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Calendar The University of British Columbia Aug 30, 1922

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Array CALENDAR
Cfje Untoersttp
OF
PrtttsSf) Columbia
EIGHTH   SESSION
1922-1923
VANCOUVER,   BRITISH   COLUMBIA
1922
ffi: CALENDAR
W$t Umtasttp
OF
Prtttsif) Columbia
EIGHTH  SESSION
1922-1923
VANCOUVER.  BRITISH COLUMBIA
1922  THE UNIVERSITY OF BRITISH
COLUMBIA
VISITOR.
The Hon. Walter Cameron Nichol, Lieutenant-Governor of
British Columbia.
CHANCELLOR.
R. E. McKechnie, Esa, M.D., CM., LL.D, F.A.C.S.
PRESIDENT.
L. S. Klinck, Esa., M.S.A., D.Sc.
GOVERNORS.
R. E. McKechnie, Esa., M.D., CM., LL.D., F.A.C.S. (ex officio).
L S. Klinck, Esa., M.S.A., D.Sc. (ex officio).
S. Dunn Scott, Esa., M.A., LL.D., Vancouver.  Term expires 1927.
Robert P. McLennan, Esa., Vancouver.   Term expires 1927.
Roderick Fraser, Esa., M.D., Victoria.  Term expires 1927.
Evelyn F. K. Farris, M.A., Victoria.   Term expires 1923.
Hon. Denis Murphy, Vancouver.   Term expires 1923.
Robie L. Reid, Esa., K.C.   Term expires 1925.
Campbell Sweeny, Esa., Vancouver.    Term expires 1925.
Chbistofheb Spencer, Esa., Vancouver.   Term expires 1925.
SENATE,
(a) The Minister of Education, The Honourable John Duncan MacLean,
M.D., CM.
The Superintendent of Education, S. J. Willis, Esa., B.A.
The Chancellor.
The President  (Chairman).
(6) Dean of the Faculty of Agriculture, F. M. Clement, Esa., B.S.A.
Dean of the Faculty of Applied Science, Reginald W. Brock, Esa.,
M.A., LL.D., F.G.S., F.R.S.C.
Dean of the Faculty of Arts and Science, H. T. J. Coleman, Esa.,
B.A, Ph.D.
Dean of the Faculty of Forestry.
Representatives of the Faculty of Agriculture: P.  A. Boving, Esa.,
C.P., C.A.A.A.;   Wilfrid Sadler, Esa., B.S.A., M.Sc, N.D.D.
Representatives of the Faculty of Applied Science:  E. H. Archibald,
Esa., B.Sc, A.M., Ph.D., F.R.S.E. & C.; L. W. Gill, Esa., B.Sc,
M.Sc.
Representatives of the Faculty of Arts and Science: T. H. Boggs, Esa.,
M.A., Ph.D.; D. Buchanan, Esa., B.A., M.A., Ph.D., F.R.S.C.
Representatives of the Faculty of Forestry. The University of British Columbia.
(c) Appointed by the Lieutenant-Governor in Council:—
Rev. William Leslie Clay, B.A., D.D., Victoria, B.C.
The Right Rev. A. U. de Pencier, M.A., D.D., Vancouver, B.C.
Lemuel Fergus Robertson, Esa., M.A., Vancouver, B.C.
(d) The Principal of Vancouver Normal School, D. M. Robinson, Esa., B.A.
The Principal of Victoria Normal School, D. L. MacL^urin, Esa., B.A.
(e) Representative  of   High   School   Principals   and   Assistants,   G.   A.
Fergusson, Esa., B.A.
(/) Representative of Provincial Teachers' Institute.
(g) Representatives of Affiliated Colleges:—
Victoria College, Victoria, George Jay, Esa.
Westminster Hall, Vancouver (Theological), Rev. W. H. Smith,
M.A., Ph.D., D.D.
The  Anglican  Theological  College  of  British  Columbia,  Vancouver, Rev. W. H. Vance, M.A.
(h) Elected by Convocation:—
His Honour F. W. Howay, LL.B., F.R.S.C, New Westminster.
G. G. Sedgewick, Esa., B.A., Ph.D., Vancouver, B. C.
N. Wolverton, Esa., B.A., LL.D., Nelson, B. C.
H. F. G. Letson, Esa., B.Sc, Vancouver, B. C.
Miss A. B. Jamieson, B.A., Vancouver, B. C
G. W. Scott, Esa., B.A., Vancouver, B.C.
C. Killam, Esa., M.A., D.C.L., Vancouver, B. C.
J. S. Gordon, Esa., B.A., Vancouver, B.C
H. C. Shaw, Esa., B.A., Vancouver, B. C.
W. B. Burnett, Esa., B.A., M.D., CM., Vancouver, B. C.
J. M. Turnbull, Esa., B.A.Sc, Vancouver, B. C
G. E. Robinson, Esa., B.A., Vancouver, B. C.
A. H. Sovereign, Esa., B.A., M.A., Vancouver, B. C
His Honour J. D. Swanson, B.A., Kamloops, B. C.
W. P. Argue, Esa., B.A., Vancouver, B. C.
OFFICERS AND STAFF.
Leonard S. Klinck, B.S.A. (Guelph), M.S.A., D.Sc. (Ames), President.
H. T. J. Coleman, B.A. (Toronto), Ph.D. (Columbia), Dean of the Faculty
of Arts and Science and Professor of Philosophy.
Reginald W. Brock, M.A., LL.D. (Queen's), F.G.S., F.R.S.C,, Dean of the
Faculty of Applied Science and Professor of Geology.
F. M. Clement, B.S.A. (Guelph), Dean of the Faculty of Agriculture and
Professor of Horticulture.
Miss M. L. Bollert, B.A., M.A.  (Toronto), A.M.   (Columbia), Dean of
Women and Assistant Professor of English.
Stanley W. Mathews, M.A. (Queen's), Registrar.
F. Dallas, Bursar.
John Ridington, Librarian. Officers and Staff.
Department of Agronomy.
P. A. Boving, Cand. Phil. (Malmo, Sweden), Cand. Agr. Alnarp. Agriculture (Sweden), Professor of Agronomy and Head of the Department.
G. G. Moe, B.S.A. (Macdonald College), M. Sc. (McGill), Associate Professor of Agronomy.
Geo. B. Boving, B.S.A. (Macdonald College), Extension Assistant under
Burrell Grant.
R. A. Derick, B.S.A.  (Macdonald), Assistant in Agronomy.
D. G. Laird, B.S.A. (Guelph), Assistant in Agronomy.
Department of Animal Husbandry.
H. M. King, B.S.A. (Guelph), Associate Professor of Animal Husbandry.
R. L. Davis, B.S.A.  (Montana), M.S.A.   (Ames), Assistant Professor of
Animal Husbandry.
Walter  N.  Jones,  B.S.A.   (Macdonald),  M.S.A.   (Iowa  State  College),
Assistant Professor of Animal Husbandry.
E. C. Stiixwell, B.S.A. (Guelph), Assistant in Animal Husbandry.
H. R. Hare, B.S.A. (Guelph), Extension Assistant under Burrell Grant.
Thomas Jagger, D.V.S.  (Ont. Vet. Col.), Lecturer in Veterinary Science.
Department of Bacteriology.
R. H. Mullin, B.A., M.B. (Toronto), Professor of Bacteriology and Head
of the Department.
R. E. Coleman, M.B. (Toronto), Lecturer in Bacteriology.
Miss Freda L. Wilson, B.A. (Brit. Col.), Assistant in Bacteriology.
Department of Botany.
Andrew H. Hutchinson, M.A.   (McMaster), Ph.D.  (Chicago), Professor
of Botany and Head of the Department.
John Davidson, F.L.S., F.B.S.E., Assistant Professor of Botany.
J. W. Eastham, B.Sc. (Edin.), Lecturer in Plant Pathology.
Department of Chemistry.
E. H. Archibald, B.Sc. (Dal.), A.M., Ph.D. (Harvard), F.R.S.E.&C, Professor of Chemistry and Head of the Department.
Robert H. Clark, M.A. (Toronto), Ph.D. (Leipsig), Professor of Organic
Chemistry.
W. F. Seyer, B.A., M.Sc. (Alberta), Ph.D. (McGill), Associate Professor
of Chemistry.
M. J. Marshall, B.Sc, M.Sc. (McGill), Ph.D. (Mass. Inst, of Technology),
Assistant Professor of Chemistry.
Miss Ruth Fulton, B.A., M.A. (Brit. Col.), Instructor in Chemistry.
John Allardyce, B.A., M.A. (Brit. Col.), Assistant in Chemistry.
A. E. Boss, B.A. (Brit. Col.), Assistant in Chemistry.
Miss Freda Handford, B.A. (Brit. Col.), Assistant in Chemistry.
Miss Violet E. Dunbar, B.A. (Brit. Col.), Assistant in Chemistry.
K. B. Gillie, B.Sc. (Brit. Col.), Assistant in Chemistry. The University of British Columbia.
Department of Civil Engineering and Surveying.
E. G.   Matheson,   B.A.Sc.   (McGill),   M.E.I.C,  M.Am.S.CE.,   Associate
Professor of Civil Engineering.
W. H. Powell, B.Sc. (McGill), Lecturer in Civil Engineering.
A. Lighthall, B.Sc. (McGill), Instructor in Civil Engineering.
G. M. Irwin, B.Sc. (McGill), Instructor in Civil Engineering.
F. A. Wilkin, B.A.Sc. (McGill), Lecturer in Civil Engineering.
J. R. Grant, B.Sc. (Queen's), Lecturer in Civil Engineering.
Department of Classics.
L. F. Robertson, M.A.  (McGill), Professor of Classics and Head of the
Department.
O. J. Todd, Ph.D. (Harvard), Professor of Greek.
H. T. Logan, B.A. (McGill and Oxon), M.A. (Oxon), Associate Professor
of Classics.
A. N. St. John Mildmay, M.A.  (Oxon.), Assistant in Classics.
Department of Dairying.
Wilfrid  Sadler,  B.S.A.   (Macdonald),  M.Sc.   (McGill),  N.D.D.,  British
Dairy Institute, University College, Reading, England, Professor of
Dairying and Head of the Department.
N. S. Golding, N.D.A., N.D.D., B.S.A.  (Guelph), Assistant Professor of
Dairying.
Miss Marion J. Mounce, B.A., B.S.A.   (Brit. Col.), Extension Assistant
under Burrell Grant.
Department of Economics, Sociology and Political Science.
Theodore H. Boggs, B.A.  (Acadia and Yale), M.A., Ph.D.   (Yale), Professor of Economics and Head of the Department.
Henry F. Angus, B.A. (McGill), B.C.L., M.A. (Oxon.), Associate Professor
of Economics.
S. E. Beckett, B.A., M.A. (Queen's), Assistant Professor of Economics.
L. T. Fournier, B.A. (Brit. Col.), Assistant in Economics.
Department of English.
G. G. Sedgewick, B.A. (Dal.), Ph.D. (Harvard), Professor of English and
Head of the Department.
W. L. Macdonald, B.A. (Toronto), M.A. (Wisconsin), Ph.D. (Harvard),
Associate Professor of English.
Frederick G. C. Wood, B.A. (McGill), A.M. (Harvard), Assistant Professor of English.
Thorlief Larsen, B.A., M.A. (Toronto), B.A. (Oxon.), Assistant Professor
of English.
Francis Cox Walker, B.A. (U.N.B.), A.M., Ph.D. (Harvard), Assistant
Professor of English.
Miss M. L. Bollert, B.A., M.A. (Toronto), A.M. (Columbia), Assistant
Professor of English and Dean of Women. Officers and Staff.
Miss Stella McGuire, B.A., M.A. (Brit. Col.), Assistant in English.
Miss Katherine McKat, B.A. (Queen's), Assistant in English.
Miss Rena Grant, B.A. (Brit. Col.), Assistant in English.
Miss Dobothy Blakey, B.A. (Brit. Col.), Assistant in English.
Department of Forestry.
H. R. Christie, F.E.  (Toronto), Associate Professor of Forestry.
Department of Geology and Geography.
R. W. Brock, M.A., LL.D. (Queen's), F.G.S., F.R.S.C, Professor of Geology and Head of the Department.
S. J. Schofield, B.Sc. (Queen's), Ph.D. (Mass. Institute of Technology),
F.R.S.C, Professor of Physical and Structural Geology.
W. L. Uglow, B.A., M.A. (Queen's), B.Sc (School of Mining, Kingston),
M.S., Ph.D. (Wisconsin), Professor of Mineralogy and Petrography.
M. Y. Williams, B.Sc. (Queen's), Ph.D. (Yale), F.G.S.A., Professor of
Palaeontology and Stratigraphy.
L. V. Miller, B.Sc (Alberta), Assistant in Geology.
Department of History.
Mack Eastman, B.A. (Toronto), Ph.D. (Columbia), Professor of History
and Head of the Department.
W. N. Sage, B.A. (Toronto and Oxon.), M.A. (Oxon.), Associate Professor
of History.
F. H. Soward, B.A. (Toronto), B.Litt. (Oxon), Instructor in History.
Department of Horticulture.
F. M. Clement, B.S.A. (Guelph), Professor of Horticulture and Head of
the Department.
A. F. Barss, A.B. (Rochester), B.S. in Agriculture (Cornell), M.S. (Oregon
Agricultural College), Associate Professor of Horticulture.
F. E. Buck, B.S.A. (Macdonald), Assistant Professor of Horticulture.
W. A. Meodleton, B.S.A. (Macdonald College), Extension Assistant under
Burrell Grant.
Department of Mathematics.
D. Buchanan, B.A., M.A.  (McMaster), Ph.D.  (Chicago), F.R.S.C, Pro
fessor of Mathematics and Head of the Department.
George E. Robinson, B.A. (Dal.), Associate Professor of Mathematics.
E. E. Jordan, M.A. (Dal.), Assistant Professor of Mathematics.
L. Richardson, B.Sc. (London), Assistant Professor of Mathematics.
B. S. Hartley, M.A. (Cambridge), Lecturer in Mathematics.
F. J. Studer, B.A. (Brit. Col.), Assistant in Mathematics.
John Henry, M.A. (Cambridge), Assistant in Mathematics.
Miss Mae Barclay, M.A., (Brit. Col.), Assistant in Mathematics.
L. W. Heaslip, Assistant in Mathematics.
M. Hoke, Assistant in Mathematics.
C. A. Woodworth, Assistant in Mathematics.
S The University of British Columbia.
Department of Mechanical and Electrical Engineering.
L. W. Gill, B.Sc, M.Sc. (McGill), Professor of Mechanical and Eleetrical
Engineering and Head of the Department.
Cedric C  Ryan, M.Sc.    (McGill),   Associate   Professor   of   Mechanical
Engineering.
H. P. Archibald, B.A.Sc. (McGill), Instructor in Mechanical Drawing and
Shopwork.
E. M. Coles, B.A.Sc. (Brit. Col.), Assistant.
C. H. Barker, Assistant in Workshop, Mechanical Engineering.
J. Crowley, Assistant  (Moulder).
J. W. Faulkner, Instructor in Steam Laboratory.
F. McCrady, Assistant (Draughtsman).
S. Northrop, Assistant (Woodworker).
H. Taylor, Instructor in Machine Shop.
E. G. Parsons, Instructor in Thermo Laboratory.
Department of Mining and Metallurgy.
J. M. Turnbull, B.A.Sc. (McGill), Professor of Mining and Head of the
Department.
H. N. Thomson, B.Sc.  (McGill), Professor of Metallurgy.
George A. Gillies, M.Sc. (McGill), Associate Professor of Mining.
P. D. I. Honeyman, B.Sc. (Brit. Col.), Assistant in Assaying.
Department of Modern Languages.
H. Ashton, M.A. (Cantab.), D. Lett. (Univ. Paris), D. Litt. (Birmingham),
Officier de l'Instruction Publique (France), Professor of French and
Head of the Department.
A. F. B. Clark, B.A.  (Toronto), Ph.D.  (Harvard), Associate Professor
of French. I md
Miss Isabel MacInnes, M.A.   (Queen's), Assistant Professor of Modern
Languages.
G. Grojean (Licencie es Lettres), Licencie en Droit (Toulouse), Assistant
Professor of Modern Languages.
Miss Margaret Ross, Instructor in French.
Miss Janet T. Greig, B.A. (Queen's), Instructor in French.
Miss Kathleen Peck, B.A. (Brit. Col.), Assistant in French.
Miss Hazel E. McConnell, B.A. (Brit. Col.), Assistant in French.
Department of Nursing.
Miss Ethel I. Johns, R.N., Assistant Professor of Nursing.
Department of Philosophy.
H.   T.  J.   Coleman,   B.A.   (Toronto),   Ph.D.   (Columbia),   Professor  of
Philosophy and Head of the Department.
James Henderson, M.A. (Glasgow), Associate Professor of Philosophy.
Department of Physics.
T. C. Hebb, M.A., B.Sc. (Dal.), Ph.D. (Chicago), Professor of Physics and
Head of the Department. Officers and Staff.
A. E. Hennings, M.A.  (Lake Forest College, 111.), Ph.D.  (University of
Chicago), Associate Professor of Physics.
J.  G.  Davidson,  B.A.   (Toronto), Ph.D.   (Cal.),  Associate  Professor of
Physics.
Department of Poultry Husbandry.
E. A. Lloyd, B.S.A. (Sask.), Associate Professor of Poultry Husbandry.
V. S. Asmundsen, B.S.A.  (Sask.), M.S.A.  (Cornell), Assistant Professor
of Poultry Husbandry.
R. J. Skelton, B.S.A. (Ont. Agric. Col.), Assistant (Field Enumerator) in
Poultry Husbandry under Burrell Grant.
Department of Public Health.
R.  H. Mullin,  B.A.,  M.B.   (Toronto),  Red  Cross  Professor  of  Public
Health and Head of the Department.
Miss Mary Abd Mackenzie, B.A. (Toronto), R.N., Red Cross Instructor
in Public Health.
Department of Zoology.
C. McLean Fraser, B.A. (Toronto), Ph.D. (Iowa), F.R.S.C, Professor of
Zoology.
R. C Treherne, B.S.A. (Guelph), Lecturer in Entomology.
H. A. Dunlop, B.A. (Brit. Col.), Instructor in Zoology.
Norman L. Cutler, Assistant in Zoology.
A.'S. Lamb, M.D. (Baltimore), Medical Examiner to Students.
VICTORIA COLLEGE
(IN  AFFILIATION  WITH  THE   UNIVERSITY  OF   B.C.)
STAFF.
Edward   B.   Paul,  M.A.   (Aberdeen),  Principal,  Associate  Professor  of
Classics.
E.  Howard Russell, B.A.   (Queen's), Registrar,  Associate Professor of
Mathematics.
Percy H. Elliott, M.Sc. (McGill), Associate Professor of Science.
Jeanette A. Cann, B.L. (Dalhousie), Assistant Professor of English and
Philosophy.
Mme.   E.   Sanderson-Mongin,   Dipldmee,   Paris,   Assistant   Professor  of
French.
Alexander G. Smith, M.A. (Aberdeen), Instructor in History.
For Courses in Victoria College see under "Victoria College"
in this Calendar. 10 The University of British Columbia.
ACADEMIC YEAR 1922-1923.
1922.
Monday,
August 28th.
Registration  Day  for  First  Year  Applied
Science.
Summer School in Mechanical Engineering 1
opens.
Matriculation    Supplemental    Examinations
Wednesday,    . .
''  Supplemental Examinations in Arts begin
Friday,        .   Supplemental    Examinations    in    Applied
September 22nd. | Science begin.
™ ., ( Last day for Registration for Arts and Sci-
o   x    i.    oo  j -I ence,  Agriculture,  and  Second,  Third,
September 22nd. | '     6     M     ' .   ' '
I and Fourth Year Applied Science.
September 26th> LeCtUreS ' dgl'
T'      1
26th. J
Saturday,
f) t h     14th   f  ^ast *^ay ^or ^ban£e in Students' Courses.
Wednesday,^   .  Meeting rf ^ ^^
October 18th.
Friday        1
t-.        u      on.   r L38* d&y °f Lectures for Term.
December   8th. J
t^        ,       i'o,i   i Examinations begin.
December 12th.)
■n.    C ^6    onli. > Meeting of the Senate.
December 20th. j
•}
_.        ,        _, .  r Examinations end.
December   21st.
1923.
Monday,
January   8th.
Second Term begins. Academic Year. 11
Wednesday    \  M Qf the genat(j
February 21st. j
., „„ ,       r Last day of Lectures.
April 12th.    J
., -~ ,      !• Sessional Examinations begin.
April 17th.    f
Field Work in Applied Science begins immediately at the close of the Examinations.
Wednesday,
5dneSy'    l Meeting of the Senate.
May 9th.       }
,, Urtft^' - Congregation.
May 10th. J
Monday, "1   Junior and Senior Matriculation Examina-
June   25th. J tions begin. Junior and Senior Matriculation Supplemental Examinations.
to
SEPTEMBER, 1922.
Date
Wednesday, September 13th
Thursday, September 14th.
Friday, September 15th. .. .
Saturday, September 16th. .
Monday, September 18th...
Tuesday,  September  19th..
Hour
9 A.M.
1 P.M.
9 A.M.
1 P.M.
9  A.M.
1 P.M.
9  A.M.
9 A.M.
1  P.M.
9  A.M.
1   P.M.
History	
English Literature	
German Translation
Latin Authors and Sight.
Latin Grammar and Composition   	
Agriculture   	
• Junior Matriculation
French Translation
French Grammar  . .
Physics   .
Geometry
Chemistry   	
German  Grammar
Algebra  	
English Composition
Botany    	
Greek   	
Hour
9  A.M.
1  P.M.
9  A.M.
1  P.M.
9  A.M.
1  P.M.
9  A.M.
9  A.Ml
1  P.M.
9  A.M.
1   P.M.
Senior Matriculation
Sight, and
History.
English Literature.
German Translation.
Latin Authors.
Latin Composition,
Roman  History.
Trigonometry.
French Literature.
French Language.
Physics.
Geometry.
Greek Grammar and Composition.
Chemistry.
German Grammar and Composition.
Algebra.
English Composition.
Greek Authors.
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w Faculty of Arts and Science Supplemental Examinations.
SEPTEMBER, 1922.
Date
Wednesday,
September 13 th
Thursday,
September 14th
Friday,
September 15th
Saturday,
September 16th
Monday,
September 18 th
Tuesday,
September 19th
Wednesday,
September 20 th
Hour
9
A.M.
1
P.M.
9
A.M.
1
P.M.
9
AM.
1
P.M.
9
AM.
9
A.M.
1
P.M.
9
A.M.
1
P.M.
9
A.M.
1
P.M.
First Year
History 1,  2,  3	
English Literature	
Latin Authors   	
Latin Composition, Sight, and
History   	
French Authors  	
French   Grammar    ,
Physics  1    ,
Geometry    ^
Greek	
Chemistry 1   	
German	
Algebra 	
English Composition	
Economics 1	
Biology  1   	
Spanish	
Second Year
Third Year
History 1,  2,   3	
English  Literature   	
Latin Authors   	
Latin Composition, Sight, and
History   	
Calculus   	
French Authors  	
French Grammar	
Physics 1, 2  	
Philosophy  1   	
Geometry    	
Greek	
Chemistry  1,   2   	
German    	
Algebra    	
English Composition	
Geology  1,   2   	
Economics  1,  2   	
Biology 1   	
Spanish  	
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so  THE UNIVERSITY OF BRITISH
COLUMBIA
HISTORICAL SKETCH.
The establishment of a University in British Columbia was
first advocated by Superintendent Jessop in 1877, when he called
public attention to the urgent need for providing the youth of
the Province with an education which would adequately equip
them for their various activities in the life of the Province. It
was several years, however, before active steps were taken in
this direction.
In 1890 the Provincial Legislature passed an Act establishing a body politic and corporate named The University of British
Columbia. The first Convocation was held in Victoria on August
26th, 1890, when the Hon. John Robson, Provincial Secretary,
presided. There were present seventy certified members of
Convocation, who elected three members of Senate.
In 1891 the Act was amended by the addition of a clause
requiring a meeting of the Senate to be held within one month
after the election of Senators by Convocation. The Senators
having been elected on June 2nd, the Chancellor, Dr. I. W.
Powell, of Victoria, called a meeting of Senate for July 2nd.
A quorum failed to assemble, and the first attempt to establish
a University proved futile.
There being no immediate prospect of a Provincial University, some friends of higher education conceived the idea of
bringing a university education—at least in part—within the
reach of the youth of the Province by establishing relations with
some one of the existing Canadian universities.
Owing to their efforts, an Act was passed in 1894 which
empowered the affiliation of high schools in the Province to
recognized Canadian universities; and this was supplemented
in 1896 by an Act providing for the incorporation of affiliated
high schools as colleges of the universities to which they were
affiliated. 16 The University op British Columbia.
Under these enactments, Vancouver High School was
admitted to affiliation with McGill University for the first year
in Arts, and began University work under the name of
Vancouver College in the year 1899. (The man to whom more
than any other the credit is due for the inauguration and
successful organization of the scheme of affiliation was the late
Mr. J. C. Shaw, M.A., formerly Principal of Vancouver High
School, and later Principal of Vancouver College, and of McGill
University College.)
In 1902 an extension of affiliation was granted to cover the
second year in Arts, and in the same year Victoria High School
also became affiliated to McGill University for the first year in
Arts under the name of Victoria College.
As the work grew, still closer connection with McGill
University became necessary, and in 1906 an Act was passed
incorporating the Royal Institution for the Advancement of
Learning of British Columbia. In the same year the Royal
Institution established at Vancouver the McGill University
College of British Columbia, taking over (by agreement with
the Vancouver Board of School Trustees) the Arts work previously done by the Vancouver College, increasing the number
of options allowed, and adding two years of Applied Science.
In 1908 the course was further extended to include the third
year in Arts.
In 1907 Victoria College came also under the control of the
Royal Institution as a part of the McGill University College of
British Columbia, with power to give courses in the first two
years in Arts.
The instruction given was similar to that of McGill University, the standards were identical, and the University examined
and accepted the undergraduates ad eundem statum.
During the last year of its existence the McGill University
College enrolled 292 students at Vancouver and 70 at Victoria.
These institutions were maintained mainly by grants from
the School Boards of Vancouver and Victoria, supplemented in
the earlier stages by contributions from Sir William Macdonald,
of   Montreal,   and   many   public-spirited   citizens   of   British Historical Sketch. 17
Columbia, and later by grants from the Provincial Government,
the City of Vancouver, and The University of British Columbia.
When The University of British Columbia opened its doors
in the fall of 1915 these colleges ceased to exist, and at the same
time the connection of the Province with McGill University in
higher education—a connection which had existed for a period
of sixteen years and was alike creditable to McGill and advantageous to the Province—was also brought to a close.
Meanwhile efforts for the establishment of a Provincial
University had been renewed, and in 1907 the Hon. Dr. H. E.
Young, Minister of Education, took definite steps to establish a
University by introducing a "University Endowment Act,"
which was passed by the Legislature. By this Act (slightly
amended in 1911 and 1913) the setting apart of 2,000,000 acres
of land, by way of University endowment, was authorized.
Constitution of Present University.
In 1908 an Act establishing and incorporating The University of British Columbia and repealing the old Act of 1890-1 was
passed.   The Act of 1908 provides:—
That the University shall consist of a Chancellor, Convocation, Board of Governors, Senate, and the Faculties;
that the first Convocation shall consist of all graduates
of any university in His Majesty's dominions resident in
the Province two years prior to the date fixed for the
first meeting of Convocation, together with twenty-five
members selected by the Lieutenant-Governor in
Council. After the first Convocation it shall consist of
the Chancellor, Senate, members of the first Convocation, and all graduates of the University; that the
Chancellor shall be elected by Convocation; that the
Board of Governors shall consist of the Chancellor,
President, and nine persons appointed by the Lieutenant-Governor in Council; that the Senate shall consist of: (a) The Minister of Education, the Chancellor,
and the President of the University, who shall be Chairman thereof;  (b) the deans and two professors of each 18 The University of British Columbia.
of the Faculties elected by members of the Faculty;
(c) three members to be appointed by the Lieutenant-
Governor in Council; (d) the Superintendent of Education, the principals of the normal schools; (e) one
member elected by the high-school principals and
assistants who are actually engaged in teaching; (/) one
member elected by the Provincial Teachers' Institute
organized under subsection (e) of section 8 of the
"Public Schools Act"; (g) one member to be elected
by the governing body of every affiliated college or
school in this Province; (h) fifteen members to be
elected by Convocation from the members thereof;
That the University shall be non-sectarian;
That instruction in Arts shall be free to all regular students
matriculated in the University;
That women students shall have equality of privilege with
men students;
That no other university having corporate powers capable
of being exercised within the Province shall be known
by the same name, or have power to grant degrees.
Instruction.
The Act of 1908 (consolidated August 2nd, 1912) provides
for:—
(a) Such instruction in all branches of a liberal education
as may enable students to become proficient and qualify
for degrees, diplomas, and certificates, in Science, Commerce, Arts, Literature, Law, Medicine, and all other
branches of knowledge; (6) such instruction especially,
whether theoretical, technical, artistic, or otherwise, as
may be of service to persons engaged in the manufactures, or the mining, engineering, agricultural, and
industrial pursuits of the Province; (c) facilities for
the prosecution of original research in Science, Literature, Arts, Medicine, Law, and especially the applications of Science;   (d)   such fellowships, scholarships, Historical Sketch. 19
exhibitions, prizes, rewards, and pecuniary and other
aids as shall facilitate or encourage proficiency in the
subjects taught in the University, and also original
research in every branch; (e) such extra-collegiate and
extra-university instruction and teaching as may be
recommended by the Senate.
Selection of a Site.
Under authority of an Act passed by the Legislature in 1910,
the Lieutenant-Governor in Council appointed a Site Commission
whose decision was to be final. The personnel of the Commission
was as follows:—
Dr. R. C. Weldon, Dean of Law School, Dalhousie University, Chairman.
Rev. Canon G. Dauth, Vice-Rector, Laval University,
Montreal.
Dr. Walter C. Murray, President, University of Saskatchewan.
Dr. Oscar D. Skelton, Professor of Economics, Queen's
University.
Dr. Cecil C. Jones, Chancellor, University of New
Brunswick. dr
The Commission held its first meeting on May 25th, 1910,
in Victoria, and after an exhaustive examination of the Province
presented the following unanimous report:—
Victoria, B. C, June 28th, 1910.
To His Honour the Lieutenant-Governor in Council:
Sir,—The University Site Commission begs to submit the following report:—
In accordance with the provisions of the "University Site Commission Act, 1910," your Commissioners have visited and made a
careful examination of the several cities and rural districts in the
Province suggested as suitable University sites, and have selected as
the location for the University the vicinity of the City of Vancouver.
Accompanying the main report was the following supplementary report:—
The University Site Commission are strongly of the opinion that 20 The University of British Columbia.
the University should not be placed on a site which may in time be
completely surrounded by a city. They respectfully suggest that not
less than 250 acres be set apart for the University campus, and 700
acres for experimental purposes in agriculture and forestry. This is
exclusive of a forest reserve for forestry operations on a large scale.
The Commission are of the opinion that the most suitable site
is at Point Grey, unless the soils there and those of the delta land
adjacent are found to be unsuitable for the experimental work of
the College of Agriculture. Should Point Grey prove impossible, the
Commissioners suggest: First, a site along the shore of North
Vancouver, provided the tunnel and bridge are constructed; second,
St. Mary's Hill, overlooking the Pitt, Fraser, and Coquitlam Rivers,
provided residences are erected for the students. Central Park,
though conveniently situated, will probably be surrounded by the
Cities of Vancouver and New Westminster, and because of this and
of the absence of outstanding scenic advantages is undesirable.
While the Commissioners are firmly convinced that it is of the
highest importance to have all the Faculties of the University doing
work of University grade located together, they believe that the
diverse conditions of agriculture in this Province make it advisable
to divide the work of agricultural education between the College of
Agriculture and Schools of Agriculture of secondary grade located
in different centres. The College of Agriculture should conduct
researches, provide courses leading to a degree, and supervise the
extension work and Schools of Agriculture. These schools should
be established in conjunction with the Demonstration Farms in
typical centres, and should provide short courses (extending over
the winter months) of two or three years for the sons of farmers.
Each school might specialize in one or more branches, such as
horticulture, dairying, etc.
Similarly, Technical Evening Schools might be opened in the
different coal-mining centres for the preparation of candidates for
mining certificates, and in the metal-mining districts for the assistance of prospectors and others.
The Commissioners have been greatly impressed by the marvellous richness, variety, and extent of the natural resources of this
Province, and by the very generous provision made for the endowment of the University; and they are of the opinion that, if the
University adopts a policy of offering salaries ranging from $3,800
to $5,000 to its professors, it will attract men of the highest ability,
who, by their scientific investigations and outstanding reputations,
will not only materially aid in developing the resources of the
Province, but will also place the University on an equality with the
best universities of America. Historical Sketch. 21
In the autumn the Executive Council, after a careful survey
of the sites proposed, decided to locate the University at Point
Grey, the site which the Commission named as its first choice.
In 1911 the Legislature passed an Act authorizing the
Lieutenant-Governor in Council to grant this site to the University.   In 1913 this grant was increased by a few acres.
The site at present consists of 250 acres lying upon the
extremity of the headland of Point Grey at an elevation of
approximately 300 feet above the sea. The waters of the Gulf
of Georgia form more than half the boundary of the site, while
the remaining sides are bounded by a tract of some 3,000 acres
of Government land. It is accessible by water for passenger
and freight service, and is within a mile and a half of the
existing electric tram service, which will be extended to the
grounds. The site has now been cleared and the main campus
and some of the roads have been graded.
First Convocation.
Between May 1st and July 31st, 1912, 849 members of
Convocation were registered, of whom twenty-five had been
appointed by the Lieutenant-Governor in Council. The first
Convocation, held August 21st of the same year, chose Mr.
Francis Carter-Cotton as first Chancellor of the University and
elected certain Senators.
Plans for Buildings.
In February; 1912, the Hon. H. E. Young, Minister of
Education, called for competitive plans which should include
plans in detail of four buildings to be erected immediately, and
a block plan exhibiting the completed buildings as a beautiful
and harmonious scheme in keeping with the site, one of the
finest in the world.
The first prize was $5,000 and the probability of being
engaged as the University architect; the second, third, and
fourth, $2,000, $2,000, and $1,000 respectively. The competition
was closed in November, and the first prize awarded to Messrs.
Sharp & Thompson, of Vancouver, by a Board of Assessors
consisting of:   Hon.   H.   E.   Young, Minister of Education; 22 The University of British Columbia.
F. Carter-Cotton, Chancellor; A. Arthur Cox, Samuel Maclure,
and W. Douglas Caroe.
The President and Governors.
In March, 1913, the Lieutenant-Governor in Council
appointed the President, F. F. Wesbrook, M.A., M.D., CM.,
LL.D., and shortly after the following Governors:—
George H. Barnard, Esq., K.C, M.P.
Robert F. Green, Esq., M.P.
Robert E. McKechnie, Esq., M.D., C.M.
Robert P. McLennan, Esq.
Lewis G. McPhillips, Esq., K.C.
Robie L. Reid, Esq., K.C.
S. Dunn Scott, Esq., M.A., LL.D.
Campbell Sweeny, Esq.
George I. Wilson, Esq.
Buildings and Grounds.
The University architects are Messrs. Sharp & Thompson, of
Vancouver, B.C., who obtained the award in the competition
held in 1912. In November, 1913, Dr. C C James, Commissioner of Dominion Agricultural Instruction, met with a Commission appointed to examine and report upon the general design
for the University. A general plan was prepared by this
Commission and approved by the Board of Governors.
The report accompanying the plan presented a statement of
the problem to be solved and the solution proposed by the
Commission, and pointed out the practical and artistic possibilities of the design. With it were submitted drawings showing
the building areas for the various constituent portions of the
University, and the location proposed for the buildings which
are to be constructed at once. The design is a comprehensive
one, and provides for the needs of an institution potentially
great, the relatively small beginnings of which must be arranged
with due regard for present economy and efficiency, yet in such
a manner as to ensure co-ordination with a properly planned
and steadily developing scheme. Historical Sketch. 23
The Commission consisted of:—
Dr. Thomas H. Mawson, City Planner and Landscape
Artist, of London, England.
Mr. Warren Powers Laird, Professor and Head, School
of Architecture, University of Pennsylvania, and
Advisory Architect to the University of Wisconsin.
Mr. Richard J. Durley, late Professor and Head of the
Department  of  Mechanical  Engineering,  McGill
University.
Messrs. Sharp & Thompson, the University Architects.
In accordance with the recommendations of the Commission's report, detailed plans and specifications are being prepared
for the various buildings, and the Science Building is under
construction.
This building is planned for the temporary accommodation
of Physics, Chemistry, Biology and certain other Sciences, but
it is intended ultimately for the sole use of Chemistry. With
its equipment it is expected to cost about $600,000.
Preparations for Work.
In 1914 the Legislature voted $500,000 and the Government
promised $1,000,000 for the following year, thus enabling the
Board to proceed with actual work on the University. The
clearing of the site was completed and necessary grading done;
the steel-concrete work of the Science Building was completed;
the Deans of Agriculture and Applied Science and some professors were appointed, and in general the necessary preliminary
preparations were made for beginning University work in the
fall of 1915.
War Conditions.
Upon the outbreak of war in August, 1914, the Board of
Governors, feeling that it would be shortsighted and unpatriotic
to commit the public to a large capital expenditure and heavy
fixed charges when every available dollar in the country might
be required in the struggle to preserve the rights and liberties
of free peoples, decided to withhold the contract for the com- 24 The University of British Columbia.
pletion of the Science Building, to make no further contracts or
appointments to the staff, and to postpone large expenditures
upon the library and grounds. By this action the grant for the
year largely reverted to the Provincial Treasury, and the people
were not committed to a heavy outlay in 1915.
In 1915 the Legislature voted sufficient funds to enable the
University to take over and carry on the work of McGill University College, and to add a year's work to it, thus giving a
complete Arts Course leading to a degree and the first three
years in a course in Applied Science. Funds were also voted
to enable Dean Klinck to prepare and put under cultivation a
small portion of the campus to be ready for experimental work
by the time agricultural classes can be undertaken.
Growth and Progress.
A detailed statement of the growth and progress of the
University since its opening in the fall of 1915 will be found in
the President's Report for 1921-22. The University and the Province. 25
THE UNIVERSITY AND THE PROVINCE
The University of British Columbia is an integral part of
the public educational system of the Province. As such it completes the work begun in the public and high schools.
By prescribing a number of studies during the first years
of undergraduate work, and by giving to the student in his
final years a wide choice under a definite system, the University
is enabled to give direction without discouraging individual
initiative.
In addition to fostering the general educational interests of
the Province, it is the policy of the University to render service
to its constituency through three generally recognized channels
—viz., teaching, research, and extension. The University undertakes to furnish instruction in the various branches of a liberal
education, and in those technical departments which are most
directly related to the life and industries of the Province. That
its teaching may be vitalized, and that it may do its share in
contributing to the advancement of knowledge, the University
aims to encourage research in all departments. When a sufficiently firm foundation was laid in these two departments of
University activity, extension work was organized. Through
this channel new truths discovered in this or in other institutions of learning are presented in popular form in many centres
throughout the Province. By this means those whose circumstances deprive them of the opportunity of attendance at the
University may avail themselves of the latest contributions to
knowledge, as well as of the most recent lessons of practical
experience. 26 The University of British Columbia.
UNIVERSITY EXTENSION.
The University sends lecturers in popular subjects to all
parts of the Province. These lecturers will go out during the
winter months under the auspices of organizations applying for
them. The University may be able to contribute to the cost of
travelling and hotel expenses, all local expense (hall, publicity,
etc.) being borne by the local organization.
The University reserves the right to arrange dates so as to
permit a lecturer to visit several places in the same district on
succeeding days and thus to save time and travelling expenses.
The number of lecturers sent to any one place will depend entirely upon the interest shown in that locality and upon the funds
at the disposal of the Committee.
A list of subjects and lecturers can be obtained on application to the Secretary of the Extension Committee.
Illustrated pamphlets on the general work of the University
are at the disposal of persons interested in educational progress
in the Province. Applications for copies of these should be made
to the Registrar. Endowments. 27
ENDOWMENTS.
The "University Act" of 1908 (slightly amended in 1912)
provides that:—
"Any person or corporation may, with the approval of the
Senate, found one or more professorships, lectureships,
fellowships, scholarships, exhibitions, prizes, or other
awards in the University, by providing a sufficient
endowment in land or other property, and conveying
the same to the University for such purposes, and every
such endowment of lands or other property shall be
vested in the University for the purpose or purposes
for which it is given."
