Field Work Seminar) . 2 units
Social Service 11  (Administration) 1 unit
Social Service 12 (Social Legislation) 1 unit
Social Service 13  (Public Welfare Seminar) 1 unit
Note :—Three other units selected from the Social Sciences may
be substituted for Economics 3 by permission of Faculty.
Students registered in the Combined Course in Nursing who
have completed the third and fourth year of professional work will
be granted the Social Service Diploma in one Winter Session and
the succeeding Summer Session on the completion of the following
courses:
Social Service 1 to 13 inclusive 16 units
Mature persons with some experience in social work may (subject to the approval of the Department of Economics) take individual courses as Partial students, but are not eligible for the
Diploma unless they have satisfied matriculation requirements.
A minimum of eight hours' field work each week for four terms
is required. A student must, in addition, spend two months with
an accredited social agency as a full-time worker under supervision
prior to registration for the technical courses of the second year.
Students are required to obtain a passing mark in their field work
as well as in lecture work and students whose field work is unsatisfactory may be required to discontinue it at any time. The agency
is not responsible for expenses (such as carfare) incident to the
field work.
Graduates in Arts and Science, who have some experience in
social work, and who have taken as part of their undergraduate
•These  courses  will   be  given   in   the   Summer   Session   of   1938 86 Faculty of Arts and Science
courses a sufficient number of the subjects required for the Diploma
in Social Service to enable them to devote additional time to field
work, may be allowed to obtain the Diploma in one Winter Session
and the succeeding Summer Session.
EXAMINATIONS AND ADVANCEMENT
1. Examinations in all subjects, obligatory for all students, are
held in April. In the case of subjects which are final at Christmas
and in the case of courses of the First and Second years, examinations will be held in December as well. Applications for special consideration on account of illness or domestic affliction must be submitted to the Dean not later than two days after the close of the
examination period. In cases where illness is the plea for absence
from examinations, a medical certificate must be presented on the
appropriate form which may be obtained from the Dean's office.
2. The passing mark will be 50 per cent, in each subject, except
in the case of First and Second Year students who, during one
session, do 15 units of regular work, in which case a percentage of
50 or more will be required in each subject or a general average of
60 per cent, and not less than 40 per cent, in each subject. In Beginners' German, Beginners' Greek, and Beginners' Latin, however,
the passing mark is 50 per cent. In any course which involves both
laboratory work and written examinations, students may be debarred from examinations if they fail to present satisfactory results in
laboratory work, and they will be required to pass in both parts of
the course.
3. Successful candidates will be graded as follows: First Class,
an average of 80 per cent, or over; Second Class, 65 to 80 per cent.;
Passed, 50 to 65 per cent.
4. A student who makes 50 per cent, of the total required for
a full year's work (at least 15 units chosen in conformity with
Calendar regulations), but who fails in an individual subject will
be granted a supplemental examination in that subject if he has
not fallen below 30 per cent, in that subject. If his mark is below
30 per cent, a supplemental examination will not be granted. Notice
will be sent to all students to whom supplemental examinations have
been granted.
A student who makes less than 50 per cent, of the total required
for a full year's work (15 units) will not be allowed a supplemental
examination.
5. A request for the re-reading of an answer paper must be
forwarded to the Registrar WITHIN FOUR WEEKS after the
results of the examinations are announced. Each applicant must
state clearly his reasons for making such a request in view of the
fact that the paper of a candidate who makes less than a passing Examination and Advancement 87
mark in a subject is read at least a second time before results are
tabulated and announced. A re-reading of an examination paper
will be granted only with the consent of the Head of the Department concerned. The fee for re-reading a paper is $2.00.
6. Supplemental Examinations will be held in September in
respect of Winter Session examinations, and in June or July in
respect of Summer Session examinations. In the Teacher Training
Course, Supplemental Examinations will be held not earlier than
the third week in June. To pass a supplemental examination a candidate must obtain at least 50 per cent.
In the first three years a candidate who has been granted a supplemental may try the supplemental only once. If he fails in the
supplemental, he must either repeat his attendance in the course or
substitute an alternative chosen in accordance with Calendar regulations. In the case of Fourth Year students two supplemental
examinations in respect of the same course will be allowed.
A candidate with a supplemental examination outstanding in
any subject which is on the Summer Session curriculum may clear
his record by attending the Summer Session course in the subject
and passing the required examinations.
7. Applications for supplemental examinations, accompanied by
the necessary fees (see Schedule of Fees), must be in the hands
of the Registrar by August 15.
8. No student may enter a higher year with standing defective
in respect of more than 3 units. (See regulations in regard to
advancement to Third Year Commerce, pages 74, 75, and in reference
to admission to Second Year Applied Science, page 64.
No student who has failures or supplementals outstanding in
more than 3 units, or who has any failure or supplemental outstanding for more than a year of registered attendance, shall be allowed
to register for more than 15 units of work, these units to include
either the subject (or subjects) in which he is conditioned or per-
missable substitutes. But a student in the Fourth Year will be
permitted to register for 15 units of work in the Fourth Year, even
though he may have failures or supplementals outstanding against
him, providing that these failures or supplementals do not carry
more than three units of credit and that they do not involve the
repetition of a course. Such a student shall not be permitted to
complete his examinations until September.
9. A student may not continue in a later year any subject in
which he has a supplemental examination outstanding from an
earlier year, except in the case of compulsory subjects in the
Second Year.
10. A student who is not allowed to proceed to a higher year
may not register as a partial student in respect of the subjects of Faculty of Arts and Science
that higher year. But a student who is required to repeat his year
will be exempt from attending lectures and passing examinations
in subjects in which he has already made at least 50 per cent. In
this case he may take, in addition to the subjects of the year which
he is repeating, certain subjects of the following year.
11. A student who fails twice in the work of the same year may,
upon the recommendation of the Faculty, be required by the Senate
to withdraw from the University.
12. Any student whose academic record, as determined by the
tests and examinations of the first term of the First or Second Year,
is found to be unsatisfactory, may, upon the recommendation of the
Faculty, be required by the Senate to discontinue attendance at the
University for the remainder of the session. Such a student will not
be readmitted to the University as long as any supplementary examinations are outstanding.
13. Term essays and examination papers will be refused a
passing mark if they are noticeably deficient in English; and, in
this event, students will be required to pass a special examination
in English to be set by the Department of English.
DEPARTMENTS IN ARTS AND SCIENCE
Department of Bacteriology and Preventive Medicine
Professor: C. E. Dolman.
Assistant Professor: D. C. B. Duff.
Instructor: 	
Assistant: Howard J. Horn.
Assistant: Ruth A. Stuart.
Assistant: Una Bligh.
1. Introductory Bacteriology.—A course consisting of lectures,
demonstrations, and laboratory work.
The history of bacteriology, the place of bacteria in nature, the
classification of bacterial forms, methods of culture and isolation,
the relationship of bacteria to agriculture, to industrial processes,
to household and veterinary science, and to public health and
sanitation.
Reference: Lutman, Microbiology, McGraw-Hill, latest edition.
Prerequisites: Chemistry 1, and Biology 1, the latter of which
may be taken concurrently.
One lecture and four hours laboratory a week. 3 units.
Lectures: 10-11, Tuesday.
Laboratory: 1.30-3.30, Tuesday and Thursday.
2. Immunology.—A course consisting of lectures, demonstrations, and laboratory work.
The protective reactions of the animal body against pathogenic
micro-organisms.  Cellular and humoral immunity.  The course will Bacteriology and Preventive Medicine 89
include demonstrations of immunity, and of various diagnostic
methods used in public health laboratories.
References: Park, Williams & Krumwiede, Pathogenic Microorganisms, Lea & Febiger, latest edition; Topley & Wilson, Principles of Bacteriology and Immunity, Wm. Wood & Co., latest
edition; Wadsworth, Standard Methods, Williams & Wilkins, latest
edition.
Prerequisite: Bacteriology 1.
One lecture and four hours laboratory a week. 3 units.
Lectures: 11-12, Monday.
Laboratory: 3.30-5.30, Tuesday and Thursday.
3. Bacteriology in Relation to Health and Disease.—A special
course for Combined Course Nursing students only, consisting of
lectures, demonstrations, and laboratory work.
Methods of isolation, culture, and identification of pathogenic
micro-organisms. Aseptic technique; disinfection and antisepsis;
infection and resistance; active immunization procedures; bacteriology in relation to public health.
Prerequisites: as for Bacteriology 1.
One lecture and four hours laboratory a week. 3 units.
Lectures: 2.30-3.30, Monday.
Laboratory: 3.30-5.30, Monday and Friday.
4. Dairy Bacteriology,   ^k
(a) The bacteriology of milk; sources of bacteria in milk, and
quantitative and qualitative determinations of the bacterial content
of milk; normal and abnormal fermentations of milk and a study
of certain organisms responsible therefor.
References: Orla-Jensen, Dairy Bacteriology, J. and A. Churchill, latest edition; Hammer, Dairy Bacteriology, John Wiley & Sons,
latest edition.
Prerequisite: Bacteriology 1.
Four hours a week. First Term. \y2 units.
[This course is the same as Dairying 4. (a).]
(6) The physical and chemical properties of milk and their
influence on the growth of bacteria in milk and in milk products.
The handling and management of milk for city consumption;
grading of milk and milk products on bacterial standards.
Reference: Rogers, Fundamentals of Dairy Science, A. C. S.
Monograph, latest edition.
Prerequisite: Bacteriology 1.
Four hours a week. Second Term. iy2 units.
| This course is the same as Dairying 4.(6).]
5. Advanced Bacteriology and Immunology.—A course of lectures, demonstrations, and laboratory work, on the antigenic structure of bacteria; serological reactions; theories of susceptibility and 90 Faculty of Arts and Science
immunity; sensitization; preparation and assay of bacterial toxins,
toxoids, and antitoxins.
References: Topley, Outline of Immunity, Edward Arnold &
Co., 1933 edition; A System of Bacteriology, Medical Research
Council. H. M. Stationery Office, latest edition.
Prerequisites: Bacteriology 1 and 2, with at least second class
standing in both courses. 3 units.
Lectures: 1.30-2.30, Monday.
Laboratory: 2.30-5.30, Monday.
6. Soil Bacteriology.—A laboratory and lecture course, in which
the bacteria of soils are studied qualitatively and quantitatively,
with special reference to soil fertility.
Reference: Waksman, Principles of Soil Microbiology, latest
edition.
Prerequisite: Bacteriology 1.
Five hours a week. 3 units.
(This course is the same as Agronomy 20.)
7. Advanced Dairy Bacteriology.—The ripening of hard-pressed
cheese and a systematic study of the lactic acid bacteria.
Reference: Orla-Jensen, The Lactic Acid Bacteria, Copenhagen.
Prerequisites: Bacteriology 1 and 4 (a).
One lecture and two laboratories per week. 3 units.
(This course is the same as Dairying 7.)
8. Reading Course in Bacteriology.—A directed reading course
in some advanced problem within the scope of bacteriology and
preventive medicine. No class instruction will be given, but regular
meetings will be held for critical discussion, and there will be an
examination, either written or oral.
Prerequisites: Bacteriology 1 and 2. Also one of Bacteriology
5, 9 or 10, with which this course may run concurrently.     3 units.
9. Microbiological Physiology.—Lectures and laboratory work
on bacteria, yeasts and moulds. Growth phases, growth rates, and
rates of metabolic activity under defined conditions, with reference
where possible to industrial applications. Use of mathematical
methods in planning investigations, and in expressing and evaluating results.
Reference: Stephenson, M., Bacterial Metabolism, Longmans,
Green & Co., latest edition.
Prerequisites: Bacteriology 1 and 2 with at least second class
standing in both courses.
Five hours a week. First Term. iy2 units.
Lectures: 11-12, Wednesday.
Laboratory: 1.30-5.30, Wednesday. Botany 91
10. Pathology of Infection.—A course of lectures and demonstrations. Stages in the development of infections in the animal
body, illustrated by post-mortem specimens, and by microscopic
sections. Modes of conveyance of communicable infections, considered in relation to the prevention of disease.
Reference: MacCallum, W. G., A Text-book of Pathology, Saunders Co., 1936.
Prerequisites: Bacteriology 1 and 2 with at least second class
standing in both courses.
Two lectures and two hours laboratory a week.   Second Term.
iy2 units.
Lectures: 11-12, Wednesday.
Laboratory: 1.30-5.30, Wednesday.
11. Methodology of Bacteriological Research.—A course of lectures, seminars, and discussion periods designed to equip the
student preparing for Honours in the Department with a critical
appreciation of historic reports and current literature in the field
of Bacteriology and Preventive Medicine; the technique of planning
experiments for a given research problem; the design of protocols,
and the general presentation of results.
This course to be taken in their Third Year by Honour course
students.
Prerequisites: Bacteriology 1 with at least second class standing,
and Bacteriology 2, with which this course may be taken concurrently. 3 units.
(May not be given in 1937-38.)
Department of Botany
Professor: A. H. Hutchinson.
Associate Professor: Frank Dickson.
Associate Professor: John Davidson.
Instructor: E. Miriam R. Ashton.
Assistant: Norah Hughes.
Assistant: Wilfred Jack.
Assistant: Charlotte Dill.
Assistant: J. D. Menzies.
Assistant: Helen M. Farley.
Assistant: Vernon C. Brink.
Assistant: Geo. P. Holland.
Biology
1. Introductory Biology.—The course is introductory to more
advanced work in Botany or Zoology; also to courses closely related
to Biological Science, such as Agriculture, Forestry, Medicine.
The fundamental principles of Biology, the interrelationship
of plants and animals; life processes; the cell and division of labour ;
life-histories; relation to environment. 92 Faculty of Arts and Science
The course is prerequisite to all courses in Botany and Zoology.
A list of Reference Books is supplied".
Two lectures and two hours laboratory a week. 3 units.
Lectures:      Section A, 10-11, Monday and Wednesday.
Section B, 11-12, Monday and Wednesday.
Laboratory: Section 1, 1.30-3.30, Tuesday.
Section 2, 3.30-5.30, Tuesday.
Section 3, 1.30-3.30, Thursday.
Section 4, 3.30-5.30, Thursday.
Section 5, 1.30-3.30 Friday.
Section 6, 3.30-5.30, Friday.
2. (a) Principles of Genetics.—The fundamentals of Genetics
illustrated by the race histories of certain plants and animals; the
physical basis of heredity; variations; mutations; acquired characters ; Mendel's law with suggested applications.
Text-book: Castle, Genetics and Eugenics, Harvard Press.
Prerequisite: Biology 1.
Two lectures and one laboratory period a week. First Term.
V/2 units.
Lectures: 9-10, Monday and Wednesday.
Laboratory: 9-10, Friday, and one hour to be arranged.
2. (ft) Principles of Genetics.—A continuation of the studies
of genetic principles with suggested applications. A lecture and
laboratory course. The laboratory work will consist of problems,
examination of illustrative material and experiments with Droso-
phila.
Text-book: Sinnott and Dunn, Principles of Genetics, McGraw-
Hill.
Prerequisite: Biology 2 (a).
One lecture and four hours laboratory a week. Second Term.
iy2 units.
Lectures: 9-10, Monday.
Laboratory: 9-10, Wednesday and Friday, and two hours to be
arranged.
2.   (c)  An introduction to genetical methods.
Prerequisite: Biology 2 (a) and 2(5).
One lecture and two hours laboratory a week. 2 units.
2. (d) A review of advanced phases and the more recent developments in genetics.
Prerequisite: Biology 2(6).
Two hours a week. First Term. 1 unit.
Lectures: 10-11, Tuesday and Thursday.
3. General Physiology.—A study of animal and plant life processes.    Open  to  students   of   Third  and  Fourth  years   having Botany 93
prerequisite Biology, Chemistry and Physics; the Department
should be consulted.
Text-book: Bayliss, Principles of General Physiology, Longmans, Green.
Three lectures and four hours laboratory a week. Reference
reading. Second term. 3 units.
Lectures: 9-10, Monday, Wednesday, and Friday.
Laboratory: 1.30-4.30, Friday.
4. General Biology.—A course primarily for students intending
to teach science in the High Schools and whose major is not Biology.
(See statement under the Teacher Training Course). A review of
the modern approaches to the morphology, histology, physiology
and ecology of animals and plants, with applications to man.
A list of reference books is supplied.
Prerequisite: Biology 1.
Two lectures and two laboratory hours a week. 3 units.
(May not be given in 1937-38.)
Botany
1. (a) General Botany.—A Course including a general survey
of the several fields of Botany and introductory to more specialized
courses in Botany.
This course is prerequisite to all other courses in Botany, except
the Evening Course. Partial credit (2 units) toward Botany 1 may
be obtained through the Evening Course.