1. For Endowments in connection with:—
Scholarships, Exhibitions and Prizes, see under '' Prizes,
Medals and Scholarships."
2. Red Cross Chair of Public Health.    The British Colum
bia Branch of the Canadian Red Cross Society has
undertaken to provide the sum of $5,600.00 annually,
for three years, for the purpose of establishing a Red
Cross Chair of Public Health in The University of
British Columbia.
For full information in reference to courses, see under
"Public Health, Department of," in this Calendar. 28 The University of British Columbia.
THE LIBRARY.
Librarian: John Ridington.
Cataloguer: Dorothy M. Jefferd. Reading Room Superintendent:
Stack   Room   and   Documents: Frances M. Woodworth.
Lionel Haweis. Stenographer: Violet Anderson.
The University Library consists of 42,000 volumes and about
10,000 pamphlets. It includes representative works in all the
courses offered, and a growing collection of works of General
Reference. It also possesses a fair number of periodical publications devoted to literature and the sciences, and of the Transactions of learned societies.
The number of books added to the Library during 1921,
exclusive of unbound periodicals, was 4,200. Four hundred and
fifty magazines and periodical publications are regularly
received.
The Library is classified throughout on the Congressional
system. The classification is complete, except in Religion
(BL-BD), the schedules for which have not yet been issued. In
this section the books are at present grouped in main classes,
and arranged in alphabetical order, by name of author.
The Main and Subordinate Catalogues, making available the
resources of the Library, total over 250,000 cards. Of these
115,000 are in the Main Catalogue in the Reading Room, and
make all classified portions of the Library referable by Author,
Title and Subject, with necessary analytieals.
The Reading Room has accommodation for 102 readers.
Additional facilities for 14 students, engaged in work requiring
frequent shelf reference, are provided in the Stack Room.
Stack Room privileges are granted for specified days to Post-
Graduate, Fourth, and Third Year Students.
Books to which the Teaching Staff have specially referred
their classes for consultation are placed in a "Reserved" class.
These are separately shelved in the Reading Room, and to them
open access is given all students. Reserved books may be loaned
only for periods during which the Library is closed. Other
works, to the number of two, may be borrowed by students for The Library. 29
a period of seven days, or for a shorter time should the volume
be in general demand.
Unbound periodical publications are not loaned. Books that
are costly, rare, or unsuitable for general circulation, are loaned
only under special conditions.
While the Library is primarily for the use of Faculty and
Students of the University, its privileges are available to those
of the general public engaged in research or special study, in
the prosecution of which it will be of value. On personal application to' the Librarian, Extra-Mural Reader's Cards are issued
to such persons, and the Library will give all facilities within
its power to assist them in their work.
During the Session the Library is open from 8.45 a.m. to
10 p.m.; on Saturdays from 8.45 a.m. to 5 p.m.; in Vacation
it is open from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m., except on Saturdays, when the
hours are from 9 a.m. to noon.
A number of valuable contributions to the Library are made
each year by Governments, institutions, corporations and private
friends of the University. The practice hitherto has been to
make public acknowledgement of the most important of these
donations by printing a list of gifts in the Calendar. The
generosity of the friends of the Library during 1921 and 1922
has greatly exceeded any previous year. Considerations of space
necessarily prevent the publication of a list of such length. The
warm thanks of the Chancellor and President, the Governors and
Senate, and of the Library Committee and Staff, are given to all
who have thus assisted in making the Library of greater value
to the institution. 30 The University of British Columbia.
HERBARIUM AND BOTANICAL GARDENS.
The University possesses a Herbarium of over 15,000 sheets
illustrating the Provincial flora, including alga?, fungi, mosses,
ferns, flowering plants. This has been accomplished largely
through the co-operation of residents in all parts of British
Columbia, in return for assistance in identification, or information regarding the usefulness or otherwise of native species.
There are several sets of specimens illustrative of poisonous
and medicinal species, plants used by Indians, weeds, native trees,
shrubs, and other species of economic importance.
The value of the Herbarium has been greatly enhanced by
several donations of private herbaria. These include (1) the
"Eli Wilson collection" of between 1,000 and 2,000 specimens;
(2) the "A. J. Hill collection" of about 2,500 specimens, and 100
water-colour illustrations of fungi; and (3) the "A. E. Baggs
collection" of nearly 1,000 specimens.
The Herbarium is at present located in the Arts Building,
where fire-proof accommodation has been provided.
Botanical Garden.
The Botanical Garden is situated on the University site,
Point Grey, and occupies 5 acres on the west side of the Campus.
Here may be seen over 1,000 different species of native plants
collected from all parts of British Columbia, including dry-belt,
alpine, and coast species. One part of the garden is devoted to
the herbaceous collection, where plants are systematically arranged according to their families; another part is reserved for a
native arboretum to illustrate the British Columbia species of
trees and shrubs; another constitutes the nursery where duplicates are raised and plants for systematic research are assembled.
The economic flora is represented by several beds of medicinal plants, the nucleus of a Salicetum containing some of the
best species and varieties of willows for basketry and ornamental
purposes, the latter a donation of about fifty species from E.
Versin, France. Herbarium and Botanical Gardens. 31
Through the co-operation of Provincial correspondents numerous donations of seeds and plants are annually received; such
donations help to make the native collection more complete.
Seeds of several hundreds of species of plants—mostly Himalayan—have been donated by the Botanical Survey of India, and
as a result the University has the nucleus of a collection of Indian
plants which are being acclimatized in British Columbia; these
include some beautiful and interesting species of value in connection with the University classes in Botany.
The University, through this Department, offers assistance in
the identification of native species, and desires to secure the cooperation of all interested in the flora, in the hope that such
assistance and co-operation will aid in filling existing gaps in
the collections of the Herbarium and Botanical Gardens. 32 The University op British Columbia.
GENERAL  INFORMATION.
Degrees.
The University Act gives the University full powers to grant
such degrees in the several Faculties and different branches of
knowledge as the Senate may from time to time determine. The
Act reserves for the University the sole right in this Province to
confer degrees, except in Theology.
Courses of Study.
For the Session 1922-23 the University offers instruction in
the four years of the Arts Course, leading to the degree of
Bachelor of Arts, which will be conferred upon those who successfully complete the course; in the four years of Courses in
Applied Science, including Nursing, leading to the degree of
Bachelor of Applied Science; and in the four years of the Course
in Agriculture, leading to the degree of Bachelor of Science in
Agriculture.
The Session.
The University year or session is divided into two terms, the
first extending to the Christmas vacation, and the second from
the end of the Christmas vacation to the end of the Sessional
Examinations in April.
The Session of 1922-23 will begin on Tuesday, September
26th.
Two Matriculation Examinations will be held, one (Sup-
plementals only) commencing on Wednesday, September 13th,
1922, and the other on Monday, June 25th, 1923.
Equipment.
Laboratories and equipment are available for courses in the
work undertaken. Facilities for field-work in Physical Geography, Geology, and Mining exist in the immediate vicinity of
Vancouver. Climatic conditions permit class excursions to be
made throughout the session. General Information 33
Church Attendance.
Students are requested to report to the Registrar, in writing,
the churches which they intend to make their places of worship.
The reports will be used for the information of the various
churches.
It is desirable that all students attend a church of the
denomination to which they adhere.
Physical Examination.
In order to promote as far as possible the physical welfare of
the student body, every student, on entering the University, will
be required to pass a physical examination, to be conducted by,
or under the direction of, a specially qualified medical practitioner.
By such an examination physical defects and weaknesses,
amenable to treatment, may be discovered. The student would
then be expected to apply to his physician for such remedial
measures as his case may require.
Board and Residence.
Good board and lodging can be obtained in the vicinity of the
College buildings at a cost of from $35 per month upwards; or,
separately, board at $30 to $40 per month; rooms at $8 to $12
per month.
Lists of approved boarding-houses, accessible to the University, may be obtained from the Registrar. Requests for these
should state whether they are for men or women students.
Men and women students are not permitted to lodge in the
same house, unless they are members of the same family, or
receive special permission from the Senate.
Dean of Women
Last year there was appointed to the Staff of the University
a DEAN OF WOMEN, with whom parents and students may
confer on matters not directly related to the curriculum. 34 The University of British Columbia.
During the Session the Dean of Women is frequently consulted about problems pertaining to living conditions, student
employment, vocational guidance, and other questions that
directly affect the social and intellectual life of the women
students.
Academic Dress.
The Undergraduate's gown shall be black in colour and of
the ordinary stuff material, of ankle length, and with long sleeves
and the yoke edged with khaki cord. Graduate's gown the
same, without cord.
Bachelor's hood shall be of the Cambridge pattern, black
bordered with the distinctive colour of the particular Faculty;
the Master's hood to be lined with the same colour. The colours
are, for Arts, University blue; for Science, red; for Agriculture,
maize. ADMISSION TO THE UNIVERSITY
ADMISSION   BY   MATRICULATION   EXAMINATION
OR ITS EQUIVALENT.
REGULATIONS.
All inquiries relating to the examinations should be
addressed to the Registrar.
1. The regular Matriculation Examination will be held
beginning June 25th, 1923, at the following centres in British
Columbia: Abbotsford, Agassiz, Armstrong, Bridgeport, Chilliwack, Courtenay, Cranbrook, Creston, Cumberland, Duncan,
Enderby, Esquimalt, Fernie, Golden, Grand Forks, Greenwood,
Hedley, Howe Sound, Kamloops, Kaslo, Kelowna, Ladner, Lady-
smith, Langley, Maple Ridge, Matsqui, Merritt, Mission, Nanaimo,
Nelson, New Westminster, Oak Bay, Peachland, Penticton, Point
Grey (King George V., Prince of Wales), Port Alberni, Prince
George, Prince Rupert, Prineeton, Quesnel, Revelstoke, Rossland,
Salmon Arm, Summerland, Surrey, Trail, Vancouver (Britannia, King Edward, King George, and Kitsilano), North Vancouver, South Vancouver, Vernon, and Victoria, and at any
other centre at which a high school is established during the
year.
2. A second examination will be held in September, but only
for extra-provincial students, and such students resident in the
Province as may have been granted the privilege of taking a
supplemental examination by the Matriculation Board of Examiners. It will be held only at the University, Vancouver, and
Victoria College, Victoria.
3. Every candidate for the examination in June is required
to fill up an application form and return the same to the Registrar of the Department of Education, Victoria, with the necessary fee, one month before the examination begins. Blank forms
may be obtained from the Education Office. 36 The University of British Columbia.
4. Every candidate for the examination in September is
required to fill up an application form and return the same to
the Registrar of the University, Vancouver, with the necessary
fee, one month before the examination begins. Blank forms
may be obtained from the Registrar.
5. Candidates will not be considered as having passed on the
Matriculation Examination unless they obtain at least 50 per
cent, on the aggregate and at least 40 per cent, on each paper.
Supplemental Examinations. — Supplemental granted on
the examination of any year must be removed not later than
September of the following year. A candidate may remove one
or more supplemental at any examination during the period
prescribed. If writing only one paper, he must obtain 50%. If
writing more than one paper, he must obtain an average of 50%
and not less than 40% on each paper.
6. Candidates for admission to the University who have
failed, by a small margin, to complete the Matriculation requirements may be allowed to enter the first year as conditioned undergraduates on the recommendation of the Committee on Admission,
Standing, and Courses.
This regulation applies also to candidates who seek to satisfy
the Matriculation requirements by means of certificates granted
by other recognized examining bodies.
7. Matriculation certificates will be issued to candidates who
have passed the Matriculation Examination, but not to those who
have qualified by means of other certificates, except when the
greater part of the requirements have been satisfied by passing
the British Columbia Matriculation examination.
8. Certificates and diplomas covering the Matriculation
requirements of other universities will, if submitted to the
Registrar, be accepted pro tanto in lieu of the Matriculation
Examination; i.e., in so far as the subjects and standard of the
examination taken to obtain them are, to the satisfaction of the
Matriculation Board, equivalent to those required for the British Admission to the University. 37
Columbia Matriculation Examination. Candidates offering certificates which are not a full equivalent will be required to pass the
Matriculation Examination in such of the necessary subjects as
are not covered thereby.
9. Intending students who wish to enter by certificates other
than Matriculation certificates issued in British Columbia should
under no circumstances come to the University without having
first obtained from the Registrar a statement of the value of the
certificates they hold, as many of these may lack one or more
essential subjects, or the work done in a subject may not be
adequate, or, again, the percentage gained may not be sufficiently
high. (See Regulation 5.) Moreover, it must be remembered
that a certificate may admit to one Faculty and not to another.
When an applicant's diploma or certificate does not show the
marks obtained in the several subjects of the examination, he
must arrange to have a statement of his marks sent to the Registrar by the Education Department or University issuing such
diploma or certificate.
MATRICULATION EXAMINATION FEES.
For the first Examination, Junior Matriculation $5.00
For the first Examination, Senior Matriculation  5.00
For a subsequent Examination, Junior or Senior Matriculation, per paper  2.00
For examination of certificates, in respect of which candidates are exempted from the whole or part of the Junior
or Senior Matriculation Examination  2.00
Fees for the Matriculation examination in June must be sent
to the Education Office at the time of application for examination.
Fees for the Matriculation examination in September must be
sent to the University Registrar at the time of application for
examination. No application will be accepted unless accompanied
by the regular fee. 38 The University of British Columbia.
SUBJECTS OF EXAMINATION.
JUNIOR MATRICULATION.
The subjects for Junior Matriculation (that is, for entrance
Into the Faculties of Arts and Agriculture are as follows:—
1. English.
2. History and Historical Geography.
3. Mathematics; Algebra and Arithmetic, Geometry.
4. French, or German, or Latin.
5. (a) The two languages in 4 not already taken,
or (6) One of the languages in 4 not already taken and
one of the following sciences: Chemistry, Physics,
Botany, Agriculture.
or (c) Three of the following sciences: Chemistry, Physics, Botany, Agriculture.
Note.—Greek may be taken in place of one science, but
only by students offering Latin.
REQUIREMENTS IN EACH SUBJECT.
English.
1. Composition and Reading.—The principles of English composition, as in High School English Composition, Western Canada
Series (Copp, Clark Co. Ltd.), with short essays on a general
subject and other subjects based on works prescribed for reading
as follows: (a.) Prose (two books to be selected)—Washington
Irving: The Sketch Book (Macmillan, Oxford); Scott: Kenil-
worth; George Eliot: Silas Marner (ed. Stevenson, Copp,
Clark; or Macmillan or Dent); Southey: Life of Nelson (Everyman's Library). (b.) Poetry (one to be selected)—Shakespeare:
As You Like It (ed. Stevenson, Copp, Clark; or Macmillan);
Tennyson: Gareth and Lynette (Macmillan or Ginn).
The editions are merely recommended, not required. Admission to the University. 39
The books to be selected should be read carefully, but the
student's attention should not be so fixed upon details that he
fails to appreciate the main purpose and beauty of the work.
Frequent practice in composition is essential.
2. Literature (for critical study).—Shakespeare: Merchant
of Venice (ed. Stevenson, Copp, Clark) or Henry V. (Junior
School ed., Blackie & Sons); Poems of the Romantic Revival
(Copp, Clark Co.), omitting the selections from Coleridge and
Byron.
Candidates will be expected to memorize some of the finest
passages.
Two examination papers of two hours each; one on Composition, the other on Literature.
Spelling will be tested by the candidate's papers in English.
Examiners in other subjects will also take note of misspelled
words and will report flagrant cases to the Board.
History and Historical Geography.
The essentials of European history, ancient, mediseval, and
modern (to the eighteenth century), as presented by Breasted &
Robinson in their Outlines of European History, Part I. (Ginn
& Company). The revised edition is entitled History of Europe,
Ancient and Mediaeval (Ginn & Company, 1920). Either edition may be used for the school year 1922-23.
The geography required will be that relating to the history
prescribed.
One paper of two hours.
Mathematics.
1. Algebra and Arithmetic.—Algebra: as in the first thirty-
one chapters, and the graphical work of Articles 411 to 428,
inclusive, Hall & Knight's Elementary Algebra, omitting the
articles in Chapter 29 marked with an asterisk. Arithmetic:
Vulgar and Decimal Fractions, Square and Cube Root, Commercial Arithmetic, Metric System. 40 The University of British Columbia.
2. Geometry—Parts I„ II., III. (omitting pp. 212-218),
and IV., of Hall & Stevens' School Geometry, London Edition.
Two papers of two hours each; one on Algebra and Arithmetic, the other on Geometry.
Chemistry.
As in Chemistry—Cornish: A Text-Book for High Schools
(Macmillan), and Cornish and Smith: A Laboratory Manual in
Chemistry (Macmillan).
One paper of two hours.
Physics.
The general principles of physics as given in any standard
text-book of High School Physics. The examination will be
based on the Ontario High School Physics (Merchant & Chant)
and The Ontario High School Laboratory Manual in Physics.
Measurement—Chapter I.
Hydrostatics—Chapters X., XL, XII., XIII. and XIV.
Sound—Chapters XVIII., XIX. (omitting Sections 198 and
199), and Chapter XX. to the end of Section 206.
Heat—Chapters XXIV., XXV., XXVI., XXVIL,XXVIII.,
XXIX. and XXXI.
Light—Chapters XXXIL, XXXIII., XXXV., XXXVL,
XXXVII.  and XXXVIII.
Magnetism and Electricity—Chapters XLL, XLIL, XLIII.,
XLIV., XLV., XLVI., XLVII. and XLVIII. (omitting
Section 529).
Exercises as in the Laboratory Manual (omitting numbers
6, 33, 34, 36, 37, 39, 51, 52, 58, 69, 77, 78, 83, 96, 97,
99 and 107).
Botany.
Upon application of schools giving a matriculation course in
Botany, the following outline of the course will be supplemented
by lists of British Columbia plants which may be used in illus- Admission to the University 41
tration and with specific references to sections in the books mentioned below.
Emphasis is placed upon comprehension of principles rather
than mastery of detail, and upon observation rather than book
knowledge.
A. Plant Structures and the Part taken by each in carrying
on Life Processes.
1. Root.
(a.) Absorption of food materials from the soil; root-
hairs;  osmosis experiment.
(6.) Anchorage; forms of roots in relation to anchorage. ^\
(c.) Food storage; examples of food storage in roots.
2. Stem (Buds and Branches).
(a.) Support of leaves and flowers; forms of stems
considered in this relation.
(6.) The conduction of food and food materials; the
general structure of the stem and its relation to
conduction,
(c.) Storage of food; examples.
(d.) Vegetative reproduction.
3. Leaves.
(a.) Manufacture of food from raw food materials;
experiments to illustrate; the importance of
light; the light relation of leaves; leaf form and
structure.
(b.) Transpiration of water; experiments to illustrate.
(c.) Food storage; examples.
(d.) Vegetative reproduction.
4. Flower.—Reproduction; the parts of a flower; the
structure and role of each; structures related to pollination. 42 The University of British Columbia.
5. Seed.
(a.) Food storage; and
(6.) Protection of young plant during its dormant
period; the structure of the bean-seed and corn.
6. Fruits.
(a.) Protection; and
(b.) Dispersal of seeds; classification of fruits on
these bases.
B. Plants in Relation to their Environment.
1. Plant Associations.—Based upon conditions of temperature, amount of available water, light, intensity, nature
of soil.
2. Modifications in form and structure of roots, stems, and
leaves in response to conditions.
3. The Interrelation of Plants and Animals.—Insect pollination; distribution of seeds.
4. Movement responses; growth movements; "day and
night" movements; the sensitive plant.
C Classification of Plants based on Structure and Development; Reproduction and Life Histories.
1. Thallophytes.—Recognition of alga? (green,red,brown),
lichens, fungi.
2. Bryophytes.—Moss; description of plant.
3. Pteridophytes.—Recognition of Horsetails and Lyco-
pods; description of a fern.
4. Spermatophytes.
(a.) Gymnosperms.—Conifers; at least five examples.
Study of leaves, cones, and general habit.
(b.) Angiosperms.—Familiarity with the local flora;
particularly examples of the following families:
(Monocotyledons) Graminea?, Cyperaceae, Li-
liaceffi (Dicotyledons) Salicaceae, Ranunculacece,
Cruciferee, Rosacea?, Leguminosae, Ericaceae,
Scrophulariaceffl, Labiata?, Compositse.
A collection is recommended. Admission to the University. 43
D. Economic Plants of British Columbia.—Weeds, medicinal
and poisonous plants.
Student's Reference Book.—Bergen & Caldwell: Practical
Botany (Ginn & Co.). This book is recommended as most nearly
fulfilling text-book requirements.
Teacher's Reference Books.
Coulter, Barns & Cowles: Text Book of Botany, Vols. I. & II.
University of Chicago Press.
Ganong: A Text Book of Botany.    (Macmillan, 1916.)
Curtis: Nature and Development of Plants. (H. Holt, 1915.)
Henry: Flora of Southern British Columbia.   (Gage, 1915.)
One paper of two hours.
Agriculture.
Soil Studies.—Origin and classification; water, air, and bacteria in soil; drainage; drainage surveys; physical analysis;
composition; plant-foods; humus and fertilizers.
Soil Management.—Tillage, manuring and rotation of crops;
humid and dry farming.
Vegetable Gardening.—Hot beds and cold frames; their preparation and use; selection of garden seeds; choice of varieties;
cultural methods.
Small Fruits.—Soil and cultural requirements; standard
varieties; harvesting and marketing.
Landscape Gardening.—Plans for beautifying home and
school grounds; making and care of lawns, walks, and flower
beds; best adapted ornamental trees, shrubs, and flowering plants.
Orcharding.—Location, planting, and management; harvesting and marketing; standard varieties.
Insect Study.—Identification and life-history of field, garden, and orchard insects; remedial measures. 44 The University of British Columbia.
Field Crops.—Selection, cultivation, harvesting, and disposition.
Live Stock.—Necessity of live stock in good farming; history, adaptability, and management of the principal classes.
Poultry.—Breeds, housing, feeding, and management.
Rural Economics.—Agricultural organizations and co-operative associations.
Bee Keeping.—Life history, care and management; equipment; recognition and treatment of diseases.
One paper of two hours.
Note.—Fifty per cent, of the possible total in the final examination will be awarded on the written paper, and fifty per cent,
on term work, including certified laboratory note-books.
Latin.
Texts:—
Caesar Book IV., Chapter 20 to the end.
Caesar Book V., Chapters 1 to 23, inclusive.
Virgil Aeneid II., Lines 1 to 505.
Grammar.—Knowledge of grammar will be tested by translation and composition, and by questions based on the specified
texts.
Translation at sight from Latin to English.
Composition.—Translation into Latin of detached English
sentences and easy narrative based on the prescribed texts, as in
Henderson and Little's Matriculation Caesar (Copp, Clark Co.
Ltd.).
Two papers of two hours each; one on composition and
grammar, the other on prescribed texts and translation at sight.
Note.—The Roman method of pronouncing Latin is recommended. Admission to the University. 45
Greek.
Lessons 1-48 of White's First Greek Book (Ginn & Co.).
One paper of two hours.
Note.—This course can be covered successfully in one year.
French.
Grammar.—Candidates will not be required to state grammatical rules, in writing, or to reproduce tables of verbs, regular
or irregular. They will be expected to have a thorough practical
knowledge of French accidence and of such points of syntax as
are of frequent occurrence in ordinary prose style.
This knowledge will be tested by asking candidates to modify
sentences given, to fill in words necessary to complete sentences,
or to change infinitives to the tense required by the context. They
may be asked to form sentences from elements given.
Translation at sight into English of a French passage of
moderate difficulty, dealing with French life, trades, industries,
history, travel.   A knowledge of useful words is required.
Translation into French of detached sentences—chiefly common idioms (not rare idioms and little used proverbs) and an
easy English passage. The latter may be a dialogue. It will be
selected with a view to testing the candidate's knowledge of
French, not of grammatical exceptions.
The text prescribed is Siepmann's Primary French Course,
Part II. (Macmillan Co., Canada) ; the first twenty lessons
only. For supplementary work, teachers are recommended to
use Allen and Schcell, French Life (Henry Holt & Co.).
Two papers of two hours each.
German.
Reading and speaking.
Candidates will be expected to have a fair knowledge of
German sounds and pronunciation.   They must be able to read 46 The University of British Columbia.
with ease German prose or verse of ordinary difficulty and to
answer correctly in German simple questions based on the reading
prescribed.
Grammar.—They will be expected to have a thorough practical knowledge of German accidence and of such points of syntax
as are of frequent occurrence in ordinary prose style.
This knowledge will be tested by asking them to modify sentences given, to fill in words necessary to complete sentences, or
to change uninflected words to forms required by context, etc.
Translation at sight into English of a German passage of
moderate difficulty, dealing with German life, ways, and customs.
A knowledge of useful words will be required.
Translation into German of detached English sentences and
of an easy English passage. A knowledge of simple idiomatic
and colloquial German expressions will be required.
Books recommended: (a.) Zinnecker: Deutsch fur Anfanger (Exercises 1-32), (Heath); (b.) Goebel: Rubezahl (Macmillan) .
N.B.—Teachers should insist upon correct pronunciation,
and use the language as much as possible in class instruction.
Two papers of two hours each.
SENIOR MATRICULATION.
Candidates must furnish evidence of having passed Junior
Matriculation, or its equivalent.
The subjects for Senior Matriculation are as follows:—
1. English and History.
2. Mathematics (Algebra, Geometry and Trigonometry).
3. 4, 5.   Three   of   the   following:   Chemistry,   Physics,
French, German, Greek, Latin.
REQUIREMENTS IN EACH SUBJECT.
English.
1. Composition—Fundamental principles—words, sentences,
paragraphs, the composition as a whole.    Lomer & Ashmun: Admission to the University. 47
The Study and Practice of Writing English (Houghton, Mifflin
& Co.), indicates the ground covered. Regular practice in Composition is essential.
2. Literature—
1. Chaucer's Prologue to the Canterbury Tales.
2. Spenser's Faerie Queene, Book I.
3. Milton's Comus.
These can be obtained in Macmillan's Pocket Classics.
4. Halleck's History of English Literature, New Edition
(American Book Co.), pages 1-261, with such illustrations as time may permit. Suitable illustrative
material will be found in Chambers' Cyclopedia of
English Literature.
History.
The evolution of modern European society as interpreted
by Robinson & Beard in their Outlines of European History,
Part 2 (Ginn & Co.). The revised edition is entitled History
of Europe, Our Own Times (Ginn & Company, 1921). Either
edition may be used for the school year 1922-23.
Mathematics.
Algebra.—Hall & Knight's Elementary Algebra (omitting
Chapters 40, 41, 42), or the same subject-matter in similar textbooks.
Plane and Solid Geometry.—As in Hall & Stevens' School
Geometry.
Trigonometry.—Hall & Knight's Elementary Trigonometry
to page 210, and Chapter 19; nature and use of logarithms (Bot-
tomley's four-figure tables).
Chemistry.
1. General Chemistry.—This course is arranged to give a full
exposition of the general principles involved in modern Chemistry, and comprises a systematic study of the properties of the
more important metallic and non-metallic elements and their compounds, and the application of Chemistry in technology. 48 The University of British Columbia.
Students must reach the required standard in both theoretical and practical work, and are required to submit a certified
laboratory note-book.
Book recommended:—Alexander Smith: General Chemistry
for Colleges (Century Co.).
Physics.
A general study of the principles of mechanics, properties of
matter, heat, light, sound, and electricity. The course has two
objects: (1) To give the minimum acquaintance with physical
science requisite for a liberal education to those whose studies
will be mainly literary; (2) to be introductory to the courses in
Agriculture, Chemistry, Engineering, and Physics. Students
must reach the required standard in both theoretical and practical work and are required to submit a certified laboratory
note-book.
Text-books: Ontario High School Physics, and Ontario
High School Laboratory Manual in Physics.
Latin.
Texts.—W. J. Woodhouse: Cicero, Pro Lege Manilla (Copp,
Clark Co., Ltd.).
Page: Virgil, Aeneid IV., Georgic IV.  (Macmillan).
Composition. — Mitchell: Latin Composition (Macmillan,
Canadian School Series).
History.—Pelham: Outlines of Roman History to 133 B.C.
(Rivingtons).
Two papers of three hours each.
Greek.
Texts.—Bond & Walpole: Lucian, Extracts (Macmillan);
Blakeney: Euripides, Alcestis  (Bell's Illustrated Classics).
Composition and Grammar. — White's First Greek Book
(Copp, Clark Co.).
History. — Cox: Athenian Empire (Longman's Epoch
Series). Admission to the University. 49
French.
(a.) Literature. — Moliere: Le Bourgeois Gentilhomme;
Bazin: Six Contes (Oxford Press); Allen & Schoell: French
Life (Henry Holt).
(b.) Language.—Revision of the essentials of French Grammar applied to the correct writing of French. Oral work from
Weil: Lecons de Frangais (Delagrave).
German.
Language.—Completion and Revision of Zinnecker: Deutsch
fur Anfanger (Heath).
Composition based on texts read.
Reading.—Moser: Der Bibliothekar (Ginn); Freytag: Die
Joumalisten (Ginn) ; Heine: Die Harzreise (Allyn and Bacon).
ADMISSION TO APPLIED SCIENCE.
The requirements for Matriculation in Applied Science are
the same as for Senior Matriculation. Students who have passed
the First Year in Arts are admitted to the First Year in Applied
Science without further examination.
RETURNED   SOLDIERS'  APPLIED   SCIENCE  MATRICULATION.
1. English (as for Junior Matriculation).
2. History and Historical Geography (as for Junior Matriculation) .
3. One of the following:—
French, German, Latin (as for Junior Matriculation).
4. Algebra and Arithmetic (as for Junior and Senior Matriculation).    Two papers. 50 The University of British Columbia.
5. Geometry (as for Junior and Senior Matriculation).
Two papers.
6. Trigonometry (as for Senior Matriculation).
7. One of the following:—
Botany, Chemistry, Physics, a language not already
chosen (as for Junior Matriculation).
ADMISSION TO ADVANCED STANDING.
A student of another university applying for exemption from
any subject or subjects which he has already studied is required
to submit with his application a Calendar of the University in
which he has previously studied, together with a complete
statement of the course he has followed and a certificate of the
standing gained therein in the several subjects. The Faculty will
determine the standing of such a student in this University.
The fee for examination of certificates, in respect of which candidates are granted exemptions, is $2.00.
AGE OF ADMISSION.
Except under special circumstances, no student under the
age of sixteen is admitted to the First Year Courses in Arts,
Applied Science or Agriculture, or under the age of seventeen to
the Second Year. Registration and Attendance. 51
REGISTRATION  AND  ATTENDANCE.
Registration.
Application for Admission.
Those who intend to register as students of the University for
the Session 1922-23 are required to make application to the
Registrar before the beginning of lectures, on forms to be obtained from the Registrar's office.
Friday, September 22nd, will be the last day of registration for all students.
Lectures will commence on Tuesday, September 26th.
The complete regulations regarding registration follow:—
1. Candidates entering on a course of study in any Faculty,
whether as undergraduates, conditioned students, or partial
students, are required to attend in person at the office of the
Registrar before the beginning of the session, to furnish the
information necessary for the University records, to register for
the particular classes which they wish to attend, and to sign the
following declaration:—
"I hereby accept and submit myself to the statutes, rules,
regulations, and ordinances of The University of British Columbia, and of the Faculty or Faculties in which I am registered,
and to any amendments thereto which may be made while I
am a student of the University, and I promise to observe the
same.''
2. Students who for any reason have failed to register by
the date specified above, may be permitted to do so within a
limited time thereafter, but only on payment of a fee of $2 for
late registration.
3. The Registrar is empowered to register all students whose
records show that they are entitled to attend the classes applied
for. To enable him to determine this, new students must present certificates at time of registration. (See paragraphs 8 and
9, pages 36 and 37.) All doubtful cases will be dealt with by
the Faculty. 52 The University of British Columbia.
4. Class Tickets will be issued to students when they register, and only those for whom tickets have been received by an
Instructor will be admitted to his class. To students whose
standing cannot be determined at the time of registration
special tickets will be issued, which will give them the right of
admission to classes until such time as their status is ascertained.
5. Students desiring to make a change in their choice of
studies must make application to the Registrar, on standard form
for "change of course." This application must be approved
by the Committee on Courses, whereupon due notice will be sent
by the Registrar to all parties concerned. No change in registration will be allowed, except under special circumstances, after
the fifteenth day of the session.
6. Persons who wish to pursue courses in the University
without a view to qualifying for a degree will be classified as
partial students and shall not be admitted to any course until
they have obtained the permission of the Dean and the Head
of the Department concerned.
7. In the Faculty of Arts, where there is a choice of courses,
students in attendance are requested to choose their electives
for the next year before the close of the preceding session, or
(in cases where this cannot be done) not later than one week
before the opening of the session.
Attendance.
1. Students are required to attend at least seven-eighths of
the total number of lectures in each course. Those whose
unexcused absences exceed one-eighth of the total number of
lectures in a course shall not be permitted to come up for the
examination in that course, but may sit for supplemental examination; those, however, whose unexcused absences exceed one-
fourth of the total number of lectures in any course must repeat
the work in that course.
Excuses on the ground of illness or domestic affliction will
be dealt with only by the Dean. Registration and Attendance. 53
**" Medical certificates must be presented immediately on
return to University work.
2. A record will be kept by each professor or lecturer, in
which the presence or absence of students will be carefully noted.
This record will be submitted to the Faculty when required.
3. Credit for attendance at any lecture or class may be refused on the grounds of lateness, inattention, neglect of study,
or disorderly conduct in the class-room or laboratory.
The following special regulations with regard to marking
the attendance of students have been adopted:—
Lectures will commence on the hour, or at the conclusion of
the roll-call. After the commencement of a lecture students
are not allowed to enter, except with the permission of the Instructor. If permitted to enter, they will, on reporting themselves at the close of the lecture, be marked '' late.'' Two '' lates"
will count as one absence. Lectures end at five minutes before
the hour.
CLASSES  OF  STUDENTS.
There are three classes of students:—
(1.) Full undergraduates—students who have passed the
Matriculation Examination and, in the case of Second,
Third and Fourth Year students, all the examinations of their course in the years below that in which
they are registered.
(2.) Conditioned undergraduates — those with defective
entrance qualifications or those who have failed in one
or more of the subjects of their course in the year previous to that in which they are registered.
(3.) Partial students—comprising all those who, not belonging to one of the above classes, are taking a partial
course of study. Except as provided below, such
students may (subject to the approval of the Dean and
the Head of the Department) attend any class without
previous examination. 54 The University of British Columbia.
FEES.
General Regulations.
1. Fees should be paid at the time of registration. The
sessional fees are:—
Registration and Class Fees $50 00
Alma Mater      7 00
Caution Money    5 00
For Partial Students
Fees, per "Unit"   $7 00
Alma Mater     7 00
Caution Money     5 00
For Graduates
Registration and Class Fees $10 00
All cheques for fees must be made payable to "The University of British Columbia."
Alma Mater fees and Caution Money must be paid by October 7th. Registration and Class Fees may be paid in two equal
instalments, the first not later than October 7th, and the second
not later than January 20th. After these dates an additional
fee of $2 will be exacted of all students in default.
At the request of the students themselves, and by the
authority of the Board of Governors of the University, $7
additional will be exacted from all students for the Alma Mater
Society.
A deposit of $5 as caution money is required from each
student. The deposit is returned at the end of the session, after
deductions have been made to cover breakages, wastage, and use
of special materials in laboratories, etc.   In case the balance of Fees. 55
the deposit remaining to the credit of a student falls below $1.50,
a second deposit of $5.00 may be required.
2. Immediately after October 21st the Bursar shall send
to the Instructors a list of the students applying for a course
who have not paid their fees, on receipt of which their names
shall be struck from the registers of attendance, and such students
cannot be readmitted to any class except on presentation of a
special ticket, signed by the Bursar, certifying to the payment
of fees.
Students registering after October 7th shall pay their fees at
the time of registration, failing which they become subject to
the provisions of Regulation 2.
Special fees are:—
A regular supplemental examination in
any course, or part of a course in
which separate examinations are held $5 00
A special examination in any subject     7 50
Graduation  20 00
Examination fees must be paid when application for examination is made, and Graduation fees two weeks before Congregation. 56 The University of British Columbia.
PRIZES, MEDALS, AND  SCHOLARSHIPS
1. General Proficiency Scholarships are open to candidates
in the Faculties of Arts and Science, Applied Science, and Agriculture.
2. No scholarship, medal, or prize will be awarded to any
candidate who has failed to take 75 per cent, of the marks
obtainable in the subject or subjects to which the award is
attached.
3. No candidate will be permitted to hold more than one
scholarship, but anyone who would, but for this provision, have
been entitled to a second scholarship will have his name published in the lists.
4. When the scholarship cannot be awarded for this reason
to the candidate obtaining the highest number of marks, it will
be granted to the candidate ranking second, provided the
requisite number of marks has been obtained.
5. A successful candidate, in order to retain his Scholarship, must proceed regularly with his College course to the satisfaction of the Faculty, but the Faculty may, upon satisfactory
reasons being shown, permit a scholar to postpone attendance
for a year. If at the end of a year a further postponement is
necessary, special application must again be made. In every
such case the payment of the Scholarship will be postponed in
like manner.
6. The scholarships will be paid in three instalments during
the session following their award—on the 15th of November, the
15th of January, and the 15th of March.
7. Winners of scholarships who desire to do so may resign
the monetary value, while the appearance of their names in the
University list enables them to retain the honour. Any funds
thus made available will be used for additional scholarships or
student loans.
8. Scholarships, medals, and prizes will be awarded at the
close of the session, and in case of Matriculation Examinations,
after the June examination. Prizes, Medals and Scholarships.      , 57
For 1922-23 the following scholarships, prizes, and medals
will be offered:—
THE GOVERNOR-GENERAL'S MEDAL.
A gold medal, presented by His Excellency the Governor-
General of Canada, will be awarded to the student standing at
the head of the graduating class in the Faculty of Arts and
Science.   Honour and pass students may compete for this medal.
ROYAL INSTITUTION  SCHOLARSHIPS AND LOANS.
(a) Matriculation Scholarships.
1. Seven General Proficiency Scholarships will be awarded
on the result of the Junior Matriculation Examinations.
A. One of $150 to be awarded to the British Columbia candidate for matriculation who obtains the highest standing.
B. Six of $100 each, one for each of the following districts,
to be awarded to the candidate from each of such districts who
obtains the highest standing among the candidates from the
district:—
1. Victoria District.
2. Vancouver Island  (exclusive of Victoria District)
and Northern Mainland.
3. Vancouver District.
4. Fraser Delta (exclusive of Vancouver District, but
including Agassiz).
5. Yale.
6. Kootenays.
Note.—In the district from which the winner of A comes,
B will be awarded to the candidate standing second.
These Scholarships can be enjoyed only by students in
attendance at the University of British Columbia.
2. A student who wins a Junior Matriculation Scholarship
and proceeds to Senior Matriculation in his own district high
school may have the scholarship reserved for him for one year,
to be awarded subject to his obtaining satisfactory standing in
the Senior Matriculation Examination. 58 The University of British Columbia.
3. A student winning a Matriculation Scholarship and taking his first two years of the Arts course in an affiliated institution, may be allowed to enjoy the privilege of the Scholarship
if he attends the University during the third year.
4. Sums accruing from unawarded Matriculation Scholarships shall be used, at the discretion of Faculty, in the form of
bursaries or loans to assist returned soldiers.
(b) First Year Scholarships.
Four scholarships of $75 each (three in Arts and one in
Applied Science) will be awarded for general proficiency in the
work of the First Year.
(c) Student Loans.
A fund is provided from which a loan not to exceed $100
may be made to a deserving student who is in need of pecuniary
assistance. Application for such a loan should be addressed to
the Chairman of the Committee on Scholarships, Bursaries,
Prizes, and Student Loans.
UNIVERSITY SCHOLARSHIPS, ETC.
1. A scholarship of the value of $200 may be awarded to a
graduate student who shows special aptitude for post-graduate
studies. (Applications should be made to the Registrar not
later than the last day of the final examinations.)
2. Two scholarships in Arts of $75 each will be awarded to
students proceeding to the Fourth Year, the award to be based
on the work of the Third Year.
3. Three Scholarships (two in Arts and one in Applied
Science) of $75 each will be awarded to students proceeding to
the Third Year, the award to be based on the work of the
Second Year.
4. A Scholarship in Agriculture of $75 will be awarded to a
student proceeding to the Second Year, the award to be based
on the work of the First Year.