Text-book: Coulter, Barnes & Cowles, Text-book of Botany,
Vol. I, University of Chicago Press.
Prerequisite: Biology 1.
Two lectures and two hours laboratory a week. 3 units.
Lectures: 11-12, Tuesday and Thursday.
Laboratory: 3.30-5.30, Monday.
1. (6) General Forest Botany (General Dendrology).—An introductory course designed particularly for forestry students, and
including the study of tree characteristics, structure, nutrition,
and identification.
Text-book: Biisgen and Munch, Structure and Life of Forest
Trees, Wiley.
Biology 1 is recommended as a preceding course.
Two lectures and two hours laboratory a week. 3 units.
(May not be given in 1937-38.)
1. (c) General Forestry.—A general survey, including Forest
distribution, influences, protection and utilization.
Text-book: Moon and Brown, Elements of Forestry, Wiley, 3rd
edition. 94 Faculty of Arts and Science
Prerequisites: Botany 1 (6) or equivalent.
Three lectures a week. 3 units
(Not given in 1937-38.)
2. Morphology.—A comparative study of plant structures. The
relationship of plant groups. Comparative life histories. Emphasis is placed upon the increasing complexity of plant structures,
from the lower to the higher forms, involving a progressive differentiation accompanied by an interdependence of parts.
Text-book:  Coulter, Barnes & Cowles,  Text-book of Botany,
Vol. I, University of Chicago Press.
Prerequisite: Botany 1.
Two lectures and four hours laboratory a week. First Term.
2 units.
(Not given in 1937-38.)
3. Plant Physiology.
3. (a) A course dealing with the fundamental life processes in
plants, such as nutrition, photosynthesis, absorption, permeability,
respiration, transpiration and growth. This course is prerequisite
for Botany 3 (6) and 3 (c).
Text-book: O. Raber, Principles of Plant Physiology, 1929, Macmillan.
Prerequisite: Botany 1.
Two lectures and four hours laboratory work a week. First
Term. 2 units.
Lectures: 10-11, Tuesday and Thursday.
Laboratory: 1.30-3.30, Monday and Wednesday.
3. (6) This course comprises a more advanced study of the
organic constituents of plants and the physiological changes occurring during plant growth.   (Same as Horticulture 41.)
Prerequisite: Botany 3 (a).
Two lectures and four hours laboratory work a week. First
Term. 2 units.
3. (c). An advanced course to supplement 3 (a) and designed
to train students of the plant sciences in an understanding of the
interrelationship of plants and soils.   (Same as Horticulture 42.)
Prerequisite: Botany3 (a).
Two lectures and four hours laboratory work a week. Second
Term. 2 units.
4. Histology.—A study of the structure and development of
plants; methods of killing, fixing, embedding, sectioning, staining,
mounting, drawing, reconstruction. Use of microscope, camera
lucida, photo-micrographic apparatus. Botany 95
Text-books: Eames and McDaniels, Introduction to Plant
Anatomy, McGraw-Hill. Chamberlain, Methods in Plant Histology,
University of Chicago Press.
Prerequisite: Botany 1.
Seven hours a week. Second Term. 2 units.
Lectures: 9-10, Tuesday.
Laboratory: 1.30-4.30, Tuesday and Thursday.
5. Systematic Botany.
5. (a) Economic Flora.—An introduction to the classification
of plants through a study of selected families of economic plants
of British Columbia; useful for food, fodder, medicine and industrial arts; harmful to crops and stock. Weeds, and poisonous plants.
Methods of control.
Prerequisite: Botany 1.
Text-books: Jepson, Economic Plants of California, University
of California; Thompson & Sifton, Poisonous Plants and Weed
Seeds, University of Toronto Press.   ,
Two lectures and two hours laboratory a week. First Term.
\y2 units.
Lectures: 10-11, Monday and Wednesday.
Laboratory: 1.30-3.30, Monday.
5. (ft) Dendrology.—A study of the forest trees of Canada, the
common shrubs of British Columbia, the important trees of the
United States which are not native to Canada. Emphasis on the
species of economic importance. Identification, distribution, relative
importance, construction of keys.
Prerequisite: Botany 1.
Text-books: Morton & Lewis, Native Trees of Canada, Dominion
Forestry Branch, Ottawa; Sudworth, Forest Trees of the Pacific
Slope, Superintendent of Documents, Washington; Davidson and
Abercrombie, Conifers, Junipers and Yew, T. F. Unwin; Trealease,
The Woody Plants, Urbana.
One lecture and one period of two or three hours laboratory
or field work a week. 2 units.
Lectures: 10-11, Friday.
Laboratory: 9-12, Saturday.
5. (c) Descriptive Taxonomy.—An advanced course dealing
with the collection, preparation and classification of "flowering
plants". Methods of field, herbarium and laboratory work. Plant
description, the use of floras, preparation of keys, identification
of species. Systems of classification. Nomenclature.
Prerequisite: Botany 5 (a). 96 Faculty of Arts and Science
Text-books: Hitchcock, Descriptive Systematic Botany, Wiley &
Sons; Henry, Flora of Southern British Columbia, Gage, Toronto.
One lecture and four hours laboratory a week.  Second Term.
iy2 units.
Lectures: 10-11, Monday.
Laboratory: 1.30-3.30, Monday and Wednesday.
6. (6) Forest Pathology.—Nature, identification and control of
the more important tree-destroying fungi and other plant parasites
of the forest.
Text-book: Rankin, Manual of Tree Diseases, Macmillan.
One lecture and two hours laboratory a week during one-half
of the Second Term. y2 unit.
Lectures: 11-12, Tuesday and Thursday.
Laboratory: 1.30-3.30 Tuesday.
6. (c) Plant Pathology (Elementary).—A course dealing with
basic concepts of plant disease and plant disease control. A number
of economically important plant diseases are studied in detail.
Text-book: Heald, Manual of Plant Diseases, McGraw-Hill.
Prerequisite: Botany 1.
Two lectures and four hours laboratory a week. Second Term.
2 units.
Lectures: 10-11, Tuesday and Thursday.
Laboratory: 1.30-3.30, Wednesday and Thursday.
6. (d) Plant Pathology (Advanced).—-A course designed for
Honour or Graduate students. Technique, isolation and culture
work; innoculations; details concerning the various stages in the
progress of plant diseases; a detailed study of control measures.
Prerequisite: Botany 6(c).
Two lectures and four hours laboratory a week. 3 units.
Lectures: 11-12, Monday and Wednesday.
Laboratory: 1.30-5.30, Friday.
6. (e) Mycology.—A course designed to give the student a
general knowledge of the fungi from a taxonomic point of view.
Text-book:  Stevens, Plant Disease Fungi, Macmillan.
Prerequisite: Botany 1.
Two lectures and four hours laboratory a week. Credit will be
given for a collection of fungi made during the summer preceding
the course. First Term. 2 units.
Lectures: 9-10, Monday and Wednesday.
Laboratory: 1.30-3.30, Tuesday and Thursday.
6.   (/)  History of Plant Pathology.—A lecture course dealing Botany 97
with the history of the science of Plant Pathology from ancient
times to the present.
Text-book: Whetzel, An Outline of the History of Phytopathology, Saunders.
Prerequisite: Botany 6 (c).
One lecture a week. Second Term. y2 unit.
7. Plant Ecology.
7 (a) Forest Ecology and Geography.—The interrelations of
forest trees and their environment; the ecological characteristics of
important forest trees; forest associations; types and regions;
physiography.
Reference books: Weaver and Clements, Plant Ecology, McGraw-Hill; Whitford and Craig, Forests of British Columbia,
Ottawa; Zon and Sparhawk, Forests of the World, McGraw-Hill;
Hardy, The Geography of Plants, Oxford University Press.
Prerequisite: Botany 1.
One lecture and one period of field and practical work a week.
First Term. 1 unit.
Lectures: 1.30-2.30, Thursday.
Laboratory: 2.30-4.30, Thursday.
Evening and Short Courses in Botany
A course in General Botany, comprising approximately fifty
lectures, is open to all interested in the study of plant life of the
Province. No entrance examination and no previous knowledge of
the subject is required.
The course is designed to assist teachers, gardeners, foresters,
and other lovers of outdoor life in the Province. As far as possible,
illustrative material will be selected from the flora of British
Columbia.
The classes meet every Tuesday evening during the University
session (September-May) from 7.30 to 9.30 p.m. Field or laboratory work, under direction, is regarded as a regular part of the
course.
No examination is required except in the case of University
students desiring credit for this course. Biology 1 is a prerequisite
for such students. This course may be substituted for the lecture
part of Botany 1; but credit is not given until the laboratory work
is complete.
Other students desiring to ascertain their standing in the class
may apply for a written test.
A detailed statement of requirements and of work covered in
this course is issued as a separate circular. Copies may be had on
request. 98 Faculty of Arts and Science
Department of Chemistry
Professor: R. H. Clark.
Professor of Analytical Chemistry: E. H. Archibald.
Associate Professor: W. F. Seyer.
Associate Professor: M. J. Marshall.
Assistant Professor: William Ure.
Assistant: Howard O. McMahon.
Assistant: James J. Pyle.
Assistant: William L. Ford.
Assistant: Edwin Lovell.
Assistant: Frances Wright.
Assistant: Francis Cook.
Assistant: Herbert J. R. Bremner.
Assistant: Margery O. Scott.
Research Assistant: J. Allen Harris.
1. General Chemistry.—The course comprises a general survey
of the whole field of Chemistry and is designed on the one hand to
provide a thorough groundwork for further study in the sciences
and on the other to give an insight into the methods of chemical
investigation, the fundamental theories and some important applications such as are suitable to the needs of a cultural education.
Students must reach the required standard in both lecture and
laboratory work.
Text-books: Smith's College Chemistry, revised by Kendall, 1935
Edition, The Century Co. For the laboratory: Harris and Ure,
Experimental Chemistry for Colleges, McGraw-Hill.
Three lectures and two and one-half hours laboratory a week.
3 units.
Lectures: 1.30-2.30, Monday, Wednesday and Friday or
11-12, Tuesday, Thursday and Saturday.
Laboratory: 3.30-6, Monday, Thursday and Friday.
2. Qualitative and Quantitative Analysis.
(a) Qualitative Analysis.—A study of the chemical reactions
of the common metallic and acid radicals, together with the theoretical considerations involved in these reactions.
Text-book: A. A. Noyes, Qualitative Analysis, Macmillan.
References: Miller, The Elementary Theory of Qualitative Analysis, The Century Co.; Hammett, Solutions of Electrolytes, McGraw-Hill.
One lecture and six hours laboratory a week. First Term.
(6) Quantitative Analysis.—This course embraces the more
important methods of gravimetric and volumetric analysis.
Text-book: Willard and Furman, Quantitative Analysis, Van
Nostrand.
Prerequisite: Chemistry 1.
One lecture and six hours laboratory a week.  Second Term.
3 units. Chemistry 99
Course (ft) must be preceded by Course (a).
Lectures: 10-11, Friday.
Laboratory: 3.30-6, Tuesday and Thursday and
5-6, Wednesday.
3. Organic Chemistry.—This introduction to the study of the
compounds of carbon will include the methods of preparation and
a description of the more important groups of compounds in both
the aliphatic and the aromatic series.
Chemistry 3 will be given only to those students taking Chemistry 2, or those who have had the equivalent of Chemistry 2.
Text-books: Holleman-Walker, Text-book of Organic Chemistry,
Wiley; Gatterman-Wielands, Laboratory Methods of Organic Chemistry, Macmillan.
Two lectures and three hours laboratory a week. 3 units.
Lectures: 10-11, Monday and Wednesday.
Laboratory. 1.30-6, Thursday and Friday.
4 (a) Theoretical Chemistry.—An introductory course in the
development of modern theoretical chemistry, including a study
of gases, liquids and solids, solutions, ionization and electrical conductivity, chemical equilibrium, kinetics of reactions, thermochemistry and thermodynamics, colloids.
Text-book: Millard, Physical Chemistry for Colleges, McGraw-
Hill.
Reference: Noyes and Sherrill, Chemical Principles, Macmillan.
Laboratory Text-books: Findlay, Practical, Physical Chemistry,
Longmans; and Sherrill, Laboratory Experiments on Physical
Chemical Principles, Macmillan.
Prerequisites: Chemistry 2 (except for students taking Honours
in Physics) and Mathematics 2. Honour students majoring in
Chemistry should take Mathematics 10 concurrently.
Two lectures and three hours laboratory a week. 3 units
Lectures: 11-12, Tuesday and Thursday.
Laboratory: 2.30-6, Tuesday and Friday.
4 (6) This course is the same as Chemistry 4 (a) with the
omission of the laboratory, and is open only to students not taking
Honours in Chemistry. 2 units.
5. Advanced Qualitative and Quantitative Analysis.
(a) Qualitative Analysis.—The work of this course will include
the detection and separation of the less common metals, particularly
those that are important industrially.
One lecture and six hours laboratory a week. First Term.
(6) Quantitative Analysis.—The determinations made will include the more difficult estimations in the analysis of rocks as well
as certain constituents of steel and alloys. The principles on which 100 Faculty of Arts and Science
analytical chemistry is based will receive a more minute consideration than was possible in the elementary course.
Prerequisite: Chemistry 2.
One lecture and six hours laboratory a week. Second Term.
3 units.
Lectures: 1.30-2.30, Monday.
Laboratory: 3-6, Tuesday and Thursday and 1-3, Friday.
6. Industrial Chemistry.—Those industries which are dependent on the facts and principles of Chemistry will be considered
in as much detail as time will permit. The lectures will be supplemented by visits to manufacturing establishments in the neighborhood, and it is hoped that some lectures will be given by specialists in
their respective fields.
Prerequisites: Chemistry 2, 3, and 4.
Two lectures a week. 2 units
7. Physical Chemistry.—This course is a continuation of Chemistry 4 and treats in more detail the kinetic theory of gases, properties of liquids and solids, elementary thermodynamics and thermochemistry, properties of solutions, theoretical electrochemistry,
chemical equilibrium, kinetics of reactions, radioactivity.
Text-books: Getman, Outlines of Theoretical Chemistry, Wiley ;
Noyes and Sherrill, Chemical Principles, Macmillan. Reference
for Laboratory: Sherrill, Laboratory Experiments on Physico-
Chemical Principles, Macmillan; Findlay, Practical Physical Chemistry, Longmans.
Prerequisites: Chemistry 2, 3 and 4. Mathematics 10, which
may be taken concurrently.
Two lectures and three hours laboratory a week. 3 units.
Lectures:  11-12, Monday and Wednesday.
Laboratory: 2.30-6, Monday.
8. Electrochemistry.— (a) Solutions are studied from the
standpoint of the osmotic and dissociation theories. The laws of
electrolysis, electroplating, electromotive force, primary and
secondary cells are considered in detail.
Text-books: LeBlanc, Elements of Electrochemistry, Macmillan; Creighton-Fink, Theoretical Electrochemistry, Vol. I,
Wiley; Allmand, Applied Electrochemistry, Longmans.
Two lectures and three hours laboratory a week.  First Term.
Vy2 units.
(6) As in Applied Science.
9. (a) Advanced Organic Chemistry. — The lectures will deal
with some of the more complex carbon compounds, such as the Chemistry 101
carbohydrates and their stereochemical configurations, fats, proteins, ureides and purine derivatives and enzyme action.
Two lectures and three hours laboratory a week. First Term.
iy2 units.
9. (6) The terpenes and alkaloids will be considered. The more
complicated types of organic reaction and various theoretical
conceptions will be presented. In the laboratory some complex compounds will be prepared and quantitative determinations of carbon,
hydrogen, nitrogen, sulphur and the halogens made.
Text-book:  Cohen, Organic Chemistry, Arnold.
Prerequisites:  Chemistry 2 and 3.
Two lectures and three hours laboratory a week.  Second Term.
iy2 units.
Lectures: 10-11, Tuesday and Thursday.
Laboratory: 1.30-6, Tuesday.
10. History of Chemistry.—A general survey of the development
of chemical knowledge from the earliest times up to the present
day, with particular emphasis on chemical theory.
References: Moore, History of Chemistry, McGraw-Hill; Campbell-Brown, History of Chemistry, Blakiston's Son.
Two hours a week. Second Term. 1 unit.
11. Physical Organic Chemistry.—Stereochemical theories will
be discussed in greater detail than in Chemistry 9, and chemical and
physico-chemical methods employed in determining the constitution
of organic compounds will be studied. The electronic conception of
valency as applied to organic compounds will be considered, and an
outline of the work done in Electro-Organic Chemistry will be given.
Prerequisites: Chemistry 7 and 9.
One hour a week. 1 unit.
(Given in 1937-38 and alternate years.)