5. Two Scholarships of $75 each may be awarded to
returned soldiers taking the work of the First Year, the award
to be based on the work of the year. Prizes, Medals and Scholarships. 59
6. One Scholarship of $75 will be awarded upon the results
of the Senior Matriculation Examination.
7. The Scholarships mentioned in the above sections will be
awarded for general proficiency in the work of the respective
years.
8. A book prize of the value of $25, open to all students of
the University, will be awarded for an essay on a special literary
subject, to be announced at the beginning of the Session.
DONATED SCHOLARSHIPS AND PRIZES.
The Shaw Memorial Scholarship.
This Scholarship of $137.50, founded by friends of the late
James Curtis Shaw, Principal of Vancouver College, and afterwards of McGill University College, Vancouver, will be paid
throughout his undergraduate course to any child of the late
Principal Shaw who is in regular attendance at the University
as a fully matriculated student; when there is no such candidate,
it will be awarded upon the results of the examination of the
Second Year in Arts to the undergraduate student standing
highest in any two of the following three subjects, English,
Latin, Greek, and proceeding to the work of the Third Year.
The McGill Graduates' Scholarship.
This Scholarship of $137.50, founded by the McGill
Graduates' Society of British Columbia, will be awarded upon
the results of the examinations of the Second Year in Arts to
the undergraduate student standing highest in English and
French, and proceeding to the work of the Third Year.
The Dunsmuir Scholarship.
This Scholarship of $165, founded by the Hon. James
Dunsmuir, will be awarded upon the results of the examinations
of the Third Year in Applied Science to the undergraduate
student standing highest in the Mining Engineering Course, and
proceeding to the work of the Fourth Year.
Note.—The above three scholarships were originally donated
to the Royal Institution, and have, with the consent of the 60 The University of British Columbia.
donors, been transferred by the Board of Governors of that
institution, to the University of British Columbia.
Convocation Scholarship.
This Scholarship, of the value of $50.00, donated by Convocation of the University of British Columbia, will be awarded
annually to the student obtaining first place in the Fourth Year
of Applied Science.
The Terminal City Club Memorial Scholarship.
This Scholarship, of the value of $110, founded by the
members of the Terminal City Club as a memorial to those
members of the Club who lost their lives in the Great War, will
be awarded upon the results of the examinations of the Second
Year in Arts to the under-graduate student standing highest in
English and Economics, and proceeding to the work of the Third
Year.
The Anne Wesbrook Scholarship.
This Scholarship, of the value of $100, given by the
Faculty Women's Club of the University, will be open to both
men and women graduates of this University who intend to
pursue post-graduate study in this or any other approved
University.
Applications for this Scholarship should be made to the
Registrar not later than the last day of the final examinations.
Nomination for the award will be made by a joint meeting of
the Committee on Scholarships and the Committee on Student
Affairs of the Faculty Women's Club.
Graduate Scholarship in Applied Science.
This Scholarship, of the value of $100, donated by Dean
R. W. Brock, may be awarded to a graduate student in Applied
Science who shows special aptitude for post-graduate studies.
The Scholarship was awarded for the first time in May,
1921.
Applications should be made to the Registrar not later than
the last day of the final examinations. Prizes, Medals and Scholarships. 61
A Graduation Prize.
A prize of $50 was given by Mrs. F. F. Wesbrook to the
student attaining second place in the Graduating Class in Arts
1921.
The Arts '19 Scholarship.
This Scholarship, of the value of $150, given by the students
of Arts '19, will be awarded on the recommendation of the
Faculty Committee on Scholarships to a Third Year student in
Arts proceeding to the Fourth Year.
The award will be based on (1) literary and scholastic
attainments, and (2) exhibition of moral force of character and
instincts to lead and take an interest in fellow-students and in
University activities.
This Scholarship will be paid in full to the winner at the
beginning of the session.
The Vancouver Women's Canadian Club Scholarship.
This Scholarship, of the value of $75, given by the Women's
Canadian Club, will be awarded to the student obtaining first
place in Canadian History.
The Gerald Myles Harvey Prize.
A book prize of the value of $50, given by J. N. Harvey,
Esq., in memory of his son, Gerald Myles Harvey, who died on
active service, will be awarded to the student of the Third Year
in Arts who submits the best essay on a specified subject in
Economics or Political Science.
The Historical Society Prize.
Through the generosity of R.  L.  Reid,  Esq.,  K.C,  the
Historical Society of   the University has been able to offer,
annually, a prize of $25, open to all students in Arts, for the
best essay on an assigned subject.
The Historical Society Gold Medal.
A gold medal, donated by E. W. Keenleyside, Esq., and.
known as the Historical Society Gold Medal, will be open to the
members of the graduating class.   The award will be made by 62 The University of British Columbia.
the Department of History, on the basis of the student's standing in the courses in History which he has taken during his
undergraduate course, and the general interest he has shown
in the subject.
The Historical Society Silver Medal.
A silver medal, donated by Hugh Keenleyside, Esq., of
the class of 1920, and known as the Historical Society Silver
Medal, will be awarded in the Third Year on the same basis as
the gold medal.
Captain LeRoy Memorial Scholarship.
This Scholarship, of the value of $250.00, donated by the
Universities Service Club, will be awarded for the academic year
1922-23 to a returned soldier student in attendance at the
University of British Columbia. Applications for this Scholarship may be made by returned soldier students who intend
doing second, third, or fourth year work at the University of
British Columbia, or post-graduate work at any approved institution. Each application must contain a statement of the
academic record, the war record, and the special claims of the
applicant, with two supporting references, and must be in the
hands of the Registrar not later than April 30, 1921.
The award will be made by Senate, upon recommendation
of Faculty acting in consultation with the Executive of the
Universities Service Club.
The Vancouver Women's Conservative Association Prize.
This prize, of the value of $25, given by the Vancouver
Women's Conservative Association, is open to students taking
the Mathematics of the First Year. In awarding the prize
preference will be given to the son or daughter of a deceased
soldier, provided satisfactory standing is secured in the subject.
The Scott Memorial Scholarship.
This Scholarship, of the annual value of $110.00—the proceeds of an endowment of $2,000—founded by the Imperial Prizes, Medals and Scholarships. 63
Order of the Daughters of the Empire of the City of Vancouver,
in memory of Captain Robert Falcon Scott, the Antarctic
explorer, who sacrificed his life in the cause of Science, will be
awarded for general proficiency in biological subjects to the
student who has completed his Second Year in Arts, and who is
proceeding in the Third Year to Honour work either in Biology
or in a course including Biology.
The Vagabonds' Club Prize.
A prize of the value of $25.00, given by the Vancouver
Vagabonds' Club, is offered for the best original short poem
written by a student of the University. The award will be made
on the recommendation of the Department of English.
The Players' Club Prize.
A prize of the value of $50.00, donated by the Players' Club,
is offered for an original play suitable for the club's Christmas
performance. The award will be made on the recommendation
of the Faculty members of the Advisory Board of the Players'
Club.
The British Columbia Dairymen's Association Prizes.
These prizes were given by the British Columbia Dairymen's
Association in order to encourage students specializing in the
department of Animal Husbandry in judging live stock.
Three prizes, of the value of $50, $30, and $20, were awarded
on the results of the judging done by the team selected to represent the University in stock-judging at the Pacific International
Exposition.
British  Columbia  Fruit  Growers'  Association  Scholarship.
This Scholarship, of the annual value of $100, donated by
the British Columbia Fruit Growers' Association, will be
awarded to a student taking the horticultural options of the
Third Year. To qualify for this Scholarship candidates must
attain scholarship standing, not only in horticultural subjects, 64 The University of British Columbia.
but also in the work of the year, and must be proceeding to the
Horticultural Course of the Fourth Year—the year in which the
Scholarship shall be enjoyed.
Canadian Institute of Mining and Metallurgy Prizes.
Undergraduate.
The British Columbia Division of the C I. M. M. offers
annually, to students of the University of British Columbia,
three prizes of $10.00 each, to be awarded as follows:—
One for the best paper on a subject in Economic Geology.
One for the best paper on a subject in Mining.
One for the best paper on a subject in Metallurgy.
The papers submitted should be in the hands of the Secretary by June 1st. The authors of approved papers will give
oral abstracts of their papers at the annual meeting of the
Division.
The Red Cross Prize.
The British Columbia Division of the Canadian Red Cross
Society gave a prize of $100.00 for competition, in the session
1921-22, in the Short Course in Public Health Nursing.
The Provincial Board of Health Prizes.
The Provincial Board of Health of the Province of British
Columbia gave two prizes of $60.00 and $40.00 for competition,
in the Session 1921-22, in the Short Course of Public Health
Nursing.
The Rhodes Scholarship.
In addition to the above Scholarships, the Rhodes Scholarship assigned by the trustees of the late Mr. Cecil J. Rhodes to
the Province of British Columbia will be awarded by the committee mentioned below.
The following are excerpts from the regulations laid down
by the trustees:— Prizes, Medals and Scholarships. 65
The election of scholars in Canada under the Rhodes bequest
will take place each year during the month of January. The
scholars will begin residence at Oxford in October of the year
for which they are elected.
Each Scholarship is tenable for three years, and is of the
value of £300 per annum.
Candidates shall be British subjects and unmarried. They
must have passed their nineteenth but not their twenty-fifth
birthday on October 1st of the year for which they are elected.
An elected scholar must have reached at least the end of his
sophomore or second year's work at some recognized degree-
granting university or college of Canada.
Candidates may elect whether they will apply for the
Scholarship of the Province in which they have acquired any
considerable part of their educational qualification, or that of
the Province in which they have their ordinary domicile, home,
or residence. They must be prepared to present themselves for
examination or election in the Province they select. No candidate may compete in more than one Province, either in the same
or in successive years.
Only candidates who have passed an equivalent to the
Oxford Responsions Examination or those who are exempted
from Responsions by the Colonial Universities' Statute are
eligible for election.
In accordance with the wish of Mr. Rhodes, the trustees
desire that "in the election of a student to a Scholarship regard
shall be had to (i) his literary and scholastic attainments;
(ii) his fondness for and success in manly outdoor sports, such
as cricket, football, and the like; (iii) his qualities of manhood,
truth, courage, devotion to duty, sympathy for and protection
of the weak, kindliness, unselfishness, and fellowship; and
(iv) his exhibition during school-days of moral force of character
and of instincts to lead and to take an interest in his schoolmates."    Mr. Rhodes suggested that  (ii)  and  (iii)  should be 66 The University of British Columbia.
decided in any school or college by the votes of fellow-students,
and (iv) by the head of the school or college.
Additional information will be furnished to intending candidates on application to the President of the University.
The Committee by whom the Rhodes scholar is elected is at
present constituted as follows:—
Chief Justice Hunter (Chairman), Mr. Justice Gregory
(Deputy-Chairman), Messrs. H. R. Bray, A. G. Cameron, H.
T. Logan (Secretary), E. A. Munro.
Graduate Bursary in Mining and Metallurgy.
Through the British Columbia Division of the Canadian
Institute of Mining and Metallurgy, the Granby Consolidated
Mining and Smelting Company, and the Crow's Nest Coal Company each offer to give employment annually to two selected
graduates of the University of British Columbia, to enable them,
while earning a livelihood, to obtain practical experience and
personal knowledge of the various phases of metal mining or
smelting, and coal mining, respectively, under favorable conditions and in the minimum of time.
1851 Exhibition Scholarship.
Under the revised conditions for the award of the 1851
Exhibition Scholarship in Science, the University of British
Columbia is included in the list of Universities from which
nominations for Scholarships allotted to Canada, may be made.
These Scholarships are of the value of £250 per annum,
tenable, ordinarily, for two years. They are granted only to
British subjects under 26 years of age, who have been bona fide
students of Science of not less than three years' standing.
The Khaki University and Young Men's Christian Association
Memorial Scholarship Fund.
The sum of $12,000.00, given to the University by the
Administrators of the Khaki University of Canada, provides a Prizes, Medals and Scholarships. 67
fund to assist Returned Soldiers who are in actual need of money
to enable them to complete their courses, and to found scholarships, in the award of which preference should be given to the
sons and daughters of Soldiers of the Great War.
SUGGESTED LOCAL SCHOLARSHIPS.
The number of Junior Matriculation Scholarships offered at
present is quite inadequate to the needs of the Province, and
opportunity is here taken to recommend a scheme for adding to
their number.
This scheme is the establishment of local or district University Entrance Scholarships by City or Municipal Councils or
other public bodies, as well as by private benefactors. These
Scholarships would be awarded by a local authority, the University reserving to itself the right of confirmation.
In the award of such Scholarships, standing in the Matriculation Examination, while important, need not be the only consideration; it is desirable that regard should be had also to
financial circumstances, character, and intellectual promise.
In the large universities, both of Great Britain and the
United States, such district Scholarships have proved a strong
bond between the community and the University, have brought
the University close to the life of the young, and opened up the
prospect of a University education to many who would not
otherwise have contemplated it.
Scholarships may be offered to students taking a particular
course; in this way the study of such sciences and technical
branches of knowledge as have a bearing on the industries of
the district will be encouraged and native sons prepared to assist
in developing the resources of the Province.
The scheme has great possibilities both for the growth of
the University and the prosperity of the Province, and it is
earnestly recommended to consideration. 68 The University of British Columbia.
DONATIONS
However well supported by public funds, a University must
depend to a great extent upon private benefactors. Only a
limited number are in a position to grant endowments, but
undergraduates, graduates and friends of higher education may
add greatly to the efficiency of the University by contributions
that lie within their power to make.
It is gratifying to note that this means of assisting the
University is being utilized by increasing numbers.
Among the more notable donations received during the
past year are the following:
Major-General J. W. Stewart—Large scale relief map, geologically coloured, of
Loch Assynth, N. W. Highlands, Scotland.
H. S. Rolston—Native silver, Dolly Varden Mine, B. C.
P. W. Racey—Rocks and ores, Belmont, Surf Inlet.
C. N. Campbell—Phoenix rocks and ores.
Col. C H. Pollen—Collection of Lower Cambrian Trilobites, Cranbrook.
C H. Crickmay—Collection of fossils, Skidegate Inlet.
Gen. R. G. E. Leckie—Fossil leaves, Eocene.
J. Walker—Collection of Cambrian Fossils, Windermere.
D. L. Thompson and R.  G.  Anderson—Suite of ore specimens  from  Sullivan
Mine, Kimberley, B. C
J. R. Giegerich and H. C Giegerich—Suite of ores from Slocan district, B. C.
J. M. Turnbull—Gold specimen from Engineer Mine, Atlin, B. C
Norton Company—Suite of abrasives and educational lectures.
American Refractories Co.—Suite of refractory ores and products.
General Ceramics Co.—Suite of clays and clay products.
Canadian Johns-Manville Co.—Suite of asbestos and refractory products.
E. C. Harder—Suite of bauxite specimens from the Guianas.
American Bauxite Co.—Suites of bauxite specimens from Georgia, Arkansas.
Asbestos & Mineral Corporation—Suite of asbestos specimens from South Africa.
The Carborundum Co.—Suite of refractories and abrasives.
Magnesia Association of America—Specimens of basic carbonate of magnesia.
Denver Fire Clay Co.—Suite of clays and clay products.
Asbestos Corporation—Suite of asbestos specimens  from  Quebec.
D. M. Morrison—Suite of silver ores from Dolly Varden Mine, B. C.
A. L. Reeve—Silver and cobalt specimens, Gowganda, Ont.
W. L. Uglow—Suite of rocks and ores from Cerro de Pasco and Morococha, Peru.
R. W. Goranson—Suite of rocks and ores from Alice Arm district, B. C.
M. Wilcox—Fossil resin from Coalmont, B. C.
N. L.  Bowen—Set of index of refraction liquids.
D. F. Stedman—Silver-lead minerals and ores  from Kootenay district.
W. E. Zwickey—Argentite and native silver from Krao Mine, B. C.
R. D. Hearn—Argentite crystal and native silver from Xrao Mine, B. C. FACULTY OF ARTS AND SCIENCE
INFORMATION  FOR STUDENTS.
COURSES LEADING TO THE DEGREE OF B.A.
The degree of B.A. is granted only after four sessions of
class-room work from Junior Matriculation. Students who enter
with Senior Matriculation may complete their course in three
years.
A double course leading to the degrees of B.A. and B.A.Sc.
(Applied Science) is offered.    (See page 158.)
The curriculum as laid down in the following pages may be
changed from time to time as deemed advisable by the Faculty.
The Courses in Arts and Science are arranged on the unit
system.
Definition of a Unit.—A unit is one lecture hour per week,
or one continuous laboratory period of not less than two or more
than three hours per week, throughout the College year.
Students in any affiliated Theological College who file with
the Registrar a written statement expressing their intention of
graduating in Theology will be allowed to offer, in each year of
their Arts Course, in place of optional subjects set down in the
University Calendar for the year and course in which they are
registered, Religious Knowledge options, to the extent of three
units taken from the following list: Hebrew, Biblical Literature,
New Testament Greek, Church History, Christian Ethics and
Apologetics.
First and Second Years.
1. The work of the first two years in Arts and Science is
treated as a whole, according to the following scheme involving
ten courses (30 units):
Units.
1, 2.—English 1 (a and 6), 2 (a and b), one
course in each year     6 70 The University of British Columbia.
3,4.—The first two courses in a language
offered for Matriculation, one course
in each year    6
5.—Mathematics 1, to be taken in the
First Year    3
6.—Economics 1, or History 1 or 2 or 3,
or Philosophy 1    3
7.—Biology 1, or Chemistry 1, or Geology 1, or Physics 1    3
8,10.—Three courses-^not already chosen—
selected from the following:—
Biology 1, Botany 1, Chemistry 1,
Chemistry 2, Economics 1, Economics 2, French 1, French 2, Geography 1, Geology 1, Geology 2,
German 1, German 2, Greek 1,
Greek 2, History 1, History 2, History 3, Latin 1, Latin 2, Mathematics 2, Mathematics 3, Mathematics 4, Philosophy 1, Physics 1,
Physics 2, Physics 3, Zoology 1....   9
Note.—Geology 1 and 2 are not open to
First Year students.
2. No student may take less than 15 units of work in either
his First or Second Year.
3. No student in his First Year may elect more than one
beginners' course in language, and no beginners' course in
language will count towards a degree unless followed by a Second
Year's work in that language.
4. A student taking three languages in the first two years
may defer the course selected under 7 (above) to the Third or
Fourth Year.
Note (for students in First Year Arts intending to enter
the Faculty of Applied Science)—Physics must be taken in First Information for Students in Arts 71
Year Arts, but Chemistry 1 should be left for the First Year in
Applied Science. French and Biology should be taken by students intending to enter Geological Engineering, and Biology by
those intending to enter Forestry.
Third and Fourth Years : Pass Curriculum.
1. The Curriculum of the Third and Fourth Years in Arts
and Science includes at least 30 units of work, of which students
must take, in their Third Year, not less than 15 units or more
than 18.
2. In courses that involve laboratory work, one hour of
lecture is regarded as the equivalent of two or three hours of
attendance in the laboratory.
3. All students who are candidates for a Pass Degree must
complete, during their Third and Fourth Years, at least 15 units
of work in two Major subjects, in each of which, except in the
case of Bacteriology, they must have done work in the first two
years. A minimum of 6 units is required in each of the Major
subjects. These Major subjects must be chosen from one of the
following groups:
(a) Chemistry, Bacteriology, Botany, Geology, Physics,
Zoology, Mathematics.*
(6) Economics, Philosophy, Mathematics.
(c) English, Greek, Latin, French, German, History,
Economics, Philosophy.
4. All students who are candidates for a Pass Degree must
take at least 6 units of work in a subject or subjects other than
their two Major subjects.
5. During the Senior Year, students may elect, with the
consent of the department concerned, one course of private
reading, to count not more than 3 units. In such courses examinations will be set, but no class instruction will be given.
To be taken only with Chemistry or Physics. 72 The University of British Columbia.
6. On or before March 31st of each year, all students in their
Second Year must submit to the Dean of the Faculty a scheme
of the courses which they propose to take during their last two
years.
Courses open to Third and Fourth Year Students
Session 1922-23:
Units
Agriculture   3
Bacteriology 1   2
2    2
3     2
4   iy2
Biology 1    3
2  1
3    2
Botany  1     3
2    2
3     2
4    2
5 (a)  2
5 (b)  1
6 (a)  1
6 (b)  1
7 (a)  1
Chemistry   1   3
2   3
3   3
4  \y2
5   3
6 ....,  2
7   3
8   V/2
9   3
10   1
11   3
12  1
14   3
15  2 Information for Students in Arts. 73
Economics 1   3
2  3
3   3
5   3
6   3
Government 1   3
2   3
English   6  2
8   2
9 (b)  3
10   3
11   2
12   2
13   3
14   3
16   3
17   3
18 (6)  2
19   3
20   3
21 (a)  2
21 (6) ,  1
22   1
24  2
French 3 (a)  3
3  (b)  3
3 (c)  3
4 (a)  3
4  (6) '.  3
4  (c)  3
4 (d)  3
Geography 1   3
Geology    1    3
2  (a)  iy
2 (6)  iy
3  iy
4  iy 74
The University of British Columbia.
Geology
5
6
7
8
10
12
Units
. 3
. 3
. 4
. 4
■ 1J*
■ 1/2
German 2  (a)  3
3   3
Greek 2   3
"      3   3
"      4   3
"     6   3
"     8  1
History 4   3
5
6
7
8
9
10
3
3
3
3
3
3
Latin 3   3
"      5   3
"      8   1
Mathematics 2   3
4
10
11
12
14
16
17
18
3
3
2
2
2
2
2
1
Philosophy 1       3
2     3 Information for Students in Arts.
75
Philosophy 3
6
7
Units.
..   3
    2
     3
Physics 2    3
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
3
3
2
2
2
3
2
3 to 6
Sociology 1    3
Zoology 1    3
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
2
2
1
2
2
2
2
No credit will be given for a First Year Language taken in
the Third Year unless it is continued in the Fourth Year.
HONOUR COURSES.
1. All the Departments in the Faculty of Arts and Science
offer Honour Courses, either alone or in combination with certain
other Departments.
General Regulations.
2. Honour Courses shall be begun at the close of the Second
Year and continued until the end of the Fourth Year.
3. Students must obtain the consent of the departments concerned, and of the Dean, before they enter upon any Course in
Honours; and, under normal conditions, consent   will   not be 76 The University of British Columbia.
granted unless they present, at the end of the Second Year, a
clear academic record, and unless they have obtained at least
Second Class standing in the subject or subjects of specialization.
Cards of application for admission to Honour Courses may be
obtained at the Registrar's office.
4. A student electing Honours in one subject is required to
take at least 18 units in that subject and at least 6 units outside
it; a student electing a combination Honour Course is required
to take at least 12 units in each subject. Credit for the graduating essay will be not less than 3 or more than 6 units.
5. All candidates for Honours may, at the option of the
department or departments concerned, be required to present a
graduating essay embodying the results of some investigation that
they have made independently.
6. Candidates for Honours are required, at the end of
their Fourth Year, to take a general examination, oral or written,
or both, as the department or departments concerned shall decide.
This examination is designed to test the student's knowledge of
his chosen subject or subjects as a whole and is in addition to the
ordinary class examinations of the Third and Fourth Years.
7. Honours are of two grades—First Class and Second Class.
Students who, in the opinion of the department concerned, have
not attained a sufficiently high ranking may be awarded a pass
degree.
Special Regulations.
The following special regulations control the Honour Courses
mentioned:
Biology (Botany and Zoology).
Prerequisites:—Students are advised to take Chemistry 1
and 2; Biology 1; Botany 1, or Zoology 1.
Course:—To be chosen from the following, in accordance
with the general regulations and on approval of the departments :— Courses in Arts. 77
Units.
Biology 2   1
3    2
Botany  1     3
3     2
4   2
5 (a)  2
6 (a)  1
Zoology 1  3
2  2
3   2
4   1
5   2
6   2
7   2
2
Chemistry.
Prerequisites:—Chemistry 1; Physics 1 or 2, and Mathematics 2.
Course:—Candidates are required to take the following
classes: Chemistry 2, 3, 4, 5, 7 and 9, and are advised to take
Physics 2, and Mathematics 10.
Geology.
Students intending to take Honour Geology are recommended to take Chemistry and Physics in the First Year, as
some knowledge of these subjects is essential. Geology 1 should
be taken in the Second Year, as it is a prerequisite for all Honour
Geology, and Geology 2, if possible, as it supplements Geology 1,
and is a prerequisite for Geology 7, 8 and 9.
Geology 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 10 and 12 may be taken as Honour
subjects.
Biology (Botany and Zoology) and Bacteriology.
Prerequisites:—Chemistry 1 and 2; Biology 1; Botany 1,
or Zoology 1. 78 The University of British Columbia.
Course:—To be chosen in accordance with the general regulations and on the approval of the departments.
Biology (Botany and Zoology) and Geology.
Prerequisites:—Chemistry 1; Biology 1, and Geology 1.
Course:—To be chosen in accordance with general regulations and on approval of departments.
Chemistry and Biology (Botany and Zoology).
Prerequisites:—Chemistry 1 and 2; Physics 1 or 2, and
Biology 1.
Course:—Candidates must complete the following courses:
Chemistry 3, 4, 7 and 9; and Botany and Zoology as arranged
with departments concerned.
Chemistry and Physics.
Prerequisites:—Chemistry 1; Physics 1 or 2, and Mathematics 2.
Course:—Candidates must complete Chemistry 2, 3, 4, 5 and
7, and Physics 3, 4, 7, or 9 and 8 or 10. They are advised to take
Mathematics 10.
Chemistry and Geology.
Prerequisites:—Chemistry 1; Physics 1 or 2, and Geology 1.
Course:—Candidates must take Chemistry 2, 3, 4, 5 and 7,
and at least 12 units in Geology.
Mathematics.
Prerequisites:—Mathematics 1 and 2; Physics 1 or 2.
Course-
Third Year:—Mathematics 10, 11 and either 12 and 14
or 13 and 15; Physics 3.
Fourth Year:—Mathematics, the remaining two of 12
to 15, and 16,17, 18; Physics 4. Courses in Arts. 79
Physics.
Prerequisites:—Mathematics 1 and 2; Physics 1 or 2.
Required in Third and Fourth Years:—Mathematics 10,
11 and 16; Physics 3, 4, 7, 8, 9 and 10.
Mathematics and Physics.
Prerequisites:—Mathematics 1 and 2; Physics 1 or 2.
Course:
Third Year:—Mathematics 10, 11 and one of 12 to 15;
Physics 3 and 4.
Fourth Year:—Mathematics 16 and two of 12, 13, 14,
15 and 17; Physics 5 or 6 and 8 or 10.
English Language and Literature.
Candidates for Honours in English Language and Literature
are subject to the following special regulations:
1. They shall take Courses 20, 21(a), 21(6), 22, 24. Attendance upon the seminar is required during both of the final years,
but credits which count for the B.A. degree will be given only
for the work of the Fourth Year.
2. They shall pass examinations on the life, times, and complete works of some major English author (see English 19).
3. They shall take other courses covering at least 15 units of
credit. One part of this work shall be a course in English
History; or, lacking this, candidates must submit to an examination in that subject.
4. They shall submit to a final Honours Examination,
written or oral, or both, on the History of English Literature.
In the award of Honours special importance will be attached
to the Graduating Essay and to the final Honours Examination.
English and History.
Candidates for Honours must comply with the following
regulations: 80 The University of British Columbia.
English:—1. They shall take Courses 20 and 24, and any
three of the English Courses of the first division. Attendance
upon the Seminar is required during both of the final years, but
credits which count for the B.A. degree will be given only for
the work of the Fourth Year.
2. They shall submit to a final Honours Examination,
written or oral, or both, on the History of English Literature
since 1400.
History:—Candidates must take at least 12 units in History
during their Third and Fourth Years.
The graduating essay will count 3 units.
English and French.
English:—As in English and History.
French:—See details under Modern Languages.
English and Latin.
English:—As in English and History.
Latin:—Candidates must in their Third and Fourth Years
take at least 12 units in Latin. They will be expected to show
special knowledge of some one major Latin author, and to pass
an examination upon their general knowledge of Latin Literature, History, Antiquities, etc.
English and Philosophy.
English:—As in English and History.
Philosophy, Prerequisite:—Philosophy 1.
Course:—Totalling 12 units, 6 of which must be taken
in the Third Year.
Economics, Political Science and Sociology.
A student seeking Honours in the Department of Economics,
Political Science and Sociology must:
(1) During the first two years have satisfactorily passed in
Economics 1; Courses in Arts. 81
(2) Obtain a satisfactory standing in Economics 2;
(3) During his Third and Fourth Years obtain a satisfactory standing in at least five additional courses in
the Department of Economics, counting not less than
14 units;
(4) Obtain a satisfactory standing in a final General Honours Examination, written or oral, or both, to be taken
at the end of the Fourth Year;
(5) Submit before the end of the Fourth Year a Graduation
Essay, embodying the result of independent work. This
essay may count for 3 to 6 units, at the discretion of
the Department of Economics. Tutorial instruction
amounting to one hour per week will be arranged in
connection with this work.
(6) Deliver an address on some subject relative to his course
of study before a general audience, to be designated by
the Head of the Department.
Advice: Those seeking Honours in this Department are
advised to take, if possible, a course in Ethics, the foundational
courses in History, and Mathematics 3.
Economics and French.
Economics:—As in Economics and History.
French:—See details under Modern Languages.
History and Economics.
History:—As in English and History.
Economics:—Three courses in this Department other than
Courses 1 and 2. For further regulations see Economics, Political Science and Sociology.
History and Philosophy.
History:—As in English and History.
Philosophy:—As in English and Philosophy. 82 The University of British Columbia.
History and French.
History:—As in English and History.
French:—See details under Modern Languages.
History and Latin.
History:—As in English and History.
Latin:—As in English and Latin.
French and Latin.
French:—See details under Modern Languages.
Latin:—As in English and Latin.
French and Philosophy.
French:—See details under Modern Languages.
Philosophy:—As in English and Philosophy.
Economics and Philosophy.
Economics:—As in History and Economics.
Philosophy:—As in English and Philosophy.
Philosophy and Latin.
Philosophy:—As in English and Philosophy.
Latin:—As in English and Latin.
EXAMINATIONS IN ARTS AND   SCIENCE.
1. There are two examinations in each year — one at
Christmas and the other at the end of the session. Successful
students are arranged in three classes, as follows: First class,
those who obtain 80 per cent, or more; Second class, 65 to 80
per cent.; Passed, 50 to 65 per cent.
In the First and Second Years, in order to pass, Candidates
must obtain 50% on the examinations as a whole and not less Courses in Arts. 83
than 40% on each subject. In the Third and Fourth Years, in
order to pass, Candidates must obtain 50% on each subject of
examination.
Christmas examinations will be held in all subjects, and are
obligatory for all students.
Applications for Special Consideration on account of illness
in the matter of examinations must be in the hands of the Dean
not later than two days after the close of the examination period.
Any student whose academic record, as determined by the
tests and examinations of the first term, is found to be unsatisfactory, may, upon the recommendation of the Faculty, be required by the Senate to discontinue attendance at the University
for the remainder of the session.
2. The following are the regulations for advancement to
the Second, Third and Fourth Years of the undergraduate
course:—
Advancement to the Second Year.—In order that a student
may proceed to the Second Year of his course, he must have
completed his Matriculation, and have passed in all or all but
one, of the subjects of the preceding year, but may not continue
in the Second Year in the subject in which he has failed to make
good his standing, except in the cases of compulsory subjects for
the Second Year.
Advancement to the Third Year.—In order that a student
may proceed to the Third Year, he must have completed his
First Year and have passed in all, or all but one, of the subjects
of his Second Year, but he may not continue the subject in which
he has failed to make good his standing.
Advancement to the Fourth Year.—In order that a student
may proceed to the Fourth Year he must have completed his
First and Second Years and have passed in all, or all but one,
of the subjects of the Third Year. 84 The University of British Columbia.
A student who fails a second time to make his year may,
upon the recommendation of the Faculty, be required by the
Senate to withdraw from the University.
3. Repeating Year.—By special permission of the Faculty, a
student who is required to repeat his year may, on application in
writing,—
(a) Be exempted from attending lectures and passing
examinations in the subjects in which he has already
passed, provided he has made therein a standing of
60 per cent, or over.
(b) And if so exempted, be permitted to take, in addition
to the subjects in which he has failed, such subjects of
the following year of his course as the Faculty may deem
advisable.
Supplemental Examinations.
4. Notice will be sent to all students to whom the Faculty
has granted supplemental examinations.
5. Examinations supplemental to the sessional examinations
will be held in September, simultaneously with the matriculation
examinations. The time for each supplemental examination will
be fixed by the Faculty; the examination will not be granted at
any other time, except by special permission of the Faculty, and
on payment of a fee of $7.50.
6. Applications for supplemental examinations, accompanied
by the necessary fees (See Schedule of Fees), must be in the
hands of the Registrar at least two weeks before the date set
for the examinations. Courses in Arts. 85
COURSES IN ARTS
Department of Agriculture.
Professor: F. M. Clement.
The Scientific Basis of Agriculture.—This course is designed
for students who desire to extend their knowledge of the application of the basic sciences to the principles underlying farm
life and farm problems. The course outlined below should prove
of value to teachers and others who are interested in Rural
Science.
(a) Historical Background:—Roman Husbandry; English
Husbandry; The Contributions of Britain to Canadian
and American Agriculture; Canadian and American
Agriculture of today.
(b) The Scientific Basis of: (1) The Maintenance of Soil
Fertility and the Production of Farm Crops; (2) Plant
and Animal Improvement; (3) Special Problems in
Production.
(c) The Farm Organization and the Scientific Basis of the
Marketing of Farm Crops.
(d) The Institutions growing out of the Problems developed
in "b" and "c"; Agricultural Colleges; Experiment
Stations; Farmer Movements; The Rural Problem and
the Country Life Movement.
Three lectures per week throughout the year. 3 units.
Department of Bacteriology.
Professor: R. H. Mullin.
Lecturer: R. E. Coleman.
Assistant:   Freda L.  Wilson.
1. A Course of General Bacteriology, consisting of lectures,
demonstrations, and laboratory work.
The history of bacteriology, the place of bacteria in nature,
the classification of bacterial forms, methods of culture and
isolation, and various bactericidal substances and conditions will 86 The University of British Columbia.
be studied.   The relationship of bacteria to agriculture, household science, and public health will be carefully considered.
Chemistry 1, and Biology 1, are prerequisites.
Seven hours a week.   First Term. 2 units.
2. A Course of Special Bacteriology, consisting of lectures,
demonstrations, and laboratory work.
The more common pathogenic bacteria will be studied, together with the reaction of the animal body against invasion by
these bacteria. The course will include studies in immunity
and the various diagnostic methods in use in public health
laboratories.   Bacteriology 1 is a prerequisite.
Seven hours a week.   Second Term.   , 2 units.
3. As in Dairying 3 (under Faculty of Agriculture).
2 units.
4. As in Dairying7 (under Faculty of Agriculture).
\y2 units.
Department of Botany.
Professor:   A. H. Hutchinson.
Assistant Professor:   John Davidson.
Lecturer in Plant Pathology:  J. W. Eastham.
Biology.
1. Introductory Biology.—The course is introductory to
more advanced work in Botany or Zoology; also to courses
closely related to Biological Science, such as Agriculture, Forestry, Medicine.
The fundamental principles of Biology; the interrelationships of plants and animals; life processes; the cell and division
of labour; life-histories; relation to environment.
The course is prerequisite to all other courses in Biology.
Two lectures and two hours laboratory work per week,,
throughout the Session.
Text-book: "W". M. Smallwood, Text-book of Biology, Lea &
Febiger, 1920. 3 units. Courses in Arts. 87
2. Principles of Heredity.—The fundamentals of Genetics
illustrated by the race histories of certain plants and animals;
the physical basis of heredity; variations; mutations; acquired
characters; Mendel's law with suggested applications.
Two lectures per week.   First Term.
Text-book: "W. E. Castle, Genetics and Eugenics, Harvard
Press. 1 unit.
3. General Physiology of animal and plant life processes.
Open to students of Third and Fourth Years having prerequisite
Chemistry and Physics.
Two lectures and four hours laboratory work per week.
Second Term.
Text-book: W. M. Bayliss, Principles of General Physiology,
Longmans, Green & Co. 2 units.
Botany.
1. General Botany.—A course including a general survey
of the several fields of Botany and introductory to more specialized courses in Botany.
Two lectures and two hours laboratory work per week,
throughout the Session.
Text-book: Coulter, Barnes & Cowles, Text-book of Botany,
Vol. I., University of Chicago Press. 3 units.
2. Morphology.
General Morphology of plants. A comparative study of
plant structures. The relationships of plant groups. Comparative life-histories. Emphasis is placed upon the increasing complexity of plant structures, from the lower to the higher forms,
involving a progressive differentiation accompanied by an interdependence of parts.
Two lectures and four hours laboratory work per week.
First Term.
Text-book: Coulter, Barnes & Cowles, Text-book of Botany,
Vol. I., University of Chicago Press. 2 units. 88 The University of British Columbia.
3. Plant Physiology.
Two lectures and four hours laboratory work per week.
First Term.
Text-book: Coulter, Barnes & Cowles, Text-book of Botany,
Vol. I., Part II., University of Chicago Press. 2 units.
4. Histology. A study of the structure and development
of plants; methods of killing, fixing, embedding, sectioning,
staining, mounting, drawing, reconstructing. Use of microscope,
camera lucida; microphotography.
Seven hours per week.   Second Term.
Prerequisite:  Botany 1.
Text-book: "W. C. Stevens, Plant Anatomy, P. Blakiston,
Son & Co. 2 units.
5. Systematic Flora.
5 (a). Economic Flora.—A course in Systematic Botany,
illustrated by native and introduced plants of economic importance.
The classification of injurious and useful algae, fungi,
mosses, ferns and flowering plants. The identification of weeds,
native trees, poisonous, medicinal, and fodder plants.
The course, while designed particularly to meet the needs of
students of Agriculture or Forestry, is open to students of the
Third and Fourth Years in Arts.
Two hours lecture, and the equivalent of four hours practical work per week, including laboratory, excursions and the
preparation of collections.   Second Term.
Prerequisite:   Botany 1.
Text-books: J. K. Henry, Flora of Southern British Columbia, W. J. Gage & Co.; R. G. Leavitt, Outlines of Botany with
Flora, American Book Co. 2 units.
5 (b). Dendrology.   As in Forestry. 1 unit.
6. Plant Pathology.
6 (a). General  Plant Pathology.—Identification  and  life- Courses in Arts. 89
histories of parasites causing plant-diseases; means of combating them.
One lecture and two hours laboratory work per week.
Second Term.
Prerequisite:   Botany 1.
Text-book: B. M. Duggar, Fungus Diseases of Plants,
Ginn & Co. 1 unit.
6 (b). Forest Pathology.   As in Forestry. 1 unit.
7. Plant Ecology.
7 (a). Forest Ecology.    As in Forestry. 1 unit.
Evening and Short Courses in Botany.
A Course in General Botany, comprising approximately
fifty lectures, is open to all interested in the study of plant life
of the Province. No entrance examination and no previous
knowledge of the subject is required.
The course is designed to assist teachers, gardeners, foresters,
and other lovers of outdoor life in the Province. As far as
possible, illustrative material will be selected from the flora of
British Columbia.
The classes meet every Tuesday evening during the University session (Sept.-May) from 7.30 to 9.30 p.m.; the first hour
is devoted to elementary work; the second hour to more advanced
botany. Field or laboratory work, under direction, is regarded
as a regular part of the course.
No examination is required except in the case of University
students desiring credit (two units) for this course. Other
students desiring to ascertain their standing in the class may
apply for a written test.
A detailed statement of requirements, and work covered in
this course, is issued as a separate circular. Copies may be had
on request. 90 The University of British Columbia.
Department of Chemistry.
Professor: E. H. Archibald.
Professor of Organic Chemistry: R. H. Clark.
Associate Professor: W. F. Seyer.
Assistant Professor:   M. J. Marshall.
Instructor:   Ruth Fulton.
Assistant: John Allardyce.
Assistant:  A. E. Boss.
Assistant:   Freda Handford.
Assistant:   Violet E. Dunbar.
Assistant:   K. B. Gillie.
1. General Chemistry.—This course is arranged to give a
full exposition of the general principles involved in modern
Chemistry and comprises a systematic study of the properties of
the more important metallic and non-metallic elements and their
compounds, and the application of Chemistry in technology.
Books recommended: Alexander Smith, Inorganic Chemistry, Century Co.
Three lectures and one laboratory period of three hours a
week. 3 units.
2. Qualitative and Quantitative Analysis.
(a) Qualitative Analysis.—A course consisting of one hour
of lecture or recitation and six hours of laboratory work each
week throughout the First Term. During the first six weeks
of the term an additional lecture or recitation hour may be substituted for a part of the laboratory work.
(6) Quantitative Analysis.—A course consisting of one hour
of lecture or recitation and six hours of laboratory work each
week throughout the Second Term. The course embraces the
more important methods of gravimetric and volumetric analysis.
Prerequisite: Chemistry 1.
Course (6) must be preceded by Course (a).
Books recommended: A. A. Noyes, Qualitative Analysis,
Macmillan Co.; Cumming & Kay, Quantitative Analysis, Gur-
ney & Jackson. 3 units. Courses in Arts. 91
3. Organic Chemistry.—This introduction to the study of the
compounds of carbon will include the methods of preparation
and a description of the more important groups of compounds
in both the fatty and the aromatic series. Two lectures and one
laboratory period of three hours weekly.
Chemistry 3 will only be given to those students taking
Chemistry 2, or those who have had the equivalent of Chemistry 2.
Books recommended: Holleman-Walker, Text-book of Organic Chemistry, John Wiley & Sons; Gatterman, The Practical
Methods of Organic Chemistry, Macmillan. 3 units.
4. Theoretical Chemistry.—An introductory course on the
development of modern Chemistry, including osmotic phenomena,
the ionization theory, the law of mass action, and the phase rule.
Prerequisite: Chemistry 2.
Two lectures and one laboratory period a week during the
Second Term.
Text-book: James Walker, Introduction to Physical Chemistry, Macmillan. \y2 units.
5. Advanced Qualitative and Quantitative Analysis.
(a) Qualitative Analysis.—One lecture and six hours in the
laboratory throughout the First Term. The work of this
course will include the detection and separation of the less common metals, particularly those that are important industrially,
together with the analysis of somewhat complex substances
occurring in nature.
(6) Quantitative Analysis.—One lecture and six hours laboratory work per week during the Second Term. The determinations made will include the more difficult estimations in the
analysis of rocks, as well as certain constituents of steel and
alloys. The principles on which analytical chemistry is based
will receive a more minute consideration than was possible in
the elementary course.
Prerequisite: Chemistry 2. 3 units. 92 The University of British Columbia.
6. Industrial Chemistry.—Two hours of lectures per week
throughout the year. Those industries, which are dependent on
the facts and principles of Chemistry, will be considered in as
much detail as time will permit. The lectures will be supplemented by visits to manufacturing establishments in the neighbourhood, and it is hoped that some lectures will be given by
specialists in their respective fields.
Prerequisites: Chemistry 2 and 3. 2 units.
7. Physical Chemistry.—The lectures, which are a continuation of those given in 4, include the kinetic theory of gases,
thermo-chemistry, the application of the principles of thermodynamics to chemistry, osmotic phenomena, applications of the
dissociation theory, colloidal solutions, and a study of the physical
properties of gases, liquids, and solids and of their chemical
constitutions.
Two lectures and one laboratory period of three hours
weekly throughout the year.
Prerequisites:   Chemistry 2, 3, and 4.
Text-books: Bigelow, Physical Chemistry, Century Co;
Findlay, Physico-Chemical Measurements, Longmans Green.
For reference: Ramsay's Series of Books on Physical Chemistry, Longmans Green. 3 units.
8. Applied Electro-Chemistry.—Solutions are studied from
the standpoint of the osmotic and the dissociation theories. The
laws of electrolysis, electroplating, primary and secondary batteries, and the preparation of the elements and compounds by
electrolytic methods and in the electric furnace are studied.
Three lectures weekly during the First Term.
Prerequisite:   Chemistry 4.
For reference: Le Blanc, Elements of Electro-Chemistry,
Macmillan; Thompson, Applied Electro-Chemistry, Macmillan;
and Stanfield, The Electric Furnace. iy units.
9. Advanced Organic Chemistry.—Important Organic reactions will be discussed.   The Carbohydrates, Proteins, Enzyme Courses in Arts. 93
Action, Terpenes and Alkaloids will be studied in more or less
detail. In the laboratory some complex compounds will be prepared and quantitative determinations of carbon, hydrogen,
nitrogen, sulphur and the halogens made with the view of identifying organic compounds.
Two lectures and one laboratory period weekly throughout
the year.
Prerequisites:   Chemistry 2 and 3.
For reference:   Cohen, Organic Chemistry, Arnold.
3 units.
10. History of Chemistry.—Particular attention will be paid
to the development of chemical theory.
Two hours a week during the Second Term.
Prerequisites:  Chemistry 2, 3, and 4.
For reference: Von Meyer-McGowan, History of Chemistry,
Macmillan. 1 unit.
11. Stereochemistry.—Stereochemical theories will be discussed in greater detail than in Chemistry 9, and chemical and
physico-chemical methods employed in determining the constitution of organic compounds will be studied.
The lectures may be taken without the laboratory.
Prerequisites: Chemistry 7 and 9. 3 units.
Lectures: 2 units.     Laboratory: 1 unit.
12. Colloid Chemistry.—The Chemistry of colloids and the
application of colloidal chemistry to industry.
Two hours a week during the First Term.
Prerequisites:   Chemistry 7 and 9.
For reference: Zsigmondy-Spear, Chemistry of Colloids,
John Wiley & Sons; Reports on Colloid Chemistry by British
Association for Advancement of Science. 1 unit.
14. Agricultural Chemistry.—The chemical composition of
the soil; fertilizers, fungicides and insecticides.
The Laboratory will be adapted to the needs of the individual
student. 94 The University of British Columbia.
Two lectures and one laboratory period throughout the year.
Prerequisite: Chemistry 2. 3 units.
15. Dairy Chemistry.—The chemistry of the carbohydrates,
fats, and proteins will be discussed in outline, and the chemical
processes involved in enzyme action and fermentation will receive
consideration.
One lecture and one laboratory period throughout the year.
Prerequisites:  Chemistry 2 and 3.
Text-book: Chamberlain, Agricultural Chemistry, Macmillan.
2 units.
Department of Classics.
Professor: Lemuel F. Robertson.
Professor of Greek: O. J. Todd.
Associate Professor:  H. T. Logan.
Assistant: A. N. St. John Mildmay.
Greek.
Beginner's Course.—White, First Greek Book, Chap. L-
XLVIII.; Copp, Clark Co.
Four hours a week.   Mr. Logan. 3 units.
1. Lectures.—White, First Greek Book, Chap. XLIX.-
LXXX. Xenophon, Anabasis I. and IV., Goodwin and White,
Ginn & Co.
History.—Shuckburgh, History of Greece, Chap. I.-V.;
Unwin.    Four hours a week.    Mr. Todd. 3 units.
2. Lectures.—Plato, Apology, Adam, Elementary Classics,
Cambridge University Press; Aeschylus, Prometheus Vinctus,
Rackham, Cambridge University Press.
Composition.—North and Hillard, Greek Prose Composition,
Rivingtons. Selected passages will occasionally be set for
Unseen Translation.
History.—Shuckburgh, History of Greece, Chap. VI.-X.,
Unwin.   Four hours a week.    Mr. Logan. 3 units. Courses in Arts. 95
3. Lectures.—Thucydides, History, Book VII., Marchant,
Macmillan; Sophocles, Antigone, Jebb and Shuckburgh, Cambridge University Press; Homer, Iliad XXII., Edwards, Pitt
Press.
Literature.—Murray, History of Greek Literature, Heine-
mann. Three hours a week. Mr. Robertson, Mr. Todd, Mr.
Mildmay. 3 units.
(Given in 1922-23 and alternate years.)
4. Greek Literature in English Translation.—A survey of
Greek literary history from Homer to Lucian, with reading and
interpretation of selected works from the most important authors.
Knowledge of Greek is not prerequisite.
Two hours a week.   Mr. Todd. 2 units.
(Given in 1923-24 and alternate years.)
5. Lectures. — Demosthenes, Third Olynthiac, First and
Third Philippics, Butcher, Oxford University Press (Vol. I.);
Sophocles, Oedipus Tyrannus, Jebb, Cambridge University
Press; Homer, Iliad VI., Edwards, Pitt Press, smaller edition.
Literature.—Murray, History of Greek Literature, Heine-
mann.
Three hours a week. 3 units.
(Given in 1923-24 and alternate years.)
6. Lectures.—Herodotus, History, Hude, Oxford University Press (the equivalent of one book will be read); Lysias,
Orations, Hude, Oxford University Press; Aristophanes, The
Birds, Hall and Geldart, Oxford University Press. (Open only
to those who have taken or are taking Greek 3 or 5.)
Three hours a week.   Mr. Todd. 3 units.
(Given in 1922-23 and alternate years.)
7. Lectures.—Aristotle, Ars Poetica, Bywater, Oxford
University Press;    Plato,  The Republic   (selections), Burnet, 96 The University of British Columbia.
Oxford University Press.    (Open only to those who have taken
or are taking Greek 3 or 5.)
Three hours a week. 3 units.
(Given in 1923-24 and alternate years.)
8. Composition. — Sidgwick, Greek Prose Composition,
Rivingtons.   Obligatory for Honour Students.
One hour a week.   Mr. Mildmay. 1 unit.
Latin.
1. Lectures.—Cicero, Pro Lege Manilia, Select Orations and
Letters, Allen and Greenough, Ginn & Co. Ovid, Elegiac Selections, Smith, Bell's Illustrated Classics.
Composition.—Bradley, Arnold's Latin Prose Composition,
Longmans, Green & Co., 19 exercises.
History.—Pelham, Outlines of Roman History (to 133 B.
C), Rivingtons.
Three hours a week.    Mr. Robertson, Mr. Mildmay.
A fourth hour a week will be devoted to lectures on:
(1) Roman History from the beginning to 27 B. C.
(2) Roman Literature.
Attendance at these lectures is voluntary and no formal
credit is given.   Mr. Logan.
2. Lectures.—Cicero, Pro Archia, Reid, Pitt Press. Livy,
Hannibal's First Campaign in Italy. Trayes, Bell's Illustrated
Classics.   Virgil, Aeneid, Bk. VI., Page, Macmillan.
Composition.—Bradley, Arnold's Latin Prose Composition,
Longmans, Green & Co., 32 exercises.
History.—Pelham, Outlines of Roman History (from 133
B. C. to 69 A. D.), Rivingtons.
Three hours a week.   Mr. Robertson, Mr. Logan.
A fourth hour a week will be devoted to reading Horace,
Selected Odes, Wickam, Clarendon Press. Attendance at this
hour  is   voluntary   and   no formal credit is given.    Students Courses in Arts. 97
contemplating Honours are, however, advised to take this course.
Mr. Robertson.
3. Lectures.—Virgil.
Three hours a week.   Mr. Robertson. 3 units.
(Given in 1922-23 and alternate years.)
4. Lectures.—Horace, Odes, Page, Macmillan's Classical
Series. Horace, Epistles, Wilkins, Macmillan's Classical Series.
Cicero, Tusculan Disputations I. and Dream of Scipio, Rock-
wood, Ginn & Co., College Series.
Three hours a week. 3 units.
(Given in 1923-24 and alternate years.)
5. Lectures.—Seneca, Select Letters, Summers, Macmillan.
Juvenal, Satires, Duff, Pitt Press. (Open only to those who
have taken, or are taking, Latin 3 or 4.)
Three hours a week.   Mr. Robertson, Mr. Logan.     3 units.
(Given in 1922-23 and alternate years.)
6. Lectures.—Tacitus, Histories I., II., Godley, Macmillan's Classical Series. Garrod, Oxford Book of Latin Verse
(selections), Oxford Press.
Three hours a week. 3 units.
(Given in 1923-24 and alternate years.)
7. Lectures.—Roman History from 133 B.C. to 180 A.D.
Text-book: Short History of Rome, by Ferrero and Bar-
bagallo, 2 vols., Putnam.
Three hours a week.   Mr. Logan. 3 units.
(Given in 1923-24 and alternate years.)
8. Composition.—Obligatory  for  Honour  Students.
One hour a week.   Mr. Mildmay. 1 unit. 98 The University of British Columbia.
Department of Economics, Sociology and Political Science.
Professor: Theodore H. Boggs.
Associate Professor: H. F. Angus.
Assistant Professor:  S. E. Beckett.
Assistant: L. T. Fournier.
Economics.
1. Principles of Economics.—An introductory study of general economic theory, including a survey of the principles of
value, prices, money and banking, international trade, tariffs,
monopoly, taxation, labour and wages, Socialism, the control of
railways and trusts, etc.
Taussig, Principles of Economics, Macmillan, 1921. Clay,
Economics for the General Reader, Macmillan.
Economics 1 is the prerequisite for all other courses in the
department, but may be taken concurrently with Economics 2,
or Government 1.
Three hours a week. 3 units.
2. History of Economic Life and Economic Thought.—A
brief outline of Economic Thought, and of Economic and Social
conditions in England previous to 1776. A survey of the more
important phases of European Organization from the time of
the Middle Ages, with special reference to the Industrial Revolution, the Progress of Agriculture, and resultant social conditions. The development of modern Economic Thought, with a
study of the influence of Smith, Malthus, Ricardo, Mill and
others, and the place of the Deductive and Historical Methods.
Toynbee, The Industrial Revolution, Longmans, Green &
Co. Price, Political Economy in England, Methuen; and
assigned readings in other texts.
Three hours a week.   Mr. Beckett. 3 units.
3. Labour Problems and Social Reform.—A study of the rise
of the factory system and capitalistic production, and of the more
important phases of trade unionism in England, Canada, and the
United States.    A critical analysis of various solutions of the Courses in Arts. 99
labour problem attempted and proposed; profit-sharing, co-operation, arbitration and conciliation, scientific management, labour
legislation and socialism.
Hoxie, Trade Unionism in the United States, D. Appleton
& Co. Cole, Guild Socialism, Stokes & Co. Skelton, Socialism:
A Critical Analysis, Houghton, Mifflin Co. Spargo and Arner,
Elements of Socialism, Macmillan.
Three hours a week.   Mr. Boggs. 3 units.
4. Money and Banking.—The origin and development of
money. Banking principles and operations, laws of coinage,
credit, price movements, foreign exchange. Banking policy in
the leading countries, with particular reference to Canada.
Phillips, Readings in Money and Banking, Macmillan.
White, Money and Banking, Ginn & Co., 1914. Patterson,
Domestic and Foreign Exchange, Alexander Hamilton Institute.
Three hours a week. 3 units.
(Given in 1923-24 and alternate years.)
5. Public Finance.—This course deals with public revenues
and expenditures, and the administration of public funds. Some
of the topics discussed are: Theories of Just Taxation, progressive taxation, the internal revenue system, tariffs on imports,
the General Property Tax, Personal and Business Income Tax,
Inheritance Tax, the Single Tax, Double Taxation, the Relation
between Provincial and Local Taxation, the Shifting and Incidence of Taxation. Particular attention is devoted to the taxation systems (Federal, Provincial, and Local) of Canada.
Seligman, Essays in Taxation, Macmillan, 1921. Plehn,
Introduction to Public Finance, Macmillan, 1920; and assigned
readings in other texts.
Three hours a week.   Mr. Beckett. 3 units.
6. International Trade and Tariff Policy.—A survey of the
theory of international trade and the foreign exchanges; and a
study of the commercial policy of the leading countries, with
considerable attention being devoted to the British Dominions. 100 The University of British Columbia.
Bastable, The Theory of International Trade, Macmillan,
1903. Taussig, Selected Readings in International Trade and
Tariff Problems, Ginn & Co.; and assigned readings in other
texts.
Three hours a week.   Mr. Boggs. 3 units.
7. Corporation Economics.—Historical development of the
different forms of industrial organization, including the partnership, joint-stock company, and the corporation, and the later
developments, such as the pool, trust, combination, and holding
company. Methods of promotion and financing, over-capitalization, stock market activities, the public policy toward corporations, etc.
Haney, Business Organization and Combination, Macmillan.
Walker, Corporation Finance, Alexander Hamilton Institute;
and assigned readings in other texts. \
Three hours a week. 3 units.
(Given in 1923-24 and alternate years.)
Government.
1. Constitutional Government.—This course deals with the
nature, origin, and aims of the State; and with the organization
of government in the British Empire, the United States of
America, France, and Germany.
Readings to be assigned.
Three hours a week.    Mr. Angus. 3 units.
2. Introduction to the Study of Law.— (a) A rapid survey
of Legal History,   (b) Outlines of Jurisprudence.
Jenks, A Short History of English Law, Methuen, 1912.
Salmond, Jurisprudence, or Theory of the Law, Sweet & Maxwell, 1919. Vinogradoff, Common Sense in Law, Home University Library;   and assigned readings.
Three hours a week.   Mr. Angus. 3 units.
Sociology.
1. Principles of Sociology.—An introductory study of early
man and his relation to his environment; of races of men and Courses in Arts. 101
their distribution; of the early forms and development of the
industrial organization, marriage and the family, the arts and
sciences, religious systems, government, classes, rights, etc. A
review also of certain of the social problems of modern society
growing out of destitution, crime, overcrowding, etc. A critical
survey of schemes for betterment.
Blackmar & Gillin, Outlines of Sociology, Macmillan. Fair-
child, Applied Sociology, Macmillan; and assigned readings in
other texts.
Three hours a week. 3 units.
(Given in 1923-24 and alternate years.)
Department of English.
Professor: G. G. Sedgewick.
Associate Professor: W. L. Macdonald.
Assistant Professor: F. G. C. Wood.
Assistant Professor: Thorleif Larsen.
Assistant Professor: F. C. Walker.
Assistant Professor: M. L. Bollert.
Assistant: Stella McGuire.
Assistant: Katherine McKay.
Assistant: Rena Grant.
Assistant: Dorothy Blakey.
First Year.
1. (a) Literature.—Elementary study of a number of
literary forms to be chosen from the short story, the play, the
novel, the essay, the simpler sorts of poetry.
Texts for 1922-23: Canby, A Study of the Short Story,
Holt. Euripides, Bacchae, in Gilbert Murray's paraphrase.
Shakespeare, Julius Caesar. Sheridan, The School for Scandal,
Everyman. Ibsen, The Doll's House, Everyman. Poems of
Today, McClelland & Stewart.
Two hours a week.
(b) Composition.—Elementary forms and principles of
composition; expository themes; study of models.
Two hours a week. 3 units. 102 The University of British Columbia.
Second Year.
2. (a) Literature.—Studies in the history of English Literature.
Pass Course: Lectures and texts illustrative of the chief
authors and movements from Tottel's Miscellany to Shelley.
Halleck, History of English Literature, American Book Company, 1918. Century Readings in English, ed. Cunliffe, Century
Publishing Co.
Two hours a week.
(b) Composition.—Narrative and Descriptive Themes; the
writing of reports.
One hour a week. 3 units.
(c) Literature.—Readings from Nineteenth Century poetry
since 1830;  Ward, The English Poets, Vol. IV.
For this course, which is intended for prospective Honour
Students in English and for others especially interested in the
study of Literature, no formal credit is given.
One hour a week.
Third and Fourth Years.
The curriculum in English for students of the Third and
Fourth Years is arranged in three divisions. The first includes a
central body of general courses which will be offered, as far as
possible, every year, and to each of which are assigned 3 units
of credit. In the second division are listed courses carrying 2
units of credit and usually given in alternate years. And the
third consists of courses designed especially for honour and
graduate students, and open to others only by special permission.
DrvisiON I.
9. Shakespeare.—This course may be taken for credit in two
successive years.   In 1922-23, 9 (b) will be given as follows:
i. A detailed study of the text of Twelfth Night, Othello, Coriolanus, Antony and Cleopatra. Courses in Arts. 103
ii. Lectures on Shakespeare's development, on his use of
sources, and on his relation to the stage and the
dramatic practice of his time.
Students will provide themselves with annotated editions of
the four plays named above, and with The Facts about Shakespeare, by Neilson and Thorndyke, Macmillan.   They are advised
to get the Cambridge Shakespeare, ed. Neilson, or the Oxford
Shakespeare, ed. Craig.
Three hours a week.   Mr. Sedgewick. 3 units.
9 (a). (Given in 1923-24 and alternate years.)
10. The Drama to 1642.—The rise, the development, and the
decline of the Elizabethan drama. The course begins with a
short study of one or two of the plays of Sophocles and an outline of Aristotle's dramatic criticism, but treats mainly the rise
of the English drama in the Miracle and Morality Plays; the
Interludes; the influence of the Roman stage; Shakespeare's
predecessors—Lyly, Kyd, Greene, Peele, and Marlowe; its full
development in Shakespeare, and, briefly, its decline.
Texts: Lewis Campbell, Sophocles in English Verse. Everyman with other Interludes, Everyman Library. Chief Elizabethan Dramatists, ed. Neilson. Oxford Shakespeare, ed. Craig;
or Cambridge Edition, ed. Neilson.
Three hours a week.   Mr. Larsen. 3 units.
13. The English Novel from Richardson to the Present Time.
—The development of English fiction will be traced from Richardson, Fielding, Smollett, and Sterne through Goldsmith, Mrs.
Radcliffe, Jane Austen, Scott, C. Bronte, Dickens, Thackeray,
and George Eliot to Trollope, Meredith, Stevenson, and a few
representative novelists now living.
A fair knowledge of the works of Jane Austen, Scott,
Dickens, Thackeray, and George Eliot is a prerequisite for those
taking this course.
Three hours a week.   Mr. Wood. 3 units.
14. From Milton to Burns.—After a preliminary survey of
the work of Milton and Bunyan, the  course will   follow  the 104 The University of British Columbia.
development of English literature during the 18th century.
Various special forms, such as the "Restoration" and "Sentimental" Drama, the Periodical Essay, etc., will be considered.
Emphasis will be laid on the work of Dryden, Butler, Addison,
Steele, Defoe, Pope, Swift, Thomson, Gray, Collins, Johnson,
Goldsmith, Cowper, and Burns.
Three hours a week.   Mr. Macdonald. 3 units.
16. Romantic Poetry, 1780 to 1830.—Studies in the beginnings and progress of Romanticism, based chiefly on the work of
Wordsworth, Coleridge, Byron, Keats, Shelley, Scott.
Texts: The Oxford editions of the first five poets named.
For reference: Elton, A Survey of English Literature, 1780-
1830.
Three hours a week.   Mr. Walker. 3 units.
17. Victorian Poetry.—This course is concerned chiefly with
the work of Tennyson, Browning, and Arnold. A few weeks
at the close of the term will be devoted to a survey of the development of later poetry down to the work of Hardy.
Texts: Browning, Complete Poetical Works, Cambridge Edition. Arnold, Poems, Oxford Edition. Tennyson, Poems, Globe
Edition.
For reference: Elton, A Survey of English Literature,
1830-1880.
Three hours a week. 3 units.
19. Private Reading.—Students of the Senior Year may
pursue, with the consent and under the direction of the Department of English, a course of private reading to which, if successfully completed, will be assigned 3 units of credit. In such
courses examinations will be set, but no class instruction will be
given. 3 units.
Division II.
5. The Elements of Poetics.—Studies in the criticism and
appreciation of poetry; the poetic frame of mind; the emotional
element in poetry; poetic content and the nature of poetic truth; Courses in Arts. 105
poetic form and its varieties; metrics; contemporary developments in poetry; literary criticism, its nature and function; and
an outline of aesthetic theory from Aristotle to Croce. Exercises
in criticism and metrical composition.
Winchester, Principles of Literary Criticism.
Two hours a week.   Mr. Larsen. 2 units.
(Given in 1923-24 and alternate years.)
6. Narrative Writing.—A study of narrative composition:
(a) critical reading of a considerable number of modern short
stories and of two or three modern novels; (6) frequent critical
and narrative themes.
Only a limited number of students will be admitted to this
course.
Two hours a week.   Mr. Sedgewick. 2 units.
(Given in 1922-23 and alternate years.)
7. Technique of the Drama.—A practical study of dramatic
form and structure based on the analysis of modern plays, with
special reference to the one-act play as an art form. Playmaking,
by Wm. Archer, and Twenty-four Representative One-act Plays
of America, Little Brown & Co., are the texts used in this course.
Two hours a week.   Mr. Wood. 2 units.
(Given in 1923-24 and alternate years.)
8. Elizabethan Poetry, exclusive of the Drama.—(1) The
Renaissance; (2) the social background of Elizabethan England;
(3) John Skelton and the poets of the transition; (4) the Lyric
from Tottel's Miscellany to the Caroline poets; (5) Spenser and
the Spenserians; (6) the Sonneteers; (7) Verse Translation; (8)
Verse Narrative.
Texts: T. H. Ward, The English Poets, Vol. I. Spenser,
ed. Smith and de Selincourt, Oxford.
Two hours a week.   Mr. Larsen. 2 units.
(Given in 1922-23 and alternate years.) 106 The University of British Columbia.
11. English Drama since 1600.—A survey of English drama
from the time of Ben Jonson to the present. Later Elizabethan
drama, representative plays of the Restoration, the works of
Goldsmith, Sheridan, and of early Nineteenth Century writers
will be considered. This will be followed by a study of some
dramatists of recent years, including Wilde, Shaw, Galsworthy,
Pinero, Jones, Stephen Phillips, Barrie, and the Irish School.
Two hours a week.   Mr. Wood. 2 units.
(Given in 1922-23 and alternate years.)
12. Romance and Ballad.—As far as possible the course will
be continuous, an attempt being made to show the relation as
well as the difference between the two forms. There will be discussion of such topics as origins, types, relations with other literatures, etc.; the Arthurian Cycle; the Matter of England,
France, the Orient; Metrical Romances 1200-1500; Malory's
Morte d'Arthur; English and Scottish Popular Ballads, Political Ballads, American Ballads.
Modernised versions of a considerable body of Middle English Metrical Romances are to be found in Chief Middle English
Poets by J. Weston.
Two hours a week.   Mr. Macdonald. 2 units.
(Given in 1922-23 and alternate years.)
15. Prose of the Sixteenth and Seventeenth Centuries.—The
development of English prose from 1500 to 1700, considered with
reference to such topics as (1) the English Bible; (2) Literary
Criticism; (3) the Character; (4) the Essay; (5) Pamphlets;
(6) Prose Fiction; (7) Milton, Bunyan, Browne, Dryden.
Two hours a week.   Mr. Macdonald. 2 units.
(Given in 1923-24 and alternate years.)
18. Nineteenth Century Prose, studied in two divisions in
alternate years:—
(a) Critical and Literary Prose of the early part of the century: Coleridge, Wordsworth, Lamb, Hazlitt, De Quincey,
Jeffrey, Landor.
(Given in 1923-24 and alternate years.) Courses in Arts. 107
(6) Social, literary, and religious movements of the Victorian period: Carlyle, Ruskin, Macaulay, Newman, Mill, Arnold,
Pater, Stevenson.
Two hours a week. 2 units.
(Given in 1922-23 and alternate years.)
Division III.
20. Chaucer and Middle English.—(a) Middle English
grammar with the reading of representative texts, (o) The
Canterbury Tales.
Texts: A Middle English reader and the Oxford Chaucer,
ed. Skeat.
Three hours a week.   Mr. Sedgewick. 3 units.
(Given in 1922-23 and alternate years.)
21a. Anglo-Saxon.—Bright, Anglo-Saxon Reader.
Two hours a week. 2 units.
21b.—Anglo-Saxon.—Beowulf.
One hour a week. 1 unit.
22. Studies in Linguistic History.—Origins, growth, and
development of the English language. A brief introduction to
Germanic philology; the Indo-European language group;
Grimm's Law; the Anglo-Saxon period; Norman, French, and
Latin influences; study of the gradual evolution of forms, sounds,
and meanings.
One hour a week.   Mr. Walker. 1 unit.
24. Seminar.—In this class advanced students will get practice in some of the simpler methods of criticism and investigation.
The subject for 1922-23 will probably be some aspect of literary
criticism.
Two hours a week. 2 units. 108 The University of British Columbia.
Department of Geology and Geography.
Professor: R. W. Brock.
Professor of Physical and Structural Geology: S. J. Schofield.
Professor of Mineralogy and Petrography: W. L. Uglow.
Professor of Palaeontology and Stratigraphy:  M. Y. Williams.
Assistant: L. V. Miller.
Geology.
1. General Geology.—This course serves as an introduction
to the science of Geology. The following subjects are treated in
the lectures:
(a) Physical Geology, which includes the study of the following topics: Weathering, work of the wind, the work of ground
water, the work of streams, the work of glaciers, the ocean and
its work, the structure of the earth, earthquakes, volcanoes and
igneous intrusions, metamorphism, mountains and plateaus, and
ore-deposits.
Two lectures and one laboratory period of two hours per
week.   First Term.   Mr. Schofield.
(b) Historical Geology, which includes a study of the following: The earth before the Cambrian, the Palaeozoic, the
Mesozoic, the Cenozoie, and Quaternary eras.
Two lectures and one laboratory period of two hours per
week.   Second Term.   Mr. Williams.
The Laboratory Exercises in Physical Geology include the
study and identification of the commonest minerals and rocks,
the interpretation of topographical and geological maps, and
the study of structures by the use of models.
Field Work will replace laboratory occasionally, and will
take the form of excursions to localities in the immediate neighborhood of Vancouver which illustrate the subject-matter of the
lectures.
The Laboratory Exercises in Historical Geology consist of
the general study of fossils, their characteristics and associations,
their evolution and migration as illustrated by their occurrence Courses in Arts. 109
in the strata. The principles of Palaeogeography will be taken
up and illustrated by the study of the palaeogeography of North
America.
Text-book: Cleland, Geology, Physical and Historical,
American Book Co.
Reference Books: Pirsson and Schuchert, Text-book of
Geology, Wiley. GeiMe, Text-book of Geology, Macmillan. Merrill, Rocks, Rock-weathering and Soils, Macmillan. National
Geographic Magazine. Shimer, Introduction to the Study of
Fossils, Macmillan. Davis, Geographical Essays, Ginn & Co.
Hugh Miller's works. 3 units.
2. (a) General Mineralogy.—This course is designed to give
students a general survey of the field of mineralogy.
Lectures consist of a description of the crystallographical
and physical properties of minerals in general, combined with a
detailed study of about 50 of the common mineral species.
Laboratory Work consists of the practical study of these
minerals, a demonstration of their chemical properties, and practise in the methods of their determination.
Text-book: Dana, Manual of Mineralogy, revised by Ford
(new edition), Wiley.
Two lectures and one laboratory period of two hours per
week.   First Term.    Mr. Uglow. \y2 units.
2. (b) Descriptive and Determinative Mineralogy.—This
course supplements 2 (a), and consists of a critical study of
about 50 of the less common mineral species, special emphasis
being given to their crystallography, origin, association, and
alteration.
Text-book: Dana, Text-book of Mineralogy, revised by
Ford, Wiley.
Reference Books: Williams, Elements of Crystallography,
Holt. Brush and Penfield, Determinative Mineralogy and Blowpipe Analysis, Wiley. J. Volney Lewis, Manual of Determinative Mineralogy, Wiley. 110 The University of British Columbia.
Two lectures and one laboratory period of two hours per
week.    Second Term.    Mr. Uglow. \y2 units.
3. Historical Geology.—Continental evolution and development of life with special reference to North America.
Three hours per week.   First Term.
Text-book:    Schuchert, Historical Geology, Wiley.
Prerequisite: Geology 1.
Mr. Williams. V/2 units.
4. Structural and Physiographical Geology.—The following
subjects are treated in the lectures: Fractures, faults, flowage,
structures common to both fracture and flow, mountains, major
units of structure, forces of deformation, the origin and development of land forms with special reference to the physiography of
British Columbia.
Text-book:   Leith, Structural Geology, Holt.
Three hours per week.    Second Term.
Prerequisite:   Geology lM
Mr. Schofield. iy units.
5. (a) History of Geology.—A brief history of the study
of the earth and the development of the geological sciences.
Mr. Brock.
(b) Geology of Canada.—The salient features of the geology
and economic minerals of Canada. Mr. Williams, Mr. Schofield,
Mr. Brock.
(c) Regional Geology.—The main geological features of the
continents and oceanic segments of the earth's crust, and their
influences upon life.   Mr. Brock.
Prerequisite:   Geology 1.
Three lectures and one laboratory period per week.  3 units.
6. Palaeontology.—A study of invertebrate and vertebrate
fossils, their classification, identification and distribution both
geological and geographical.
Two lectures and one laboratory period per week.
Mr. Williams. 3 units. Courses in Arts. HI
7. Petrology—Lectures: These consist of a discussion of the
origin, occurrence, alteration, decomposition, and removal of
rocks; a study of their chemical, mineralogical and physical
characteristics; their mode of classification; and a presentation
of the method of application of the polarizing microscope to the
determination of rock types.
Laboratory Work.—The collections of the department are
used by the students for practice in the application of the above
principles to rock study, determination and classification. Field
methods of determination are stressed; and the polarizing microscope is used to study the texture, structure and composition of
the common rock types.
Text-books: Pirsson, Rocks and Rock Minerals, Wiley.
Luquer, Minerals in Rock Sections, Van Nostrand.
Prerequisites: Geology 1 and 2.
Two lectures and two laboratory periods of two hours per
week.   Mr. Uglow. jd> 4 units.
8. Economic Geology.—A study of the occurrence, genesis,
and structure of the principal metallic and non-metallic ore-
deposits with type illustrations; and a description of the ore-
deposits of the British Empire, special stress being placed on
those in Canada.
Text-book:   Ries, Economic Geology, Wiley, 4th ed.
Reference Book: Lindgren, Mineral Deposits, McGraw-
Hill, 2nd ed.
Prerequisite: Geology 7 must precede or accompany this
course; Geology 1 must have been taken.
Three hours of lectures and one of laboratory work per
week.   Mr. Brock and Mr. Williams. 4 units.
9. Mineralography.—A study of opaque minerals by means
of the reflecting microscope.
Two hours per week.    Mr. Uglow. 2 units.
(Given in 1923-24 and alternate years.) 112 The University of British Columbia.
10. Field Geology.—The methods taught are the fundamental ones used by professional geologists and by the officers
of the Geological Survey of Canada. The course is essentially
practical, and is designed to teach methods of observing, recording and correlating geological facts in the field. The students
construct geological maps of selected areas in the vicinity of
Vancouver which require the use of the various methods and
instruments employed in field geology.
Reference Books: Lahee, Field Geology, McGraw-Hill.
Hayes, Handbook for Field Geologists, Wiley. Spurr, Geology
Applied to Mining, Hill Pub. Co.
Three hours per week.
Prerequisite: Geology 1. Geology 4, if not already taken,
must be taken concurrently.
Mr. Schofield. \y, units.
12. Meteorology and Climatology.—Two lectures and one
laboratory period of two hours per week.   Second Term.
Mr. Schofield. iy units.
Geography.
1. Principles of Geography.—A general course dealing
especially with the effects of the physical features of the earth
upon life, and the ways in which various forms of life respond
to their physical environment. The following topics are studied:
earth relations; earth features; climate and climatic factors;
oceans; materials of the land and their uses; changes of the
earth's surface; coasts, plains, plateaus, mountains, inland
waters, and their relations to life; distribution and development
of industries; distribution of population.
This subject is useful in Geology, Botany, Zoology, History,
Political Economy, Engineering, etc.
Three lectures per week.
Mr. Brock and Mr. Schofield. 3 units. Courses in Arts. 113
Department of History.
Professor: Mack Eastman.
Associate Professor:   W.  N.  Sage.
Instructor: F. H. Soward.
First and Second Years.
Students who intend to specialize in History are advised
to associate with it from the first some allied subject, such as
Economics. A reading knowledge of French and German will be
found extremely valuable in senior courses, while in certain
classes of more advanced work Latin is indispensable.
1. Modern European History. — A general view of the
development of modern Europe, from the eve of the French
Revolution to present day. This course is designed more especially for First Year students who do not expect to take senior
classes in modern European History, but who wish to complete
the survey of world history begun in the high schools.
Text-book: Robinson and Beard, History of Europe, Our
Own Times, Ginn & Co., 1921.
Three hours a week.   Mr. Sage. 3 units.
2. Canadian History.—A comparison of Spanish, English,
and French colonial effort in the New World serves as an introduction to this course in Canadian history. Church and State
during the French regime, the relations between French and
English since the British Conquest, Canadian constitutional
development, and present-day problems will receive special attention.
Books recommended: Parkman, Pioneers of France in the
New World; The Jesuits in North America; Count Frontenac
and New France; The Old Regime; La Salle and the Discovery
of the Great West; Little, Brown & Co., Boston. G. M. Wrong,
Conquest of New France (in Chronicles of America), or Park-
man, Montcalm and Wolfe. These books may be purchased
from the University Bookstore.
A preliminary essay, counting 10 per cent, of the year's
work, must be handed in as soon as possible after the opening of 114 The University of British Columbia.
the autumn term.    Subject: "The Work of Champlain and of
Frontenac in New France: a Comparison and a Contrast."
Three hours a week. 3 units.
3. English History. — The history of England from the
Norman Conquest to the Revolution of 1688. This course is
intended primarily for Second Year students who mean to specialize in history. It aims at interpreting the constitutional, political,
economic, and religious development of England and Wales during the period prescribed. Attention will also be paid to the
history of Scotland and Ireland and the origin of Overseas
Britain.   The sequel to this course is History 8.
Text-book: R. Muir, A Short History of the British Commonwealth, Vol. I., G. Philip & Son, 1920.
Three hours a week.   Mr. Sage.^ 3 units.
Third and Fourth Years.
History 4, 5, and 6 are intended especially for Third Year
students. History 4 should be taken by all candidates for
Honours.
4. Mediaeval History.—A sketch of Mediaeval History from
the Council of Nicaea to the Fall of Constantinople, 325-1453
A.D. The following subjects will be treated: The triumph of
Christianity; the breakdown of the Roman Empire; the Barbarian Invasions; the Franks; Charlemagne; the rise of the
Papacy; the struggle between the Empire and the Papacy; the
Crusades; Frederick II.; the later Middle Ages.
Text-book: Thorndike, A History of Mediaeval Europe,
Houghton, Mifflin Co.
A preliminary essay, counting 10 per cent, of the year's
work, must be handed in as early as possible in the autumn
term. Subject: "The Conflict of Religions in the Roman Empire."
Three hours a week.   Mr. Sage. 3 units.
5. Renaissance and Reformation.—A brief outline of the rise
of the Christian Church; a closer study of the Renaissance, the Courses in Arts. 115
Reformation and the Counter-Reformation, and, in conclusion, a
short account of the subsequent history of religious thought down
to our own times, with special reference to the English Deists,
the French Philosophes, Wesleyanism, Pietism, Catholic Modernism and the Higher Criticism.
Text-books: Symonds, Short History of the Renaissance in
Italy, Henry Holt. Sichel, The Renaissance, Home University
Library. Lindsay, A History of the Reformation, 2 vols., Scrib-
ners; or Fisher, The Reformation, Scribners.
A preliminary essay, counting 10 per cent, of the year's
work, must be handed in as soon as possible after the opening
of the autumn term.   Subject: '' The Significance of Dante.''
Books recommended for reading and reference: Christopher Hare, Dante the Wayfarer. H. W. Boynton, The World's
Leading Poets. Mackail, Lectures on Poetry. Santayana, Three
Philosophical Poets. Snell, Handbook to the Works of Dante.
Caird, Essays on Literature and Philosophy, Vol. V. Translations by Cary, Norton, etc. i
Three hours a week.   Mr. Eastman. 3 units.
6. The Revolutionary and Napoleonic Era.—A preliminary
essay, counting 10 per cent, of the year's work, must be handed
in as early as possible in the autumn term. Subject: "The Age
of Voltaire."
Books recommended for reading and reference: Wadia, The
Philosophers and the French Revolution, Sonnenschein. Lowell,
The Eve of the French Revolution, Houghton Mifflin. De Tocqueville, The State of Society in France before the Revolution. Taine,
L'Ancien Regime (abridged by W. F. Giese), Heath & Co.—or
Taine, The Ancient Regime. Arthur Young, Travels in France,
John's Popular Library. S. G. Tallentyre, The Friends of Voltaire, Putnam's Sons. John Morley, Voltaire (1 vol.); Diderot
and the Encyclopedists (2 vols.); Rousseau (2 vols.), The Evers-
ley Series, Macmillan. Cambridge Modern History, Vols. VI.,
VIII. Lavisse, Histoire de France, Vol. 8, p. 289; Vol. 9.
Lavisse et Rambaud, Histoire Generate, Vol. 7.   These and other 116 The University of British Columbia.
books may be borrowed during the summer from the University
Library.
Text-books: Shailer Matthews, The French Revolution, Longmans. Johnston, Napoleon, Henry Holt. For further reading:
Aulard, The French Revolution, Fisher Unwin. J. H. Rose,
The Life of Napoleon I., Macmillan.