Primarily for Graduate Students
12. Colloid Chemistry.—A consideration of the principles which
underlie the behaviour of disperse systems and reactions at surfaces, including electro-capillary phenomena, preparation of colloids,
Brownian movement, surface tension, adsorption, emulsions, membrane equilibria and gels.
References: Thomas, Colloid Chemistry, McGraw-Hill; Sved-
berg, Colloid Chemistry, Chemical Catalog Co.; Freundlich, Colloid
Chemistry, Methuen.
Prerequisites:  Chemistry 3 and 4.
Two hours a week. First Term. 1 unit.
17. Chemical Thermodynamics.—Study of first, second and third 102 Faculty of Arts and Science
laws. Derivation of fundamental equations and application gas
laws, chemical equilibrium, theory of solutions, electro-chemistry
and capillarity.
Text-book: Lewis & Randall, Principles of Thermodynamics,
McGraw-Hill.
Prerequisite: Chemistry 7.
One lecture a week. 1 unit.
(Given in 1937-38 and alternate years.)
18. Advanced Inorganic Chemistry.—A more detailed treatment
of chemistry of the metals than is possible in Chemistry 1, together
with the Chemistry of the Rare Elements.
Prerequisites: Chemistry 2 and 4.
Two lectures a week. First Term. 1 unit.
(Given in 1938-39 and alternate years.)
19. Biochemistry.—This course will deal with such topics as,
some special applications of colloid chemistry to Biology, the
determination of hydrogen-ion concentration, the chemical and
physical processes involved in the digestion, absorption and assimilation of foodstuffs in the animal body, the intermediate and ultimate
products of metabolism, and nutrition.
Prerequisites: Chemistry 3 and 9 (a). Chemistry 9 (a) and 19
may, on permission, be taken conjointly.
Two lectures a week.  Second Term. 1 unit.
^Given in 1938-39.)
20. Methods in Teaching High School Chemistry.—This course
is offered primarily for students in the Teacher Training Course and
does not carry undergraduate credit.
References: Black and Conant, Practical Chemistry, The Macmillan Company. Smith's College Chemistry, revised by Kendall,
1935 Edition.  The Century Company.
Two lectures a week. First Term.
21. Chemical Kinetics.—The applications of statistical mechanics
to chemical problems, such as the rates of thermal and photochemical reactions, and the emission and absorption of radiation by
molecules. The Quantum theory as applied to molecular processes
and band spectra.
Reference: Tolman, Statistical Mechanics with Applications to
Physics and Chemistry.
Two lectures a week.  Second Term. 1 unit.
(Given in 1938-39 and alternate years.)
22. Surface Chemistry.—Thermodynamics of surfaces, adsorption equations, heats of adsorption, theory of combustion, clean-up Classics 103
of gases in vacuum tubes, reactions on hot filaments, theory of
contact catalysis, industrial uses of adsorption phenomena.
References: McBain, The Sorption of Gases by Solids, Rout-
ledge; Adam, The Physics and Chemistry of Surfaces; Clarendon
Press, Oxford; Rideal, Surface Chemistry, University Press, Cambridge.
Prerequisite: Chemistry 7.
One lecture per week. 1 unit.
(Given in 1938-39 and alternate years.)
23. General Chemistry.—This course will include a survey of
the development of modern physical and organic chemistry.
It is intended for students who plan to teach Science in High Schools
and whose major is not in Chemistry.
Three lectures a week. 3 units.
(May not be given in 1937-38.)
Department of Classics
Professor: Lemuel Robertson.
Professor: O. J. Todd.
Professor: H. T. Logan. (On leave of absence.)
Instructor: Patrick G. M. Guthrie.
Assistant: Jean M. Auld.
Assistant: Geoffrey B. Riddehough.
Assistant: Leonard Grant.
Greek
Beginners' Greek.—White, First Greek Book, Chap. I-XLVIII,
Copp Clark.
Four hours a week. 3 units.
1. Lectures.—White, First Greek Book, Chap. XLIX-LXXX;
Xenophon, Anabasis IV, Goodwin and White, Ginn.
Composition.—North and Hillard, Greek Prose Composition,
Rivington; one exercise each from sections 1-16.
History.—Robertson and Robertson, The Story of Greece and
Rome, Dent, Chap. I-XXXII.
Four hours a week. 3 units.
2. Lectures.—Plato, Apology, Adam, Cambridge Elementary
Classics; Aeschylus, Prometheus Vinctus, Sikes and Willson, Macmillan.
Composition.—North and Hillard, Greek Prose Composition,
Rivington, sections 17-44.
Literature.—Norwood, The Writers of Greece.
Four hours a week. 3 units. 104 Faculty of Arts and Science
3. Lectures.—Thucydides, History, Book VII, Marchant, Macmillan; Sophocles, Antigone, Jebb and Shuckburgh, Cambridge;
Euripides, Heracles, Byrde, Oxford.
Three hours a week. 3 units.
(Given in 1938-39 and alternate years.)
5. Lectures.—Homer, Iliad (Selections), Monro, Iliad, 2 Vols.,
Oxford; Greek Elegiac, Iambic, and Lyric Poets, Harvard; Demosthenes, Third Olynthiac and Third Philippic, Butcher, Oxford
(Vol. I.).
Three hours a week. 3 units.
(Given in 1937-38 and alternate years.)
6. Lectures.—Herodoti Historiae (selections), Hude, Oxford;
Lysiae Orationes XVI (selections), Shuckburgh, Macmillan; Aristophanes, The Birds, Hall and Geldart, Oxford. (Open only to those
who have taken or are taking Greek 3 or 5.)
Three hours a week. 3 units.
(Given in 1938-39 and alternate years.)
7. Lectures.—Aristotle, Ars Poetica, Bywater, Oxford; Plato,
The Republic (selections), Burnet, Oxford. (Open only to those
who have taken or are taking Greek 3 or 5.)
Three hours a week. 3 units.
(Given in 1937-38 and alternate years.)
8. Composition.—Obligatory for Honour students; to be taken
in both Third and Fourth Years. 1 unit.
9. Greek History to 14 A.D.—The course will begin with a brief
survey of contributory civilizations of pre-Hellenic times and will
include a study of social and political life in the Greek world during
the period. Knowledge of Greek is not prerequisite.
Text-book: M. L. W. Laistner, Greek History, Heath.
Three hours a week. 3 units.
(Given in 1937-38 and alternate years.)
Lectures:   9-10, Monday, Wednesday and Friday.
21. Primarily for Graduate students. Aristotle, Politica, Im-
misch, Teubner.
Three hours a week. 3 units.
Latin
Beginners' Latin.—
This course is intended for students who have no previous
knowledge of Latin. It is open for credit only to students who have
not offered Latin for credit in Matriculation. Classics 105
The aims of the course include: (1) a mastery of what is fundamental in Latin Grammar and Composition and the learning of a
basic Latin vocabulary; and (2) a continuous correlation with
English—in a careful study of the origins and meanings of English
words derived from Latin and of the structure of the English
sentence. Throughout the year frequent practice will be given in
translating from Latin to English selected passages of a progressive
nature dealing with Rome and the Romans. During the latter part
of the year selections from Latin poetry will be read.
Texts: Collar and Daniell, First Year Latin, revised by Jenkins,
Ginn; Selections from Horace, Ullman, Macmillan.
Four hours a week. 3 units.
(Not given in 1937-38.)
1. Lectures.—Cicero, Pro Lege Manilia, King, Oxford; Horace,
Odes II, Page, Macmillan.
Composition. — Pillsbury, Latin Prose Composition, Chap.
I-XXIV, Oxford.
History.—Robertson and Robertson, The Story of Greece and
Rome, Dent, Chap. I-XXXII.
Three hours a week. 3 units.
Lectures:   9-10, Monday, Wednesday and Friday, or
11-12, Tuesday, Thursday and Saturday.
2. (a) Lectures.—Cicero, Catilinarian Orations, Upcott, Oxford; Virgil, Aeneid VI, Page, Macmillan.
History.—Robertson and Robertson, The Story of Greece and
Rome, Dent, Chap. XXXIII-LIV.
Three hours a week. 3 units.
Lectures:   9-10, Tuesday, Thursday and Saturday.
2. (ft) Lectures.—Cicero, Catilinarian Orations, Upcott, Oxford ; Virgil, Aeneid VI, Page, Macmillan.
History.—Robertson and Robertson, The Story of Greece and
Rome, Dent, Chap. XXXIII-LIV.
Composition.—Pilsbury, Latin Prose Composition, Chap. XXV-
XXXVIII, Oxford.
All students are advised to provide themselves with Allen and
Greenough, New Latin Grammar.
Three hours a week. 3 units.
Lectures: 10-11, Tuesday, Thursday and Saturday.
2 (a) and 2 (6) are alternate courses; students intending to read
for Honours in the Third and Fourth Years are expected, and
students intending to offer Latin as a subject .in the Education
course are advised, to take Latin 2 (ft). 106 Faculty of Arts and Science
3. Lectures.—Terence, Phormio, Bond and Walpole, Macmillan;
Virgil, Bucolics and Georgics, Page, Macmillan.
Three hours a week. 3 units.
(Given in 1938-39 and alternate years.)
Lectures: 1.30-2.30, Monday, Wednesday and Friday.
4. Lectures.—Tacitus, Histories, I, II, Godley, Macmillan;
Horace, Epistles, Wilkins, Macmillan.
Literature.—Duff, Writers of Rome, Oxford.
Three hours a week. 3 units.
(Given in 1937-38 and alternate years.)
Lectures:  1.30-2.30, Monday, Wednesday and Friday.
5. Lectures.—Cicero, Selected Letters, Pritchard and Bernard,
Oxford; Juvenal, Satires, Duff, Cambridge.
Three hours a week. 3 units.
(Given in 1938-39 and alternate years.)
Lectures: 9-10, Tuesday, Thursday and Saturday.
6. Lectures. — Seneca, Select Letters, Summers, Macmillan;
Garrod, Oxford Book of Latin Verse (selections), Oxford.
Three hours a week. 3 units.
(Given in 1937-38 and alternate years.)
Lectures: 9-10, Tuesday, Thursday and Saturday.
7. Lectures.—Roman History from 133 B.C. to 180 A.D.
Text-books: A Short History of the Roman Republic, Heitland,
Cambridge; A Short History of the Roman Empire, Wells and
Barrow, Methuen.
A knowledge of Latin is not prerequisite for this course.
Three hours a week. 3 units.
(Given in 1938-39 and alternate years.)
Lectures: 9-10, Monday, Wednesday and Friday.
8. Composition.—Obligatory for Honour students; to be taken
in both Third and Fourth Years.
One lecture a week; individual conferences at the pleasure of
the instructor. 1 unit.
Lectures:  2.30-3.30, Tuesday or Thursday.
9. Methods in High School Latin. Spring term only. This course
is offered primarily for students in the Teacher Training Course, and
does not carry undergraduate credit. Readings to be assigned.
Two hours a week.
21. Primarily for Graduate students. Cicero, Select Letters (two
volumes), How, Oxford Press.
Three hours a week. 3 units. Economics 107
22. Caesar, De Bello Gallico, T. Rice Holmes, Oxford.
Students are referred to the chapters covering the period con-
• cerned in the pages of Mommsen, Rice Holmes or Ferrero or in
Cambridge Ancient History, Vol. IX, also to Hubert's volumes on
the Celts in Kegan Paul's History of Civilisation series, or to Rice
Holme's books on Ancient Britain and the Conquest of Gaul.
Three hours a week. 3 units.
Department of Economics, Political Science,
Commerce and Sociology
Professor: H. F. Angus.
Professor: W. A. Carrothers.
Associate Professor: J. Friend Day.
Associate Professor: C. W. Topping.
Associate Professor: G. F. Drummond.
Associate Professor: Robert England.
Lecturer in Accountancy: Frederick Field.
Lecturer in Commercial Law: R. H. Tupper  (1936-37).
Lecturer in Commercial Law: F. K. Collins  (1937-38).
Assistant: C. N. Brennan.
Assistant: Helen R. Parker (1936-37).
Assistant: George Deacon  (1936-37).
Assistant: J. M. Berrettoni (1936-37).
Special Lecturer in Commercial Law: Charles W. Brazier  (1936-37).
Assistant: George Cormack (1937-38).
Honorary Lecturers :
Mabel Blackley, Y.W.C.A. Training School, Part-time Lecturer (Social
Service Course).
H. M. Cassidy, B.A. (U.B.C.), Ph.D. (Brookings), Part-time Lecturer
(Social Service Course).
Laura Holland, C.B.E., R.N., Cert. School of Social Work (Simmons
College), Part-time Lecturer (Social Service Course).
Elizabeth  King,  B.A.,  M.A.   (Acadia),   Part-time  Lecturer   (Social
Service Course).
Mary   McPhedran,   Diploma,   Social   Science   Department   (Toronto
University), Part-time Lecturer (Social Service Course).
Miss   Zella  Collins,  Diploma,  Social  Service  Department   (Toronto),
Part-time Lecturer (Social Service Course).
Economics
Social Science 1.—This course is obligatory for students matriculating in or after 1937, who are preparing for the Teachers' Training
Course and are specializing in Social Studies. It is accepted in lieu
of Economics 1 as a prerequisite for Sociology 1 or Government 1.
A survey of Man's relation to his Environment and to his Social
Heritage designed to serve as an introduction to more advanced
courses in the Departments of Economics and History. It will begin
with a description of Institutional Origins and the Rise and Fall of
Civilization and will then deal with the political and economic
institutions of the world today. 108 Faculty of Arts and Science
This course is offered with the collaboration of the Department
of History.
Readings to be assigned. 3 units.
Lectures: 9-10, Monday, Wednesday and Friday.
(May not be given in 1937-38.)
1. Principles of Economics.—An introductory study of general
economic theory, including a survey of the principles of value,
prices, money and banking, international trade, tariffs, monopoly,
taxation, labour and wages, socialism, the control of railways and
trusts, etc.
Text-book: Deibler, Principles of Economics, McGraw-Hill;
Canada Year Book, 1936.
Additional readings will be assigned for students offering this
course for credit in the Third or Fourth Year.
Economics 1 is the prerequisite for all other courses in this department except Economics 2 and Economics 10, but may be taken
concurrently with Sociology 1, or with Government 1.
Three hours a week. 3 units.
Lectures:
Section 1, 10-11, Monday, Wednesday and Friday.
Section 2, 11-12, Monday, Wednesday and Friday.
Section 3, 10-11, Tuesday, Thursday and Saturday.
2. Economic History.—A survey of the factors of social and
economic significance in the development of society from early times
leading to a consideration of the more important phases of European
organization with special reference to Great Britain, and in particular to the village community, feudal organization, governmental
control of industry and trade, the domestic system, the industrial
revolution, and agricultural progress, including a survey of economic
development on the North American continent during the nineteenth century.
Text-book: Southgate, English Economic History, Dent.
Readings: Peake, The English Village, Benn; Knight, Barnes,
and Flugel, Economic History of Europe, Houghton Mifflin; Day,
History of Commerce, Longmans; Knowles, Industrial and Commercial Revolutions, Dutton; Fay, Great Britain from Adam Smith
to the Present Day, Longmans; Hobson, Evolution of Modern
Capitalism, Scott; Ashley, Economic Organisation of England,
Longmans; Mantoux, The Industrial Revolution in the Eighteenth
Century, Cape; Ernie, English Farming Past and Present, Longmans; Faulkner, American Economic History, Harpers; Innis,
Economic History of Canada, Ryerson; Bland, Brown and Tawney,
English Economic History Select Documents, Bell. Economics 109
Three hours a week. Mr. Carrothers. 3 units.
Lectures:  9-10, Tuesday, Thursday and Saturday.
3. Labour Problems and Social Reform'.—A study of the rise
of the factory system and capitalistic production, and of the more
important phases of trade unionism in England, Canada and the
United States. A critical analysis of various solutions of the labour
problem attempted and proposed; profit-sharing, co-operation, arbitration and conciliation, scientific management, labour legislation
and socialism.
Texts:   Patterson, Social Aspects of Industry, McGraw-Hill;
W. B. Catlin, The Labour Problem, Harper.
Assigned readings.
Three hours a week. 3 units.
(May not be given in 1937-38.)
Lectures:  11-12, Monday, Wednesday and Friday.
4. Money and Banking.—A study of the origin and development
of money and credit and their economic effects, the trade cycle,
proposed monetary reforms, banking and credit, foreign exchange,
together with a study of the Canadian and other banking systems,
such as Great Britain, United States, France, Germany, and Sweden.
Text-books: F. A. Hayek, Monetary Theory and the Trade Cycle,
Cape; E. F. M. Durbin, The Problem of Credit Policy, Wiley;
E. F. M. Durbin, Purchasing Power and Trade Depression, Cape;
G. W. Downie, Money and Banking, Wiley.
Three hours a week. Mr. Carrothers. 3 units.