Three hours a week.   Mr. Eastman. 3 units.
History 6 should, if possible, precede History 7.
7. Europe Since 1815.—The political, industrial, religious,
and military history of continental Europe from the close of the
Napoleonic era to the present day, with especial attention to
the origins of the Great War and the problems of the peace
settlement.
A preparatory essay, counting 10 per cent, of the year's
work, must be handed in not later than the beginning of the
autumn term. Subject: The Industrial Revolution in England
during the Revolutionary and Napoleonic Period.
Books recommended for reading and reference: Cambridge
Modern History, Vol. X, Chap. 23. Slater, The Making of
Modern England, Houghton Mifflin. Gibbins, Industry in England, Scribners. Perris, The Industrial History of Modern England, Henry Holt. Cunningham, Western Civilization, Vol. 2,
Cambridge Historical Series. Usher, Introduction to the Industrial History of England, Houghton Mifflin.
Text-books: Hazen, Europe since 1815, Henry Holt. Shapiro,
Modern and Contemporary European History, Houghton Mifflin.
Three hours a week.   Mr. Eastman. 3 units.
History 7 should be preceded, if possible, by History 6.
(Given in 1923-24.)
8. Great Britain Since 1688.—This course aims at an interpretation of the constitutional, political, economic and religious
development of the British Isles since the Revolution of 1688.
Attention will also be paid to the growth of the British Empire
during the eighteenth, nineteenth and twentieth centuries.
This course is the sequel to History 3. Courses jn Arts. 117
Text-book: Cross, A History of England and Greater
Britain, Macmillan.
Reference should also be made to the following books: Political History of England, Vols. VIII.-XII. Trevelyan, England
under the Stuarts. Robertson, England under the Hanoverians.
Marriott, England since Waterloo. Lecky, England in the
Eighteenth Century. Morley, Life of Gladstone. Cambridge
Modern History (chapters dealing with English History). Traill,
Social England.
An essay counting 10 per cent, of the year's work must be
handed in as soon as possible after the opening of the autumn
term. Subject: The development of Political Parties during the
reign of William III. and Anne.
Three hours a week.   Mr. Sage. 3 units.
(Given in 1923-24.)
9. American History.—A sketch of the political, constitutional and economic development of the United States of America
from the beginning of the War of Independence to the close of
the World War.
Text-book: Muzzey, American History, Ginn.
Summer reading: The colonial period of American history
up to the passage of the Stamp Act. A preliminary essay will
be required. Books recommended for reading and reference:
Curry, A Short History of British Colonial Policy, Oxford University Press. Channing, The Student's History of the United
States, Macmillan. Chronicles of America, Cambridge Modern
History, Vol. VII.
A preliminary essay, counting 10 per cent, of the year's
work, must be handed in as early as possible in the autumn
term.    Subject:   "The Old Colonial System."
Three hours a week. 3 units.
10. Great Britain and Europe Since 1815.—The economic,
political, and cultural history of Great Britain and Europe
from the close of the Napoleonic era to the present day, with 118 The University of British Columbia.
especial attention to international relations, the origins of the
World War, and the problems of reconstruction.
A preparatory essay, counting 10 per cent, of the year's
work, must be handed in as early as possible in the autumn
term. Subject: "Robert Owen and the Industrial Revolution
in England."
Books recommended for reading and reference: As in History 8, and also: Podmore, Robert Owen (Appleton, 1907).
Sargant, Robert Owen. Joseph Clayton, Robert Owen (Martin
Seeker).    Dictionary of National Biography, etc.
Text-books: Cross, A History of England and Greater
Britain, Macmillan, or, Ramsay Muir, A Short History of the
British Commonwealth, Vol. II., G. Philip & Son. Hazen,
Europe Since 1815, Henry Holt. Shapiro, Modern and Contemporary European History, Houghton, Mifflin.
Three hours a week.   Mr. Eastman. 3 units.
(Given only in 1922-23.)
Department of Mathematics.
Professor: Daniel Buchanan.
Associate Professor: G. E. Robinson.
Assistant Professor: E. E. Jordan.
Assistant Professor: L. Richardson.
Lecturer:  B. S. Hartley.
Assistant: John Henry.
Assistant:  F. J. Studer.
Assistant:  Mae L. Barclay.
Assistant:   L.  W.  Heaslip.
Assistant:  M. Home.
Assistant: C. A. Woodworth.
Course 1 is required of all regular students in First Year
Arts. Courses 2, 3, and 4 are open to students who have completed Course 1. Those intending to proceed to Honours in
Mathematics are required to take Course 2, and are advised to
take Course 4. Course 3 is intended primarily for those looking
forward to business and public service.
Courses numbered 10 and over are Honour Courses. Courses in Arts. 119
Courses 3, 13, 15 and 4, 12, 14 are given in alternate years,
as indicated below.
Courses 20 to 25 are graduate courses of two units each.
A selection will be made from these courses at the beginning of
each session to meet the needs and qualifications of students proceeding to the degree of M.A.
Pass Courses.
1. (a) Algebra.—An elementary course, including ratio,
proportion, variation, solutions of equations, simple series, permutations, combinations, and the binomial theorem.
Hall and Knight, Elementary Algebra.
Three hours a week.   First Term.
(b) Geometry.—This course covers the work in Hall and
Steven's School Geometry, Parts V. and VI.
Two hours a week.   Second Term.
(c) Trigonometry.—An elementary course involving the use
of logarithms.
Playne and Fawdry, Practical Trigonometry.
Wentworth and Hill, Logarithmetic Tables.
One hour a week, First Term, and two hours a week, Second
Term. 3 units.
2. (o) Analytical Geometry.—An introductory course with
special emphasis upon the straight line and circle.
Tanner and Allen, Brief Course in Analytical Geometry.
Three hours a week.   First Term.
(6) Algebra.—A continuation of the previous course in
algebra involving exponential, logarithmic and other series, undetermined coefficients, partial and continued fractions.
Hall and Knight, Higher Algebra.
Three hours a week.   Second Term.
(c) Calculus.—An introductory course in differential and
integral calculus, with various applications. 120 The University of British Columbia.
Attendance at this course is voluntary and no formal credit
is given. Those intending to take Honours in Mathematics are
advised to attend this course.
One hour a week. 3 units.
3. The Mathematical Theory of Investments and Statistics.
—This course deals with the theory of interest, annuities, debentures, valuation of bonds, sinking funds, depreciation, probability and its application to life insurance, the mathematical
theory of statistics.
Rietz, Crathorne and Rietz, Mathematics of Finance.
West, Mathematical Theory of Statistics.
Three hours a week. 3 units.
(Given in 1923-24 and alternate years.)
4. Descriptive Astronomy.—The object of this course is to
acquaint the student with the various heavenly bodies and their
motions. It is intended primarily for Pass students, and only a
knowledge of elementary mathematics is essential. The subject-
matter treated includes: The shape and motions of the earth,
systems of coordinates, the constellations, planetary motion, gravitation, tides, time, the stars and nebulae, theories of evolution
of the solar system.
Moulton, Introduction to Astronomy.
Three hours a week. 3 units.
(Given in 1922-23 and alternate years.)
Honour Courses.
10. Calculus.—The elementary theory and applications of
the subject.
Three hours a week. 3 units.
11. Plane and Spherical Trigonometry.—The work in plane
trigonometry will deal with the following: Identities and trigonometrical equations, the solution of triangles with various applications, circumscribed, inscribed and escribed circles, De Moivre's
theorem, expansions of sin n#, etc., hyperbolic and inverse func- Courses in Arts. 121
tions. The work in spherical trigonometry will cover the solution
of triangles with various applications to astronomy and geodesy.
Loney, Plane Trigonometry, Parts I. and II.
Dupuis and Matheson, Spherical Trigonometry and Astronomy.
Two hours a week. 2 units.
12. Synthetic Plane and Solid Geometry.—The course in
plane geometry is intended to cover such topics as the principle
of duality, cross ratio geometry, etc. In solid geometry the principal properties of solid figures are studied, as well as the theory
of projection in space, with various applications to the conic
sections.
Dupuis, Elementary Synthetic Geometry. Dupuis, Elements
of Synthetic Solid Geometry.
Two hours a week. 2 units.
(Given in 1922-23 and alternate years.)
13. Analytical Geometry.—A general study of the conies and
systems of conies, and elementary work in three dimensions.
Loney, Coordinate Geometry. Tanner and Allen, Brief
Course in Analytical Geometry.
Two hours a week. 2 units.
(Given in 1923-24 and alternate years.)
14. Theory of Equations and Determinants. — A course
covering the main theory and use of these subjects.
Burnside and Panton, Theory of Equations, Vol. I. Weld,
Theory of Determinants.
Two hours a week. 2 units.
(Given in 1922-23 and alternate years.)
15. Higher Algebra.—Selected topics in higher algebra, including infinite series, continued fractions, the theory of numbers,
probability.
Hall and Knight, Higher Algebra. Chrystal, Text-book of
Algebra, Part II.
Two hours a week. 2 units.
(Given in 1923-24 and alternate years.) 122 The University of British Columbia.
16. Calculus and Differential Equations.—A continuation of
the previous course in calculus, treating partial differentiation,
expansions of functions of many variables, singular points, reduction formulae, successive integration, elliptic integrals, and
Fourier series.
Ordinary and partial differential equations, with various
applications to geometry, mechanics and physics.
Granville, Differential and Integral Calculus. Murray,
Differential Equations.
Two hours a week. 2 units.
17. Applied Mathematics.—A course dealing with the
applications of mathematics to dynamics of a particle and of a
rigid body, and to the two body problem in celestial mechanics.
Reference Books: Webster, Dynamics of Particles and of
Rigid, Fluid and Elastic Bodies; Moulton, An Introduction to
Celestial Mechanics.
Two hours a week. 2 units.
18. History of Mathematics.—A reading course covering the
historical development of the elementary branches of mathematics from the earliest times to the present.
Ball, History of Mathematics. Cajori, History of Elementary Mathematics. 1 unit.
20. Analytical Solid Geometry.—Snyder and Sisam, Analytical Geometry of Space.
21. Theory of Functions of a Real Variable. — Goursat-
Hedrick, Mathematical Analysis, Vol. I.
22. Theory of Functions of a Complex Variable.—Pierpont,
Functions of a Complex Variable.
23. Differential Geometry. Eisenhart, Differential Geometry.
24. Projective Geometry.—Veblen and Young, Projective
Geometry, Vol. I.
25. Celestial Mechanics.—Moulton, An Introduction to
Celestial Mechanics. Courses in Arts. 123
Department of Modern Languages.
Professor: H. Ashton.
Associate Professor: A. F. B. Clark.
Assistant Professor: Isabel Maclnnes.
Assistant Professor: G. Grojean.
Instructor:  Margaret Ross.
Instructor:  Janet Greig.
Assistant: Kathleen Peck.
Assistant:   Hazel McConnell.
French.
1. (a) Moliere, Le Bourgeois Gentilhomme, Ginn. Bazin,
Six Contes, Oxford Press. Allen and Schoell, French Life,
Henry Holt.   Weil, Legons de Frangais, Delagrave, Paris.
Revision of the essentials of French grammar and syntax
applied to the correct writing of French.
Oral work from Weil, Legons de Frangais.
There will be an oral examination based on this book.
Course 1 (a) is for students who intend to stay more than
one year in the Faculty of Arts and Science. 3 units.
1. (b) Labiche et Martin, Le Voyage de Monsieur Perrichon,
Allyn and Bacon.   Allen and Schoell, French Life, Holt.
Course 1 (6) is for students of the Faculty of Agriculture
or Applied Science and for those who intend to leave the University at the end of the First Year. It does not entitle students
to enter the Second Year classes in French in the Faculty of
Arts and Science, and must not be taken by students who intend
to graduate in, the Faculty of Arts and Science. 3 units.
1. (c) A course of Lectures on France, French Life and
Institutions. Open to all students without obligation to take the
examination. Students intending to take French throughout
their course are advised to attend these lectures. Future Honours students in French should take the course and the examination.   No formal credit is given for this course.
2. (a) La Fontaine, One Hundred Fables (Super), Ginn.
Augier et Sandeau, Le Genre de Monsieur Poirier (Roedder), 124 The University of British Columbia.
Am. Book Co. France, Le Crime de Sylvestre Bonnard
(Wright), Holt & Co.
Conversation in French on the above.   Written resumes.
Composition from Wilson and Jaccard, A First French
Prose Composition, Bell & Sons, London. 3 units.
2. (b) Modern Methods applied to the study of French
Authors. Reading and commentary in French. Book required:
Faguet, Ce que disent les livres, Cambridge Press.
For students who intend to continue French in the Third
and Fourth Years.   No formal credit is given for this course.
3. (a) Marivaux, Le Jeu de VAmour et du Hasard, Macmillan. Montesquieu, Lettres Persanes, Macmillan. Voltaire,
Contes (Preston), Oxford University Press. Beaumarchais,
Le Barbier de Seville, Macmillan.
Conversation and resumes based on the above.
For Pass and Honours students. 3 units.
3. (b) Voltaire's Prose (Cohn and Woodward), Heath.
Schinz, La vie et les oeuvres de J. J. Rousseau, Heath.
For Honours students. 3 units.
3. (c) French Composition and translation from English
into French. Weekley, French Prose Composition, Clive, London.
Obligatory for Honours students. 3 units.
4. (a) Rostand, L'Aiglon, Fasquelle, Paris. Rostand, Cyrano de Bergerac, Fasquelle, Paris.
For Pass and Honours students. The classes will be conducted in French, and will include Composition and Conversation based on the above. 3 units.
4. (b) La Bruyere, Les Caracteres (Radouant), Hatier,
Paris.
Mme. de La Fayette, La Princesse de Cleves, Paris, Cres
(Collection Gallia).
For Honours students. 3 units. Courses in Arts. 125
4. (c) Composition and Oral French.
Book required: Ritchie and Moore, A Manual of French
Composition, Cambridge Press.
For Honours students. 3 units.
4. (d) Methods of Modern Language Teaching.
For Honours students and all who intend to teach French.
3 units.
N. B.—All Honours students should procure G. L. Strachey,
Landmarks in French Literature, Holt. Courses 3 (a), (b),
(c), and 4 (a), (b), (c), (d), call for much work out of class.
They should be chosen only by students able and willing to work
alone.
While the Library provides copies of standard dictionaries
for occasional reference, every student of the Second, Third, and
Fourth Years should possess a small dictionary for use when
preparing class work. Suitable dictionaries can be obtained at
the Bookstore.
German.
Beginner's Course. Composition, Grammar, Conversation.
—Text, Zinnecker, Deutsch fur Anfanger, Heath. 3 units.
Beginner's Course, Scientific. — As Beginner's Course
above, together with Scientific Reading, Gore, German Science
Reader, Heath. 3 units.
1. Language.—Completion and Revision of Zinnecker. Composition based on texts read. Moser, Der Bibliothekar, Ginn.
Heine, Die Harzreise, Allyn and Bacon. F. Bruns, Book of German Lyrics, Heath.
Four hours a week. 3 units.
2. (a) Language.—Pope, Writing and Speaking German,
Holt.   Composition based on texts read.
Lessing, Minna von Barnhelm, Macmillan. Schiller, Die
Jungfrau von Orleans, Holt.   Goethe, Egmont, Ginn.
Three hours a week. 3 units. 126 The University of British Columbia.
2. (b) A general survey of German Literature.    Stroebe
and Whitney, Geschichte der deutschen Literatur, Holt.
For students who intend to take German in the Third and
Fourth Years.
One hour a week.   No formal credit is given for this course.
3. A course in nineteenth century literature, including the
reading of a number of standard works.
Three hours a week. 3 units.
Department of Philosophy.
Professor: H. T. J. Coleman.
Associate Professor: James Henderson.
1.  (a) A Course in Elementary Psychology.
Text-book: Pillsbury, The Essentials of Psychology, Macmillan.
References: Stout, A Manual of Psychology. Titchener,
A Text-book in Psychology; A Beginner's Psychology. James,
Psychology (Briefer Course).
Two hours a week throughout the year.
(b) A Course in Elementary Logic,Deductive and Inductive.
Text-book: Mellone, Introductory Text-book of Logic,
Blackwood (latest edition).
One hour a week throughout the year.
(c) A fourth hour per week will be devoted to lectures
introductory to the main problems of Philosophy, and a special
study of Descartes' Discourse on Method and Berkeley's Treatise
Concerning the Principles of Human Knowledge. Attendance
at this hour is voluntary and no formal credit is given. Students
contemplating honors are, however, advised to take this course.
3 units. Courses in Arts. 127
2. A general course in Ethics.
Text-book: Everett, Moral Values, Holt.
A special study will be made of selected portions of Aristotle's Ethics, Mill's Utilitarianism, and Kant's Metaphysic of
Morals.
Three hours a week. 3 units.
3. History of Greek Philosophy from Thales to Plato
(inclusive).
Text-book: Burnet, Greek Philosophy (Part I.), Macmillan.
In connection with the course a special study will be made of
Plato's Republic, Phaedo, and Philebus.
Three hours a week. 3 units.
(Given in 1922-23 and alternate years.)
4. The History of Philosophy from the Renaissance to the
Present time.
Text-book: Calkins, Persistent Problems of Philosophy,
Macmillan.
Works of reference: Rand, Modern Classical Philosophers,
and the various Histories of Philosophy.
Three hours a week. 3 units.
(Given in 1923-24 and alternate years.)
5. The Philosophy of Kant, with special study of the
Critique of Pure Reason.
Two hours a week. 2 units.
(Given in 1923-24 and alternate years.)
6. Philosophic Movements since the time of Kant. Post-
Kantian Idealism, Pragmatism, the New Realism, Bergson and
others.
Two hours a week. 2 units.
(Given in 1922-23 and alternate years.)
7. Introduction to Education. A course of lectures and
discussions dealing with educational movements since the beginning of the 19th century, and with the theories of life and of
mind which are implicit in these movements. 128 The University of British Columbia.
Texts: Spencer, Education, Everyman Edition. Dewey,
Democracy and Education, Macmillan.
References: Butler, The Meaning of Education. Moore,
What is Education? Adams (ed.), The New Teaching. Holmes,
What is and What might be. Articles in Cyclopedia of Education, Macmillan.
Philosophy 1 is recommended as preparatory to this course.
Three hours a week. 3 units.
(Given in 1922-23 and alternate years.)
8. (a) Social Psychology.—First Term. A study of those
particular phases of mental life and development which are
fundamental in social organization and activity.
Text: McDougall, Social Psychology, Methuen, London.
Collateral reading will be prescribed from the following: Cooley,
Human Nature and the Social Order. Wallas, Human Nature
in Politics; The Great Society.   Ross, Social Psychology.
(b) Educational Psychology.—Second Term. A study of
the psychological basis of teaching, with particular attention to
newer methods of class organization and instruction, and the
problem of the measurement of mental traits.
Text: Colvin, The Learning Process, Macmillan.
References: Thorndike, Educational Psychology. Judd,
Psychology of High School Subjects. Terman, The Measurement of Intelligence.   Starch, Educational Psychology.
Philosophy 1 is recommended as preparatory to this course.
Three hours a week. 3 units.
(Given in 1923-24 and alternate years.)
Students will note that Courses 3 and 4, Courses 5 and 6,
and Courses 7 and 8 are given in alternate years. This arrangement is designed to meet the needs of students who desire to
pursue the study of philosophy beyond the elementary stage. Courses in Arts. 129
Department of Physics.
Professor: T. C. Hebb.
Associate Professor: A. E. Hennings.
Associate Professor: J. G. Davidson.
1. A General Study of the principles of mechanics, properties of matter, heat, light, sound, and electricity, both in the
lecture-room and in the laboratory. The course has two objects:
(1) To give the minimum acquaintance with physical science
requisite for a liberal education to those whose studies will be
mainly literary; (2) to be introductory to the courses in Agriculture, Chemistry, Engineering, and Advanced Physics. Students must reach the required standard in both theoretical and
practical work.
Three hours of lectures and one period of two hours of
laboratory work per week.
Note: Separate lectures and laboratory periods will be provided for those students who have matriculated in Physics.
3 units.
2. General Physics.—Lectures and demonstrations. Especial
attention is given to modern points of view.
Three lectures per week for the pass course and one extra
lecture hour, or one laboratory period of two hours per week,
for distinction students.
Students who intend to proceed to a Medical Course should
take the laboratory work.
Prerequisite: Course 1, or its equivalent.
Text-book: Kimball, College Physics. 3 units.
3. Mechanics, Molecular Physics and Heat.—A study of the
statics and dynamics of both a particle and a rigid body, the laws
of gases and vapors, temperature, hygrometry, capillarity, expansion, and calorimetry.
Two hours of lectures and three hours of laboratory per
week. 130 The University of British Columbia.
Prerequisite: Course 1, or its equivalent.
Text-book: Millikan, Mechanics,   Molecular   Physics   and
Heat. 3 units.
4. Electricity, Sound, and Light.—A study of the fundamentals of magnetism, electricity, sound, and light.
Two hours of lectures and three hours of laboratory per
week.
Prerequisite: Course 1, or its equivalent.
Text-book: Millikan and Mills, Electricity, Sound and Light.
3 units.
5. Dynamics of a Particle and of a Rigid Body.—A rigorous
mathematical study of this subject.
Two hours of lectures per week.
Prerequisites: Course 3, and Differential and Integral Calculus. 2 units.
6. Advanced Electricity and Magnetism.—In this course,
especial attention is given to the theoretical phases of Electricity
and Magnetism.
Two hours of lectures per week.
Prerequisites: Courses 3 and 4, and Differential and Integral
Calculus.
Text-book: Starling, Electricity and Magnetism.     2 units.
7. Kinetic Theory of Gases and Introduction to Thermodynamics.—A course of lectures elucidating the fundamentals of
these subjects.
Two hours of lectures per week.
Prerequisites: Course 3, and Differential and Integral Calculus.
Books for reference: Poynting and Thomson, Heat. Boyn-
ton, Kinetic Theory of Gases. Preston, Heat, and Meyer,
Kinetic Theory of Gases. 2 units.
8. Theoretical and Experimental Optics.—A course of lectures accompanied by laboratory work consisting of accurate Courses in Arts. 131
measurements in diffraction, dispersion, interference, and polarization.
Two hours of lectures and three hours of laboratory per
week.
Prerequisites: Courses 3 and 4, and Differential and Integral
Calculus.
Books for reference: Houstoun, Treatise on Light. Mann,
Advanced Optics. Wood, Physical Optics. Preston, Theory of
Light.   Drude, Theory of Optics, and Edser, Light for Students.
3 units.
9. Recent Advances in Physics.—A course of lectures dealing
with the electrical properties of gases, the electron theory, and
radioactivity.
Two hours of lectures per week.
Prerequisites: Courses 3 and 4, and Differential and Integral
Calculus.
Books for reference: Thomson, Conduction of Electricity
through Gases. Rutherford, Radio-active Substances and Their
Radiations. Millikan, Electron. Thomson, Positive Rays.
Hughes, Photo-electricity, and Kaye, X-Rays. 2 units.
10. Advanced Experimental Physics.—In this course the
candidate for honours is expected to perform one or more classical experiments and to do some special work.
Carefully prepared reports, abstracts, and bibliographies will
constitute an essential part of the course.
Six hours of laboratory work per week. 3 to 6 units.
Department of Zoology.
Professor: C. McLean Fraser.
Lecturer in Entomology: R. C. Treherne.
Instructor:  H. A. Dunlop.
Assistant: Norman L. Cutler.
Note: Biology 1 is prerequisite to all courses in Zoology.
1. General Morphology.—General morphology of animals.
Comparative anatomy. The relationships of animal groups.
Comparative life-histories. 132 The University of British Columbia.
This course is prerequisite to other courses in zoology.
Pass Course: Two hours lecture and two hours laboratory
work per week throughout the year. 3 units.
Text-books: T. J. Parker and W. A. Haswell, Manual of
Zoology, Macmillan & Co. (American Edition, 1916).
2. Comparative Anatomy of Vertebrates.—A detailed comparative study of a member of each of the classes of Vertebrates.
Two lectures and four laboratory hours per week. First
Term. 2 units.
3. Comparative Anatomy of Invertebrates.—A detailed comparative study of a member of each of the main classes of Invertebrates.
Two lectures and four laboratory hours per week. Second
Term. 2 units.
4. Morphology of Insects. General Entomology: A collection is required.
One lecture and two hours laboratory work per week. One
Term. 1 unit.
5. Histology.—Study of the structure and development of
animal tissues.   Methods in histology.
Seven hours per week.   Second Term. 2 units.
6. Embryology. A general survey of the principles of vertebrate embryology. Preparation and examination of embryologi-
cal sections.
Seven hours per week.   First Term. 2 units.
7. Economic Entomology.—A study of the insect pests of
animals and plants; means of combating them.
Lecture and laboratory work, six hours per week. Second
Term. 2 units.
8. Private Reading.—A course of reading on Biological
theories. In this course examinations will be set but no class
instruction will be given. 2 units. FACULTY OF APPLIED SCIENCE
INFORMATION FOR STUDENTS IN APPLIED
SCIENCE
Admission.
The general regulations as to admission to the University
are to be found on page 35 and following.
Students entering the Faculty of Applied Science are
required to have completed one year in Arts. A Senior Matriculation certificate may be accepted provided at least 50 per cent,
has been obtained on the aggregate and 40 per cent, on each
paper, or in the case of students entering the Department of
Nursing, Junior Matriculation.
In First Year Arts or Senior Matriculation, Mathematics
and Physics must both be taken.
Students intending to enter Forestry should take Biology
in their First Year Arts, and those intending to enter Geological
Engineering, French and Biology.
English, Mathematics and Physics are prerequisite subjects,
and students must have passed the examinations in them to be
admitted to First Year Applied Science.
For returned soldiers the requirements for entrance to the
Faculty of Applied Science are those of the Applied Science
Matriculation of 1915.    (See pages 49 and 50.)
COURSES LEADING TO THE DEGREE OF M.A.Sc.
(See page 220.)
COURSES LEADING TO THE DEGREE OF B.A.Sc.
The degree of B.A.Sc. is granted on the satisfactory completion of four sessions of class-room work in the Applied Science
Faculty. 134 The University of British Columbia.
A double course leading to the degree of B.A. and B.A.Sc.
is also offered.
The curriculum as laid down in the following pages may be
changed from time to time as deemed advisable by the Faculty.
Courses leading to the degree of B.A.Sc. are offered in the
following:
I. Chemical Engineering.
II. Chemistry.
III. Civil Engineering.*
IV. Electrical Engineering.!
V. Forest Engineering.
VI. Geological Engineering.
VII. Mechanical Engineering.
VIII. Metallurgical Engineering.
IX. Mining Engineering.
X. Nursing
XL     Public Health.
GENERAL OUTLINE OF COURSES
Except in the Department of Nursing, which is treated
separately (pages 155, 193), the work of the first two years is
largely in Mathematics and pure science, giving a foundation for
specialization in the various branches of Engineering in the
Third and Fourth Years of a BA.Sc. Course.
Vacation Work
Students are expected to spend their summer vacations in
some employment that will furnish practical experience helpful
in their professional studies, or in their future professional
work. It is of prime importance for the mastery of the professional subjects that the theoretical work of the classroom
and the practical work of the laboratory should be supplemented
by experience in field or industrial work.
* Fourth Year not given in 1922-28.    See page 148.
t Third and Fourth Years not given in 1922-28.   See footnotes, pages 143, 144. Information for Students in Applied Science.     135
Before applying for a degree, a candidate is required to
furnish certificates of having had at least four months' employment of a nature that, in the opinion of the Department concerned, shall have afforded suitable experience in the practice
of his profession.
Students engaged in summer work that, in the opinion of
the Head of the Department and the Dean, affords necessary
practical experience in connection with their academic courses,
such as Geological students on geological survey field parties,
and who cannot, by reason of such work, enter college at the
specified time, may be allowed to register and enter classes,
without penalty, after the time specified in the calendar, on
presentation of statements from their employers that circumstances rendered it impossible for them to report at college
earlier.
Summer work and sessional work are required.
The summer work in Mechanical Engineering 1, required
of all students entering First Year Applied Science except
Nursing, will begin on Monday, August 28th.
Field work will begin at the close of the sessional
examination.
Practical work, such as Shop-work, Freehand Drawing,
Mechanical Drawing, Surveying, etc., done outside the University, may be accepted in lieu of laboratory or field work (but
not in lieu of lectures) in these subjects, on the recommendation of the Head of the Department and approval of the Dean.
Students seeking exemption as above must make written
application accompanied by certificate indicating the character
of the work done and the time devoted to it.
First Year.
The work of the First Year is the same in all courses in
Applied Science except Nursing. 136
The University of British Columbia.
Summer Work.
All undergraduates entering the First Year of Applied
Science (except in Nursing) are required to register on or before,
and to be in attendance at the University, on Monday, August
28th, when the classes in Mechanical Engineering 1 will commence.
Sessional Work.
Subject.
Mathematics 1	
Mathematics 2	
Mathematics 3	
Mathematics 4	
Mathematics 5	
Civil Engineering 1	
Mechanical Drawing  1   . .
Physics 1  	
Physics 2  	
Chemistry 1*	
Mechanical Engineering 1.
179
179
179
179
180
163
180
194
194
162
181
First Term.
u J
I*
Second Term.
Ii*
<& 00 v
»- b «
&%*
taw
J*
* Students who have already taken Chemistry 1 will substitute an
Arts subject approved by the Dean of Applied Science.
Field Work.
(See page 162.)
All undergraduates completing the First Year—except those
taking the Chemistry (Course II) and Nursing Courses — are
required to take Civil Engineering 2 immediately after the spring
examination.
Second Year.
The work of the Second Year is the same in all courses
except Chemistry, Forest and Geological Engineering, and
Nursing. Information for Students in Applied Science       137
Sessional Work.
Subject.
First Term.
ft
ffl JO  4)
H H V
Second Term.
8*
3|
281
IF
Mathematics 6	
Mathematics 7	
Chemistry 2   	
Civil Engineering 3	
Civil Engineering 4	
Mechanical Engineering 3
Physics 4  	
Physics 3  	
Mechanical Engineering 2
Civil Engineering 5	
Civil Engineering 6	
180
180
162
165
165
183
195
195
182
165
166
3
3
2
1
1
6
1
1
1
i
'*
1
2
,   .
2
2   .
3
2
1
3
3
1
2
1  2
Field Work.
Civil Engineering 7 (see page 166) will commence immediately after the spring examination for students in Civil, Forest,
Geological, Metallurgical, and Mining Engineering.
Third and Fourth Years.
Information regarding Third and Fourth Year work will be
found under the various courses on succeeding pages.
Third and Fourth Year Essays.
Essays are required of all students entering the Third and
Fourth Years, and must conform to the following:—
1. The essay shall consist of not less than 2,000 words.
2. It must be a technical description or study of the work on
which the student was engaged during the summer, or of
any scientific, engineering or industrial work with which
he is familiar. In the preparation of the essay, advantage
may   be   taken   of   any   source   of information, but due 138 The University of British Columbia.
acknowledgment must be made of all authorities consulted.
It should be suitably illustrated by drawings, sketches,
photographs or specimens.
3. It must be typewritten, or clearly written on paper of substantial quality, standard letter size (8V2XII inches), on
one side of the paper only, leaving a clear margin on top
and left-hand side. Students are recommended to examine
sample reports to be found in the library.
4. All essays must be handed in to the Dean not later than
November 15th.
All essays, when handed in, will become the property of the
Department concerned, and will be filed for reference. Students
may submit duplicate copies of their essays in competition for
the students' prizes of the Engineering Institute of Canada, or
the Canadian Institute of Mining and Metallurgy.
The value of an essay will be judged, not only by its substance, but also by the precision and quality of its English. A
maximum of 100 marks is allowed for an essay, 50 being required
for a pass. Essays will be considered as final Christmas
examinations, and subject to the same regulations and fees as
apply to supplemental examinations.
I.    Chemical Engineering.
This course is arranged to prepare the student for the duties
of managing engineer in a chemical manufactory. As such he
must be not only conversant with the chemical processes involved,
but he must be prepared to design and to oversee the construction of new buildings and to direct the installation and use of
machinery. Accordingly, the course of study combines a considerable amount of engineering with the maximum of chemical
training allowed by the time at his disposal.
First and Second Years.
As in other Engineering courses.   (See pages 136 and 137.)
Third Year.
Summer Work.
Essay.    (See page 137.) Information for Students in Applied Science.      139
Sessional Work.
Subject.
First Term.
813
ft s
ft
ft «
Second Term.
ft
ft «
Economics  1   	
Metallurgy 1   	
Mechanical Engineering 6
Geology 2  (a)   	
Chemistry 3	
Chemistry 4	
Chemistry 5	
Civil Engineering 10 ....
Civil Engineering 9	
Electrical Engineering 1.
174
190
184
178
163
163
163
167
167
186
Fourth Year.
Summer Work.
Essay.    (See page 137.)
Sessional Work.
Subject.
Geology 1 (a) ....
Civil Engineering 19
Civil Engineering 12
Chemistry 6	
Chemistry 8	
Chemistry 7   	
Metallurgy 2   	
Thesis	
."3   u
ft   a)
S tn
178
171
168
163
163
163
191
First Term.
ft v
Is t,
*-*  A.
ft »
ft|8
Second Term.
8-g
ft •
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!|*
14
II. Chemistry.
The aim of this course is to train the students in the practice
of Chemistry, and to give a thorough knowledge in the fundamental principles of this subject, that they may be prepared to
assist in the solution of problems of value to the industrial and
agricultural life of the Province. The course is arranged to
give in the first two years a knowledge of the fundamental 140
The University of British Columbia.
principles of chemistry and physics, with sufficient mathematics
to enable the theoretical parts of the subject to be understood.
In the Third Year, analytical, organic, and physical
chemistry are studied from the scientific side and in relation
to technology; while in the Fourth Year a considerable amount
of time is devoted to a short piece of original work.
First Year.
As in other Engineering courses.    (See page 136.)
Second Year.
Subject.
First Term.
d » a)
b b «
■Si*
Second Term.
58  JO   4)
b b *
II*
Mathematics 6 .
Mathematics 7 .
Chemistry 2 . . .
Chemistry 3 . . .
Chemistry 4 . . .
Physics 4   	
Physics 3   	
German (Arts) 1
180
180
162
163
163
195
195
125
' 3
2
1
2
' 2-
2
3
3
1
5 1
3 2
2
2
3 2
3
Third Year.
Summer Work.
Essay.    (See page 137.)
Sessional Work.
Subject.
ft    4>
First Term.
sis
ft*
So.*
Second Term.
f*
fa 0J
« QOU
b b »
Economics  1   	
Geology   1   	
Chemistry 5  	
Metallurgy 1   	
Geology 2  (a)   	
Chemistry 7	
Bacteriology 1 (Arts)
Metallurgy 5   	
174
178
163
190
178
163
85
191 Information for Students in Applied Science       141
Fourth Year.
Summer Work.
Essay.    (See page 137.)
Sessional Work.
Subject.
Physics 9   . .
Chemistry 6
Chemistry 8
Chemistry 9
Metallurgy 2
Thesis	
II
|*
First Term.
g-3
ft u
195
163
163
163
191
C 01
So. .
Second Term.
18
fcfe
■§a*
Ii*
18
III. Civil Engineering.
The aim of this course is to give the student a sound training
in the fundamental scientific principles on which the practice of
the profession is based, and in the various branches of general
engineering which are most called for in the practice of the
profession in this Province. Experience shows that graduates
do not usually follow any narrow differentiation that they may
make in their course, but are governed by many other factors
which affect them after leaving college. In practice in British
Columbia, in particular, the engineer is called upon to undertake
work in various branches of the profession. The course is
therefore adapted to the needs of the engineer who expects to
enter the profession in this Province in general practice, or the
student who wishes to take up a special branch of engineering
in a post-graduate course. The instruction is given by means of
lectures and practical work in the field, the draughting-room,
and the laboratory, and by visits to works in regularly conducted
class excursions.
During the earlier years of the course the training is along
engineering lines in Mathematics, Physics, Mechanics, and allied
subjects which are essential to the proper education of the 142
The University of British Columbia.
engineer who in practice is applying the principles of these
sciences.
In the Third and Fourth Years, while the student's
attention is devoted especially to the study of the courses in
Civil Engineering, his outlook is broadened by courses in
General Economics, General Geology, Engineering Law and
Economics, as well as a brief introduction to the business side
of the profession.
The subjects covered in each year follow in tabulated form:
First and Second Years.
As in other Engineering courses.   (See pages 136 and 137.)
Third Year.
Summer Essay.   (See page 137.)
Sessional Work.
3 «
ft £
First Term.
Second Term.
Subject.
a
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" a
ft S
£ « 4)
is*
p <ti
* V
!*
H  *
a.
fr*
ft «
Geology 1	
178
167
167
167
168
168
184
186
174
168
169
169
2
1
2
2
1
2
2
2
2
1
2
3
3
2
6
3
2
i
2
2
1
2
2
2
2
2
Civil Engineering 8	
Civil Engineering 9	
Civil Engineering 10	
Civil Engineering 11	
Civil Engineering 12	
Mechanical Engineering 6. .
Electrical Engineering 1   . .
Economics   1   	
3
3
3
3
2
4
Field Work.
Civil Engineering 16 (see page 169) will commence immediately after the spring examination. Information for Students in Applied Science.       143
Summer Essay.
Fourth Year.*
(See page 137.)
Sessional Work.
Subject.
Civil
Civil
Civil
Civil
Civil
Civil
Civil
Civil
Civil
Civil
Engineering 17
Engineering 18
Engineering 19
Engineering 20
Engineering 21
Engineering 22
Engineering 23
Engineering 24
Engineering 25
Engineering 26
170
170
171
171
172
172
173
173
173
174
First Term.
o.
3 p. .
*e1
5S*
Second Term.
Pi
Si*
Sat. mornings 20 weeks
* Fourth Year not given in 1922-23, Courses 20, 21, 25, 26 being cancelled.
IV.   Electrical Engineering.!
This course is designed for those students who desire a general training in the theory and practice of electrical engineering
in addition to the basic principles of mechanical engineering.
The Third Year of the course is devoted mainly to mechanical
engineering, together with work which involves the broad principles which underlie all engineering work. The Fourth Year is
devoted to electrical engineering, the fundamental principles of
industrial economics, works organization, management, and financing. No attempt is made to give the student that intimate
knowledge of the details of Electrical Engineering practice which
practical experience alone can supply.
Vancouver and the surrounding country afford excellent
facilities for the study of engineering works under commercial
conditions. The managing officials of these works are pleased to
permit students, in charge of a member of the Faculty, to inspect
and conduct tests at pre-arranged times. Organized visits to
industrial plants constitute a regular part of the advanced work.
t Note—The Third and Fourth Years in Electrical Engineering have been withdrawn,
and will not be given in 1022-28. 144
The University of British Columbia.
First and Second Years.
As in other Engineering courses.   (See pages 136, 137.)
Third Year.*
Summer Work.
Essay.   (See page 137.)
Sessional Work.
s ••
X ft
Q
H    W
° en
First Term.
Second Term.
Subject.
SB'S
Pi
frte
h|S
3a
Lectures
>.H
ft »
Cd 93 V
ft ft »
^l*
Mechanical Engineering 4 . .
Mechanical Engineering 5 . .
Mechanical Engineering 6 . ,
Mechanical Engineering 7 . .
Civil Engineering 9	
Civil Engineering 10	
Electrical Engineering 1   . .
Electrical Engineering 2   . .
Civil Engineering 12	
Economics  1   	
183
183
184
184
167    |
167
186
187
168
174
2
1
2
1
2
2
2
1
2
3
3
6
2
2
2
1
2
1
1
2
2
2
1
2
3
3
6
3
2
3
Fourth YEAR.f
Summer Work.
Essay.    (See page 137.)
Sessional Work.
'3 §>
a *
.  *>
ft <y
First  Term.
Second Term.
Subject.
f-
fr*
ft a
.2 p..*
die v
b £: «
31 X
ii a
ft »
a
fcfe
i-4
Electrical Engineering 4   . .
Electrical Engineering 5   . .
Electrical Engineering  6   . .
Electrical Engineering  7   . .
Electrical Engineering 8   . .
Mechanical Engineering 8 . .
Mechanical Engineering 10.
Mechanical Engineering 12.