Lectures:   10-11, Tuesday, Thursday and Saturday.
5. Government Finance.—An outline course dealing with the
principles and methods of taxation, and administration of public
funds. Topics examined include: Growth of taxation methods;
theories of justice in taxation, classification, increase, economic
effects and control of expenditures; property, business, personal,
commodity and inheritance taxes, with reference to Canada,
Britain and other countries; the single tax; .double taxation;
shifting, incidence and economic effects of taxation; flotation, administration, conversion and redemption of government loans.
Text-book: H. L. Lutz, Public Finance.
Readings: E. R. A. Seligman, Essays in Finance, 1925; H.
Dalton, Principles of Public Finance, 1929; A. Comstock, Taxation
in the Modern State, 1931; G. F. Shirras, Science of Public Finance,
Macmillan, 1936.
Three hours a week. 3 units.
Lectures:   11-12, Monday, Wednesday and Friday.
(Not given in 1937-38.) 110 Faculty of Arts and Science
6. International Trade and Tariff Policy.—A survey of the
theory of international trade and the foreign exchanges; the balance
of trade, foreign investments and other fundamental factors; the
problem of Reparations and of War Debts; the protective tariff
and commercial imperialism; the commercial policy of the leading
countries, with considerable attention to Canada.
Text-books: Taussig, International Trade, Macmillan; Griffin,
Principles of Foreign Trade, Macmillan; Taussig, Selected Readings
in International Trade and Tariff Problems, Ginn; and assigned
readings.
Three hours a week.   Mr. Drummond. 3 units.
Lectures:  9-10, Monday, Wednes'day and Friday.
7. Corporation Economics. — Historical development of the
different forms of industrial organization, including the partnership,
joint stock company and the corporation, and the later developments, such as the pool, trust, combination and holding company.
Methods of promotion and financing, over-capitalization, stock
market activities, the public policy toward corporations, etc.
Readings to be assigned.
Three hours a week. 3 units.
(Not given in 1937-38.)
9. History of Economic Thought.—A study of the development
of modern economic theory, with special reference to the Mercantilists; the Physiocrats; Adam Smith; the Classical School and
its critics; the Historical School; Jevons and Austrian School;
Marshall; together with a study of recent trends in economic
thought.
Text-books:   A. Gray, The Development of Economic Doctrine,
Longmans; W. A. Scott, The Development of Economics, Century;
Gide and Rist, A History of Economic Doctrine, Harrap; S. H. Patterson, Readings in the History of Economic Thought, McGraw-Hill.
Three hours a week.  Mr. Carrothers. 3 units.
Lectures: 10-11, Monday, Wednesday and Friday.
10. Economic Geography.—A general survey of the principal
resources and industries of the world, with emphasis on those entering into international trade, leading to a study of the principles
and problems of transportation by sea.
Text-books: MacFarlane, Economic Geography, latest edition,
Pitman; Whitbeck and Finch, Economic Geography, McGraw-Hill;
Chisholm, Handbook of Commercial Geography, Longmans & Co.
Assigned readings: Leith, World Minerals and World Politics,
McGraw-Hill; Holland, Mineral Sanctions as an Aid to International Security, Oliver & Boyd; Brookings Institute Lectures,
Mineral  Economics,   McGraw-Hill;   A.I.M.E.   Essays,  edited  by Economics 111
Mathewson, Modern Uses of Non-ferrous Metals, Maple Press;
Crerar, Future of Canadian Mining, King's Printer.
Some lectures in this course will be given by an instructor from
the Department of Geology and Geography.
Three hours a week. Mr. Day. 3 units.
Lectures: 11-12, Tuesday, Thursday and Saturday.
11. Transportation. — A comprehensive study of the fundamentals of railroad development and organization, with the legal and
economic problems involved; theory and practice of rate-making;
discriminations; factors in public control, etc.
Text-books: Acworth, Elements of Railway Economics, Clarendon Press, Oxford; Jackman, Economics of Transportation, University of Toronto Press. Assigned readings.
Three hours a week. 3 units.
Lectures:   10-11, Monday, Wednesday and Friday.
(Given in 1937-38 and alternate years.)
12. Statistics 1.—Statistical methods in relation to economic and
social investigations. Statistical groups; types of average. Statistical
series in time; trend and fluctuation. Index numbers. Methods of
measuring correlation. Elementary probabilities and the normal
curve of error. Problem of sampling.
Text-books: Mills, F. C, Statistical Methods; Mills, F. C, and
Davenport, D. H., A Manual of Problems and Tables in Statistics,
Henry Holt and Company.
Prerequisite: Mathematics 2 or 3.
One lecture and two hours laboratory work a week. Mr. Drummond. 3 units.
Lectures:  1.30-2.30, Monday.
Laboratory: 1.30-3.30, Wednesday.
13. Statistics 2.—This course is a continuation of Statistics 1,
and aims at giving an understanding of statistical technique in its
application to problems of business and economic research. It involves a study of more advanced methods of correlation analysis,
cyclical fluctuations and business forecasting. In addition to covering a wide course of reading, students will be required to construct
tables, diagrams, etc., based on original data (official or private)
of the statistics of trade, production, sales, prices, wages, etc., and to
write reports and precis.
Text-books: Ezekiel, Methods of Correlation Analysis, John
Wiley & Sons; Riggleman and Frisbee, Business Statistics, McGraw-
Hill ; Haney, Business Forecasting, Ginn & Co.; Persons, The Problem of Business Forecasting, Houghton Mifflin; Warren-Pearson,
Prices,  Wiley;   Brown,   Bingham   and   Temnomeroff,   Laboratory 112 Faculty of Arts and Science
Hand Book of Statistical Methods, McGraw-Hill; Mills, Economic
Tendencies in the United States, National Bureau of Economic
Research.
Assigned readings.
Three hours a week.  Mr. Drummond. 3 units.
Courses Open Only to Candidates for the Degree
of B.Com.
14. Accountancy 1.—An introductory course to give a broad
perspective of accounting principles and methods, and to promote
an intelligent appreciation of business transactions in their relation
to the balance sheet and income account. Consideration is given to
single proprietorships and partnerships, with attention to the basis
of corporation organization from which the study of the final year in
accounting can be developed.
Text-book: Kester, Accounting Theory and Practice, Vol. I,
Ronald Press.
Assigned readings.
Prerequisites:   Economics 2, Economics 10, Mathematics 3.
Three hours a week. Mr. Day. 3 units.
Lectures: 1.30-2.30, Tuesday.
Laboratory:  1.30-3.30, Thursday.
15. Accountancy 2.—More advanced work in connection with
the accounting and financial problems of corporations, including
consolidations; special reference to depreciation; and the miscellaneous details connected with balance sheet valuations in general.
Text-book: Kester, Accounting Theory and Practice, Vol. II,
Ronald Press.
Assigned readings.
Prerequisite: Accountancy 1.
Three hours a week. Mr. Field. 3 units.
Lectures: 2.30-4.30, Monday and 11-12, Saturday.
16. Accountancy 3.—A study of the principles involved in cost
accounting, including the practical working through a model set of
accounts and a consideration of the managerial use of cost records.
Prerequisite: Accountancy 1.
Three hours a week. 3 units.
(Not given in 1937-38.)
17. Commercial Law 1.—The formation, operation, construction
and discharge of contracts; bills and notes; agency; and company
law. If time permits, consideration will be given to the principles
of bankruptcy law. Economics 113
Three hours a week. 3 units.
Lectures: 9-10, Tuesday, Thursday, and Saturday.
(Given in 1938-39 and alternate years.)
18. Commercial Law 2. — Sale of goods; fraudulent conveyances; fraudulent preferences; bills of sale; assignment of book
accounts; bulk sales; partnership; trusts; certain principles in the
law of real property; mortgages, and landlord and tenant.
Three hours a week. 3 units.
Lectures: 9-10, Tuesday, Thursday, and Saturday.
(Given in 1937-38 and alternate years.)
19. Marketing and Problems in Sales Management.—A detailed
study of marketing functions, leading up to the analysis of problems
which have to be solved by sales executives.
Three hours a week. Mr. Day. 3 units.
Lectures: 10-11, Monday, Wednesday, and Friday.
(Given in 1938-39 and alternate years.)
Agricultural Economics
1. Agricultural Economics. — The principles of Economics as
applied to Agriculture; historical background, the agricultural
problem; and some special topics, such as the agricultural surplus,
production in relation to population growth, the farm income and
the share of Agriculture in the national income.
Text-book:  Taylor, Agricultural Economics, Macmillan.
References and assigned readings from Gray, Carver, Nourse
and others.
Three lectures a week.  Mr. Clement. 3 units.
Lectures: 10-11, Monday, Wednesday, and Friday.
2. Marketing.—The principles of Marketing as applied to the
individual farm and to Agriculture as a whole. The general principles of Marketing, the marketing of agricultural products as
compared to wholesale and retail distribution of manufactured
goods, the contributions of national Farmer Movements, co-operative marketing as illustrated by the marketing of wheat, fruit and
milk in Canada.
Text-books: Hibbard, Marketing Agricultural Products, Appleton; Patton, Grain Growers' Co-operation in Western Canada,
Harvard University Press. References and assigned readings from
Macklin, Boyle, Benton, Black, Patton and others.
Three lectures a week. Mr. Clement. 3 units.
Lectures: 12-1, Monday, Wednesday, and Friday.
Forest Economics
1. Forest Economics.—This course is devoted to the economic
aspects of land use, forestry resources, timber production, and the 114 Faculty of Arts and Science
forest industries, especially the distribution of lumber and other
products.
(May not be given in 1937-38.)
Government
1. Constitutional Government. — This course deals with the
nature, origin and aims of the State; and with the organization of
government in the British Empire, the United States of America, and
France.
Readings to be assigned.
Three hours a week.  Mr. Angus. 3 units.
Lectures:  10-11, Tuesday, Thursday, and Saturday.
2. Introduction to the Study of Law.— (a) A rapid survey of
Legal History,  (ft) Outlines of Jurisprudence.
Readings to be assigned.
Three hours a week. Mr. Angus. 3 units.
Lectures: 11-12, Tuesday, Thursday, and Saturday.
3. Imperial Problems.—A course on problems of government
within the British Empire.
Readings to be assigned.
Three hours a week. Mr. Angus. 3 units.
(Not given in 1937-38.)
4. Problems of the Pacific.—A course on the problems of the
Pacific Area discussed at the Conferences of the Institute of Pacific
Relations. Each problem will be related to its economic and political
background.
Readings to be assigned.
Three hours a week.   Mr. Angus. 3 units.
Lectures: 11-12, Monday, Wednesday, and Friday.
Sociology
1. Introduction to Sociology.—The approach to the study of
society is by way of the local community and its institutions. An
evaluation of the importance of the geographic, the biological, the
psychological and the cultural factors in the determination of the
rise, growth and functioning of groups will be undertaken. There
will be an attempt to discover fundamental principles and to trace
these principles in their interrelationships. Several of the problems
resulting from group contacts will be studied.
Text-books: Davis and Barnes, Introduction to Sociology,
Heath; Dawson, Gettys, Introduction to Sociology (Revised Ed.),
Ronald.
The rule that Economics 1 or Social Science 1 must be taken
prior to this course or concurrently with it may be waived in the
case of students in Nursing.
Three hours a week.  Mr. Topping. 3 units.
Lectures: 2.30-3.30, Monday, Wednesday, and Friday. Economics 115
2. Social Origins and Development. — The different views
relating to the origin and evolution of human society; the
geographic factor and economic methods in their bearing upon
social life; primitive mental attitudes; the development of ethical,
etc., ideas among primitive peoples; primitive institutions, tools,
art and their modern forms; the growth of cardinal social ideas
through the ancient and classical period to the present time.
Text-books: Lowie, Introduction to Cultural Anthropology,
Farrar and Rinehart, 1934; Wissler, The American Indian, Oxford,
1922.
Three hours a week. Mr. Topping. 3 units.
Lectures: 10-11, Monday, Wednesday, and Friday.
(Not given in 1937-38.)
3. The Urban Community.—The structural characteristics of
the modern city will be outlined and the sociological significance
of the functions performed by its inhabitants discussed. A factual
study will be made of urban personalities, groups and cultural
patterns. Methods of urban social control will be investigated and
solutions for urban problems will be evaluated.
Text-books: Anderson, Lindeman, Urban Sociology, Knopf,
1928; Carpenter, The Sociology of City Life, Longmans, 1931.
Three hours a week. Mr. Topping. 3 units.
Lectures: 10-11, Monday, Wednesday, and Friday.
(Given in 1937-38 and alternate years.)
4. Social Problems and Social Policy. — A detailed study of
significant modern social problems, together with a statement and
evaluation of the more promising suggested solutions for these
problems.
Text-books: Gillett and Reinhardt, Current Social Problems,
American Book Co., 1933; Elliott and Merrill, Social Disorganization, Harpers, 1934.
Three hours a week.  Mr. Topping. 3 units.
Lectures:  10-11, Monday, Wednesday, and Friday.
(Given in 1938-39 and alternate years.)
Courses Open Only to Candidates for the Diploma
of Social Service
Note.—A student must be a University graduate or be of the
full age of twenty-one years for admission to any of these courses.
1. Introduction to Social Service.—An introductory course in
which is presented a general view of the entire field of social service
as illustrated by its present scope and methods.
Two hours a week. Mr. Topping. 2 units. 116 Faculty of Arts and Science
2. Social Organization and Case Work Methods. — An introductory course in which the general principles of the social
treatment of unadjusted individuals and disorganized families are
elucidated.
One hour a week. Miss McPhedran. 1 unit.
3. Child Welfare.—An introductory course in which methods
of caring for dependent, neglected, and delinquent children are
presented and discussed.
One hour a week. Miss Holland. 1 unit.
Lectures: 9-10, Tuesday.
4-8. Hygiene and Public Health.—An introduction to the underlying factors relating to health and disease as a basis for
forming rational health habits and attitudes; and a discussion of
the social problems arising from the common communicable and
degenerative diseases.
Two hours a week. Miss Kerr. 2 units.
Lectures:  10-11, Tuesday and Thursday.
5. Case Work Methods.—Selected case records which present
complex or difficult situations are studied with a view to determining
the principles of diagnosis and treatment involved.
One hour a week. Miss McPhedran. 2 units.
Summer Session, 1938.
6. Child Welfare Case Studies. —■ An intensive study of the
problems met by a child welfare organization through discussion of
specific records.
One hour a week. Miss Collins. 1 unit.
Summer Session, 1938.
7. Group Work.—The course covers the principles of group and
community organization and provides an opportunity to understand
the educational processes of group work.
Two hours a week, Second Term.  Miss Blackley. 1 unit.
Evening.
9 and 10. Field Work Seminar. — The problems met by the
students in connection with field work are discussed, as well as
certain other selected problems. The object of the seminar is to
unify and integrate the whole course.
Two hours a week. Mr. Topping, Miss Collins. 3 units.
Lectures:   4-6, Friday.
11. Administration. — Elements of administrative organization
in social agencies; functions and inter-relationships of boards of
directors, executives, and staff; principles involved in formulation
and administration of finance policy, budgeting and accounting,
office management; principles of executive efficiency.
Two hours a week, First Term. Mr. Davidson. 1 unit.
Lectures:  3.30-5.30, Wednesday. Economics 117
12. Social Legislation.—-An outline of the background and underlying principles of British Columbia social legislation and its
relation to similar legislation in European and other countries.
One hour a week.  Miss King. 1 unit.
Lectures: 9-10, Wednesday.
13. Public Welfare Seminar.—The object of the course is to
bring out the major characteristics of public welfare organization,
particularly in British Columbia, and to raise for discussion and
study certain pressing problems in this field.
Two hours a week, Second Term. Mr. Cassidy. 1 unit.
Lectures:  3.30-5.30, Wednesday.
Department of Education
Professor: G. M. Weir. (On leave of absence.)
Acting Head: Daniel Buchanan.
Associate Professor: Jennie Wyman Pilcher.
Associate Professor: W. G. Black.
Lecturer: C. B. Wood.
Lecturers in High School Methods: The following professors:
R. H. Clark, A. C. Cooke, J. G. Davidson, Janet T. Greig,
A. II. Hutchinson, L. Richardson, L. Robertson, G. G. Sedgewick, Isabel Maclnnes.
Notes
1. Registration for the Teacher Training Course is limited to
sixty (60). Applications for admission should be made to the
Registration on or before September 1.
2. Philosophy 7 and Psychology 4 may be counted as courses in
Education.
3. Undergraduates who intend to proceed to the Teacher Training Course are advised to take Psychology 1 and are advised to
select at least one of the following: Philosophy 1, 7, Psychology 4.