Civil Engineering 18	
Civil Engineering 19	
187
187
187
188
188
185
185
186
170
171
3
1
1
1
1
2
2
1
2
1
9
3
3
3
3
1
1
1
1
2
2
1
2
1
9
3
3
3
* Given as Third Year in Mechanical Engineering only, in 1022-23.
t Not given in 1922-23.   Subject to change or cancellation. Information for Students in Applied Science.       145
V.    Forest Engineering.
This course is intended primarily for students who wish to
enter the lumbering industry in this Province. The course,
therefore, is designed to give a thorough training in branches of
engineering that are applied in the industry. At the same time
a sufficient training is afforded in the sciences fundamental to
forestry to enable a student to enter professional forestry,
especially in this Province, where a knowledge of the special
problems connected with the industry greatly increases the
usefulness of the forester.
Vancouver contains large saw-mills, wood-working plants,
and plants for seasoning and preserving wood—more, in fact,
than any other place in the Province. Pulp mills, logging operations, and extensive forests are within easy reach. The advantages of location are therefore exceptional.
As in the Engineering courses, students are expected to
obtain practical experience in their work during the summer
vacations, as this is an essential supplement to the theoretical
and practical work of the Session.    (See pages 134, 135.)
The requirements for admission to this course are those set
forth for admission to Applied Science.    (See page 133.)
Students intending to enter this course are strongly urged
to take the Biology option in their First Year Arts course.
First Year.
As in other Engineering courses.    (See page 136.) 146
The University of British Columbia.
Second Year.
Sessional Work.
Subject.
Mathematics 6	
Mathematics 7	
Civil Engineering 3	
Civil Engineering 4 ,	
Mechanical Engineering 3.
Physics 4  	
Physics 3   	
Mechanical Engineering 2.
Civil Engineering 5	
Civil Engineering 6	
Botany If	
Biology   If   	
Forestry 1   	
Forestry 2  	
Forestry 3   	
180
180
165
165
183
195
195
182
165
166
162
162
174
175
175
First Term.
I*
h) 0)
fr*
ft a
3§*
t If not already taken in Arts.
Field Work.
Civil Engineering 7 (see page 166)
diately after the spring examination.
Third Year.
Essay.    (See page 137.)
Sessional Work.
Second Term.
5te
I1*
g wo!
in
will commence imme-
Subject.
Geology 1   (a)   	
Civil Engineering 8	
Civil Engineering 9	
Civil Engineering 10
Civil Engineering 11  ....
Mechanical Engineering 6
Electrical Engineering 1
Economics  1   	
Civil Engineering 13  ....
Civil Engineering 14  ....
Forestry 4   	
Forestry 5   	
Forestry 6   	
Forestry 9   	
First
Term.
Second Term.
>.H
>.!.
a*
a a
h a
«s 5° «
C fc «
V 0>
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a
v u
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a
3!*
178
2
2
167
1
3
167
i
3
167
2
2
3
168
2
2
184
2
3
2
3
186
2
2
2
2
174
2
2
168
3
169
2
175
2
175
1
3
1
3
176
2
177
2
3
2
3 Information for Students in Applied Science.
147
Field Work.
Civil Engineering 16 (see page 169) will commence immediately after the spring examination.
*
Fourth Year.
Essay.    (See page 137.)
Sessional Work.
Subject.
S3   ii
2 8
a*
First Term.
1*
Forestry 7 and 8 . .. .
Forestry 10   	
Forestry 11  	
Forestry 12   	
Forestry 13   	
Civil Engineering 12 .
Civil Engineering 17 .
Civil Engineering 18 .
Civil Engineering 19 .
Civil Engineering 22t
Civil Engineering 23 .
Civil Engineering 24 .
•§°\a*
s e «
ft a •
176
, ,
177
1
177
1
178
2
178
4
168
1
170
2
. 170^
2
171
1
172
2
173
173
2
Second Term.
8*
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So.jj
ggs
11*
t Part of regular course omitted.
DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR.
FOREST PRODUCTS LABORATORIES OF CANADA.
VANCOUVER LABORATORY.
The above Laboratory was established in 1918 by the Forestry Branch of the Department of the Interior, as a permanent
branch of the Forest Products Laboratories of Canada, McGill
University, Montreal.
The purpose of the Laboratories is the testing of Western
Canadian woods to establish their correct mechanical and physical properties.
A scheme of co-operation exists between the Laboratory and
University by which students of the University have access to
the Laboratory to watch the work being carried on, and by which 148 The University of British Columbia.
the apparatus may be used at times in testing the strength of
materials.
The main apparatus consists of two Olsen Universal* Testing Machines of 200,000-lb. and 30,000-lb. capacity, respectively,
and one Hat-Turner Impact Machine, having three test weights
of 50,100, and 250-lb., respectively, and a drop of 6 feet. Woodworking machinery, consisting of saw-table, buzz planer, thickness planer, borer, etc., is also installed in connection with the
Laboratory for the preparation of test specimens.
VI.    Geological  Engineering.
This course is designed to meet the requirements of students
who intend to enter Geology as a profession.
It gives a broad training not only in Geology, but also in
the sciences of Biology, Chemistry, Physics, and Mathematics,
which are extensively applied in the solution of geological problems. The engineering subjects are useful not only to the
mining and consulting geologist and the geological surveyor, but
to the geologist engaged in original research in any branch of
the science.
The course therefore furnishes a foundation for the professions of mineralogist, geological surveyor, mining geologist,
consulting geologist, palaeontologist, geographer, etc., and is
useful for those who will be in any way connected with the
discovery or development of the natural resources of the country.
As a supplement to the work in the classroom, laboratory
and field during the session, the student is expected to obtain
practical experience during the summer vacations.
First Year.
As in other Engineering courses.    (See page 136.) Information for Students in Applied Science.      149
Second Year.
Sessional Work.
Subject.
First Term.
8*
ft «
fr*
ft «
$ H
ggS
3
',      2
2
2
1
6
1
2
2
3
,   ,
3
2
1
3
Second Term.
% u
fr*
ft "
So. j,
IP
Mathematics 6 . . . .
Mathematics 7  . . . .
Geology 1	
Chemistry 2  .•	
Civil Engineering 3
Physics 4  	
Physics 3  	
Civil Engineering 5
Civil Engineering 6
Civil Engineering 15
180
180
178
163
165
195
195
165
166
169
Field Work.
Civil Engineering 7  (see page 166) will commence immediately after the spring examination.
Third Year.
Summer Work.
Essay.    (See page 137.)
I Sessional Work.
Subject.
1
'i
■o
Da
u>
!R
fa
tn
First Term.
8 h
Geology 2	
Geology 3	
Geology 4	
Geology 5	
Chemistry 4	
Chemistry 5  	
Economics 1   	
Mining  1   	
Mining  5   	
Metallurgy 5  	
Metallurgy 1   	
Ore Dressing 1  . ..
Zoology 3	
Civil Engineering 13
178
2
178
3
178
178
3
163
163
1
174
2
188
1
190
191
1
190
2
192
2
197
2
168
II*
Second Term.
u
H>  g
fr*
So.*
U* 150
The University of British Columbia.
Essay.
Fourth Year.
Summer Work.
(See page 137.)
Subject.
3
"3
First Term.
&*
ges
■§1*
Second Term.
0) o>
ft «
a
fr*
ft *>
■§Qj<
.3*
Geology 6	
Geology 7	
Geology 8	
Civil Engineering 1
Geology 10	
Mining 2   	
Mining 3   	
Metallurgy 2
Ore Dressing 2 . . .
Civil Engineering 8
Geological Essay .
178
178
178
170
178
189
189
191
192
167
VII.    Mechanical Engineering.
As this branch of Engineering forms an outstanding feature
in all industrial development, the course of training is general
and basic in its character. Because of its general character it is
not possible in the time available to give the student an intimate
knowledge of the details of practice in any special line of work.
The course is designed more particularly for those who are likely
to take up the manufacture of machinery, power plant work
(including design and construction of steam, gas, oil, or hydraulic
plants), heating and ventilation of buildings, refrigeration, or
industrial management.
Students in this course are given a systematic course in the
fundamentals of Electrical Engineering.
Governed by the fact that values and costs are controlling
factors in the practice of Engineering, the subjects of the final
years are treated with a view of developing a business sense,
an understanding of men, and the ability to report clearly on
industrial problems.   This demands the study of Economics, the Information for Students in Applied Science.      151
use of good English, and the participation in outside industrial
work during the vacation.
The courses of the First and Second Years are the same as
in other branches of Engineering.   (See pages 136 and 137.)
Third Year.
As in Electrical Engineering.    (See page 144.)
Fourth Year.
Summer Work.
Essay.    (See page 137.)
Sessional Work, a
«...
a*
u %
pm
First Term.
Second Term.
Subject.
00-*
ii ii
M ii
1*
V H
•J 8
Pi
228
!§*
5 4)
H ii
2eS
Mechanical Engineering 8 . .
Mechanical Engineering 9. .
Mechanical Engineering 10.
Mechanical Engineering 11.
Mechanical Engineering 12 .
Mechanical Engineering 13.
Mechanical Engineering 14.
Electrical Engineering 3 . . .
Civil Engineering 19	
185
185
185
185
186
186
186
187
170
171
2
1
2
1
1
i
2
2
1
3
6
5
3
2
2
1
2
1
1
2
2
1
3
6
5
3
3
VIII.-IX.   Metallurgical and Mining Engineering.
These courses are intended to give a broad foundation in
Mining or Metallurgical Engineering that will form a suitable
introduction to any branch of the work that aptitude or circumstances may lead the student to enter after graduation.
Special attention is therefore given to the fundamental
sciences upon which the practice of the profession is based. As
the usual avenues toward professional work are through
draughting, surveying, and assaying, special attention will be
given to training in these branches of the work. 152 The University of British Columbia.
Specialization does not begin until the Third Year, when
courses in Mining, Metallurgy, Ore-dressing, Assaying, and Mine
Surveying are commenced, but the chief work of the Third Year
is still in such fundamental subjects as Applied Mechanics,
Mechanical Engineering, Chemistry, Geology, and Mineralogy.
Instruction is given by means of lectures and practical work
in the field, draughting-room, and laboratory, and by visits to
mines and works. Students are recommended to spend their
vacations at practical works in connection with Mining or
Metallurgy, and are required to do so between the Third and
Fourth Years.
Vancouver is conveniently located in proximity to coal and
metal mining districts, large coal and metal mining operations
being carried on within a few hours' journey of the city, while
a number of mining companies have offices in the city itself.
Students have little difficulty in obtaining positions in mines or
in smelters during vacations, as several of the larger companies
have established the practice of accepting student employees in
reasonable numbers during the vacation months.
Special attention is paid to British Columbia conditions,
fitting students to practise their profession to special advantage
in this Province after graduation either in Mining or Metallurgy.
Students are advised to become members of the Canadian
Institute of Mining and Metallurgy.
VIII.    Metallurgical Engineering.
First and Second Year.
As in other Engineering courses.    (See pages 136 and 137.
Third Year.
Summer Work.
Essay.    (See page 137.) Information for Students in Applied Science.      153
Sessional Work.
Subject.
First Term.
Second Term.
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Economics  1   	
Civil Engineering 10
Civil Engineering 13
Civil Engineering 9	
Mechanical Engineering 6
Geology 1	
Geology 2	
Chemistry 5m  	
Mining  1   	
Mining 5   	
Metallurgy  5   	
Metallurgy 1   	
Ore Dressing 1	
Civil Engineering 12
Fourth Year.
Summer Work.
Essay.    (See page 137.)
Sessional Work.
Subject.
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Second Term.
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Civil Engineering 18 . . .
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Metallurgy 2   	
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Metallurgy 4   	
Chemistry 8 	 154
The University of British Columbia.
IX.   Mining Engineering.
Ftrst and Second Years.
As in other Engineering courses.    (See pages 136 and 137.)
Third Year.
As in Metallurgical Engineering.    (See page 153.)
Fourth Year.
Summer Work.
Essay.    (See page 137.)
Sessional Work.
Subject.
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Geology 8	
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Ore Dressing 2	
Civil Engineering 18  . . .
Mining  2   	
Mining  3   	
Mining  4   	
Metallurgy 2   	
178
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192
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Short Course in Mining.
The regular Short Courses in Mining for the Session of
1922-23 will commence the second Monday in January, 1923,
and will continue for eight weeks. These courses include Mining,
Smelting, Ore Concentration, Geology and Ore-deposits, Mineralogy and Rock Study, Fire Assaying, Chemistry, and Surveying.
The courses are thoroughly practical in nature. They are
not primarily designed for those who have had a technical training, but rather for those who have had practical experience in
mining and prospecting, or are connected with the business of
mining in any way. The courses are designed to give practical
and technical knowledge, helpful in practical mining work and Information for Students in Applied Science.      155
mining business. While they are short they are complete in
themselves, and require no other preparation than a common-
school education or ability to read and write.
Experience has shown that they fill a real need in a practical way and they have proved very successful in the past.
As they do not form part of the regular University course,
a special bulletin is issued, in which details of the courses and
requirements for admission are given. Copies of this may be
obtained on application to the Registrar of the University.
This course will not be given unless at least ten students
register for it.
X.   Nursing.
The University of British Columbia, in conjunction with
approved training schools for nurses in this Province, offers a five
years' course in Nursing, leading to the degree of B.A.Sc. (Nursing). The aim of this course is to afford to women capable of
leadership a broader and more liberal education than can be given
by the training school alone, and thus to prepare them for teaching and administration in schools of nursing and public health
nursing service.
The requirements for admission for this course are those set
forth for Junior Matriculation.    (See page 38.)
The degree will be granted upon the successful completion
of a five years' course, consisting of University work and Hospital training.
The latter may be taken in any institution that is of the
standard set by the University, and that has made application
and submitted evidence of fitness to the University, and has been
approved of by the University.
Until 1925, nurses who have graduated from a hospital that
is in affiliation with this University or otherwise approved of by
the Senate, may be awarded the degree on complying with the
following conditions:—
1. They shall have matriculated. 156 The University of British Columbia.
2. They shall take, or shall have taken, the full academic
training laid down for this course. At least one year of
such training shall be, or shall have been, taken in the
University of British Columbia.
3. Except under special circumstances the course shall be
entered upon within two years of the time of graduating
as a nurse.
The curriculum, as outlined below, is subject to alteration
at any time.
First Year.
1. English 1 (a) and (b).
2. Mathematics 1 or Latin 1 or French 1 or History 1, 2,
or 3. ^
3. Physics 1.
4. Chemistry 1.
5. Biology 1.
If she has not already done so, the student must enter an
approved Training School for Nurses in May at the close of the
First Year, and take the ordinary four months' Preparatory
Course for Probationers. During this period the student will
undergo (a) rigid physical examination, (b) examination as to
fitness in temperament and character for nursing.
Second Year.
1. English 2 (a) and (b).
2. Chemistry 2.
3. Philosophy 1.
4. Economics 1.
5. Bacteriology 1 and 2.
Third and Fourth Year.
The Third and Fourth Years will be spent in practical training in an approved Hospital, but students must register with the
University.    (For registration see page 51.) Information for Students in Applied Science.     157
During this portion of the course the pupil, though registered at the University, resides at the Hospital, and while there is
subject to the authority and is under the direction of the Officers
of the Training School. She receives full maintenance and such
allowances as the Hospital authorities may designate. For information regarding courses of instruction given during the Hospital
portion of the course, see page 193.
Fifth Year.
In the Fifth Year the student will attend the Session of the
University. Two major subjects are offered, of which the student,
with the consent of her advisers, may elect either (a) Teaching
and Administration in Schools of Nursing, or (b) Public Health
Nursing.
Course A.—Teaching and Administration in
Schools of Nursing.
Academic Work.—A course of lectures in each of the following :—
(a) Introduction to Education.
(o) Teaching of Nursing principles and methods.
(c) History of Nursing and contemporary problems.
(d) Nutrition.
(e) Sanitation and Hygiene.
(/)  Economics and Social Legislation.
(g) Mental Hygiene.
Field Work.—Students electing this option will be required
to do practice teaching under supervision, and will be afforded
an opportunity of studying training school administration.
Course B.—Public Health Nursing.
Academic Work.—A course of lectures in each of the following :—
(a) Motor mechanics, (b) Nutrition, (c) Communicable
diseases. (d) Sanitation and Hygiene. (e) Tuberculosis.
(/)  Child Welfare,    (g)  Public Health Nursing,    (h)  School 158 The University of British Columbia.
Nursing, (t) Social Service, (j) History of Nursing, (k) Psychology and Teaching Principles. (I) Economics and Social
Legislation,   (m) Mental Hygiene,    (n) Health Legislation.
Students electing Public Health Nursing as their major subject will have suitable field work arranged for them in conjunction with the Department of Public Health, and in selected cases,
with the consent of the Department, may specialize in some one
branch of Public Health Nursing.
XI.  Public Health.
Through the generosity of the Provincial Branch of the
Canadian Red Cross Society in providing the salaries of the
staff, a Department of Public Health has been established. The
regular course leading to the degree of B.A.Sc. is the same as in
Nursing Course X, excepting that in the fifth year Course B,
Public Health Nursing, must be taken.
The short course for Graduate Nurses is outlined on pages
195-197.
Double Course for the Degrees of B.A. and B.A.Sc.
The requirements are as follows:
First and Second Years.
As set forth in the Calendar for the First and Second Years
of Arts, except as follows:
Physics 1 and Mathematics 2 must be taken.
Civil Engineering 1 will be taken as an additional subject
in the Second Year.
Chemistry 1 must not be taken, as it is a Third Year subject.
French and Biology should be selected by students intending
to enter Geological Engineering, and Biology by those intending
to enter Forest Engineering. Information for Students in Applied Science.     159
A course in German is recommended for students intending to enter Chemical, Forest, Geological or Metallurgical
Engineering.
The summer school in Mechanical Engineering 1 of the
First Year of Applied Science must be taken before entering
upon the Third Year of the Double Course.
Third Year.
1. Three units in one of the following:
A foreign language;
History;
Economics;
Philosophy;
Biology;
2. Chemistry.
3. Mathematics 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, Applied Science.
4. Physics 1 and 2 Applied Science.
5. Mechanical Drawing 1 Applied Science.
Civil Engineering 2 (Field Work) will be taken immediately after the spring examination by all except those intending
to enter Chemistry (Course II).
Fourth Year.
As for Second Year Applied Science.
Fifth Year.
As for Third Year Applied Science. The degree of B.A.
to be conferred on completing the Fifth Year of this course.
Sixth Year.
As for Fourth Year Applied Science. 160 The University of British Columbia.
EXAMINATIONS IN APPLIED  SCIENCE.
1. There are two examinations in each year—one at Christmas and the other at the end of the session. Successful students
are arranged in three classes, as follows: First class, those who
obtain 80 per cent, or more; Second class, 65 to 80 per cent.;
Passed, 50 to 65 per cent.
Christmas examinations will be held in all subjects of the
First and Second Years, and are obligatory for all students of
these years. Christmas examinations in subjects of the Third
and Fourth Years, excepting those subjects that are completed
before Christmas, shall be optional with the Departments concerned.
Applications for Special Consideration in the matter of
examinations on account of illness must be in the hands of the
Dean not later than two days after the close of the examination
period.
Any student whose academic record, as determined by the
tests and examinations of the first term, is found to be unsatisfactory, may, upon the recommendation of the Faculty, be
required by the Senate to discontinue attendance at the University for the remainder of the session.
A student who fails to pass in the final examinations of his
year, may, upon the recommendation of the Faculty, be required
by the Senate either to repeat his year, or to withdraw from the
Faculty.
For Classes of Students, see page 53.
2. Except in special cases as provided below, no undergraduate or conditioned undergraduate shall be permitted to
take any second-year subjects until he has passed or secured
exemption in all Matriculation and First Year Arts requirements;
and, similarly, no third-year work may be undertaken until all
first-year subjects shall have been passed or exemption granted.
No fourth-year work may be undertaken until all second-year
subjects shall have been passed or exemption granted. Information for Students in Applied Science.     161
3. No student proceeding to a degree will be allowed to
take any subject unless he has previously passed, or secured
exemption, in all prerequisite subjects. If any subject has
another which is concurrent with it, both must be taken in the
same session.
Supplemental Examinations.
4. Notice will be sent to all students to whom Faculty has
granted supplemental examinations.
5. Examinations supplemental to the sessional examinations
will be held in September, simultaneously with the matriculation
examinations. The time for each supplemental examination will
be fixed by the Faculty; the examination will not be granted at
any other time, except by special permission of the Faculty, and
on payment of a fee of $7.50.
6. Applications for supplemental examinations, accompanied by the necessary fees (see page 55), must be in the hands
of the Registrar at least two weeks before the date set for the
examinations.
7. Repeating Year.—By special permission of the Faculty, a
student who is required to repeat his year may, on application
in writing,—
(a) Be exempted from attending lectures and passing
examinations in the subjects in which he has already
passed, provided he has made therein a standing of
60 per cent, or over.
(b) And if so exempted, be permitted to take, in addition
to the subjects in which he has failed, such subjects
of the following year of his course as the Faculty
may deem expedient. 162 The University of British Columbia.
COURSES OF INSTRUCTION, APPLIED SCIENCE.
N.B.—The following courses are subject to such modifications during the year as the Faculty may deem advisable.
Department of Botany.
Professor: A. H. Hutchinson.
Assistant Professor: John Davidson.
Lecturer in Plant Pathology:  J. W. Eastham.
Biology.
Biology 1.—General Biology.—As in Arts.
"       2.—Principles of Heredity.—As in Arts.
"       3.—General Physiology.—As in Arts.
Botany.
Botany 1.     —General Botany.—As in Arts.
2. —Morphology.—As in Arts.
3. —Physiology.—As in Arts.
4. —Histology.—As in Arts.
5(a).—Economic Flora.—As in Arts.
5(b).—Dendrology.—As in Forestry 5.
6(a).—General Plant Pathology.—As in Arts.
6(&).—Forest Pathology.—As in Forestry 7.
7(a).—Forest Ecology.—As in Forestry 6.
Department of Chemistry.
Professor: E. H. Archibald.
Professor of Organic Chemistry:  R. H. Clark.
Associate Professor: W. P. Seyer.
Assistant Professor: M. J. Marshall.
Instructor: Ruth Fulton.
Assistant:   J. Allardyce.
Assistant:   A. E. Boss.
Assistant:  Freda Handford.
Assistant:  Violet E. Dunbar.
Assistant:   K. B. Gillie.
1. General Chemistry.—As in Arts.
2. Qualitative and Quantitative Analysis.—As in Arts. Courses in Applied Science. 163
3. Organic Chemistry.—As in Arts.
4. Theoretical Chemistry.—As in Arts.
5. Advanced Qualitative and Quantitative Analysis.—
As in Arts.
5 m.—For mining students,  one hour lecture and three
hours' laboratory.
6. Industrial Chemistry.—As in Arts.
7. Physical Chemistry.—As in Arts.
8. Applied Electro-Chemistry.—As in Arts.
9. Advanced Organic Chemistry.—As in Arts.
Department of Civil Engineering and Surveying.
Professor:
Associate Professor:   E. G. Matheson.
Lecturer: W. H. Powell.
Instructor: A. Lighthall.
Instructor: G. M. Irwin.
Lecturer: F. A. Wilkin.
Lecturer: J. R. Grant.
First Year.
Civil Engineering 1.
Descriptive Geometry.—Geometrical drawing; orthographic,
isometric, and axometric projections; shades and shadows.
Two lectures and four hours' laboratory per week.
Text-book:   Armstrong, Descriptive Geometry, Wiley.
Second Year.
Civil Engineering 2.
Field Work.—
(1) Telemeter and Compass.—A closed circuit following
Marine Drive and the road boundary of The University
site at Point Grey.
Closing Error, 1 in 100.   Time, 1 day. 164 The University of British Columbia.
(2) Chain and Compass.—Traverse of the newly cleared
portion of The University site. Calculation of Area.
Established Stations to be occupied by each party. Latitudes and Departures to be calculated when work is
being done.
Closing Error, 1 in 500.    Time, 2 days.
(3) Chain and Transit.—Traverse of the cultivated portion
of The University site (except the area occupied by the
Horticultural Department). All Buildings, Roads,
Fences, etc., to be noted for mapping purposes. Angles
to be measured, using both Deflection and Plate Azimuth
methods. The lines to be calculated and run directly
across the farm from West to East. Obstacles to be
passed by right-angled offsets.
Closing Error, 1 in 5000.   Time, 8 days.
(4) Establishment of Bench Marks at beach by comparison
with tide tables. Connection of same with Bench Marks
established by the Geodetic Survey (one on the Dairy
Barn, one on Monument P). Profile of Main Roadway.
Marine Drive to Dairy Barn. Macadam Road. Dairy
Barn to Marine Drive. Contour carefully a given section of the Farm, using different methods of location.
Hand level practice.
Time, 5 days.
(5) Detail Survey.—Oak Street to Heather, Tenth Avenue
to Twelfth.    This will form the basis for one of the
maps to be plotted during the College year, and accurate
notes must be taken by each and every student.
Time, 3 days.
Extra days may be utilized for special problems.
All calculations to be made as the field work progresses.
Sufficient notes to be copied that there shall be no confusion in
the draughting room.
All undergraduates completing the First Year—except those
taking the Chemistry Course 2 and Nursing. Courses in Applied Science. 165
Civil Engineering 3.
Materials of Engineering.—Manufacture and properties of
iron and steel; principal alloys; considerations governing selection of materials; manufacture and properties of cements; study
of concrete; stone and brick masonry; principal kinds of commercial timber; preservation of timber; discussion of standard
specifications for engineering work.
Second Year Students.   One hour per week.
Text-book: Moore, Materials of Engineering, McGraw-Hill.
Reference Books: Mills, Materials of Engineering. Johnssn,
Materials of Construction.   Upton, Materials of Engineering.
Civil Engineering 4.
Graphical Statics.—Composition of forces; general methods
involving the use of funicular and force polygons; determination
of reactions, centres of gravity, bending moments and moments
of resistance; stresses in cranes, braced towers, roof-trusses, and
bridge-trusses. The stresses shall be found also by the Algebraic
method.
Laboratory period of three hours during the Second Term.
Required of all Engineering students.
Text-book: Johnson, Bryan and Turneaure, Modem Framed
Structures, Vol. 1 to end of Section III, page 156, Wiley.
Prerequisites:  Mathematics 1, Mechanics 1 and 2.
Civil Engineering 5.
Mapping 1. — Draughting from notes obtained in Field
Work 1.
1. Telemeter Survey.—Angles to be plotted by protractor
method.   Scale, 1 inch=200 feet.
2. Compass Survey.—To be plotted by Latitudes' and Departure method.   Scale, 1 inch=3 chains.
3. Transit Survey.—Angles to be plotted by Tangents and
Chords.   Scale, 1 inch=200 feet.
4. Contours. 166 The University of British Columbia.
5. Detail Survey.—Scale, 1 inch = 50 feet. This map may
be tinted in water colors.
6. Mine plan from notes furnished.
7. Land plan from notes furnished.
All undergraduates in Second Year except those taking
Chemistry Courses.
Three hours per week.
Civil Engineering 6.
Surveying I.—Lectures. Chain and angular surveying. The
construction, adjustment and use of the transit, level, compass,
stadia, and minor field instruments; topography; levelling; contour surveying; stadia surveying; railway circular curves; vertical curves;  transition curves;  planimeter;  pantograph.
Second Year students.   Two hours per week.
Text-book: Breed and Hosmer, Elementary Surveying,
Vol. I., Wiley.
Reference Books: Gillespie, Surveying, Vol. I. Nugent,
Plane Surveying. Baker, Engineers' Surveying Instruments.
Allen, Curves and Earthwork. Sullivan, Spiral Tables, McGraw-
Hill.
Third Year.
Civil Engineering 7.
Field Work 2.— (a) Railway surveys, including reconnaissance, preliminary and location surveys, illustrating the methods
of taking topography; of cross-sectioning; of estimating quantities of earth, and of running in easement and vertical curves,
etc. The notes secured will be used in class work during term
for mapping and for estimating quantities and costs.
(b) Hydrographie Surveys.—This will include the topography of- the bed of a section of a river by sounding and fixing
positions by transits and by sextants, illustrating the three-point
problem; the gauging the stream-flow by surface and deep floats
and by the current meter.
(c) Mine Surveys.—Carrying lines down shafts and producing the same. Courses in Applied Science. 167
(d) Astronomical observations with sextant and transit to
determine Latitude and Azimuths.
(e) The use of the transit, plane table, sextant, barometer,
current meter, etc.
Civil Engineering 8.
Foundations and Masonry.—Borings; bearing power of
soils; pile and other foundations; coffer-dams; caissons; open
dredging; pneumatic and freezing processes; estimates of quantities and costs.
One hour lecture and three hours' laboratory during First
Term.
Text-book: Howe, Foundations, Wiley.
Reference Books: Baker, Treatise on Masonry Construction,
Wiley. Jacoby and Davis, Foundations of Bridges and Buildings,
McGraw-Hill, New York.
Civil Engineering 9.
Building Design.—Problems in draughting, illustrating designs in structural engineering; estimates of quantities and
costs;  preparation of plans.
One hour lecture and three hours' laboratory during Second
Term.
Text-book: Conklin, Structural Draughting and Elementary
Design, Wiley.
Prerequisites: Structural Engineering 1; General Engineering 2.   First Term.
Civil. Engineering 10.
Strength of Materials.—Lectures dealing with the fundamental principles of the strength of materials. The subject
includes stress, strain, resilience; bending moment and shearing
force diagrams; simple, continuous, and cantilever beams;
strength of shafting; spiral springs; elementary consideration
of compound stresses and shearing in different sections.
Strength of Materials in Laboratory.—Testing of concrete,
timber, steel, and other materials to illustrate the theories and
factors considered in the lectures. 168 The University of British Columbia.
Text-book: Boyd, Strength of Materials, McGraw-Hill.
Third Year students. Two hours a week, with one laboratory period per week offered during the Second Term.
Prerequisite: Mathematics and Mechanics of the First and
Second Years.
Civil Engineering 11.
Railway Engineering 1.—The inception of railway projects;
reconnaissance, preliminary and location; grade problems,
grades, curvature and distance, and their effects on operating
costs; assistant engines; adjustment of grades for unbalanced
traffic; construction; improvement of old lines; railway economics, traffic, revenue, branch lines, yards and terminals.
Two lectures per week.
Text-books: Allen, Railroads, Curves and Earthwork,
McGraw-Hill.    Williams, Design of Railway Location, Wiley.
Civil Engineering 12.
Hydraulic Engineering and Laboratory.—
Hydrostatics.—Design of Standpipes, Reservoirs and Dams.
Hydrodynamics.—Fundamental principles and application
of same to problems on the discharge of orifices, notches and
weirs; flow in pipes and in open channels, such as ditches and
flumes; practical field measurements of above. Examination of
hydraulic developments.
Third Year students in Civil Engineering.
Fourth Year students in Chemical Engineering.
One hour per week First Term; four hours per week Second
Term.
Text-book: Russell, Hydraulics, Holt.
Prerequisites: Mechanics and Mathematics of First and
Second Years.
Civil Engineering 13.
Mapping 2 and Map Projections.—
Draughting from notes obtained on Field Work of railway
location and hydrographie survey. Courses in Applied Science. 169
Theory of, and practical work in Map Projections.
Location and design of pipe line for hydraulic development
from notes of survey furnished; estimate of cost, etc.
Third Year students Metallurgical and Mining Engineering.
Three hours per week.   First Term.
Third Year students Civil Engineering. Six hours per week
First Term, four hours per week Second Term.
Civil Engineering 14.
Surveying 2.—A continuation of Surveying 1.
Theory and use of instruments, Aneroid, Sextant, Plane
Table Surveying, Mine Surveying, Hydrographie Surveying,
Phototopographic Surveying, Dominion and Provincial Surveys,
Field Astronomy.
Third Year students in Civil Engineering.
Two hours per week.
Text-book: Breed and Hosmer, Surveying, Vol. II., Wiley.
Reference Books: Johnson and Smith, Theory and Practice
of Surveying. Wilson, Topographic, Trigonometric and Geodetic
Surveying. Green's Practical and Spherical Astronomy. Manual
of Surveys of Dominion Lands. Instructions for B. C. Land
Surveyors.
Civil Engineering 15.
Perspective Drawing.—Mathematical perspective; perspective of shadows.
One lecture and three hours' laboratory.   First Term.
Text-book: Crosskey, Elementary Perspective, Blackie &
Son, London.
Civil Engineering 16.
Field Work 3.—The following work shall be performed by
each student or group of students:—
1. Determination of latitude—
(a) By transit and sextant observations of polaris.
(6) Noon observations with transit and sextant. 170 The University of British Columbia.
2. Determination of azimuth—
(a) By equal altitude observations of the sun.
(b) By observation of elongation of polaris.
(c) By observation of circumpolar star   and   also   of
polaris.
(d) By means of solar attachments and solar compass.
3. Determination of time—
(a) By equal altitude observations of the sun with the
sextant and transit.
(b) By observation of meridian passage of stars with
transit.
4. Baseline measurements.
5. Precision levelling.
6. Measurements of angles by geodetic methods.
7. Plane table surveys.
Fourth Year.
Civil Engineering 17.
Bridge Design.—In this subject the factors governing the
selection of the most suitable type of bridge will be considered;
the loads to which structures may be subjected will be discussed;
the stresses in the several members calculated; the cross-sectional
forms and areas chosen; the connections designed and complete
drawings made.
Two lectures and six hours' laboratory.
Text-book: Johnson, Bryan & Turneaure, Modern Framed
Structures, Vol. III., Wiley.
Civil Engineering 18.
Engineering Economics.—Students must understand simple
and compound interest and all the elements of the latter as a
prerequisite.
The subject shall include the consideration of: Sinking
funds; first-cost; cost analysis; salvage and scrap values; yearly
cost of service; collecting data; estimating; economic selection. Courses in Applied Science. 171
Specification and contract writing; general management;
banking; partnerships and corporations; stocks; bonds; operating and fixed charges; business finance and organization; capital ; interpretation of financial statements.
Text-books: Fish, Engineering Economics, McGraw-Hill.
Waddell and Wait, Specifications and Contracts, McGraw-Hill.
Anger, Digest of Canadian Mercantile Law, chapters on banking;
contracts; partnerships; joint stock companies.
Two hours per week.
Civil Engineering 19.
Engineering Law,—
The engineer's status; fees; salary; as a witness; responsibility for negligence; engineering contracts generally; tenders;
quantities; specifications; plans; drawings; designs; extras and
alterations; time; payments and certificates; penalty bonus or
liquidated damages clauses; maintenance and defect clauses; subcontractors; engineer's assistant or agent; arbitration and
awards, etc. I
Students must read: Anger, Digest of Canadian Mercantile
Law of Canada; chapters on Banks and Banking; Chattel
Mortgages; Mortgages; Contracts; Joint Stock Companies;
Landlord and Tenant; Master and Servant; Mechanics' Lien
Act; Negotiable Paper; Partnership; Principal and Agent;
Statute of Limitations; also notes on Law of Contracts in
Specifications and Contracts, by Waddell and Wait; also the
Law Affecting Engineers, by Ball.   All are in Library.
One hour per week.
Civil Engineering 20.*
Geodesy.—
The lectures in this subject shall cover the determinations
of azimuth, longitude, latitude, time, the figure of the earth,
measurements of base lines, triangulation systems, adjustments
and reductions of observations, and precision levelling.
One hour per week.
* Not given in 1922-23. 172 The University of British Columbia.
Civil Engineering 21.*
Hydraulic Machines.—
The design of turbines and centrifugal pumps shall be determined by the application of the principles of hydraulics. The
leading dimensions of different machines will be ascertained.
The several forms of machines and the methods of their control
or operation will be carefully considered, as well as the transmission of hydraulic power.
Two hours per week First Term, one hour per week Second
Term.
Civil Engineering 22.
Municipal Engineering.—
1. Water Supply.—Rainfall; evaporation; run-off; quantity, quality and pressure required; pumping machinery;
storage; aqueducts, pipe lines and distribution systems; valves;
hydrants; purification systems; fire service; construction
methods; materials, estimates and designs; costs.
2. Sewerage—
(a) General methods and economic considerations; quantity
of sewage; storm water run-off; design of sewers; manholes;
flush tanks; catch basins, overflows, outlets, siphons, etc.; construction methods, materials, costs; estimates, design, maintenance and management.
(b) Sewage disposal; physical, chemical, biological and
economical aspects of sewage treatment; dilution; screening;
sedimentation; filtration; disinfection; maintenance and management costs.
3. Roads, Streets and Pavements—
(a) Highway economics, surveys and locations; grades;
cross-sections; paving materials—bituminous, stone, brick, wood,
concrete, etc.; construction methods; street cleaning and repairs ;
designing and estimating.
(b) Disposal of waste, etc.: Composition and quantity of
city wastes, ashes, garbage, rubbish, etc.; collection, disposal,
' Not given in 1922-28. Courses in Applied Science. 173
dumping, land treatment; incineration; reduction; feeding to
swine; costs and returns.
(c) Town planning: Covering the economical and artistic
development of a city.
Two hours' lectures per week throughout the year.
Three hours' laboratory period per week, First Term.
Civil Engineering 23.
Railway Engineering 2.—
Organization and rules of maintenance-of-way; roadway;
ballast; ties; lumber preservation; rails and appurtenances;
turnouts, tracks, accessories; structures and their design;
stresses in track; track tools; track work; work train service;
maintenance-of-way records and accounts; expenditures;
betterments.
Two hours' lectures per week, Second Term.
Civil Engineering 24.
Mechanics of Materials.—
The bending and deflection of beams loaded in any manner;
continuous beams over several supports; distribution of shear;
deflection due to shear; principle of work applied to deflection
of beams; trussed beams; bending of unsymmetrical sections;
elastic strains; strength of thick shells; earthwork theories,
retaining walls, reinforced concrete and other; design of floor
and column systems for reinforced concrete buildings; study of
standard specifications.
Two hours' lectures per week First Term, and one hour
Second Term.   Three hours' laboratory per week Second Term.
Civil Engineering 25.*
Theory of Structures.—
The analysis of statically determinate framed structures
under dead and live loads; distortion of framed structures;
swing spans; braced arches; hinged arched ribs; hingeless reinforced concrete arches.
' Not given in  1922-5 174 The University of British Columbia.
One lecture and three hours' laboratory per week, First
Term. Two lectures and six hours' laboratory per week, Second
Term.
Civil Engineering 26.*
Class Excursions.—
The class, under the guidance of a professor, will visit such
factories, industrial developments, public works, docks, shipyards, etc., as are calculated to best assist the student to grasp
fully the application and scope of the studies he has pursued in
his college career.
Department of Economics.
Professor: T. H. Boggs.
Associate Professor: H. F. Angus.
Assistant Professor: S. E. Beckett.
Assistant:   L. T. Fournier.
1. Principles of Economics.—An introductory study of general Economic theory, including a survey of the principles of
value, prices, money and banking, international trade, tariffs,
monopoly, taxation, labour and wages, socialism, the control of
railways and trusts, etc.
Text-books: Clay, Economics for the General Reader, Macmillan.   Ely, Outlines of Economics, Macmillan, 1915.
Two lectures per week. 2 units.
Department of Forestry.
Associate Professor of Forestry:   H. R.  Christie.
Professor of Botany: A. H. Hutchinson.
Assistant Professor of Botany: John Davidson.
Introductory Biology and General Economic Botany 1.—
As under Botany in Arts.
Forestry 1.
Forest Mensuration.—Log scaling, timber cruising, volume
tables, growth studies, yield tables.
One lecture and four hours' field or laboratory work per
week.
Text-book:   Chapman, Forest Mensuration, Wiley.
* Not given in 1922-28. Courses in Applied Science. 175
Forestry 2.
General Forestry.—A general survey of the subject.
One lecture per week.
Text-book: Fernow, Economics of Forestry, Toronto University Press.
References: Whitford and Craig, Forests of British
Columbia, Commission of Conservation, Ottawa. Pinchot, Primer
of Forestry, Superintendent of Documents, Washington. Moon
and Brown, Elementary Forestry, Wiley.
Forestry 3.
Forest Protection.—The fire problem, legislation, organizations, prevention and control.
One lecture per week.
Text-book: Western Fire Fighters' Manual, Western
Forestry and Conservation Association, Portland, Ore. Millar,
Methods of Communication Adapted to Forest Protection,
Dominion Forestry Branch, Ottawa.
Forestry 4.
Forest Finance.—A study of the financial aspects of Forestry, compound interest, methods of determining costs and
values, appraisal of damage, taxation, etc.
Two lectures per week.   Second Term.
Text-book: Roth, Forest Valuation, University of Michigan.
Reference Books: Chapman, Forest Valuation, Wiley.
Woodward, Valuation of North American Timber Lands, Wiley.
Forestry 5.