4. Two of the three courses, Education 10, 11, 12, may be taken
for undergraduate credit, but only by students who have completed
their Normal Training.
Teacher Training Courses
10. Educational Psychology.
Text to be announced.
Prerequisite: Psychology 1.
Lectures: 2.30-3.30, Monday, Wednesday, and Friday.
11. History of Education.—A study of educational developments
in theory and practice, with special attention to the period since
1800.
Text-book: Cubberley, A Brief History of Education, Houghton
Mifflin. 118 Faculty of Arts and Science
Chief References: Cubberley, Readings in the History of
Education; Reisner, The Evolution of the Common School; Kandel,
History of Secondary Education; Reisner, Nationalism and Education in 1789.
Lectures: 9-10, Monday, Wednesday, and Friday.
12. School Administration and Law. — The organization of the
school system. The aims and characteristics of the Elementary,
Junior High, and Senior High Schools. Principles of curriculum
construction. Fundamentals of school administration and class
management. The supervision of instruction. The school law of
British Columbia.
Text-book to be announced.
References: Manual of the School of Law of British Columbia;
Report of the School Survey Commission of British Columbia; King,
School Finance in British Columbia.
Selected reading to be assigned.
Lectures: 10-11, Monday, Wednesday, and Friday.
13. Tests and Measurements.
14. Methods, Observation and Practice,
(a)  General Methods.  First Term.
(6) Elementary School Subjects. First Term.
(c) High School Subjects.—English, Social Studies, Latin,
French, German, Mathematics, Biology, Chemistry,
Physics, Art, Physical Education, Agriculture.
Two hours a week in each course. Second Term.
Two courses are required under (c), but students are
advised to attend a third course.
(d) Observation and Practice.
(1) First   Term:   At   least   forty (40)   hours   in   the
elementary schools of the Province.
(2) Second Term:  At least sixty   (60)   hours in the
high schools of the Province.
15. Seminar.—A special study, with an essay or report, in one
of the three fields, Education 11, 12, 13.
One hour a week.
Graduate Courses
20. History of Education.
21. Educational Psychology.
22. Philosophy of Education.
23. Problems in Education.
Course 23 will be limited to those having experience in teaching
or administration. English 119
Department of English
Professor: G. G. Sedgewick.
Professor: W. L. MacDonald.
Professor: F. G. C. Wood.
Professor: Thorleif Larsen.
Associate Professor: Ira Dilworth.
Assistant Professor: M. L. Bollert.
Assistant Professor: H. C. Lewis.
Instructor: Dorothy Blakey.
Assistant: R. W. Hewetson.
First Year
1. (a) Literature.—Elementary study of a number of literary
forms to be chosen from the short story, the play, the novel, the
essay, the simpler sorts of poetry.
Texts for 1937-38: Bates, Twentieth Century Short Stories,
Houghton-Mifflin; Euripides, Bacchae, in Gilbert Murray's paraphrase ; Shakspere, Julius Caesar; Sheridan, The School for Scandal,
Everyman; Ibsen, A Doll's House, Everyman; Monro, Twentieth
Century Poetry, Chatto and Windus.
Two hours a week.
(ft) Composition.—Elementary forms and principles of composition.
Text: Thomas, Manchester and Scott, Composition for College
Students, Macmillan.
Two hours a week. 3 units.
The work in composition consists of (i) themes and class
exercises, and (ii) of written examinations. Students will be required to make a passing mark in each of these two parts of the work.
Lectures :
9-10, Monday, Wednesday, Friday and 2.30-3.30, Thursday,
or
9-10, Tuesday, Thursday, Saturday and 2.30-3.30, Tuesday.
Second Year
2. Literature.—Studies in the history of English Literature.
Lectures and texts illustrative of the chief authors and movements from Tottel 's Miscellany to Shelley. Legouis, A Short History
of English Literature, Oxford.
Three hours a week. 3 units.
Lectures: 1.30-2.30, Monday, Wednesday, and Friday.
Third and Fourth Years
9. Shakspere.—This course may be taken for credit in two
successive years. In 1937-38, 9 (a) will be given as follows-. 120 Faculty of Arts and Science
i. A detailed study of the text of Romeo and Juliet, Twelfth
Night, Hamlet, King Lear, The Winter's Tale.
ii. Lectures   on   Shakspere's   development,   on   his   use  of
sources, and on his relation to the stage and the dramatic
practice of his time.
Students will provide themselves with annotated editions of the
five plays named above, and with The Facts About Shakespeare,
by Neilson and Thorndike, Macmillan.   They are advised to get
The Complete Works of Shakespeare, ed. Kittredge, or the Cambridge Shakespeare, ed. Neilson, or the Oxford Shakespeare, ed.
Craig.
Three hours a week. Mr. Sedgewick. 3 units.
Lectures: 10-11, Monday, Wednesday, and Friday.
9. (ft)   (Given in 1938-39 and alternate years.)
10. The Drama to 1642.—The course begins with a study of the
Theban plays of Sophocles and of Aristotle's Theory of Tragedy.
The main subject of the course is Elizabethan Drama: (1) its beginnings in the Miracle and Morality Plays and in the Interludes;
(2) its development in Shakspere's predecessors — Lyly, Peele,
Greene, Kyd and Marlowe; (3) its culmination in Shakspere; (4)
and its decline in Jonson, Beaumont and Fletcher, Middleton,
Webster, Massinger, Shirley and Ford.
Text-books: Lewis Campbell, Sophocles in English Verse,
World's Classics, Oxford; Everyman and Other Interludes, Dent;
Elizabethan Dramatists, other than Shakespeare, ed. Oliphant,
Prentice-Hall; Shakespeare, Shakespeare Head Press, or the Cambridge Shakespeare, ed. Neilson, Houghton-Mifflin.
Three hours a week. Mr. Larsen. 3 units.
Lectures: 10-11, Tuesday, Thursday, and Saturday.
13. The English Novel from Richardson to the present Time.—
The development of English fiction will be traced from Richardson,
Fielding, Smollett, and Sterne through Goldsmith, Mrs. Radcliffe,
Jane Austen, Scott, C. Bronte, Dickens, Thackeray, and George Eliot
to Trollope, Meredith, Stevenson, Hardy and a few representative
novelists now living.
A fair knowledge of the works of Jane Austen, Scott, Dickens,
Thackeray and George Eliot is a prerequisite for those taking this
course.
Three hours a week. Mr. Wood. 3 units.
Lectures: 9-10, Monday, Wednesday, and Friday.
14. Eighteenth Century Literature.—This course aims to give
a view, as comprehensive as possible, of the main currents of English
thought and literature during the period 1660-1800.   It is mainly English 121
concerned with the work of such men as Dryden, Pope, Swift,
Addison, Steele, Johnson, Goldsmith, Burke and Burns.
Three hours a week. Mr. MacDonald. 3 units.
Lectures: 11-12, Monday, Wednesday, and Friday.
16. Romantic Poetry, 1780-1830.—Studies in the beginnings and
progress of Romanticism, based chiefly on the work of Wordsworth,
Coleridge, Byron, Keats, Shelley, Scott.
Text-book: Bernbaum, Guide Through the Romantic Movement.
For reference:   Elton, A Survey of English Literature, 1780-
1830.
Three hours a week. Mr. Dilworth. 3 units.
(Not given in 1937-38.)
17. Victorian Poetry.—This course is concerned chiefly with the
work of Tennyson, Browning, and Arnold. A few weeks at the close
of the term will be devoted to a survey of the development of later
poetry.
Text-books: Browning, Complete Poetical Works, Cambridge
Edition; Arnold, Poems, Oxford Edition; Tennyson, Poems, Globe
Edition; Pierce, Century Readings in the Nineteenth Century Poets,
The Century Co.
For reference: Elton, A Survey of English Literature, 1830-1880.
Three hours a week. Mr. Dilworth. 3 units.
Lectures: 2.30-3.30, Monday, Wednesday, and Friday.
19. Contemporary Literature. — Some tendencies of English
Literature of the present generation, in poetry and the essay and
the novel, will be studied in this course.
Text-books: Brown, Essays of Our Times, Scott, Foresman
Company; Roberts, The Faber Book of Modern Verse, Faber &
Faber. Three novels, to be assigned.
Three hours a week. Mr. Lewis. 3 units.
Lectures: 11-12, Tuesday, Thursday, and Saturday.
25. (a) Private Reading.—Students who are candidates for an
Honours degree in English may elect a course of private reading in
their Third Year. 3 units.
25. (6) Private Reading.—Students of the Fourth Year may
pursue, with the consent and under the direction of the Department,
a course of private reading. 3 units.
In such courses examinations will be set, but no class instruction
will be given.
20. Chaucer and Middle English.— (a) Middle English grammar
with the reading of representative texts,   (ft) The Canterbury Tales. 122 Faculty of Arts and Science
Text-books: A Middle English Reader; Chaucer, The Cambridge
Poets, ed. Robinson, Houghton Mifflin; Manly, The Canterbury
Tales, Holt.
Three hours a week. Mr. Sedgewick. 3 units.
(Given in 1938-39 and alternate years.)
21. (a) Anglo-Saxon.—Moore & Knott, The Elements of Old
English, George Wahr; Bright, Anglo-Saxon Reader, Holt.
Two hours a week. Mr. MacDonald. 2 units.
Lectures: 9-10, Tuesday and Thursday.
22. Studies in Linguistic History.—Origins, growth, and development of the English language. A brief introduction to Germanic
philology; the Indo-European language group; Grimm's Law; the
Anglo-Saxon period; Norman, French, and Latin influences; study
of the gradual evolution of forms, sounds and meanings; further
study of Old and Middle English Literature.
Two hours a week. 2 units.
Lectures: 9-10, Monday and Wednesday.
24. Seminar.—In this class advanced students will get practice
in some of the simpler methods of criticism and investigation. The
subject for 1937-38 will be some topic in romantic poetry.
Two hours a week. Mr. Dilworth. 2 units.
Seminar: 3.30-5.30, Friday.
Teacher Training Course
26. Methods in High School English.—This course does not carry
undergraduate credit.
Two hours a week. Second Term. Mr. Sedgewick.
Department of Geology and Geography
Professor: M. Y. Williams.
Professor of Physical and Structural Geology: S. J. Schofield.
Professor of Mineralogy and Petrography: Clarence Otto Swanson.
Assistant Professor of Mineralogy and Petrography: H. V. Warren.
Instructor: Gordon Davis.
Assistant: Roy Graham.
Geology
1. General Geology.—This course serves as an introduction to
the science of Geology. The following subjects are treated in the
lectures and laboratory.
(a) Physical Geology, including weathering, the work of the
wind, ground water, streams, glaciers, the ocean and its work, the
structure of the earth, earthquakes, volcanoes, and igneous intrusions, metamorphism, mountains and plateaus and ore deposits.
Two lectures a week. First Term. Mr. Williams.
Lectures: 10-11, Monday and Wednesday. Geology 123
(ft) Laboratory Exercises in Physical Geology, include the
study and identification of the most common minerals and rocks,
the interpretation of topographical and geological maps, and the
study of structures by the use of models.
Field Work will replace laboratory occasionally, and will take
the form of excursions to localities, in the immediate neighborhood
of Vancouver, which illustrate the subject matter of the lectures.
Two hours laboratory a week. Mr. Warren, Mr. Davis and
Mr. Graham.
Laboratory: 1.30-3.30, Tuesday and Thursday.
(c) Historical Geology, including the earth before the Cambrian,
the Palaeozoic, the Mesozoic, the Cenozoic and Quarternary eras.
Two lectures a week. Second Term. Mr. Williams.
Lectures: 10-11, Monday and Wednesday.
(d) Laboratory Exercises in Historical Geology, consisting of
the study of fossils, their characteristics and associations, as illustrated by their occurrence in the strata.
Prerequisite: Matriculation Chemistry or Physics, or Chemistry 1 or Physics 1, taken either before or concurrently.
Text-book: Longwell, Knopf, Flint and Schuchert, Outlines of
Physical and Historical Geology, Wiley.
Students will be required to make passing marks in the combined
written and the combined practical divisions of the course, and may
be required to pass in each of the laboratory divisions.
Two hours laboratory a week. Second Term. Mr. Wlliams,
Mr. Graham and Mr. Davis. 3 units.
Laboratory: 1.30-3.30, Tuesday and Thursday.
2. (a) General Mineralogy.—A brief introduction to the field
of Mineralogy, with particular emphasis on the cultural aspect.
Lectures take the form of a concise treatment of (1) Elementary
Crystallography, (2) Physical Mineralogy, and (3) Descriptive
Mineralogy of 50 of the most common mineral species, with special
reference to gem stones and to the minerals which are important in
present day Canadian and world economics.
Laboratory Work consists of a study of the more common crystal
forms of about 50 prescribed minerals, accompanied by a brief
outline of the principles and methods of Determinative Mineralogy
and Blowpipe Analysis.
Prerequisites: Geology 1 must, and Chemistry 1 and Physics 1
or 2 should, precede or accompany this course.
Text-book: Dana, Text-book of Mineralogy, revised by Ford,
Wiley, 4th Edition. 124 Faculty of Arts and Science
References: Brush and Penfield, Determinative Mineralogy and
Blowpipe Analysis, Wiley, 16th Edition revised. Kraus, Hunt and
Ramsell, Mineralogy, McGraw-Hill, 3rd Edition.
Two lectures and two hours laboratory a week. First Term.
Mr. Warren. \y2 units.
Lectures: 10-11, Tuesday and Thursday.
Laboratory: 1.30-3.30, Friday.
2. (6) Descriptive and Determinative Mineralogy.—This course
supplements 2 (a) and consists of a more complete survey of Crystallography, Physical and Chemical Mineralogy, with a critical study
of about 70 of the less common minerals, special emphasis being
laid on their crystallography, origin, association, alteration and
economic significance.
Prerequisites: Geology 2 (a), Chemistry 1 and Physics 1 or 2
must precede or accompany this course. ^^
Text-book: Dana, Text-book of Mineralogy, revised by Ford,
Wiley, 4th Edition.
References: Brush and Penfield, Determinative Mineralogy and
Blowpipe Analysis, Wiley, 16th Edition revised. Kraus, Hunt and
Ramsell, Mineralogy, McGraw-Hill, 3rd Edition.
Two lectures and two hours laboratory a week. Second Term.
Mr. Warren. iy2 units.
Lectures: 10-11, Tuesday and Thursday.
Laboratory: 1.30-3.30, Friday.
4. Structural and Physiographical Geology. — The following
subjects are treated in the lectures: Fractures, faults, flowage,
structures common to both fracture and flow, mountains, major
units of structure, forces of deformation, the origin and development of land forms, with special reference to the physiography of
British Columbia.
Prerequisite: Geology 1.
Text-book: Leith, Structural Geology, 2nd Ed., Holt.
Three hours a week.  Mr. Schofield. 3 units.
Lectures: 9-10, Monday, Wednesday and Friday.
5. (a) History of Geology.—A brief history of the study of the
earth and the development of the geological sciences.
One lecture a week. Mr. Williams.
Lectures: 3.30-4.30, Monday.
(6) Geology of Canada.—The salient features of the geology
and economic minerals of Canada.
Two lectures a week. Mr. Williams, Mr. Schofield, Mr. Swanson.
Lectures: 9-10, Tuesday and Thursday. Geology 125
(c) Regional Geology.—The main geological features of the continents and oceanic segments of the earth's crust, and their influence
upon life.
Prerequisites: Geology 1 and 2.
One lecture a week. Mr. Williams, Mr. Davis. 4 units.
Lectures: 4.30-5.30, Monday.
6. Palaeontology. — A study of invertebrate and vertebrate
fossils, their classification, identification and distribution, both
geological and geographical.
Text-book: Twenhofel and Shrock, Invertebrate Palaeontology,
McGraw-Hill.
References: Grabau and Shimer, North American Index Fossils;
Zittel-Eastman, Text-book of Palaeontology.
Prerequisite: Geology 1.
Two lectures and two hours laboratory a week. Mr. Williams,
Mr. Graham. 3 units.
Lectures: 11-12, Tuesday and Thursday.
Laboratory: 3.30-5.30, Tuesday.
7. Petrology.—This course consists of systematic studies of (i)
optical mineralogy and (ii) petrography, with an introduction to
petrogenesis.
The laboratory work deals with the determination of rocks, first
under the microscope and then in hand specimens.
Text-books: Harker, Petrology for Students, Cambridge University Press; Rogers and Kerr, Thin-Section Mineralogy, McGraw-
Hill.
Prerequisites:  Geology 1 and 2.
Two lectures and two laboratory periods of two hours a week.
Mr. Swanson. 4 units.
Lectures: 10-11, Wednesday and Friday.
Laboratory: 11-1, Tuesday and Thursday.
1.30-3.30, Tuesday and Wednesday.
8, 9,10, and 11, Saturday.
8. Economic Geology.—A study of the occurrence, genesis, and
structure of the principal metallic and non-metallic mineral deposits
with type illustrations; and a description of the ore deposits of the
British Empire, special stress being placed on those in Canada.
Text-book: Ries, Economic Geology (6th edition), Wiley. 126 Faculty of Arts and Science
Prerequisite: Geology 1 and 2. Geology 7 must precede or accompany this course.
Four hours a week. Mr. Williams, Mr. Schofield, Mr. Swanson,
Mr. Warren. 4 units.
Lectures: 11-12, Monday, Wednesday, and Friday;
2.30-3.30, Friday.
9. Mineralography. — Principally a laboratory course dealing
with the study and recognition of the opaque minerals by means of
the reflecting microscope.
The work consists of practice in cutting, grinding and polishing
of ore specimens, accompanied by an introduction to microchemical
methods of mineral determination.
During the second term each student is assigned a suite of ores
from some mining district for a critical examination and report.
Prerequisites: Geology 7 and 8 must precede or accompany
this course.
Text-book: Davy and Farnham, Microscopic Examination of the
Ore Minerals, McGraw-Hill.
Two hours laboratory a week. Mr. Warren. iy2 units.
Occasional Seminars and 1.30-3.30, Thursday.
10. See Geology 10, Faculty of Applied Science.
Three hours laboratory a week. Mr. Davis. \x/2 units.
Courses for Graduate Students
(To be arranged in consultation with the Instructors and the
Heads of the Department.)
20. Sedimentation.
Text-book: Twenhofel, Treatise on Sedimentation, Williams and
Wilkins, Second Edition.
Prerequisites: Geology 1, 2, and 5.
One lecture or seminar and 6 hours of reading or laboratory a
week.  Mr. Williams. 3 units.
21. Problems in Palaeontology.
Prerequisite:  Geology 6.
One seminar and 6 hours laboratory a week.  Mr. Williams.
3-5 units.
22. Physiography.—General principles of Physiography, illustrated by examples from British Columbia.
Reference:  Davis, Geographical Essays, Ginn & Co.
Two lectures and one seminar a week.  Mr. Schofield.      3 units. Geology 127
23. (a) Advanced Mineralogy (Gems and Precious Stones).—
A systematic study of the gem minerals and of some of the more
popular semi-precious stones.
Text-books: Dana, Text-book of Mineralogy, revised by Ford,
Wiley, 4th Edition; G. F. Herbert Smith, Gemstones, Methuen.
Prerequisite: Geology 2 (a).
One seminar and four hours laboratory a week.  First Term.
Mr. Warren. \y2 units.
Note.—This course may be taken as an undergraduate course,
subject to the approval of the Department.
23. (ft) Advanced Mineralogy.—A systematic study of some of
the rarer minerals, particular attention being given to those of
economic importance. An elementary study of crystal measurements
may be undertaken.
Text-book: Dana, Text-book of Mineralogy, revised by Ford,
Wiley, 4th Edition.
. References: Brush and Penfield, Determinative Mineralogy and
Blowpipe  Analysis, Wiley,  16th  Edition revised;  Kraus,  Hunt
and Ramsell, Mineralogy, McGraw-Hill, 3rd Edition.
Prerequisites: Geology 7 and 8.
One seminar and four hours laboratory a week, or six hours
laboratory a week. Second Term. Mr. Swanson, Mr. Warren.
iy2 units.
24. Advanced Mineralography. — A critical study of some
approved suite of ores, using the more recent methods of investigation, including the examination of polished sections under polarized
light, mierochemistry, microphotography, use of "super-polisher,"
etc.
Prerequisites: Geology 7, 8 and 9.
Text-book: Frequent reference will be made to U.S. Geological
Survey Bulletin 825, Microscopic Determination of the Ore Minerals.
Occasional seminars and from five to seven hours laboratory a
week. Mr. Warren. 3 to 4 units.
25. (a) Metamorphism.—A reading and seminar course, supplemented with occasional laboratory work.
Reference: Harker, Metamorphism, Methuen & Co., London.
Mr. Swanson. 2 to 3 units.
25.  (ft) Igneous Petrology.—A seminar and laboratory course.
Mr. Swanson. 2 to 3 units. 128 Faculty of Arts and Science
Geography
1. Principles of Geography.—This introductory course aims to
develop in the student the point of view of modern geography and
to furnish a foundation or background that will be useful not
alone to those who may intend to continue a study of geography
or to teach it in the schools, but also to those who intend to study
history, economics and other subjects, or to enter business or professional careers, into which geographical considerations enter.
Since geography is a study of the surface of the earth and its
relation to man, the course involves consideration of earth relations;
weathering and. soils; land forms and oceans; climates; natural
resources; and a brief introduction to the study of man and his
response to the geographical environment.
Text-book: James, An Outline of Geography, Ginn & Co.
An Atlas—failing a large, comprehensive atlas, one of the following cheap ones will serve: Philip's Senior School Atlas, Geo.
Philip & Son; Canadian School Atlas, J. M. Dent; Goode's School
Atlas, Rand McNally Co.
Three hours a week. Mr. Davis, Mr. Warren. 3 units.
Lectures: 2.30-3.30, Monday, Wednesday, and Friday.
2. Meteorology and Climatology.—A course covering in a general
way the whole field, with practice in using instruments, constructing
and using weather charts, and weather predicting.
Two lectures and one laboratory period of two hours a week.
Second Term. Mr. Schofield, Mr. Davis. iy2 units.
Lectures: 12-1, Wednesday and Friday.
Laboratory: 3.30-5.30, Monday.
3. Human and Regional Geography.—A study of man and his
physical environment treated regionally. The characteristics of
man and the influence of geographical environment are most easily
discerned in primitive societies; consequently these are examined
in some detail. From these as a starting point, the relationships
between man and his environment in complex western civilization is
investigated.
Prerequisite: Geography 1.
Reference: Pomfret, The Geographic Pattern of Mankind,
Students' Edition, Appleton Century.
Three hours a week. Mr. Davis. 3 units.
Lectures: 10-11, Monday, Wednesday, and Friday.
Economics 10, Economic Geography.— (See under Economics,
Pages 110, 111.)
Mr. Day, Mr. Warren. 3 units.
Note.—This course is given jointly by the two departments concerned, and may be taken as a second year course in Geography. History 129
Department of History-
Professor: W. N. Sage.
Professor: F. H. Soward.
Assistant Professor: A. C. Cooke.
Instructor: Sylvia Thrupp.
Assistant: Sydney G. Pettit.
Assistant: Patricia Johnson.
Students who intend to specialize in history or who are preparing for the Teacher Training Course are advised to associate with
it such allied subjects as Economics, Government, Sociology and
Geography. Economics 1, 2, 9, 10; Government 1, 3, 4; Sociology 1
and Geography 1 will be found especially helpful. Attention, however, is called to the regulation in paragraph 3, page 83.
A reading knowledge of French and German will be found
extremely valuable in Third and Fourth Year courses, while in
certain classes of more advanced work Latin is indispensable.
French, at least, will be required for Honour work, and the study
of German is strongly recommended, i
First and Second Years
Social Science 1. — This course is obligatory for students,
matriculating in or after 1937, who are preparing for the Teachers'
Training Course and are specializing in Social Studies.
A survey of Man's relation to his Environment and to his Social
Heritage designed to serve as an introduction to more advanced
courses in the Departments of Economics and History. It will begin
with a description of Institutional Origins and the Rise and Fall of
Civilization and will then deal with the political and economic
institutions of the world today.
This course is offered with the collaboration of the Department
of Economics.
Readings to be assigned.
3 units.
Lectures: 9-10, Monday, Wednesday, and Friday.
(May not be given in 1937-38.)
1. Main Currents in Twentieth-Century History.— This course
completes the study of World History in the High Schools and
offers a background for contemporary World problems. The following topics are discussed: The Great Powers at the Opening of
the Century, Alliance and Entente, The Coming of the World War,
The World War, The Peace Treaties, The New Map of Europe,
Reparations and War Debts, Security and Disarmament, The
League of Nations, The Russian Revolution and the U.S.S.R., Italy 130 Faculty of Arts and Science
and Fascism, Germany from Empire to Third Reich, Post-War
Britain and Democratic Europe, The New Balkans, The Little
Entente and Poland, Nationalism and Imperialism in the Far East,
The United States and World Peace.
Text-books: Benns, Europe Since 1914; Langsam, The World
Since 1914; Cole, The Intelligent Man's Review of Europe Today;
Schmitt, The Triple Alliance and Triple Entente; J. F. Horrabin,
Atlas of Current Events.
Essays will be assigned throughout the Session.
Three hours a week.  Mr. Soward. 3 units.
Lectures: 2.30-3.30, Monday, Wednesday, and Friday.
2. The History of Canada.—Geographical factors; Exploration
and early settlements; The French Regime; Constitutional development, 1759-1867; Economic and social progress to Confederation;
Development of the Dominion of Canada since 1867; Canada in the
Commonwealth; Canada in the World.
Text-books: Wittke, A History of Canada; Trotter, Canadian
History: A Syllabus; Siegfried, Canada.
Essays will be assigned throughout the Session.
Three hours a week. Mr. Sage. 3 units.
(Given in 1938-39 and alternate years.)
3. -Canada West of the Great Lakes. — The place of Western
Canada in Canadian development; Anglo-French rivalry in the
West; Struggle for supremacy between the Hudson's Bay Company
and the North- West Company; The Selkirk Settlement; Discovery
and exploration of the Pacific Coast; The Maritime fur trade; The
North West Company in British Columbia; The Western Department of the Hudson's Bay Company, 1821-70; Rivalries in Old
Oregon; The Colonial period of British Columbia; Confederation;
The Riel rebellion; The rise of the new West; The agrarian movement on the prairies; Development of the Province of British
Columbia.
Text-books: Wittke, A History of Canada; Howay, British
Columbia, the Making of a Province; Sage, Sir James Douglas and
British Columbia; England, The Colonization of Western Canada.
Essays will be assigned throughout the Session.
Three hours a week. Mr. Sage. 3 units.
Lectures: 9-10, Tuesday, Thursday, and Saturday.
(Given in 1937-38 and alternate years.)
History 4. Mediaeval Europe, 500-1500.—A general outline of
mediaeval history from the fall of the Roman Empire to the 15th
century. Sketches of Byzantine history and of the rise of Islam are
included, but the main emphasis is laid upon the culture of the
12th and 13th centuries in the West. History 131
Text-book: Collins, A History of Mediaeval Civilisation in
Europe.
Essays are assigned throughout the Session.
(Extra work will be required from Third and Fourth Year
students taking this course.)
Three hours a week. Miss Thrupp. 3 units.
Lectures: 11-12, Monday, Wednesday, and Friday.
Third and Fourth Years
History 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 16 and 18 are intended primarily for
Third Year students; History 15, 19 and 20 for Fourth Year.
History 10 must be taken by all candidates for Honours.
All Honours students (whether in History alone or in a combined course) must take the History Seminars in their Third and
Fourth Years. The Seminar is offered as a training in intensive
work and carries no credits.
If the graduating essay be written in History it will count as
3 units.
10. British History to 1485. — This course aims at an interpretation of the political, constitutional, economic and religious
development of the British Isles from the earliest times to the close
of the Middle Ages.
Text-books: Trevelyan, A History of England; Williamson,
The Evolution of England; Lunt, History of England; Adams and
Stephens, Select Documents of English Constitutional History;
Adams, Constitutional History of England.
Essays will be assigned throughout the Session.
Three hours a week. Mr. Sage. 3 units.
Lectures: 9-10, Monday, Wednesday, and Friday.
11. The Development and Problems of the British Empire-
Commonwealth.
This course is given in two parts, and may be taken for credit
in two successive years.
(a)  The Development and Problems of the British Commonwealth.
(ft)  The Development and Problems of the British Dependent
Empire.
In the session 1936-37, and alternate years, 11 (a) will be given
as follows:
The first two centuries of Empire — the age of discovery and
colonization; the Old Colonial System in its political, economic
and international aspects. Effects on the Empire of the American,
French, and Industrial Revolutions. From Empire to Commonwealth — development and problems of Canada, Australia,  New 132 Faculty of Arts and Science
Zealand, South Africa, Ireland. Problems of the Commonwealth,
economic, constitutional, international.
Text-books: J. A. Williamson, Short History of British Expansion, or D. C. Somervell, The British Empire; A. B. Keith (ed.),
Speeches and Documents on the British Dominions, 1918-1931;
R. G. Trotter, The British Empire-Commonwealth.
Readings and reports will be assigned throughout the Session.
Bibliographies for voluntary summer reading will be supplied on
application to the instructor in charge.
Three hours a week. Mr. Cooke. 3 units.
Lectures: 11-12, Monday, Wednesday, and Friday.
12. History of the United States of America. — This course
begins with a sketch of the American colonies at the outbreak of
the Revolution and traces the history of the United States from the
commencement of the War of Independence to the close of the
World War.
Text-books: Charles and Mary Beard, The Rise of American
Civilisation; J. T. Adams, The Epic of America; H. Faulkner,
American Economic History; F. J. Turner, The Frontier in American History.
Essays will be assigned throughout the session.
Three hours a week. 3 units.
(Given in Session 1938-39.)
13. The Age of the Renaissance and Reformation.—The Cultural Development of Europe from the 14th to the 17th Centuries.
The transition from the medieval to the modern world; humanism;
Renaissance art; overseas exploration and expansion; the rise of
modern capitalism and national states; the Reformation; the
counter-Reformation; the scientific revolution and intellectual developments.
Text-books:   H. S. Lucas, The Renaissance and the Reformation; E. M. Hulme, Renaissance and Reformation.
Essays will be assigned throughout the session.
Three hours a week. Mr. Cooke. 3 units.
Lectures: 11-12, Tuesday, Thursday, and Saturday.
14. The Age of Louis XIV; The Revolutionary and Napoleonic
Era.—Europe in the 17th and 18th centuries; the establishment
of absolutism; the ascendancy of France; expansion and conflict
overseas; the enlightened despots; the age of reason; the French
Revolution; Napoleon; the Congress of Vienna.
Text-books: S. Benians, Renaissance to Revolution; L. B.
Packard, The Age of Louis XIV; G. Bruun, The Enlightened
Despots; L. R. Gottschalk, The Era of the French Revolution, or
Leo Gershoy, The French Revolution and Napoleon; C. Brinton, History 133
A Decade of Revolution; J. H. Rose or F. M. Kircheisen, Napoleon.
Essays will be assigned throughout the session.
Three hours a week. Mr. Cooke 3 units.
Lectures: 2.30-3.30, Monday, Wednesday, and Friday.
15. Europe, 1815-1919. — The political, social and economic
history of the chief countries of continental Europe, with especial
attention to international relations.
Text-books: Carleton Hayes, A Political and Cultural History
of Modern Europe, Vol. 2; Moon, Imperialism and World Politics;
Buell, International Relations.
Essays will be assigned throughout the session. Mr. Soward.
3 units.
Lectures: 10-11, Monday, Wednesday, and Friday.
16. Social and Economic History of Mediaeval Europe. — The
object of this course is to study the origins of our commercial
culture as it arose in the mediaeval town of the llth century, and
to trace the gradual transition from feudal to commercial ideals
in the four centuries following. The course deals with the culture
of the various classes of mediaeval society, the contribution of the
Church to economic development, avenues of social opportunity,
industrial inventions, social conflict in the later middle ages, the
birth of the modern state and national economy.
Text-books: Pirenne, Economic and Social History of the
Middle Ages, and Mediaeval Cities and the Revival of Trade;
Boissonnade, Life and Work in Mediaeval Europe. Further reading assigned.
Essays will be assigned throughout the session.
Three hours a week. Miss Thrupp. 3 units.
(Not given in 1937-38.)
17. Social and Economic History of Europe, 1500-1914.—This
course aims to estimate the part played by social and economic
forces in shaping European institutions throughout the various
phases of modern history, with especial emphasis upon the changes
of the 19th century.
Text-books to be assigned.
Essays will be assigned.
Three hours a week. Miss Thrupp. 3 units.
Lectures: 11-12, Tuesday, Thursday, and Saturday.
(May not be given in 1937-38.)
18. British History, 1485-1760. — This course offers a general
survey of political, economic, social and cultural change in the
Tudor and Stuart periods and the early 18th century. Some
knowledge of contemporary literature in any of the three periods
will be helpful. 134 Faculty of Arts and Science
Text-books: Trevelyan, History of England; Adams and
Stephens, Select Documents of English Constitutional History;
Bland, Brown and Tawney, English Economic History, Select
Documents.
Essays will be assigned throughout the session.