Botany 5 (b).—Dendrology, or Forest Botany.—A study of
the forest trees of Canada, the common shrubs of British Columbia, the important trees of the United States which are not native
to Canada. Emphasis on the species of economic importance.
Identification, distribution, relative importance, construction of
keys.
One to two hours' lecture and two to three hours' field or
laboratory work per week. 176 The University of British Columbia.
Text-books: Morton and Lewis, Native Trees of Canada,
Dominion Forestry Branch, Ottawa. Sudworth, Forest Trees of
the Pacific Slope, Superintendent of Documents, Washington,
D. C    Henry, Flora of Southern British Columbia, Gage.
Reference Books: Sargent, Manual of the Trees of North
America, Houghton Mifflin. Hough, Handbook of the Trees of
the Northern States and Canada, Hough, Lowville, N.Y. Blake-
slee and Jarvis, Trees in Winter, Macmillan. Gray, New Manual
of Botany, American Book Co. Britton, North American Trees,
Holt.
Forestry 6.
Botany 7 (a).—Forest Ecology and Geography.—The interrelations of forests and their environment; the biological characteristics of important forest trees; forest associations; types
and regions;  physiography.
Two lectures per week. Second Term. Field trips during
year amounting to thirty hours.
Reference Books: Schimper, Plant Geography, Clarendon
Press. Warming, Ecology of Plants, Clarendon Press. Clements,
Plant Succession, Carnegie Institution, Washington, D.C. Bowman, Forest Physiography, Wiley.
Forestry 7.
Botany 6 (b).—Forest Pathology.—Nature, identification,
and control of the more important wood-destroying fungi and
other plant parasites.
One leeture and two hours' laboratory work per week during
one-half of one term.
Reference Books: Rankin, Manual of Tree Diseases, Macmillan. Various Government Bulletins, Canada and the United
States.
Forestry 8.
Forest Entomology.—Nature, identification, and control of
the more important insect enemies of the forest.
One lecture and two hours' laboratory work per week during
one-half of one term. Courses in Applied Science. 177
Reference Books: Swaine, Canadian Bark Beetles, Dominion
Entomological Branch, Ottawa. Various Government Bulletins,
Canada and the United States.
Forestry 9.
Timber Physics and Wood Technology.—The structure of
wood; the identification of different woods and their qualities
and uses; wood preservation; emphasis on the Canadian woods
of commercial importance.
Two lectures and three hours' laboratory work per week.
Text-books: Record, Economic Woods of the United States,
Wiley.   Record, Mechanical Properties of Wood, Wiley.
Reference Books: Weiss, Preservation of Structural Timber,
McGraw-Hill. Snow, Wood and Other Organic Structural Materials, McGraw-Hill.    Various Government Bulletins.
Forestry 10.
Forest Organization.—The principles and methods of organizing forest areas for business management. Normal forest, increment, rotation, felling budget, working plans.
One lecture per week.
Text-book: Roth, Forest Regulation, Roth, University of
Michigan.
Reference Books: Recknagel and Bentley, Forest Management, Wiley.    Recknagel, Forest Working Plans, Wiley.
Forestry 11.
History of Forestry and Forest Administration.—The development of Forestry in different parts of the world, with particular emphasis on Canada. Forestry policy, legislation, and
education.
One lecture per week.
Text-book: Fernow, History of Forestry, University Press,
Toronto.
Reference Books: Ise, The United States Forest Policy,
Yale.   Various Government publications. 178 The University of British Columbia.
Forestry 12.
Silviculture.—Principles and methods of caring for forests
and growing timber crops.
Two lectures per week during the year, and three hours'
field work during the Second Term.
Text-book:   Hawley, Practice of Silviculture, Wiley.
Reference Books: Graves, Principles of Handling Woodlands, Wiley. Tourney, Planting and Seeding, Wiley. Wolsey,
Studies in French Forestry, Wiley.
Forestry 13.
Forest Utilization.—A study of the principles and practice
of logging, manufacturing, and marketing.
Four lectures and four hours' laboratory or field work per
week.
Reference Books: Bryant, Logging, Wiley. Brown, Forest
Products, Their Manufacture and Use, Wiley. Tiemann, The
Kiln Drying of Lumber, Lippincott. Leete, Lumbering and
Woodworking Industries in the United States and Canada, Government of India, Simla.
Department of Geology and Mineralogy.
Professor:   R. W. Brock.       i   W^
Professor of Physical and Structural Geology:  S. J. Schofield.
Professor of Mineralogy and Petrography: W. L. Uglow.
Professor of Palaeontology and Stratigraphy:   M. Y. Williams.
Assistant:   L. V. Miller.
Geology 1. General.—As in Arts.
2. Mineralogy.—As in Arts.
3. Historical.—As in Arts.
4. Structural.—As in Arts.
5. Regional.—As in Arts.
6. Palaeontology.—As in Arts.
7. Petrography.—As in Arts.
8. Economic.—As in Arts.
10. Field.—As in Arts. Courses in Applied Science. 179
Department of Mathematics.
Professor: Daniel Buchanan.
Associate Professor:   G. E. Robinson.
Assistant Professor:   E. E. Jordan.
Assistant Professor:   L. Richardson.
Instructor:  B. S. Hartley.
Instructor:   John Henry.
Mathematics 1.
Plane Trigonometry.—An elementary course, including the
solution of triangles and the use of logarithms, inverse and hyperbolic functions.
Text-book: Playne and Fawdry, Practical Trigonometry.
Two lectures per week.   First Term.
Mathematics 2.
Solid Geometry.—A study of the three-faced corner, the
various polyhedra and solid figures, and the theorems of Pappus.
Text-book: Hall and Stevens, A School Geometry.
Two lectures per week.   Second Term.
Mathematics 3.
Algebra.—A review of simple series, permutations, combinations and the binomial theorem, and a study of exponential
and other series, undetermined coefficients, partial and continued
fractions, graphical algebra.
Text-book: Rietz and Crathorne, College Algebra.
Three lectures per week.
Mathematics 4.
Analytical Geometry and Calculus.—The straight line and
circle will be studied in detail, and some of the simple properties
of the other conies will be discussed. An introductory study
of the differential and integral calculus will be made, and some
of the simpler applications considered. An introductory study
of the calculus will be made.
Text-book: Tanner and Allen, Brief Course in Analytical
Geometry.
Two lectures per week. 180 The University of British Columbia.
Mathematics 5.
Astronomy.—Lectures on selected topics, including systems
of co-ordinates, the constellations, parallax, aberration, the shape
and motions of the earth, gravitation, planetary motion, time.
One lecture per week.
Mathematics 6.
Calculus.—Differential and integral calculus with various
applications.
Three lectures per week.
Mathematics 7.
Analytical Geometry and Spherical Trigonometry.—A continuation of Course 4, including a study of the curves occurring in engineering practice, and elementary work in three
dimensions. Numerical work in spherical trigonometry covering
the solution of triangles and various applications to geodesy
and astronomy.    The method of least squares.
Text-books: Tanner and Allen, Brief Course in Analytical
Geometry. Dupuis and Matheson, Spherical Trigonometry and
Astronomy.
Two lectures per week, First Term, and one lecture per
week, Second Term.
Department of Mechanical and  Electrical Engineering.
Professor: L. W. Gill.
Associate Professor:  C. C. Ryan.
Instructor in Mechanical Drawing and Shopwork: H. P. Archibald.
Assistant: E. M. Coles.
Instructor in Thermo Laboratory:  E. G. Parsons.
Instructor in Machine Shop: H. Taylor.
Instructor in Steam Laboratory: J. W. Faulkner.
Assistant in Workshop, Mechanical Engineering: C. H. Barker.
Assistant (Moulder): J. Crowley.
Assistant  (Draughtsman):  F. McCrady.
Assistant  (Woodworker):  S. Northrop.
Mechanical Drawing 1.
Practice in freehand lettering in accordance with common
practice.    Geometrical Drawing, to give facility in the use of Courses in Applied Science. 181
drawing instruments. Freehand sketching of machine parts and
structures from which drawings are made to scale. Drawing to
scale of simple machine parts. Making of assembly drawings
from detail drawings, and detail drawing from assembly drawings.   Tracing and blueprinting.
Six hours per week. 2 units.
Mechanical Engineering 1.
This work is intended to supplement the manual training
given in the high schools, and also to give the student some
knowledge of the more common machine shop methods and
processes as employed commercially. The object is to provide
some basis for the intelligent design of machine and structural
parts.
After the session 1922-3 practice in shopwork will be discontinued as part of the university courses in applied science.
Students applying for admission to any one of these courses
(excepting the course in Nursing) in 1923 or thereafter will be
required to present a certificate (or certificates) indicating that
they have devoted at least 180 hours to practice in woodworking,
including bench and lathe work. This work may be done in a
high school, a technical school or an approved inudstrial establishment. Certificates will be accepted from principals of high
and technical schools which are equipped with facilities for doing
this work, and also from the official in charge of such industrial
establishments as may be approved. Each certificate must
indicate not only the amount of time spent on this work by
the student, but also that he has satisfactorily performed the
tasks assigned to him.
In addition to the above, all students proceeding to a degree
in Mechanical or Electrical Engineering will be required to
present certificates indicating that they have devoted to the
other branches of shopwork the periods of time as specified
below, and have satisfactorily executed the work assigned to
them: Metal-working, including bench-work, lathe-work, shaping,
planing, drilling, milling, gear-cutting, and tool-dressing—200
hours;   smithwork—40 hours;   foundry-work—80 hours.   Cer- 182 The University of British Columbia.
tificates covering this work will be required before students are
allowed to proceed to the work of the third year of their course.
Note. While machine-work, smith-work and foundry-work
will be compulsory only for students in Mechanical and Electrical Engineering, the Faculty strongly advises all students to
take this work.
Lectures. A course of instruction is given on: The use of
the slide rule. Use of the polar planimeter. Physical properties
of the materials used in machine construction. Modern methods
of handling and finishing wood. Forging and hammering of
metals. Annealing and tempering. Making of patterns and
cores.   Cupola practice.
One lecture per week.
Machine Shop Practice.   (For the session 1922-3 only.)
Practice in Smith-work. Forging, welding, annealing, tempering, use and repairing of smith's tools.
Three hours per day during two weeks of summer course.
Practice in Foundry-work. Bench and floor moulding, core
making, casting in iron and brass.
Three hours per day during two weeks of summer course.
Practice in Woodworking. The use of the various hand
tools and woodworking machines, making of various joints and
small structures with finished surfaces, turning and boring.
Three hours per week throughout the session.
Practice in Metal-working. Bench-work, including chipping,
filing, scraping, tapping, marking-off and fitting. Lathe-work,
'including turning and boring, screw-cutting and finishing.
Shaping, drilling, milling,  gear-cutting and tool-dressing.
Three hours per day during four weeks of summer course.
3 units.
Mechanical Engineering 2.
Machine   Shop   Processes   and   Practice.    Soldering and
brazing, tinning, electroplating.   Drilling and tapping, turning
and boring, calipering and fitting, milling and milling cutters,
reaming and reamers,  screw cutting.    Grinding and abrasive Courses in Applied Science. 183
wheels. Lapping. Punching and shearing. Drop forging and
die-casting. Metal spinning. Torch and electric welding. Cold
sawing and torch cutting. Tool-making and dressing. Use of
jigs. Machine shop standards, including wire and sheet metal
gauges, threads, etc.
One lecture per week.
Practice in Metal - working. (For Session 1922-3 only.)
Bench work, including marking off, chipping, filing, scraping,
tapping, and fitting; lathe work, including turning and boring,
screw-cutting and finishing; lathe adjustments; shaping; milling;  gear-cutting; tool-dressing.
Three hours per week. 2 units.
Mechanical Engineering 3.
Kinematics of Machines.—Displacement, velocity and acceleration. Relative motions. Harmonic motions. Gear trains.
Cams, ratchets, and escapements. Classification of mechanisms.
Study of mechanisms in common use. Transmission of motion
by belting.   Design of outlines of gear teeth.
One lecture per week. 1 unit.
Text-book:  Notice to be given at beginning of session.
Mechanical Engineering 4.
Dynamics of Machines.—Friction and lubrication. Transmission of power by belts, ropes, gears and friction clutches.
Function and dynamics of speed governors. Dynamics of the
screw. Forces involved in linear and angular acceleration of
moving parts, with special reference to engines, turbines, and
pumps. Stresses due to centrifugal force. Balancing of moving
parts.   Dynamics of the gyroscope.
Two lectures per week. 2 units.
Text-book:  Notice to be given at beginning of session.
Reference Book: Ewing, The Steam Engine and Other
Heat Engines.
Mechanical Engineering 5.
Machine Design.—Strength of materials used in machine
construction.    Factors of safety and allowable stresses under 184 The University of British Columbia.
various conditions of load. Design of: Valve mechanisms for
steam engines; governors; thin cylinders and tanks; rivetted
joints; fastenings, such as bolts, screws and cotters; levers and
winch handles.
One lecture and three laboratory hours per week.    2 units.
Reference Books: Ewing, Steam Engines and Other Heat
Engines.   Spooner, Machine Design, Construction and Drawing.
Mechanical Engineering 6.
Elementary Thermodynamics.—Fuels and combustion. General principles underlying the construction and operation of
steam boilers. Elementary theory of the steam engine. Measurement of power. Performance of various types of steam engines.
Elementary theory of internal combustion engines. Design and
operation of isolated power plants to give the best economic results. Theory of air compressors, transmission and use of compressed air. Elementary theory and practical operation of producer gas plants.
Laboratory. Testing of boilers, steam engines and internal
combustion engines.   Analysis and calorimetry of fuels.
Two lectures and three laboratory hours per week.    3 units.
Text-book: Fernald and Orrock, Engineering of Power
Plants. 1
Reference Books: Simmons, Compressed Air. Marks and
Davis, Steam Tables and Diagrams. Gebhardt, Steam Power
Plant Engineering.   Kent, Mechanical Engineer's Pocket Book.
Mechanical Engineering 7.
Thermodynamics.—Extension of Mechanical Engineering 6.
A more rigorous treatment of the performance and construction
of various types of boilers, including furnaces and superheaters.
Theoretical efficiency of different types of reciprocating engines
working under various conditions. Influence on efficiency of
engines, of size, speed and ratio of expansion. Variation of efficiency with load. Compound and triple expansion engines. Use
of superheated steam. Flow of gases and vapours through orifices and nozzles. Courses in Applied Science. 185
One lecture and six laboratory hours per week.       3 units.
Reference Book:  Lucke, Thermodynamics.
Mechanical Engineering 8.
Thermodynamics.—Continuation of Mechanical Engineering
6 and 7. Advanced theory relative to the transformation of heat
into mechanical energy. Laws governing the flow of heat through
various substances. More precise study of the theory and performance of all types of prime movers, including all types of
reciprocating and rotary steam engines, steam turbines, and
internal combustion engines.
Two lectures and three laboratory hours per week.   3 units.
Text-book:  Notice to be given at beginning of session.
Mechanical Engineering 9.
Thermodynamics.—An extension of Mechanical Engineering
8, for Mechanical Engineering students only.
One lecture and six laboratory hours per week.       3 units.
Mechanical Engineering 10.
Machine Design.—The design of machine and structural
parts, including parts of engines of all types; design of appliances for the transmission of power, including belts, rope, cable,
friction and toothed gearing. The student is required to work
out the complete design of some machine or appliance, and make
the drawings and tracings requisite for its construction.
Two lectures and four (average) laboratory hours per week.
2 units.
Text-book:  Notice to be given at beginning of session.
Mechanical Engineering 11.
Heating, Ventilation, and Refrigeration.—Design of steam,
hot water, and hot air systems of heating. Heaters for steam and
water systems. Use of exhaust steam for heating. Central
heating plants. Loss of heat from buildings. Refrigerating
systems.
One lecture per week. 1 unit.
Text-book:  Notice to be given at beginning of session. 186 The University of British Columbia.
Mechanical Engineering 12.
Plant Design.—A study of the function, construction, and
performance of the various machines and appliances which enter
into the design of industrial plants. Special attention is given
to the economic results to be expected from various combinations.
One lecture per week during First Term, two lectures per
week during Second Term. 1 unit.
Text-book:  Notice to be given at beginning of session.
Mechanical Engineering 13.
Physical Treatment of Metals.—A study of the various
metals used in commercial work, with special reference to the
treatment applied to get the physical properties and qualities
required for specific purposes.
One lecture and three laboratory hours per week, Second
Term. 1 unit.
Text-book:  Notice to be given at beginning of session.
Mechanical Engineering 14.
Industrial Management.—Present-day tendencies in industry. Principles of organization, including cost-keeping, purchasing and storing of materials, and inspection. Problems of employment and systems of compensation for labor. Location and
arrangement of industrial plants for maximum production.
One hour per week throughout session. 1 unit.
Text-book: Kimball, Principles of Industrial Organization.
Electrical Engineering 1.
Fundamentals of Electrical Engineering.—General theory
relating to the flow of continuous and alternating currents.
Measurement of power. Elementary theory of alternating and
direct current generators and motors. Commercial systems of
transmission, transformation, and distribution of power.
Two lectures and three laboratory hours per week.   3 units.
Text-book: Gray, Principles and Practice of Electrical Engineering. Courses m Applied Science. 187
Electrical Engineering 2.
Fundamentals of Electrical Engineering.—An extension of
the work taken up under Electrical Engineering 1. More precise
study of the laws governing the flow of alternating current.
Meters and their applications. Transient phenomena. Use of
charts and tables.
One lecture and three laboratory hours per week.    2 units.
Electrical Engineering 3.
Electrical Engineering Practice.—For students in Mechanical Engineering only. A special course covering standard practice in generation, transmission, and application of electric
power.
Two lectures and three laboratory hours per week.   3 units.
Electrical Engineering 4.*
Electrical Machinery.—Complete theory of direct and alternating current machines and appliances. Transmission lines and
distribution systems. Use of hyperbolic functions in solution of
problems.
Three lectures and six laboratory hours per week.     6 units.
Text-book:  Notice to be given at beginning of session.
Electrical Engineering 5.*
Electric Traction.—Advantages and disadvantages of electric traction. Characteristics of traction motors. Power requirements and motor ratings. Methods of braking. Comparison of
steam and electric locomotives. Urban, interurban, and main line
systems.   Selection of equipment and methods of construction.
One lecture hour per week. 1 unit.
Electrical Engineering 6.*
Electric Power Plants and Transmission Lines.—Selection of
site and equipment. Switching and controlling devices. Metering of power. Location and design of transmission lines and substations.
One lecture hour per week. 1 unit.
Text-book:  Notice to be given at beginning of session.
' Not given in 1922-28. 188 The University of British Columbia.
Electrical Engineering 7.*
Electrical Design.—Calculation of performance of standard
types of transformers, generators, and motors. Design of simple
apparatus and standard types of motors and generators.
One lecture and three laboratory hours per week.   2 units.
Text-book:   Gray, Electrical Machine Design.
Electrical Engineering 8.*
Electric Cells.—Theory and applications of storage batteries.
Electrolytic cells.   Electro-plating.
One lecture per week.    First Term.
Electric Illumination. — Photometry. Types of electric
lamps.   Systems for interior and street lighting.
One lecture per week.   Second Term. 1 unit.
Electrical Engineering 9.*    (Optional.)
Communication  by  Electricity.—Various systems of telegraphy.   Automatic and printing telegraph.   Standard telephone
systems.    Wireless   telegraphy   and   telephony.    Simultaneous
telegraphy and telephony.
Department of Mining and Metallurgy.
Professor of Mining:   J. M. Turnbull.
Professor of Metallurgy:   H. N. Thomson.
Associate Professor of Mining: Geo. A. Gillies.
Assistant in Assaying:
Mining 1.
A general course in prospecting and metal mining covering
the following subjects:
Ores and economic minerals; Ordinary Prospecting—
Economic considerations; finding mineral deposits; float; deductions from outcrops and other indications; core and churn
drilling; mineral belts; mineral fashions; conditions in British
Columbia; legal considerations.
Preliminary development; timbering and framing; tunnelling ; shaft sinking; ordinary mining methods; transportation
and haulage; drainage; ventilation.
: Not given in 1922-23. Courses in Applied Science. 189
One hour per week in the First Term, and two hours per
week in the Second Term.
Mining 2.
A general course in coal and placer mining, covering the
following subjects:
Coal Mining.—Classification of coals; mining methods;
ventilation; transportation and haulage; tipples; Western Canadian coal fields.
Placer and Hydraulic Mining.—Prospecting; examination
and testing of deposits; hydraulics; flumes; ditches; mining
methods.
Two hours per week.
Mining 3.
An advanced course in Mining Engineering covering the
following subjects:
Scientific prospecting; mine development; special mining
methods; blasting and explosives; sampling and estimation of
ore; examination of mines and prospects; accounting and costs;
mining laws; administration; welfare and safety work;
economics;  ethics;  mine valuation.
Two hours per week.
Prerequisite: Mining 1.
Mining 4.
A special course covering the structural and mechanical
features of Mining Engineering, as follows:
Mine structures; mining plant and machinery; core and
churn drills; tramways, etc.
One hour per week throughout the Fourth Year for Mining
Engineering students.
No text-book is required.
Prerequisites: Mining 1; Mechanical Engineering 3, 6;
General Engineering 1 and 2. 190 The University of British Columbia.
Mining 5.
This course covers the application to mining problems of
the general principles of surveying, under the following heads:
Instruments and accessory appliances used, their selection,
care, and methods of use underground. Practical details of
underground survey work and special difficulties. Surveying in
shafts. Setting and lining-in of timbers. Stope surveys. General
underground surveys. Co-operation with sampling and geological work. Different systems of taking notes and sketches.
Mapping methods. Scale of maps. Uses of maps for various
purposes. Records, and methods of keeping them. Estimating
tonnages and volumes. Functions of the Mine Survey
Department.
One lecture per week.   Second Term.
Prerequisite: Surveying 1.
Mining 6.
A laboratory course covering the special requirements of
Mining students in regard to design of the layout and details of
mining plant, structures, and mine survey plans.
Three hours per week throughout the Fourth Year.
Metallurgy 1.
This course covers the fundamental principles underlying
metallurgical operations in general, and is introductory to
subsequent more specialized study.
The lectures follow in general the subject as taken up in
Principles of Metallurgy, by Chas. H. Fulton, including the
following main subjects:
Physical mixtures and thermal analysis. Physical properties
of metals. Alloys. Measurement of high temperatures. Typical
metallurgical operations. Roasting and fusing. Electrometallurgy. Slags. Matte. Bullion. Refractory materials.
Fuels.    Combustion.    Furnaces.
Two lectures per week.
Text-book: Fulton, Principles of Metallurgy. Courses in Applied Science. 191
Reference Books:   Hofman, General Metallurgy; Current
Mining and Metallurgical Journals.   Trade Catalogues.
Prerequisites: Chemistry 1 and Physics 1 and 2.
Metallurgy 2.
A general course covering principles and practice of Pyro-
metallurgy and Hydrometallurgy as applied to gold, silver,
copper, iron, lead and zinc.
Two hours per week.
Prerequisite: Metallurgy 1.
Metallurgy 3.
A special course covering Thermochemistry; Metallurgical
Calculations; Furnace Design and Efficiency; Special Processes.
A large portion of the time will be given to the study of heat
balances of typical smelting operations.
Text-book: Richards, Metallurgical Calculations.
Two hours per week.
Prerequisites: Metallurgy 1, Chemistry 1.
Metallurgy 4.
Laboratory course in Metallurgical Analysis of Ores and
Furnace Products, Pyrometry and Refractories.
Special attention will be given to analytical methods used
by smelting plants in purchase of ores and control of furnace
operations.
Nine hours per week.
Prerequisites:  Metallurgy 1, Chemistry 5m.
Metallurgy 5.
Quantitative determination of gold, silver, and other metals
by fire-assay methods, with underlying principles.
One lecture and five hours' laboratory work.   First Term.
Text-book:  Fulton, Manual of Fire Assaying. 192 The University of British Columbia.
Ore Dressing 1.
Owing to rapid and radical changes in the practice of ore
dressing in recent years, and the great number and variety
of machines in use, no attempt is made to describe all the
machines. Most of the time is spent in considering fundamental
principles, typical machines, and their general operations and
relations in modern milling practice, emphasizing the economic
and practical aspects.
Students are taught the commercial and technical characteristics of true concentrating ores, the general principles on which
the size, character, site, and other features of a mill are designed.
The general lay-out of crushing, handling, and separating
machinery. The laws of crushing and of various classifying
and separating actions, and the design, operation, and comparative efficiency of typical machines, such as crushers, rolls,
stamps, ball and tube mills, jigs, tables, screens, classifiers, and
slime-handling devices.
Attention is paid to pneumatic, magnetic, electrostatic, flotation, and other special processes, including coal-washing.
Two lectures per week.
Text-book: Richards, Text-book of Ore Dressing.
Ore Dressing 2.
A variety of crushing, sizing, classifying and separating
operations are carried out by the students and studied quantitatively on appropriate machines, singly and in combination.
Special attention is paid to flotation processes, several types of
machines being used.
Ores from British Columbia working mines are usually
chosen, so that the work of the students is along practical lines
in comparison with actual work in operating plants.
Nine hours per week.
Prerequisite:   Ore Dressing 1. Courses in Applied Science. 193
Department of Nursing.
Assistant Professor: Ethel I. Johns.
In addition to the curriculum already outlined for the academic portion of the combined course in Nursing, courses in the
following subjects are given during the two years of nursing
service in an approved training school required from students
in the Department of Nursing.
First Year of Hospital Service.—
Introductory History and Ethics of Nursing.
Primary Nursing Procedure.
Introductory Nutrition and Cookery.
Materia Medica.
Surgical Nursing.
Medical Nursing.
Second Year of Hospital Service.—
History of Nursing.
Obstetrical Nursing.
Nursing Communicable Diseases, including Tuberculosis.
Gynecological Nursing.
Pediatric Nursing.
Diet in Disease.
Nursing of Diseases of the Eye, Ear, Nose, and Throat.
Nursing in Mental Diseases.
Instruction in all of the above-mentioned subjects is given
by members of the medical staff of the hospital and by qualified
nurse instructors.
The following schedule outlines the period of hospital service, which is so arranged as to afford the student actual nursing
experience in every department:
General Services.—
Medical Wards (Male and Female).
Surgical Wards (Male and Female).
Gynecological Wards.
Children's Ward  (including Orthopaedics).
Private Wards.
Observation Wards. 194 The University of British Columbia.
Special Services.—
Operating Rooms.
Eye, Ear, Nose, and Throat Department.
Obstetrical Department.
Diet Kitchen.
Infectious Department.
Tuberculosis Department.
Infants' Department.
Experience in the Social Service and Outpatients' Departments will be given during the fifth year of the course.
Department of Physics and Mechanics.
Professor:   T. C. Hebb.
Associate Professor:   A. E. Hennings.
Associate Professor:   J. G. Davidson.
The instruction includes a fully illustrated course of experimental lectures on the general principles of Physics, accompanied by courses of practical work in the laboratory, in which
students will perform for themselves experiments, chiefly quantitative, illustrating the subjects treated in the lectures. Opportunity will be given to acquire experience with all the principal
instruments used in exact physical and practical measurements.
Physics 1.
Mechanics 1.—An elementary treatment of the subject of
statics, dynamics, and hydrostatics, with particular emphasis
on the working of problems. In the laboratory the fundamental
principles of statics and dynamics are established. The course
is given in the first half of the First Year of Applied Science.
The seven hours per week devoted to the course are divided into
four hours of lectures and one laboratory period of three hours.
Text-books: Loney, Mechanics and Hydrostatics. Millikan,
Mechanics, Molecular Physics and Heat.
Physics 2.
Advanced Heat.—This course is begun when Mechanics 1
is finished, and the seven hours devoted to it are divided in the Courses in Applied Science. 195
same manner. The course is based on the supposition that
the student is already familiar with the elementary principles
of heat.
Text-books: Edser, Heat for Advanced Students. Millikan,
Mechanics, Molecular Physics and Heat.
Physics 3.
Electricity and Magnetism.—A quantitative study of the
fundamental principles of electricity and magnetism, with a
special reference to the fact that the student is to be an engineer.
The course includes a short treatment of the elements of
alternating currents.
Two lectures and three hours of laboratory work per week.
Text-books:   Millikan  and Mills,  Electricity,  Sound  and
Light (first part).   Smith, Electrical Measurements.
Physics 4.
Mechanics 2.—The subject-matter consists of an extension
of the statics and dynamics of Mechanics 1, but with the use of
the differential and integral calculus.
Two lectures per week.   Second Year of Applied Science.
Prerequisite: Mechanics 1.
Text-book: Poorman, Applied Mechanics.
' Physics 9.
As in Arts.
Department of Public Health.
Red Cross Professor: R. H. Mullin.
Red Cross Instructor:   Mary Ard MacKenzie.
Public Health 1.—A series of lectures on public health
designed to supply general information concerning the principles
of the science and the relationship it bears to the community at
large.
One lecture per week.   Second Term.
Public Health Nursing.—The course is open to nurses in
good standing who have graduated from a recognized training 196 The University of British Columbia.
school connected with a hospital of not less than fifty beds, and
who are eligible for registration in British Columbia. A certificate of good health and physical condition, signed by a regular
physician, must be forwarded with application. A candidate for
this course should apply to the Department not later than Friday,
September 22nd, 1922. The registration and class fees for the
course are $50.00. These fees may be paid in two equal instalments, the first not later than October 7th, and the second not
later than January 20th.
The course will consist of three months' of academic work in
The University. This will be followed by four months' field work
in the various branches of public health in which services are
available for teaching purposes. Upon the completion of the
course an examination will be held, and to successful candidates
a certificate will be issued.
The aim of the course is to afford such instruction to graduate
nurses entering the public health field as will assist them in dealing with those problems of public health, economies and education that are met in public health service, and to give them a
broader understanding of present-day nursing conditions. Special emphasis will be placed upon the public health programme
in this Province.
The general scope of the course is outlined as follows:—
1. Academic Work.—
(1) A course of lectures on each of the following:
(a) Motor Mechanics.
(b) Nutrition.
(c) Communicable Diseases.
(d) Sanitation and Hygiene.
(e) Tuberculosis.
(/)  Child Welfare.
(g)  Public Health Nursing.
(h)  School Nursing.
(i)   Social Service.
(j)  History of Nursing. Courses in Applied Science. 197
(k) Psychology and Teaching Principles.
(I)  Economics and Social Legislation.
(m) Mental Hygiene.
(n) Health Legislation.
(2) Occasional lectures on Provincial Legislation, Municipal Health Departments, Voluntary Organizations,
Delinquent and Deserted Children, etc.
(3) Excursions to special health features in and around
Vancouver.
2. Field Work.—
For field work the class will be divided into sections
of appropriate size, each of which will receive instruction
and experience under trained workers in the actual operation of each of the following services:
(a) General Visiting Nursing.
(b) Child Welfare.
(c) Urban School Nursing.
(d) Rural Nursing.
(e) Tuberculosis.
(/) Settlement and Social Service.
3. Conferences.—
Weekly conferences will be held throughout the year
on selected topics. Opportunities will be afforded for
practice in public speaking, etc.
Department of Zoology.
Professor:   C. McLean Fraser.
Lecturer in Entomology: R. C. Treherne.
Assistant in Zoology and Botany:  H. A. Dunlop.
Assistant in Zoology: N. L. Cutler.
Zoology 1.
As in Arts.
Zoology 3.
As in Arts.  FACULTY OF AGRICULTURE
INFORMATION FOR STUDENTS  IN
AGRICULTURE.
Courses of Study.
Two distinct lines of study are offered, as follows:—
(1.) A Four-year Course leading to the Degree of Bachelor
of Science in Agriculture (B.S.A.).
(2.) A series of Short Courses:   (a) At the University;
(b) Extension   Courses  at  different  points  in  the
Province.
Course Leading to the Degree of B.S.A.
Students in Agriculture are required to have Junior
Matriculation or its equivalent before entering upon this course
(see "Matriculation Requirements"). The degree of B.S.A. is
granted only after the successful completion of four years of
lecture and laboratory work. The course is planned for students
who wish to obtain a practical and scientific knowledge of
Agriculture, either as a basis for demonstration and teaching,
or as an aid to success in farm management.
Short Courses.
(a.) At the University.—These Short Courses are planned
for those men and women who are unable to take advantage of
the longer course, but who desire to extend their knowledge of
agriculture in one or more of those branches in which they are
particularly interested. The work throughout is intensely practical. Illustrative material and periods devoted to demonstration and judging work are strong features of the courses. No
entrance examination is required, nor are students asked to write
an examination at the conclusion of the course.
(6.) Extension Courses at Different Points in the Province.—In order to reach those engaged in Agriculture who are
not able to avail themselves of the Short Courses given at the 200 The University of British Columbia.
University, the Faculty of Agriculture offers extension short
courses in various centres throughout the Province. These
courses are of at least four days' duration, are proceeded with
according to a definite time-table, and include lectures and
demonstrations in connection with the work of each department
of the Faculty. Detailed programmes are prepared to suit the
specific centres, and requests for such courses may be addressed
to the Registrar of the University.
EXAMINATIONS IN  AGRICULTURE.
1. There are two examinations in each year—one at Christmas and the other at the end of the session. Successful students
are arranged in three classes, as follows: First class, those who
obtain 80 per cent, or more; Second class, 65 to 80 per cent.;
Passed, 50 to 65 per cent.
In the First and Second Years, in order to pass, candidates
must obtain 50% on the examination as a whole and not less than
40% on each subject. In the Third and Fourth Years, in order
to pass, candidates must obtain 50% on each subject of examination.
A unit is one lecture hour per week or one continuous
laboratory period of not less than two or more than three hours
per week throughout the College Year. In the case of one-term
courses, two lecture hours, or two laboratory periods, or one
lecture hour and one laboratory period, constitute one unit.
Christmas examinations will be held in all subjects, and are
obligatory for all students.
Applications for Special Consideration on account of illness
in the matter of examinations must be in the hands of the Dean
not later than two days after the close of the examination period.
Any student whose academic record, as determined by the
tests and examinations of the first term, is found to be unsatisfactory, may, upon the recommendation of the Faculty, be
required by the Senate to discontinue attendance at the University for the remainder of the session.
For Classes of Students, see page 53.
For Fees, see page 54. Information for Students in Agriculture. 201
2. Repeating Year.—By special permission of the Faculty, a
student who is required to repeat his year may, on application in
writing,—
(a) Be exempted from attending lectures and passing
examinations in the subjects in which he has
already passed, provided he has made therein a
standing of 60 per cent, or over.
(6) And if so exempted, be permitted to take, in addition to the subjects in which he has failed, such
subjects of the following year of his course as
the Faculty may deem expedient.
A student who fails a second time to pass the final examination of his year, may, upon the recommendation of the Faculty,
be required by the Senate to withdraw from the University.
Supplemental Examinations.
3. Notice will be sent to all students to whom the Faculty
has granted supplemental examinations.
4. Examinations supplemental to the sessional examinations
will be held in September, simultaneously with the matriculation
examinations. The time for each supplemental examination will
be fixed by the Faculty; the examination will not be granted at
any other time, except by special permission of the Faculty, and
on payment of a fee of $7.50.
5. Applications for supplemental examinations must be
accompanied by the necessary fees (see Schedule of Fees), and
be in the hands of the Registrar at least two weeks before the
date set for the examinations.
CURRICULUM.
The first two years of work leading to the degree in Agriculture are devoted to acquiring a knowledge of the basic sciences
upon which Agriculture rests, in adding to the student's knowledge of language, and in laying a foundation for more advanced 202 The University of British Columbia.
studies in practical and scientific Agriculture. The Third Year
is devoted largely, and the Fourth Year almost wholly, to courses
in Applied Agriculture.
Except under special circumstances, students under the age
of seventeen will not be eligible for registration. Specialization
will begin at the commencement of the Third Year. Students
who have not had at least one full season's practical farm experience will be required to obtain this preliminary training before
registering for the Third Year.
First Year Course of Study.
Units.
Agronomy 1   1
Animal Husbandry 1   \y2
Horticulture A  1
Biology 1   3
Chemistry 1   3
English 1(a) and 1(6)   3
French 1, or Beginners' German   3
Botany 1   3
Total required   18J4
Second Year Course of Study.
Units.
Agronomy 2   2
Animal Husbandry 4   iy
Dairying 1    iy
Horticulture B  1
Poultry Husbandry 1   iy
Zoology 1   3
Chemistry 2   3
English 2(6)  :.  1
French Special, or German 1  2
Bacteriology 1   2
Total required   18y
2 Information for Students in Agriculture. 203
Third and Fourth Year Courses of Study.
On account of the specialized types of farming which must
necessarily be followed in many parts of British Columbia, the
work in the Third and Fourth Years leading to the degree of
B.S.A. has been arranged in major courses so as to admit of a
measure of specialization in one of the several recognized
branches of Agriculture. At the same time all courses have
been so arranged that every student will get the basic work in
all lines no matter what option is chosen.
Prior to the beginning of the Third Year every student must
indicate in which one of the major options he wishes to continue
his study, and shall arrange his elective courses with the approval
of the Head of the Department in which he is majoring, and in
consultation with the Heads of other Departments directly concerned.
Agricultural students are required to take a total of 35 units,
thesis included, in their Third and Fourth Years.
Third Year Course of Study.
(Required subjects.)
Units.
Economics 1      3
Agricultural Chemistry      3
Principles of Heredity—Biology 2     1
Total required      7
Fourth Year Course of Study.
(Required subjects.)
Units.
Evolution of Agriculture     1J4
Thesis       3
Total required     4j^ 204 The University of British Columbia.
Agronomy Major.
Third Year.
Units.
Required subjects, as above   7
Agronomy 3   iy
4   2
7  iy
Plant Physiology—Botany 3   2
Zoology 4   1
Total required   15
Fourth Year.
Units.
Required subjects, as above     &y2
Agronomy 5      iy
6    iy
8  iy
9     1
"    ii    y
Systematic and Economic Botany—5 (a)....   2
Economic Entomology—Zoology 7    2
Animal Husbandry 9      iy
Total required   16
Animal Husbandry Major.
Third Year.
Units.
Required subjects, as above      7
Animal Husbandry 2      iy
3   iy
6    1
7   \y2
14   iy
Agronomy 4      2
Total required   16 8
9
10
11
12
13
Information for Students in Agriculture. 205
Fourth Year.
Units.
Required subjects, as above    ±y2
Animal Husbandry 5      \y2
     1
  va
  i
  i
  i
  iy
Agronomy 7      iy
Total required   liy2
Dairying Major.
Third Year.
Units.
Required subjects, as above    7
Dairying 3     2
Dairying 4, \y2 units)
or )       V/a
Dairying 5, iy units)
Total required   10y
Fourth Year.
Units.
Required subjects, as above     4y
Dairying 6      4
7    iy
8      y
9  1
Municipal Engineering 1   1
Plant Physiology—Botany 3   2
Dairy Chemistry   2
Total required   16>4 206 The University of British Columbia.
Horticulture Major.
Third Year.
Units.
Required subjects, as above   7
Horticulture 3   2
4   1
Plant Physiology—Botany 3   2
Systematic Entomology—Zoology 4  1
Total required   13
Fourth Year.
t Units.
Required subjects, as above     &y2
Horticulture 5     \y2
6     VA
7  vy
8     1
9     1
io  \y
Plant Pathology—Botany 6(a)       1
Economic Entomology—Zoology 7     2
Systematic and Economic Botany 5(a)    2
Total required   17^
Poultry Husbandry Major.
Third Year.
Units.
Required subjects, as above  7
Poultry Husbandry 2  1
3   VA
4   VA
Embryology—Zoology 6  2
Total required   13 Courses in Agriculture. 207
Fourth Year.
Units.
Required subjects, as above    4J4
Poultry Husbandry 7     Vy2
8     4
9     1
"    10   iy
"11    vy2
Total required   14
COURSES   IN   AGRICULTURE.
Department of Agronomy.
Professor:   P. A. Boving.
Associate Professor: G. G. Moe.
Assistant:   D. G. Laird.
Extension Assistant:   G. B. Boving.
Assistant:   R. A. Derick.
1. Soil and Soil Fertility.—An examination will be made of
the more important soil types; cultivation, manuring, and rotation of crops will be studied in their relation to soil productivity;
methods of treatment will be observed, and the principles underlying soil management and improvement will constitute the basis
for subsequent courses in Agronomy.
Two lectures.   First Term, First Year. 1 unit.
2. Field Crops.—This course embraces a study of the most
important grain, corn, forage, and root crops. A detailed study
of the crops, in the field and in the laboratory, will supplement
the lecture work in order to give the student a comprehensive
idea, not only of the different phases of crop production, but
also of the relative value of separate specimens and samples.