Three hours a week. Miss Thrupp. 3 units.
Lectures: 1.30-2.30, Monday, Wednesday, and Friday.
19. Great Britain Since 1760. —■ This course aims at an interpretation of the constitutional, political, economic and religious
development of the British Isles since 1760.
Text-books: Grant Robertson, England Under the Hanoverians;
Williamson, The Evolution of England; Fay, Life and Labour in
the Nineteenth Century; Trevelyan, British History in the Nineteenth Century.
Essays will be assigned throughout the session.
Three hours a week.  Mr. Sage. 3 units.
Lectures: 11-12, Monday, Wednesday, and Friday.
20. The Evolution of Canadian Self-Government.—A survey of
the period from the Peace of Utrecht to the present day. The
following subjects will be dealt with: French and British Colonial
Systems; British experience in Acadia; British policy after the
Treaty of Paris; the Quebec Act; the effect of the American Revolution ; the Constitutional Act; the opening of the West; the War
of 1812; the formation of parties and the struggle for Reform;
Durham's Report; the achievement of Responsible Government;
Confederation and the completion of the Dominion, the development of Responsible Government and the growth of nationhood.
Text-books: Martin, Empire and Commonwealth; Kennedy,
The Constitution of Canada; Kennedy, Statutes, Treaties and
Documents of the Canadian Constitution, 1713-1929.
Essays will be assigned throughout the session.
Three hours a week. Mr. Soward. 3 units.
Lectures: 10-11, Tuesday, Thursday, and Saturday.
21. Methods in High School Social Studies. — This course is
offered primarily for students in the Teacher Training Course and
does not carry undergraduate credit.
Readings to be assigned.
Two hours a week in Spring term only. Mr. Cooke. (Time to
be arranged.)
22. Honours Seminars:
(a)  Third Year: Historical Method. Mr. Soward.
(6)  Fourth Year:   Problems of British  Colonial Administration. Mr. Cooke.
23. M.A. Seminar: The History of British Columbia. Mr. Sage.
(Time of Seminars to be arranged.) Mathematics 135
Department of Mathematics
Professor: Daniel Buchanan.
Professor: F. S. Nowlan.
Professor: L. Richardson.
Associate Professor: Walter H. Gage.
Assistant Professor: F. J. Brand.
Instructor: May L. Barclay.
Assistant: Morris Bloom.
Assistant: Joseph L. Kadzielawa.
Assistant: Gleb Goumeniouk.
Assistant: Margery E. Mellish.
Assistant: Muriel Wales.
Assistant: William H. Simons.
Assistant: Donald MacPhail.
Assistant: Charles W. McLeish.
Mathematics 2 is a prerequisite for all the Honour Courses.
General Courses
1. Introductory Mathematics. —• An elementary course in
Algebra including proportion, variation, logarithms, progressions,
theory of quadratic equations, permutations, combinations, annuities, binomial theorem; Analytical Geometry including the study
of the straight line and the circle, with an introductory study of
the parabola, ellipse and hyperbola; elementary Trigonometry.
Text-books: Brink, Algebra, a College Course, Appleton-Cen-
tury Co.; Nowlan, Analytical Geometry, McGraw-Hill; Brink,
Plane Trigonometry with Tables, Appleton-Century Co.
Four, hours a week. 3 units.
Lectures:
10-11, Monday, Wednesday, Friday; 1.30-2.30, Tuesday;
or
10-11, Tuesday, Thursday, Saturday; 1.30-2.30, Thursday.
2. (a) Algebra. — The binomial theorem, complex numbers,
induction, remainder theorem, Horner's method, exponential, logarithmic and other series, undetermined coefficients, partial fractions,
convergence and divergence, determinants.
Text-book to be announced.
Two hours a week.   Mr. Nowlan. 2 units.
Lectures: 11-12, Monday and Wednesday, or 11-12, Tuesday
and Thursday.
(6)  Calculus.—An   introductory   course   in   differential   and
integral calculus, with various applications.
Text-book:   Passano, Calculus and Graphs, Macmillan.
One hour a week. Mr. Buchanan, Miss Barclay. 1 unit.
Lecture: 11-12, Friday or 11-12, Saturday.
3. The Mathematical Theory of Investments.—This course deals
with the exponential law, the power law, curve fitting, the theory 136 Faculty of Arts and Science
of interest, annuities, debentures, valuation of bonds, sinking funds,
depreciation, probability and its application to life insurance.
Text-books: Bauer, Mathematics Preparatory to Statistics and
Finance, Macmillan; Hart, Mathematics of Investment (Revised),
Heath.
Three hours a week.  Mr. Brand. 3 units.
Lectures: 9-10, Monday, Wednesday, and Friday.
4. Descriptive Astronomy. — An introductory course dealing
with the solar system, stellar motions, the constitution of the stars,
and nebulae.
Text-book: Baker, Astronomy, Van Nostrand.
Two hours a week. Mr. Gage. 2 units.
Lectures: 2.30-3.30, Tuesday and Thursday.
Students desiring credit for an additional unit in connection
with this course may register for Mathematics 18.   They will be
required to write essays on prescribed subjects dealing with various
phases of Astronomy. 1 unit.
(Given in 1937-38 and alternate years.)
Honour Courses
10. Calculus.—The elementary theory and applications of the
subject.
Text-book: Granville, Differential and Integral Calculus, Ginn.
Three hours a week. Mr. Nowlan. 3 units.
Lectures: 9-10, Monday, Wednesday, and Friday.
11. Plane and Spherical Trigonometry.—The work in plane
trigonometry will deal with the following: Identities and trigonometrical equations, the solution of triangles with various applications, circumscribed, inscribed and escribed circles, De Moivre's
theorem, expansions of sin n6, etc., hyperbolic and inverse functions. The work in spherical trigonometry will cover the solution
of triangles with various applications to astronomy and geodesy.
Text-book:   Durell and Robson, Advanced Trigonometry, Bell.
Two hours a week. Mr. Brand. 2 units.
(Given in 1937-38 and alternate years.)
12. Differential Equations.—Ordinary and partial differential
equations with various applications to geometry, mechanics, physics
and chemistry.
Text-book: Miller, Differential Equations, Macmillan.
This course may be taken concurrently with Mathematics 10.
Two hours a week. Mr. Buchanan. 2 units.
Lectures: 9-10, Tuesday and Thursday.
13. Plane and Solid Analytical Geometry.—A general study
of the conies and systems of conies, and elementary work in three
dimensions. Mathematics 137
Text-book: Nowlan, Analytical Geometry, McGraw-Hill.
Three hours a week. Mr. Nowlan. 3 units.
Lectures: 10-11, Monday, Wednesday, and Friday.
14. Theory of Equations, Determinants and Matrices. — A
course covering the main theory and use of these subjects. Introduction to Matrices.
Text-book:   Dickson, Elementary Theory of Equations, Wiley.
Three hours a week. Mr. Nowlan. 3 units.
(Given in 1938-39 and alternate years.)
15. Higher Algebra.—Selected topics in higher algebra, including infinite series, continued fractions, the theory of numbers,
probability.
Text-books: Hall and Knight, Higher Algebra, Macmillan;
Chrystal, Text-book of Algebra, Part II.
Two hours a week. 2 units.
(Given in 1937-38 and alternate years.)
16. Advanced Calculus.—A continuation of the previous course
in calculus, treating partial differentiation, expansions of functions
of many variables, singular points, reduction formulas, successive
integration, elliptic integrals, and Fourier series.
Two hours a week. Mr. Buchanan. 2 units.
Lectures: 9-10, Monday and Wednesday.
17. Applied Mathematics.—A course dealing with the applications of mathematics to dynamics of a particle and of a rigid body,
and to the two body problem in celestial mechanics.
Prerequisite:  Physics 6.
Text-book: Loney, A Treatise on Dynamics of a Particle and
Rigid Bodies, Cambridge.
Three hours a week.  Mr. Richardson. 3 units.
This course may be taken either as an undergraduate or a
graduate course.
(Given in 1938-39 and alternate years.)
18. History of Mathematics.—A reading course covering the
historical development of the elementary branches of mathematics
from the earliest times to the present. Essays will be assigned.
Mr. Gage. 1 unit.
19. Methods in High School Mathematics.—This course is offered
primarily for students in the Teacher Training Course and does not
carry undergraduate credit.
Readings to be assigned.
Two hours a week. Second Term. Mr. Richardson.
Graduate Courses
20. Vector Analysis.—Weatherburn, Vector Analysis.
21. Theory of Functions of a Real Variable. 138 Faculty of Arts and Science
22. Theory of Functions of a Complex Variable.
23. Differential Geometry. — Weatherburn, Differential Geometry.
24. Projective Geometry. — Veblen and Young, Projective
Geometry, Vol. I.
25. Celestial Mechanics.—Moulton, An Introduction to Celestial
Mechanics.
26. Ordinary and Partial Differential Equations.
27. Theory of Numbers and Algebraic Numbers.
28. Linear Algebras. — Dickson, Algebren und ihre Zahlen-
theorie.
29. Modern Algebraic Theories. — Dickson, Modern Algebraic
Theories.
30. Harmonic and Elliptic Functions.—Byerly, Integral Cal-
guIus; Whittaker and Watson, Modern Analysis; Gray, Mathews
and MacRobert, Bessel Functions.
Department of Modern Languages
Professor: D. O. Evans.
Professor: A. F. B. Clark.
Associate Professor: Isabel Maclnnes.
Assistant Professor: Janet T. Greig.
Assistant Professor: Dorothy Dallas.
Assistant Professor: Wessie Tipping.
Instructor: Joyce Hallamore.
Instructor: W. T. E. Kennett.
Assistant in French: Madame D. Darlington.
Assistant in German: Alice Roys.
With the consent of the Professor in charge of the course, a
student taking a General Course B.A. degree may be admitted to
any course in the Third and Fourth Years in addition to, but not
in lieu of, 3 (a) and 4 (a) ; and a student taking a B.Com. degree may
be admitted to French 3 (6) in lieu of French 3 (a). Students from
other universities who have already taken the work of 3 (a) and
4 (a) may be given special permission by the Head of the Department to substitute other courses.
French
1. Maupassant, Contes (Nelson) ; Moliere, Le Bourgeois gentil-
homme (Didier); Mills, Free Composition in French (Nelson) ;
Les cent meilleurs poemes lyriques (Gowans & Gray).
For reference: Ritchie, Third French Course (Nelson).
3 units.
Prerequisite: Junior matriculation French or its equivalent. Modern Languages 139
Lectures: 11-12, Monday, Wednesday, and Friday or
11-12, Tuesday, Thursday, and Saturday or
1.30-2.30, Monday, Wednesday, and Friday.
2. Balzac, Gobseck (Oxford University Press) ; Gautier, Le
capitaine Fracasse (Dent). Independent reading will be required,
to include Anatole France, Le crime de Sylvestre Bonnard (Nelson)
and other prescribed texts.    See  also   under Summer Reading.
Composition in French based on the above.
3 units.
Prerequisite: French 1 or its equivalent.
Lectures: 9-10, Monday, Wednesday, Friday or
9-10, Tuesday, Thursday, and Saturday or
2.30-3.30, Monday, Wednesday, and Friday.
3. (a) The Literature of the Age of Louis XIV. Lectures on the
history and social conditions of the period, and on the development
of the literature. Careful reading and discussion of the following
texts: Schinz and King, Seventeenth Century French Readings
(Holt) ; Corneille, Le Cid (Didier) ; Racine, Iphigenie (American
Book Co.) or Phedre (Heath) ; Moliere, Le Misanthrope (Didier),
or L'Avare (Manchester Univ. Press) ; Le Tartuffe (Heath).
Conversation and written resumes based on the above.
This course is obligatory for all students taking Third Year
French. French 2 is a prerequisite. Students who cannot write
French with some facility are advised not to attempt 3 (a).
Students who intend to take French throughout the four years
or who wish to teach this subject should also take 3(c).        3 units.
Lectures: 11-12, Tuesday, Thursday, and Saturday.
3. (6) The Literature of the XlXth Century (Verse and
Novel). Nine French Poets (Macmillan) ; Hugo, Poemes choisis
(Manchester University Press) ; Balzac, Eugenie Grandet (Oxford)/
Independent readings will be specified. This course is intended
for Honours students.
Lectures: 10-11, Monday, Wednesday, and Friday.
3. (c) French Composition. Phonetics. 1 hour a week. Composition and oral practice, 2 hours. French Intonation Exercises,
by Klinghardt and De Fourmestraux; Exercises de prononciation
frangaise, by Nicolette Pernot. 3 units.
Summer Reading: See the announcement after the Fourth Year
Courses.
Lectures: Section 1, 11-12, Monday, Wednesday, and Friday.
Section 2, to be arranged.
4. (a) The Romantic Drama. — Lectures on the evolution of
the drama during the XlXth Century. Hugo, Hernani (Nelson) ;
Alfred de Vigny, Chatterton (Oxford); Musset, Three Plays
(Nelson) ;   Rostand,   Cyrano   de  Bergerac   (Holt) ;   Stewart   and 140 Faculty of Arts and Science
Tilley,   The  Romantic   Movement  in   French  Literature   (Cambridge).  Extensive independent reading will be expected.
3 units.
French 3 (a) is a prerequisite. Students who cannot write
accurate French with facility and understand spoken French are
advised not to attempt 4(a).
Lectures: 10-11, Tuesday, Thursday, and Saturday.
4. (6) The Literature of the Eighteenth Century.—Lectures on
the history and social conditions of the period, with special emphasis
on the philosophe movement, and the beginnings of romanticism.
The inter-relations of French and English thought and literature
will be touched upon. Careful reading and discussion of the following texts: Selections from Voltaire (Havens), Century Co.;
Rousseau, Morceaux choisis (Mornet), Didier; Diderot, Extraits
(Fallex), Delagrave; Beaumarchais, Le Barbier de Seville, Macmillan.
French 3 (a) and 3(6) are prerequisites. \
Lectures: 10-11, Monday, Wednesday, and Friday.
4. (c) French Composition. Practice in oral French, readings
and discussion, free composition and translation. Lectures on
French institutions, one hour. This course should be taken in conjunction with French 4 (a) and French 4 (ft). 3 units.
Prerequisite: French 3 (c).
Lectures:
Section 1, 2.30-3.30, Monday, Wednesday, and Friday.
Section 2, to be arranged.
5. (a) Modern Language Teaching.—The study and analysis of
the methods of teaching modern languages, with special reference to
French and German. Theory and practice of High School teaching.
Correlation of modern foreign languages with other school subjects.
This course is provided for students in the Teacher Training
Course and does not carry undergraduate credit.
5. (6) The Middle Ages and XVIth Century.—For graduates
only. Texts: Le Mystere d'Adam (Manchester University Press) ;
Rabelais, Gargantua xiv, xv, xxi, xxiii, xxiv, Pantagruel viii
(Jouaust) ; Montaigne, Selected Essays (Manchester University
Press) ; Ronsard, Oeuvres choisies (Larousse). 3 units.
5. (c) The History of French Criticism. — French literary
criticism and theory, from the Pleiade to the present day. Vial-
Denise, Idees et doctrines litteraires (three vols., Delagrave). For
graduates only. 3 units.
Summer   Reading
Upon entering the courses for the years stated, the student must
satisfy the instructor that he has read the books mentioned below. Modern Languages 141
Second Year:
1. Balzac, Le Pere Goriot.
2. Scarron, Le roman comique.
Third Year:
1. Chateaubriand, Atala*
2. Madame de Stael, De I'Allemagne.
3. Rivarol, Discours sur I'universalite de la langue frangaise.
4. Napoleon Ier., Lettres, Bulletins, Proclamations.
Fourth Year:
1. Marivaux, Le Jeu de I'amour et du hasard.
2. Voltaire, Contes.
3. Voltaire, Zaire.
4. Sedaine, Le philosophe sans le savoir*
5. Bernardin de Saint-Pierre, Paul et Virginie*
6. Musset, Fantasio.
7. Banville, Gringoire*
The above have all been chosen from the series Les Classiques
pour tous so as to lighten the cost of buying books for vacation
reading. At the present rate of exchange they can be bought at the
University Bookstore for ten or fifteen cents each. As these books
can be carried in the pocket and read at odd moments, no excuse will
be accepted for failure to do summer reading.
Note:—Those books marked with an asterisk (*) are expected
to be read by Honours students only.
German
Beginners' Course. — Evans and Roseler, College German,
Crofts; Durian, Kai aus der Kiste, Holt. 3 units.
Lectures:
Sections A and B, 11-12, Monday, Wednesday and Friday.
Sections C and D, 2.30-3.30, Monday, Wednesday and Friday.
1. (1) Baerg, Alternate German Grammar Review, Crofts; (2)
Schnack, Klick aus dem Spielzeugladen, Holt; (3) Nohara, Aben-
teuer in Berlin, Crofts; (4) Thoma, Cora; Vier Lausbubengeschich-
ten, Heath.
Lectures:
Section A,   9-10, Tuesday, Thursday, and Friday.
Section B, 10-11, Tuesday, Thursday, and Friday.
2. Whitney and Stroebe, Easy German Composition, Holt.
Composition and conversation based on texts read.
Diamond and Schomaker, Lust und Leid, Holt; Roseler,
Moderne Deutsche Erzahler, Norton; Bruns, Book of German
Lyrics. 3 units. 142 Faculty of Arts and Science
German 1, or its equivalent, is prerequisite for German 2.
Lectures: 2.30-3.30, Monday, Wednesday, and Friday.
3.  (a)  The Classical Period.
Lectures on the development of Eighteenth Century literature.
Texts for special study: Lessing, Emilia Galotti, Heath; Goethe,
Faust I, Heath; Schiller, Die Jungfrau von Orleans, Holt. Some
knowledge will also be required of Lessing's Minna von Barnhelm,
Goethe's Iphigenie and Schiller's Maria Stuart. Composition text:
Whitney and Stroebe, German Composition, Holt. 3 units.
Lectures: 9-10, Tuesday, Thursday, and Saturday.
Summer Reading: Before entering German 3 students must
read: Fleissner, Deutsches Literatur-Lesebuch, Crofts, to page 92.
(J. G. Robertson, The Literature of Germany, Home University
Library, is also recommended.)
3. (ft) The Novelle. — Lectures on the development of the
German Novelle, with special emphasis on the XlXth Century.
Text: Deutsche Erzahler, Insel Verlag. Extensive independent
reading will be expected. 3 units.
4. (a) Nineteenth Century German Drama.—Text: Campbell,
German Plays of the Nineteenth Century, Crofts. 3 units.
4.  (ft)  Nineteenth Century German Fiction. 3 units.
Courses 4 (a) and 4 (ft) are given alternately.
Department of Philosophy and Psychology
Professor: H. T. J. Coleman.
Associate Professor of Psychology and Education:
Jennie Wyman Pilcher.
Lecturer: Joseph E. Morsh.
Philosophy
1. Introduction to Philosophy.—This course is intended for two
classes of students: first, those who contemplate specializing in
Philosophy either as Honour or Pass students in their Third and
Fourth Years; and second, those who wish a single course which
will give in an untechnical way a statement and discussion of fundamental philosophical problems and thus assist them in their special
studies in other departments.
Text-book: Patrick, Introduction to Philosophy, Houghton-
Mifflin, revised ed.
References: Brightman, An Introduction to Philosophy; Cunningham, Problems of Philosophy; Drake, An Invitation to Philosophy; Alexander, A Short History of Philosophy; Perry, The
Approach to Philosophy.
Three hours a week. 3 units.
Lectures: 2.30-3.30, Monday, Wednesday, and Friday. Philosophy 143
2. Ethics.
Text-book: Dewey and Tufts, Ethics, Holt.
A special study will be made of selected portions of Aristotle's
Ethics, Mill's Utilitarianism, and Kant's Metaphysic of Morals.
Three hours a week. 3 units.
Lectures: 10-11, Tuesday, Thursday, and Saturday.
3. History of Greek Philosophy from Thales to Plato (inclusive).
Text-books: Bakewell, Source Book in Ancient Philosophy,
Scribners; Burnet, Greek Philosophy (Part I), Macmillan. In
connection with this course a special study will be made of Plato's
Republic, Phaedo, and Philebus.
Three hours a week. 3 units.
(Given in 1938-39 and alternate years.)
4. The history of Philosophy from the Renaissance to the
Present Time.
Text-book: Alexander, A Short History of Philosophy, Macmillan.
References: Rand, Modern Classical Philosophers, and the
various Histories of Philosophy.       J
Three hours a week. 3 units.
Lectures: 11-12, Monday, Wednesday, and Friday.
(Given in 1937-38 and alternate years.)
5. The Philosophy of Kant, with special study of the Critique of
Pure Reason.
Three hours a week. 3 units.
(Given in 1937-38 and alternate years.)
6. Philosophic Movements Since the Time of Kant. Post-
Kantian Idealism, Pragmatism, Modern Realism, Bergson and
others.
Three hours a week. 3 units.
(Given in 1938-39 and alternate years.)
7. Philosophy of Education.—A course of lectures and discussions dealing with educational movements since the beginning of
the 19fh century, and with the theories of life and of mind which
are implicit in these movements.
Text-books: Spencer, Education, Everyman Edition; Dewey,
Democracy and Education, Macmillan.
References: Butler, The Meaning of Education; Rousseau,
Emile; Locke, The Conduct of the Understanding; Froebel, The
Education of Man; Dewey, The School and Society; Articles in the
Cyclopediaof Education, Macmillan. 144 Faculty of Arts and Science
Psychology 1 or Philosophy 1 is recommended as preparatory to
this course.
Three hours a week. 3 units.
8. Logic.—A course in formal logic, both deductive and inductive, followed by a study of the newer developments in logical
theory.
Three hours a week. 3 units.
Lectures: 1.30-2.30, Monday, Wednesday, and Friday.
Psychology
1. Elementary Psychology.
Text-book: Dunlap, Elements of Psychology, Mosley Co.
Three hours a week. Mr. Morsh. 3 units.
Lectures:
Section 1,    9-10, Monday, Wednesday, and Friday.
Section 2, 11-12, Monday, Wednesday, and Friday.
2. Elementary Experimental Psychology.
Text-book: Seashore, Elementary Experiments in Psychology,
Henry Holt.
Prerequisite:  Psychology 1.
Three hours a week.  Mr. Morsh. 3 units.
3. Social Psychology.—A study of those particular phases of
mental life and development which are fundamental in social
organization and activity.
Texts to be announced.
Prerequisite: Psychology 1 or Philosophy 1.
Three hours a week. Mr. Morsh. 3 units.
Lectures:
Section 1, 10-11, Monday, Wednesday, and Friday.
Section 2, 11-12, Tuesday, Thursday, and Saturday.
4. Psychology of Personality. — Development of personality;
heredity and environment; history of mental measurement;
current theories of the nature and growth of intelligence; measurement of intelligence; subnormal, normal and gifted children;
development from birth to maturity; nature and causes of mental
defects and peculiarities; juvenile delinquency; psychology of
adjustment.
Text-book: Sehaffer, The Psychology of Adjustment, Houghton-
Mifflin.
Prerequisite: Psychology 1.
Three hours a week. Mrs. Pilcher. 3 units.
Lectures: 1.30-2.30, Monday, Wednesday, and Friday. Physics 145
5. Abnormal Psychology.
Prerequisite: Psychology 4.
Three hours a week. Mr. Morsh. 3 units.
(Not given in 1937-38.)
6. Clinical Psychology.
Text-book: Terman, Measurement of Intelligence, Houghton-
Mifflin.
Prerequisite: Psychology 4.
(Students will be admitted to this class only by permission of
the instructor.)
Three hours a week. Mrs. Pilcher. 3 units.
Department of Physics
Professor: T. C. Hebb.
Professor: A. E. Hennings.
Associate Professor: J. G. Davidson. (On leave of absence.)
Associate Professor: G. M. Shrum.
Assistant: Robert Christy.
Assistant: George Mossop.
Assistant: Kenneth R. McKenzie. 1
Assistant: Henry H. Clayton.
Assistant: Morris Bloom.
Assistant: Gleb Goumeniouk.
Primarily for First and Second Year Students
1. Introduction to Physics.—A general study of the principles
of mechanics, properties of matter, heat, light, sound and electricity, both in the lecture room and in the laboratory. The course
has two objects: (1) to give the minimum acquaintance with
physical science requisite for a liberal education to those whose
studies will be mainly literary; (2) to be introductory to the
courses in Chemistry, Engineering and Advanced Physics. Students
must reach the required standard in both theoretical and practical
work. Open only to students who have not matriculated in Physics.
Text-book: Millikan, Gale and Edwards, A First Course in
Physics for Colleges.
Three lectures and two hours laboratory a week. 3 units.
Lectures: 9-10, Monday, Wednesday, and Friday.
2. Elementary Physics.—This course consists of a general course
in Physics suitable for those students who have obtained standing in
Junior Matriculation Physics or its equivalent. It covers mechanics,
properties of matter, heat, light, sound, electricity and some of the
more recent developments and theories.
Text-book: Knowlton, Physics for College Students, second
edition, McGraw-Hill.
References: Watson, A Text-book of Physics, Longmans; Kaye
and Laby, Physical and Chemical Constants, Longmans. 146 Faculty of Arts and Science
Prerequisite: High School Physics.
Three lectures and one two-hour laboratory period a week.
3 units.
Lectures: 9-10 and 10-11, Tuesday, Thursday, and Saturday.
3. Mechanics, Molecular Physics and Heat.—A study of statics
and dynamics of both a particle and a rigid body, the laws of
gases and vapors, temperature, hygrometry, capillarity, expansion,
and calorimetry.
Prerequisite: Physics 1 or 2.
Text-books: Reynolds, Elementary Mechanics, Prentice-Hall;
Edser, Heat for Advanced Students, Macmillan.
Two lectures and two hours laboratory a week. 3 units.
Lectures: 10-11, Monday and Wednesday.
4. Modern Physics.—This is a general course for students who
are not specializing in physics, but who are interested in the recent
developments in this branch of science. It includes descriptions
and discussions of many of the fundamental experiments which
are responsible for the present viewpoint in physics. Analytical
demonstrations, such as are given, do not involve advanced mathematics. Among the topics treated are: The nature of light, the
quantum theory, radioactivity, electronic phenomena, X-rays, relativity, astrophysics, and cosmic rays.
Candidates for Honours in Physics receive no credit for this
course.
Prerequisite: Physics 1 or 2.
Text-books: Jauncey, Modern Physics, Van Nostrand; Blackwood, Outline of Atomic Physics, Wiley; Eldridge, The Physical
Basis of Things, McGraw-Hill.
Three lectures a week. 3 units.
(Not given in 1937-38.)
Primarily for Third Year Students
5. Electricity and Magnetism. — A study of the fundamentals
of magnetism and electricity, including alternating currents and
electron physics.
Prerequisite: Physics 1 or 2.
Text-book:  Zeleny, Elements of Electricity, McGraw-Hill.
Two lectures and three hours laboratory a week. 3 units.
Lectures: 11-12, Monday, Wednesday, and Friday.
6. Theoretical Mechanics. — A selected course in statics, dynamics of a particle and of a rigid body.
Text-book: Edwards, Analytic and Vector Mechanics, McGraw-Hill.
Two lectures a week. 2 units. Physics 147
7. Introduction to Theoretical Physics.—A course of lectures
upon selected topics, including elasticity, viscosity, and hydromechanics.
Two lectures a week. 2 units.
8. Physical Optics.—A course of lectures accompanied by laboratory work, covering optical instruments, interference, diffraction,
polarisation, the nature of light and experiments on ether drift.
Text-book: Robertson, Introduction to Physical Optics, second
edition, Van Nostrand.
Reference: Meyer, The Diffraction of Light X-rays and Material Particles, University of Chicago Press.
Two lectures and one three-hour laboratory period a week.
3 units.
9; General Physics (or Physics for Teachers.)—This course is
primarily for those students who plan to teach Science in High
School and whose major is not Physics. In addition to a more
advanced study of general Physics than is usual in a college text,
a critical study of selected topics as presented in a number of High
School Physics texts will be made. The laboratory period will be
devoted to the working of problems and the acquiring of laboratory
technique.
Candidates for Honours in Physics receive no credit for this
course.
Text-book: Watson, A Text-book of Physics, Longmans; or
equivalent.
Two lectures and one three-hour laboratory period a week.
3 units.
(May not be given in 1937-38.)
Primarily for Fourth Year Students
10. Light.—A short lecture course for students who have not
taken Physics 8. A study of optical instruments, light sources and
filters, spectroscopy, photometry, energy measurements, refrae-
tometers, interference, diffraction and polarised light.
Text-book: Robertson, Introduction to Physical Optics, Van
Nostrand.
One lecture a week. 1 unit.
11. Electricity and Magnetism.—In this course especial attention
is given to the theoretical phases of Electricity and Magnetism.
Prerequisites: Physics 3 and 5 and Mathematics 10.
Text-book:    Page-Adams, Principles of Electricity, Van Nostrand.
Two lectures a week. 2 units.
12. Introduction to Atomic Structure. — A course of lectures
dealing with the conduction of electricity through gases, cathode and 148 Faculty of Arts and Science
positive rays, elementary spectroscopy, X-rays, radioactivity and
other atomic phenomena.
Prerequisites: Courses 3 and 5, and Differential and Integral
Calculus.
Text-book: Richtmyer, Introduction to Modern Physics, McGraw-Hill.
Two lectures a week. 2 units.
13. Kinetic Theory of Gases.—A course of lectures giving an
exposition of the classical deductions and an outline of recent
experimental advances of the subject.
Text-book: Loeb, Kinetic Theory of Gases.
Two lectures a week. 2 units.
14. Thermodynamics.—A course of lectures covering the fundamental principles of the subject.
Text-book: Birtwistle, The Principles of Thermodynamics.
One lecture a week. 1 unit.
19. Experimental Physics.—This is chiefly a laboratory course
covering work in thermionics, spectroscopy, high vacua and general
laboratory technique.
Carefully prepared reports, abstracts and bibliographies will
constitute an essential part of the course.
Six hours laboratory a week. 2 to 3 units.
With the consent of the Head of the Department, Fourth Year
students may select one or more units from the following graduate
courses:
Primarily for Graduate Students
20. Spectroscopy. — A study of the methods of excitation and
observation of spectra, series in arc and spark spectra, multiplets,
Zeeman and Stark effects, and band spectra.
One lecture a week. 1 unit.
21. Radiation and Atomic Structure.—A study of the theories
of radiation and miscellaneous related topics selected from current
literature.
One lecture a week. 1 unit.
22. Advanced Electricity and Magnetism. — A study of the
Electromagnetic theory and its application, the theories of metallic
conduction, and electrical oscillations.
One lecture a week. 1 unit.
23. Vector Analysis. — A course of lectures upon the applications of Vector Analysis to problems in Physics.
One lecture a week. 1 unit. Zoology 149
24. X-rays and Crystal Structure. — A study of the modern
methods of production and observation of X-rays, the Compton
effect, X-ray analysis, and the structure of crystals.
One lecture a week. 1 unit.
25. The Theory of Sound — A course of lectures covering the
propagation of sound, and the general phenomena associated with
vibrating systems.
One lecture a week. 1 unit.
26. The Theory of Potential. — A general course giving the
applications of the Theory of Potential to Physics.
One lecture a week. 1 unit.
27. The Theory of Relativity.—An introductory course to the
Theory of Relativity.
One lecture a week. 1 unit.
28. Quantum Mechanics. — An introduction to the theory of
Quantum Mechanics, and the application of Wave Mechanics to
atomic problems.
One lecture a week. 1 unit.
40. Methods in High School Physics. — This course is offered
primarily for students in the Teacher Training Course and does not
carry undergraduate credit.  Readings to be assigned.
Two lectures a week. Second Term.
Department of Zoology
Professor: C. McLean Fraser.
Associate Professor: G. J. Spencer.
Assistant Professor: Mrs. Gertrude M. Watney.
Assistant: J. Laurence McHugh.
Assistant: Kenneth Jacob.
Note :—Biology 1 is prerequisite to all courses in Zoology.
1. General Morphology.—General morphology of animals. Comparative anatomy. The relationships of animal groups. Comparative
life-histories.
Text-book: Parker and Haswell, Manual of Zoology, Macmillan.
This course is prerequisite to other courses in Zoology.
Two lectures and two hours laboratory a week. 3 units.
Lectures: 11-12, Monday and Wednesday.
Laboratory: 1.30-3.30 or 3.30-5.30, Thursday.
2. Comparative Anatomy of Vertebrates.—A detailed comparative study of a member of each of the classes of Vertebrates.
Two lectures and four hours laboratory a week. First Term.
2 units.
Lectures: 9-10, Tuesday and Thursday.
Laboratory: 1.30-5.30, Tuesday. 150 Faculty of Arts and Science
3. Comparative Anatomy of Invertebrates.—A detailed comparative study of a member of each of the main classes of Invertebrates.
Two lectures and four hours laboratory a week. Second Term.
2 units.
Lectures: 9-10, Tuesday and Thursday.
Laboratory: 1.30-5.30, Tuesday.
4. Morphology of Insects.—General Entomology.
A collection of insects is required.
This course is prerequisite to other courses in Entomology.
Two lectures and four hours laboratory a week. First Term.
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