Two lectures and two laboratories. First Term, Second Year.
2 units.
3. Seed Growing.—This course deals with the production
and marketing of vegetable, root, clover, and grass seeds.
Two lectures and one laboratory.   First Term, Third Year.
IV2 units. 208 The University of British Columbia.
4. Field Crops (Advanced.)—Course 4 constitutes a more
detailed study of field crops than was possible in Course 2. It
also embraces special lecture and laboratory work on the harvesting, threshing, cleaning, storing, and marketing of our
ordinary field crops. The two courses combined will give the
student a more complete understanding of the various factors
bearing upon the production of a first-class article, whether
intended for sale or for feeding.
Two lectures and two laboratories. Second Term, Third
Year. 2 units.
5. Farm Management.—This course embraces a study of the
selecting, planning, and operating of a farm. Various conditions,
systems and practices prevailing on the American Continent and
in Europe will be discussed and compared.
Two lectures and one laboratory. First Term, Fourth
Year. \y2 units.
6. Field-crop Judging.—The judging and handling of
grains, grasses, forage and root crops will be taken up in the
field as well as in the laboratory.
One lecture and two laboratories.   First Term, Fourth Year.
V/2 units.
7. Soil Management.—Different systems of cultivation, rotation, manuring and irrigation, as practised in Canada and
elsewhere, will be discussed, and the influence of these factors
on the maintenance or exhaustion of soil fertility will be studied.
Two lectures and six half-days. Second Term, Third
Year. iy units.
8. Plant-breeding.—This course is planned to follow
Biology 2. With this as a basis the course is designed to illustrate and explain the breeding of field crops.
Two lectures and one laboratory. Second Term, Fourth
Year. iy units.
9. Field Experiments.—The scope, the methods, and the
interpretation of field experiments will be discussed and a study
will be made of the more important results obtained in different
parts of the world.
Two lectures.   Second Term, Fourth Year. 1 unit. Courses in Agriculture. 209
10. Thesis.—Subject to be selected with the approval of the
Head of the Department before the end of the Third Year;
the written thesis to be handed in before the 1st of April in
the Graduating Year. 3 units.
11. Crop Adaptation and Distribution.—The relation of
field crops to elevation, climate and soils will be studied in order
to give the student a comprehensive idea of the distribution of
crops and the adaptation of various types to different parts of
the world.
One lecture.   First Term, Fourth Year. y unit.
Students majoring in Agronomy are required to work one
year under the direction of the Department.
Department of Animal Husbandry.
Associate Professor: H. M. King.
Assistant Professor: R. L. Davis.
Assistant Professor: Walter N. Jones.
Extension Assistant: H. R. Hare.
Lecturer in Veterinary Medicine: Thomas Jagger.
1. Market Classes and Grades of Live Stock.—A study of
the characteristics and requirements of the various market
classes and grades of beef cattle, dairy cattle, horses, sheep, and
swine.
Texts: Plumb, Judging Farm Animals. Vaughan, Types
and Market Classes of Live Stock.
Three two-hour laboratory periods per week. Second Term,
First Year.
V/2 units.
2. Breeds of Cattle and Swine.—A study of the origin,
history of development, characteristics, and adaptations of the
breeds of beef cattle, dairy cattle, and swine.
Text:  Plumb, Types and Breeds of Farm Animals.
One lecture and two three-hour laboratory periods per week.
First Term, Third Year.
Prerequisites:   Animal Husbandry 1 and 4. V/2 units. 210 The University of British Columbia.
3. Breeds of Horses and Sheep.—A study of the origin,
history of development, characteristics, and adaptations of the
breeds of horses and sheep.
Text:  Plumb, Types and Breeds of Farm Animals.
One lecture and two three-hour laboratory periods per week.
Second Term, Third Year.
Prerequisites:  Animal Husbandry 1 and 4. iy2 units.
4. Live-stock Feeding and Management.—The feeding, care,
and management from birth to maturity of the various types
of live stock.
Text:  Toole, The Book of Live Stock.
Three lectures per week.    First Term, Second Year.
Prerequisite:   Animal Husbandry 1 | V/2 units.
5. Advanced Judging.—A continuation of the type of work
represented in the laboratory of Animal Husbandry 2 and 3.
Designed to strengthen Animal Husbandry students in the selection of herd sires, foundation breeding herds, and in the building-
up of superior flocks and herds. Students will be required to
make several trips to leading herds in the Province.
Two two-hour laboratory periods per week. First Term,
Fourth Year.
Prerequisites:  Animal Husbandry 2 and 3. 1 unit.
One three-hour laboratory period per week in the fitting
and handling of live stock is required of Animal Husbandry
major students. y2 additional unit.
6. Live-stock Breeding.—A study of the principles of
breeding in their application to live-stock development and
improvement.
Two lecture periods per week.   Second Term, Third Year.
Prerequisites:  Animal Husbandry 2 and 3 and Biology 2.
1 unit.
7. Herd, Flock and Stud-book Study.—An advanced course
in the study of the principal breeds of live stock, familiarizing Courses in Agriculture. 211
the student with the leading sires, dams, families, and herds of
the various breeds, and the blood lines entering into their
formation.   Emphasis will be placed upon a study of pedigrees.
Two lecture periods and one three-hour laboratory period
per week.   Second Term, Third Year.
Prerequisites: Animal Husbandry 2 and 3. iy2 units.
8. Nutrition.—A study of the elements and compounds
important to animal nutrition and their relation to the animal
organism; the digestive system; the digestion, absorption,
assimilation, and disposition of food materials. A study of the
various feedstuffs.
Texts: Henry and Morrison, Feeds and Feeding. Armsby,
Animal Nutrition.
Two lectures per week.   First Term, Fourth Year. 1 unit.
9. Animal Feeding.—The feeding of all classes of live stock,
having distinct regard to the economic problems confronting the
breeder and the producer.
Text: Henry and Morrison, Feeds and Feeding.
Three  lecture periods per week.    Second  Term,  Fourth
Year. \y2 units.
10. Markets and Marketing.—A careful study of the markets with their requirements for live stock and live-stock
products, and the relation which these bear to production.
Marketing of breeding stock.
Two lectures per week.   First Term, Fourth Year.
Prerequisite:  Animal Husbandry 7. 1 unit.
11. Thesis and Seminar.—Students majoring in Animal
Husbandry are required to write a thesis on some live-stock
subject, the selection being made by the student with the
approval of the Head of the Department. The subject of this
thesis shall be chosen not later than the end of the Third Year.
3 units.
A seminar of one hour per week for the special study of
current problems and literature shall be held. 1 unit. 212 The University of British Columbia.
12. Live-stock Practice.—Every Animal Husbandry student
is required to spend the summer months between the Third and
Fourth Years on an approved live-stock farm and to present a
written report upon his summer's work before entering upon
the Second Term of the Fourth Year.
Open only to students majoring in Animal Husbandry.
1 unit.
13. Farm and Ranch Management.—The management of
the range, ranch, and farm for the production of live stock.
Texts: Potter, Western Live Stock Management. Leitch,
The Dairy Farm.
Two lectures and one three-hour laboratory period per week.
Second Term, Fourth Year.
Prerequisite: Animal Husbandry 12. V/2 units.
14. Veterinary Science.—A study of the common diseases
of horses, cattle, sheep, and swine; their causes, prevention,
and treatment.
Three lecture periods per week.   First Term, Third Year.
Prerequisites: Animal Husbandry 1 and 4. \y2 units.
Department of Dairying
Professor:   Wilfrid Sadler.
Assistant Professor:   N. S. Golding.
Extension Assistant:   Marion J. Mounce.
1. Elementary Dairying.—An elementary course of lectures
on milk, cream, and the principles and practices of butter-
making. Laboratory work in cream-raising, separators, preparation of cream for butter-making, butter-making on the farm,
preparation of Devonshire clotted cream.
Two lectures and three hours' laboratory per week. Second
Term, Second Year. iy units.
2. Farm Cheese-making.—Principles and practices of cheese-
making, hard-pressed, blue-veined, and soft; the making of
cheese on the farm;  a general knowledge required of the prin- Courses in Agriculture. 213
cipal varieties of each class of cheese, and laboratory practice
in the making of standard varieties.
This course is offered in the Third Year or Fourth Year to
students other than those who propose to major in Dairying.
One lecture and six hours' laboratory per week for one term.
IV2 units.
3. Dairy Bacteriology.—The bacteriology of milk, and milk
products; sources of bacteria in milk, number and varieties;
influence of time, temperature, etc., on these; methods of culture
and isolation; fermentation of milk, lactic, butyric, peptonizing,
gaseous, ropy, etc.; relation of milk to spread of tuberculosis,
typhoid fever, and other diseases; pasteurization and sterilization of milk; certified milk and bacterial standards applied to
milk; relation of bacteria to cream, butter-making and butter;
control of bacteria in relation to milk and milk products.
Two lectures and six hours' laboratory work per week. First
Term, Third Year. 2 units.
4. Creamery   Butter-making. — Creamery butter-making;
grading  of   cream;   treatment   and preparation of cream for
butter-making;     pasteurization;     manufacture    of    creamery
butter;  judging, grading, and marketing of butter.
One lecture and six hours' laboratory work per week. Second
Term, Third Year.
Prerequisites:   Dairying 3. V/2 units.
5. Market Milk.—The hygienic aspect of milk production;
the bacterial quality of machine-drawn versus hand-drawn milk;
certified milk; handling and management of milk for city consumption; grading of milk on bacterial standards; pasteurization; transportation and distribution of milk; ordinances and
regulations concerning the sale of milk. This course will include
laboratory work in dairy bacteriology, practice in the dairy, and
visits to selected farms and milk distributing depots.
One lecture and six hours' laboratory work per week. Second
Term, Third Year. IV2 units. 214 The University of British Columbia.
6. Cheese and Cheese-making.—This course deals with the
principles and practices of cheese-making—hard-pressed, blue-
veined, and soft.
Two lectures and six hours' laboratory work per week
throughout the session.   Fourth Year.
Offered to those majoring in Dairying. 4 units.
7. Dairy Bacteriology.—Qualitative and quantitative bacteriological analysis of market milk, condensed milk, milk
powder, cream, butter, and cheese; bacterial changes in
storage butter; ripening of cheese. Opportunities are presented
for exercising bacterial control of the various processes carried
out in the dairy laboratory.
One lecture and six hours' laboratory work per week. First
Term, Fourth Year.
Offered to those majoring in Dairying. V/2 units.
8. Testing of Milk and Dairy Products.—The testing of
milk, cream, butter, and cheese; the selling of milk and cream
on the butter-fat basis; causes of variation in butter-fat content.
One lecture-laboratory period per week. First Term, Fourth
Year. y2 unit.
9. Dairy Buildings and Equipment.—Buildings suitable for
handling of milk and manufacturing of dairy products; their
situation, construction, arrangement; equipment of farm dairies,
creameries, and cheese-factories. This course includes detailed
studies of selected buildings.
One lecture and one laboratory period per week. Second
Term, Fourth Year. 1 unit.
10. The Judging and Grading of Milk and Milk Products.—
Offered to students of the Senior Year. V/2 units.
11. Thesis. 3 units. Courses in Agriculture. 215
Department of Horticulture
Professor:   F. M. Clement.
Associate Professor:   A. F. Barss.
Assistant Professor:   F. E. Buck.
Extension Assistant:   W. A. Middleton.
A. Principles of Fruit Growing.—The aim in this course
is to give the student sufficient instruction in the fundamental
steps in the growing of tree fruits and small fruits, to enable
him to care for the home plantings.
Two lectures each week.   First Term, First Year.     1 unit.
B. Principles of Gardening.—A study of the principles
involved in the planting and growing of the more important
vegetables, flowers, and ornamental trees and shrubs for the
farm home and garden.
Two lectures each week.    Second Term, Second Year.
1 unit.
Courses A and B are designed to meet the needs of all
students in Agriculture, giving them a general knowledge of the
care of Horticultural crops. At the same time these courses are
fundamental for students who are planning to take further
courses in Horticulture.
3. Practical Pomology.—A detailed study of the best
methods in Orchard Management with field practice in various
orchard operations, such as planting, pruning, and spraying.
The course also deals with the culture of small fruits.
Two lectures and two laboratories each week. Second Term,
Third Year. 2 units.
4. Plant Propagation and Nursery Practice.—This course
deals with the methods used in propagating plants, including
budding and grafting; and with Commercial Nursery practices.
One lecture and one laboratory each week. First Term,
Third Year. 1 unit. 216 The University of British Columbia.
5. Commercial Pomology.—A study of the problems connected with the handling of fruits and vegetables—harvesting,
grading, packing, shipping, storing, marketing; packing and
storage houses; marketing associations; costs of production and
marketing.
Two lectures and one laboratory each week. First Term,
Fourth Year. IV2 units.
6. Systematic Pomology.—A course in description, identification, classification, displaying, and judging of fruits. The
course also includes a certain amount of work in Systematic
Olericulture.
One lecture, two laboratories each week. First Term, Fourth
Year. V/2 units.
7. Practical Vegetable Gardening.—A study of the problems
connected with the commercial growing of vegetables, including
the selection of a location, soil requirements, fertilizing, irrigating, and special cultural methods for the more important vegetables. This course also deals with the construction of hot-beds,
cold-frames, greenhouses, and their management in the forcing
of vegetable crops.
Two lectures and one laboratory each week. Second Term,
Fourth Year. V/2 units.
8. Special Horticulture.—A course for the study of special
branches of Commercial Horticulture, including the manufacture of horticultural products, such as canned foods, dried
products, jams, jellies, and fruit juices.
Two lectures each week.    Second Term, Fourth Year.
1 unit.
9. Horticultural Problems.—An introduction to the study
of problems in Horticulture, including the breeding of Horticultural crops, variety adaptations, and methods of research,
together with a review of Horticultural investigational work in Courses in Agriculture. 217
other institutions.    There will also   be   practice   in   outlining
investigations, and in preparing reports.
Two lectures each week.    Second Term, Fourth Year.
1 unit.
10. Landscape Gardening and Floriculture.—The course
aims to give the student a working knowledge of the selection,
planting and care of ornamental plants—trees, shrubs, and
flowers; with the principles for the improvement of home
grounds, school grounds, city streets, and parks. The course
includes practice in identification of plant materials; also practice in making of planting plans.
Two lectures and one laboratory each week. First Term,
Fourth Year. IV2 units.
11. Thesis. 3 units.
Department of Poultry Husbandry
Associate Professor:   E. A. Lloyd.
Assistant Professor:   V. S. Asmundsen.
Field Enumerator:  R. J. Skelton.
1. General.—Includes a study of the fundamentals of
poultry-keeping, such as: Breeds, breeding, and judging; feeds
and feeding; locating and constructing poultry-houses; equipment; incubation and brooding; markets and marketing. The
class-room lectures and recitations are supplemented with practice work in the laboratory.
Two lectures and one two-hour laboratory per week. Second
Term, Second Year. V/2 units.
2. Markets and Marketing.—An advanced course in the
preparation and marketing of poultry products. Students
taking this course are required to prepare products for market,
and, when possible, to do the actual marketing.
One lecture and one two-hour laboratory period. First Term.
1 unit. 218 The University of British Columbia.
3. Incubation and Brooding.—A study of the problems concerned in hatching and rearing poultry. Practice is given in
the operation of different types of incubators and brooders.
One lecture and two two-hour laboratory periods per week.
Second Term. iy2 units.
4. Breeds and Breeding.—Arranged to give the student a
general understanding of the principles of breeding as applied
to Poultry Husbandry. Emphasis is laid upon breeding for egg
and meat production.
One lecture and two two-hour laboratory periods per week.
Second Term.
Prerequisite:   Biology 4. V/2 units.
5. Poultry Management.—A study of stystems of extensive
and intensive poultry-farming. Capital, labour, and economic
methods of flock management are studied.
Required of Seniors in Poultry Husbandry.   First Term.
One lecture and four hours' laboratory per week. V/2 units.
6. Advanced Poultry Husbandry.—Arranged to give the
student an opportunity for special and original problems.
Required of Seniors in Poultry Husbandry.   Second Term.
Hours by arrangement. 4 units.
7. Feeds and Feeding.—Consists of a study of the various
feedstuff's used for poultry, and their value; the balancing of
rations; a study of experimental data and practice in feeding.
Required of Seniors in Poultry Husbandry.   First Term.
One lecture and three hours' laboratory and practice per
week.
Prerequisites: Poultry Husbandry 1; Animal Husbandry 8.
1 unit.
8. Poultry Literature.—A study of scientific literature
published on poultry problems, and the gathering of reports,
data, and information. Courses in Agriculture. 219
One lecture period per week.   Six hours' practice work.
V/2 units.
9. Judging and Selection.—Substituted for Poultry Husbandry 5 and 6.
One lecture and one three-hour laboratory period per week.
IV2 units.
10. Thesis. 3 units.
The Evolution of Agriculture
Professor F. M. Clement.
In this course a study will be made of the gradual evolution
of those ideas and forces which have resulted in the approved
agricultural practices of the present day. A knowledge of the
development of these ideas is essential to an understanding of
the present status of the farmer and of the farming industry,
and will enable the student to forecast with greater accuracy the
lines along which further progress may be expected.
First Term, Fourth Year.   Three lectures per week.
IV2 units.
French.
(Special course in French.)
2nd Year.—Prescribed text: Cunisset-Carnot, Le livre
d'Agriculture, Paris, Larousse.   2 hours a week.
2 units.
Note: Where courses other than those listed under Agronomy, Animal Husbandry, Dairying, Horticulture, and Poultry
are mentioned, the student will please refer to outlines of courses
in Arts and Science or Applied Science. 220 The University of British Columbia.
REGULATIONS AS TO M.A., M.A.Sc, AND M.S.A.
COURSES.
1. Candidates for the M.A., M.A.Sc, or M.S.A. degree must
hold a bachelor's degree from this University, or its equivalent.
The B.A. is prerequisite for the M.A., the B.A.Sc. for the
M.A.Sc, and the B.S.A. for the M.S.A.
2. Candidates with approved degrees who proceed to the
Master's degree shall be required:
(a.) To spend one year in resident graduate study; or
(b.)   (At the discretion of the Faculty concerned):
(i.) To do two or more years of private work
under the supervision of the University,
such work to be equivalent to one year of
graduate study; or,
(ii.) To do one year of private work under
University supervision and one term of
resident graduate study, the total of such
work to be equivalent to one year of
resident graduate study.
3. One major and one minor shall be required.
4. (a.) A thesis must be prepared on some approved topic
in the major subject.
(6.) Examinations, written   or   oral, or   both, will be
required.
5. Candidates for the Master's degree, whether in residence
or extra-mural, shall pay an annual registration fee of $10.00.
Application for admission as a graduate student, accompanied
by official credentials giving details of courses taken, shall be
made to the Registrar by October 1st. Application to stand for
an advanced degree shall be made by November 1st.
6. Three copies of each thesis (preferably typewritten), on
standard-sized thesis paper, shall be filed with the Registrar on
or before the last day of lectures. One of these copies will be
deposited with the Librarian. (See special circular of "Instructions for the Preparation of Masters' Theses.") List of Students. 221
LIST OF STUDENTS IN ATTENDANCE, SESSION 1921-22
FACULTY OF ARTS AND SCIENCE
First Year.
Full Undergraduates,
Name. Home Address.
Adams,  Edgar  B Vancouver.
Agar,   James   M New Westminster.
Allen, George A Vancouver.
Anderson, Gwladys M Vancouver.
Anthony, Edward J Nakusp.
Arkley, Adalene Vancouver.
Arkley, Stanley T Vancouver.
Baillie, Oenone G Vancouver.
Baker, Lorimer G Vancouver.
Ball, Robert W Sandwick.
Barnsley, Frank R Vancouver.
Barton, Carl F Vancouver.
Baxendale, Robert D Trail.
Baylis, Robert H Marpole.
Bell, Ella W Vancouver.
Bell, Veronica J Vancouver.
Bely, Jacob J Chita, Siberia.
Boulton, Marguerite C. E Vancouver.
Bowser, Frank C Vancouver.
Brown, Kenneth S Regina, Sask.
Brown, Thomas W Grand Forks.
Buchanan, Thomas G Vancouver.
Byrne, Thomas S South Vancouver.
Campbell, C. Robert T South Vancouver.
Canfleld, Orra W New Westminster.
Carpenter, Gilbert B     Vancouver.
Carrico, Marguerite E Vancouver.
Carter, Dorothy G Vancouver.
Chapman, Edward F New Westminster.
Chell, Joseph   Mission City.
Christie, John A Victoria.
Clague, John E Vancouver.
Clark, Florence E Vancouver.
Clarke,  Mary  K Vancouver.
Coghlan, Basil S Vancouver.
Conlan, Kathleen L Vancouver.
Conlan,  Margaret I Vancouver. 222 The University of British Columbia.
Name. Home Address.
Cooper, Arthur J. O Vancouver.
Corry,  Jack  R Vancouver.
Coulter, Maynard E Chilliwack.
Cowx, Joseph G Vancouver.
Craig, James H Vancouver.
Cranston, Roxy R Vancouver.
Creighton, James H South Vancouver.
Cross,  Earle  S Lynn Creek.
Davidson, Jean E. W Vancouver.
Davies, Charles E Chilliwack.
DeWolfe, John E Vancouver.
Dobbin, Mary H Vancouver.
Dodds, Kathleen    Vancouver.
Dowling, Clifford H Vancouver.
Dudley, Stephen M Vancouver.
Duncan, Cedric J Prince Rupert.
Dunkley, Eugenie A Vancouver.
Dunn, Eric J Vancouver.
Eades, James E North Vancouver.
Eades, William J North Vancouver.
Ebert, John A.  M New Westminster.
Eckert, Louis C Vancouver.
Edwards,  Mamie    Vancouver.
Elliot, George F Vancouver.
Emery, Geoffrey B Edmonds.
Emery, Gertrude B New Westminster.
Evans,  Walter  F Vancouver.
Farrington, Eileen G Vancouver.
Fee, Archibald R Vancouver.
Fee, Doris L Kajnloops.
Fennell, Joyce M Edmonds.
Fisher, Jessie L Vancouver.
Foran, Theresa C Vancouver.
Ford, M. Doris Vancouver.
Forster, Eric North Vancouver.
Fowler, Helen S Vancouver.
Fraser,  Ruth A Vancouver.
Futcher, Frederick G Vancouver.
Gadd, Gwendolyn M Vancouver.
Gage, Walter H South Vancouver.
Gibson, Swanston Vancouver.
Gignac, Frances V Vancouver.
Gillanders, Earle Chilliwack.
Gillen, James L Abbotsford. List of Students. 223
Name. Home Address.
Gorringe, Marjorie E. K South Vancouver.
Graham, Etta L Vancouver.
Grauer, Albert E Vancouver.
Greggor, Clara F Vancouver.
Gregory, Phyllis M Rossland.
Griffith, William I Grand Forks.
Groves, Dorothy Vancouver.
Gruchy, Earl S Vancouver.
Hale, Frederick M -.'" South Vancouver.
Hall, Winnifred M Vancouver.
Hallamore,  Gertrude J New Westminster.
Hamilton, John A Vancouver.
Hankinson,   Bessie Vancouver.
Hansen, Ida L New Westminster.
Harvey, Mary Vancouver.
Heywood, Alice Vancouver.
Hopkins, Jean F. C South Vancouver.
Home,   Winifred South Vancouver.
Hughes, Isobel Vancouver.
Ing,  Sun  On Vancouver.
Inglis, Kathleen M Gibson's Landing.
Ingram, Sydney B Vancouver.
Jackson, Susie C Vancouver.
Jenney, Evelynd R Vancouver.
Johnston, Harry S Vancouver.
Jones, David R Vancouver.
Jude, Hilda Langley Prairie.
Kania, Joseph E. A Trail.
Kay, Edith W South Vancouver.
Keenan, Thomas J Vancouver.
Keir, George South Vancouver.
Kelly,  Clive A Vancouver.
Kelly,  Wilfred  C Vancouver.
Kempton, Ida M Vancouver.
Kerr, Margaret E New Westminster.
King, William C Vancouver.
Knowlton, Willson E Vancouver.
Ladner, Edward M Vancouver.
Lane, Edwin  I South Wellington.
Larson, Arthur G. A Vancouver.
Law, Arthur C Vancouver.
Ledingham, Jack P South Vancouver.
Leek, Charles W Vancouver. 224 List of Students.
Name. Home Address.
Leong, Kingfrankton South Vancouver.
Leveson, Jean S. M Vancouver.
Liersch, John E North Vancouver.
Lindsay, Margaret E Prince Rupert.
Lockard, Edith F Vancouver.
Lofting,  Queenie Vancouver.
Louden, Thomas N Vancouver.
Lyne, Frances E Creston.
Malott, Nellie Chilliwack.
Manuel, Jenny E.  M Vancouver.
Martin,  Clarence  G Massett.
Martin,  Edith  I McKay.
Martin, George C Vancouver.
Mather, Vera G North Vancouver.
Meredith, Grace E Vancouver.
Millar,  James  W Revelstoke.
Mills, Reginald C Vancouver.
Milne, Eleanor E Vancouver.
Miyazaki,  Masaziro  Japan.
Moe, Dorothy I Vancouver.
Moffatt,  Muriel  M Vancouver.
Montgomery, George R Vancouver.
Morrison, Hugh M... Vancouver.
Morsh, Joseph E Peachland.
Mowatt, Laura S Vancouver.
Murray, Dorothy A Vancouver.
MacDonald, Catherine South Vancouver.
MacDonald, Janet R New Westminster.
McDuffee, Russell S Vancouver.
MacGill, Elizabeth M. G Vancouver.
MacGill, Helen G Vancouver.
McGugan, Edna M Vancouver.
McGuire, Maude E. M Salmon Arm.
Mcintosh, Mary C. E Greenwood.
McKee, Mary M Vancouver.
MacKenzie, Kelvin G Aldergrove.
McKillop, Lex L Vancouver.
MacKinnon, Findlay S Cumberland.
McLarty, Elsie I Vancouver.
McLean,  Leslie  M Vancouver.
McLennan, Alan B Vancouver.
McLennan, Percy G Vancouver.
McLeod, Florence A Vancouver. List of Students. 225
Name. Home Address.
McMeans, Jean R Vancouver.
McNicholl,  Allan  D Prince Rupert.
McRae,  John  H Vancouver.
Nelson, Clarence Vancouver.
Newcombe, Gwendolyn North Vancouver.
Nicol, Grace A. M Vancouver.
Nikiel, Charles Vancouver.
North, John T Vancouver.
Nunn, Edward H Vancouver.
Oliver, John C Vancouver.
Owen, Francis J Trail.
Painter,  Francis  M Vancouver.
Paterson, Evelyn A Vancouver.
Payne, Irene Marpole.
Perry, Dorothy A North Vancouver.
Pike, Anthony Vancouver.
Pollock, Douglas B Vancouver.
Pryde, Walter Nanaimo.
Railton, Joan M Vancouver.
Rankin,  Elizabeth L Vancouver.
Reynolds, Kathleen M.  W North Vaneouver.
Rickard, Dorothy G Vancouver.
Rigby, Annie New Westminster.
Rilance, Elsie G.  S Vancouver.
Roberts, Mariorie A Smithers.
Roberts, Suzanna M Vancouver.
Robertson, Elizabeth M Vancouver.
Robinson, George R Vancouver.
Roe, Mary I Port Moody.
Rowan, Muriel M Vancouver.
Russell, Isabel M Marpole.
Sansum, Victor H Vancouver.
Schaffer, John J Vancouver.
Schell, Kenneth A Vancouver.
Scott, James C. W North Vancouver.
Shaw, Jack C Vancouver.
Shaw,   Louisa  W Vancouver.
Sheppard, Lucy A New Westminster.
Shiel8, Georgina P Vancouver.
Shore, John W. B Vancouver.
Shorney, Kathlyn D Vancouver.
Shotton, John A Kamloops.
Sien, Foon Cumberland. 226 The University of British Columbia.
Name. Home Address.
Slingerland,  Frank South Vancouver.
Smith, Fred H Vancouver.
Smith,  Grace  E.  M Vancouver.
Smith, James Vancouver.
Spencer, Margaret J Victoria.
St. Denis, Frederic G Vancouver.
Stepler,   Lillian  M Vancouver.
Stevenson, Anna V Vancouver.
Stewart, Neil A Vancouver.
Stirling, Gwendolen G Kelowna.
Stroyan,   Marjorie A Vancouver.
Stuart,  Lillian  B Vancouver.
Sutherland, Brookie E Vancouver.
Sutherland, Marion G New Westminster.
Swencisky, Victoria M New Westminster.
Tamura, Morikiyo Port Haney.
Tapp, Ross S Eburne.
Tarr, Francis G. A North Vancouver.
Tatlow, Helen G Vancouver.
Taylor, Harold E Vancouver.
Thompson, Albert B Trail.
Thompson, Bertha H Vancouver.
Thompson, Homer A Rosedale.
Thomson, James A Vancouver.
Thomson, Jean Vancouver.
Thomson, Mary M Chilliwack.
Thorburn, Marjorie M Vancouver.
Thrupp, Sylvia L Kamloops.
Tiffin, Leighton O.  M Vancouver.
Timleck, Curtis J New Westminster.
Tipping, Wessie M. M Vancouver.
Topper,  Mary E Mission City.
Turnbull,  Thomas A Vancouver.
Wallis, John C Rossland.
Warren, Harry V Vancouver.
Watney, Douglas P New Westminster.
Welch, Beatrice R Vancouver.
Welch, William H Vancouver.
Westman,  Marjorie Marpole.
White, Ronald E Summerland.
Whiteside, Helen R.. New Westminster.
Whittaker, Norah M Vancouver.
Whitworth, Jack E Vancouver. List of Students. 227
Name. Home Address.
Wilander, William A Gibson's Landing.
Wilby, Eugene R Vancouver.
Wilcox,  Laura Vancouver.
Wilkinson,  Jane  H Vancouver.
Wilkinson,  John  H Vancouver.
Williamson, Cecilia Vancouver.
Williamson, Marguerite M Vancouver.
Winter, Alice G Vancouver.
Woods,  Mary K Vancouver.
Woodsworth, Winona G Vancouver.
Wright, Muriel E Vancouver.
Wright, Stanley V Vancouver.
Young, Minnie A New Westminster.
Zink, Charles W Vancouver.
Conditioned.
Adam, Dorothy M Vancouver.
Alexander, Beryl Clarke Vancouver.
Baynes, Doris L Vancouver.
Blaney,  Claire  E Vancouver.
Crich, Evelyn P Vancouver.
Domoney,  Clarence Vancouver.
Fanning,   Oscar Vancouver.
Fraser, Frances M Vancouver.
Fraser,   Marjorie  A Vancouver.
Giberson,  Gladys Vancouver
Gill, Otto H Cranbrook.
Griffith, Braham G Grand Forks.
Gustafson,  Carl E Vancouver.
Hardie, William L Cloverdale.
Hatfield,  Marjorie B  Penticton.
James, Harriet C Vancouver.
Jones,  Violet   L Vancouver.
Kee, Josephine E Vancouver.
Kelman, Douglas S Vancouver.
Livingstone,   Edward   R Vancouver.
Logan, Kingsley S Central Park.
Lynn, Eileen  M Vancouver.
May,   Edna   B.   C North Vancouver.
Moore, Elizabeth G South Vancouver.
Morrison, Neil E Greenwood.
Mounce, Lewis S Vancouver.
MacBeth, Jean D Vancouver.
McClellan, Norma J Vancouver. 228 The University of British Columbia.
Name. Home Address.
McCreery,   Joseph   R Vancouver.
McDonald, Marjorie A Vancouver.
Mclntyre, Margary Vancouver.
Owen,   Gladys  W Vancouver.
Ridley, Frank E New Westminster.
Ross, Jefferson C Vancouver.
Stuart, Margaret I. D Vancouver.
Sutherland, Bertha I New Westminster.
Swanson,  Marion L Creston.
Weinberg, Jeanette Vancouver.
Whaun, Moore Vancouver.
Partial.
Anders, Charles H Vancouver.
Bell,  Gertrude  H.  H Vancouver.
Blackburn, Malcolm S Beachburg, Ont.
Bloomfield, Edgar J Vancouver.
Bourgue, Theodore H Vancouver.
Effinger, Claude N Vancouver.
Eshoo, Kurish Tabriz, Persia.
Gould,   Clara  W.  D Vancouver.
Hamilton, George S Musselburgh, Scotland.
Hart, Donald B Jamaica.
Hennessy, Terence P Vancouver.
Hill-Tout,  James  E Abbotsford.
Ingledew,  John   R Vancouver.
Lawson, Dorothy M Vancouver.
Malcolm, Mabel M Vancouver.
Man, Dasaundha Singh Kalan, India.
Morehouse, John W Vancouver.
McDougall, Murray J New Westminster.
MacFarlane, Robert T Hollyburn.
Nicholson, Louis F Vancouver.
Penwill, Frank H Vancouver.
Perkins, Merwyn G Vancouver.
Rigney, Clara M Vancouver.
Rosborough, Hugh C Claudy, Co. Derry,
Ireland.
Scott, Gordon H Vancouver.
Shaw, Robert B Vancouver.
Smith, Henry B Victoria.
Stuart, Ernest S Vancouver.
Uchiyana, Yuiji E Vancouver. List of Students. 229
Second Year.
Full Undergraduates.
Name. Home Address.
Albo, Joseph Rossland.
Aske, Flora M Vancouver.
Astell, Mary C. L Vancouver.
Berry, Annie B Langley Prairie.
Blair, Alice E Milner.
Breese,  Ida J Vancouver.
Brink,   Reginald   M Vancouver.
Bruun, Arthur G Vancouver.
Buchanan, Allen Vancouver.
Bull, Armour M Vancouver.
Burns, Nettie Dundarave.
Burton, John Stuart Vancouver.
Cameron, William C Chilliwack.
Cant, Hector R New Westminster.
Cantelon, Harold B Vancouver.
Cline, Catherine D Vancouver.
Coates, Bertha W Vancouver.
Cochrane, William Blair Vancouver.
Cope, Mary C. L Vancouver.
Creelman,  Helen Vancouver.
Crozier,  Robert N Vancouver.
Curtis, Philip S Vancouver.
Daly,  James   S Ladner.
Edgell, Phyllis M Vancouver.
Edgett, Lloyd W Vancouver.
Elliott, Marjorie L South Vancouver.
Elliott, Maxine P Vancouver.
Evans, Muriel M Vancouver.
Farrand, Zoe E Vancouver.
FawCett, Marie L South Vancouver.
Forward, Jessie M Ladysmith.
Fraser, Ferguson R North Vancouver.
Gaddes, Leonard Vancouver.
Gibbard,  John  E Mission City.
Gill, Alan F North Vancouver.
Gillen, Agnes S Abbotsford.
Goodchild,  Margaret E Matsqui.
Goodwin, Theodore H Vancouver.
Grant,  Archibald L Prince Rupert.
Grant, John A Vancouver.
Green, Rowland T Kaslo. 230 The University of British Columbia.
Name. Home Address.
Hagelstein, George F Langley Prairie.
Harman, Eileen B Vancouver.
Haughton, Harry Vancouver.
Henderson,  Harold  R Vancouver.
Higginbotham,  Frances  I Vancouver.
Hislop, Gordon B Moose Jaw,  Sask.
Hobson, George Vancouver.
Hodgson, Charles W South Vancouver.
Holmes, Dorothy M Victoria.
Hood, Helen R Vancouver.
Hyland, Ivadele H Vancouver.
Ingram, Lucy Vancouver.
Jackson, Eric W Hammond.
Johnston,  Florence  E Vancouver.
Johnston, Ralph M Vancouver.
Jones, Florence N Kelowna.
Jones, John D Cloverdale.
Kerby, Kathleen B Grand Forks.
Kievell, Myrtle Vancouver.
Knowling, Edith L Vancouver.
Langdale,  Ada  G Vancouver.
Lanning, Walter S. W Ladner.
Leask, John R Cranbrook.
Livingston,  Garrett  S Vancouver.
Lundie, James A Vancouver.
Marrion, Robert F. C Vancouver.
Mather, Greta E North Vancouver.
Meadows, Lyman Vancouver.
Miller,   George   S Vancouver.
Moodie, Stephen T Burnaby.
Munn, Lyle E Vancouver.
Munn,  W.   H.  Blanchard Summerland.
McColl, Hugh A Vancouver.
McDiarmid,  Dorothy K Vancouver.
McDonald,  Gertrude  E Nelson.
McGregor, Jessie M Kaslo.
MacKay, Donald C Vancouver.
McKee, William H Vancouver.
Mackinnon, Isabel M Vancouver.
McLane, Paul V Jubilee,
Maclean, Ethel M Vancouver.
McMorris, Frances E Vancouver.
Macnaghten, Kathleen E North Vancouver.
McRae,  Rena V Vancouver. List of Students. 231
Name. Home Address.
McRae,  Violet  G Vancouver.
MacWilliam, Ruth A South Vancouver.
Notzeel, Clifford A Vancouver.
Palmer, Peter F Vancouver.
Palmer, Sarah Vancouver.
Paradis, Josephine A Enderby.
Parmiter, Lois G New Westminster.
Peck,  Dorothy  C Vancouver.
Reilly, Ruby R Vancouver.
Reith, Helen W Penticton.
Riddehough,  Geoffrey B Penticton.
Roberts, Marian O. R Vancouver.
Robinson, Kathleen G Vancouver.
Ross, Beulah W Vancouver.
Russell, George Union Bay.
Simpson, William W McKay.
Sing,  Marjorie  B Cowichan Station.
Smith, Agnes C Kamloops.
Smith,  Donald B Vancouver.
Smith, John A. C Vancouver.
Sparks,  Frederick  P Vancouver.
Stratton, Elaine G Vancouver.
Stringer, Harold C Vancouver.
Teeple,  Mildred  G Vancouver.
Tisdall, Margaret B Vancouver.
Tisdall, Mary R Vancouver.
Tolman, Carl Vancouver.
Topper,   Robert Mission City.
Turnan, Alice V Vancouver.
Turpin, Helen M Vancouver.
Wheeler, Arthur L Victoria.
Williams, Florence I Vancouver.
Conditioned.
Adams, Jessie E.J Vancouver.
Angell,   Eloise Vancouver.
Bell,  Frederick  H Vancouver.
Burton,  Erling W Vancouver.
Chapin, Florence M Kelowna.
Clever, Emily E New Denver.
Collier, Ivy Vancouver.
Cowan, Frances K Vancouver.
Cross,  Henry N... . Seattle, Wash.
Dalton, Jasper A. R North Vancouver. 232 The University of British Columbia.
Name. Home Address.
Davidson, John R Vancouver.
Freeman, Ida D Vancouver.
Handy,  Anna T Vancouver.
Kearns,  Marcus A.  R Vancouver.
Langtry, George N Vancouver.
Lawrence, Eva M Vancouver.
Lillico, Annie B Vancouver.
Ormrod,  Eleanor O North Vancouver.
Robinson, Spencer George South Vancouver.
Somerset, Ventris A Vancouver.
Sparks, Frederick Percival Vancouver.
Stewart,  Thomas A Vancouver.
Telfer, Jean Vancouver.
Wilkinson, Nelly Vancouver.
Williams, Laurence F. P Vancouver.
Woolliams, George E Keremeos.
Partial.
Anderson, Daniel J New Westminster.
Bell, John C Vancouver.
Binnie,   Mary   C Trail.
Burton, J. Stoneman Vancouver.
Clark, Helen I Vancouver.
Colton, Leonard C Fernie.
Coombs, Marjorie L Vancouver.
Doidge, Gilbert North Vancouver.
Edwards, Isaac J Vancouver.
Lewis,  Gordon  A New Westminster.
Mangat, Nah.ar S Punjab, India.
Manson, Ralf. S Hatzic.
Miller,  Kenneth L Vancouver.
Morgan, Lome T Vancouver.
Schmidt, Walter E Vancouver.
Taylor, Kenneth B Vancouver.
Yonemura, Hozumi New Westminster.
Third Year.
Full Undergraduates.
Abel, Ilva Isabella Jean Vancouver.
Allen, Harold Tuttle Naramata.
Anderson, Annie Margaret Vancouver.
Aylard, Clara Muriel Victoria.
Baynes, Lloyd Lester Vancouver.
Bell, Marjory Emma Hollyburn. List of Students. 233
Name. Home Address.
Benedict, Frances Ellen Arrowhead.
Bickell, Gertrude Elizabeth Vancouver.
Brown, Joseph Frederick Hammond.
Brown, Margaret Ada Vancouver.
Buck, May Dorothea Kelowna.
Bulmer, Mary Lucinda Buena Vista.
Burke, Beatrice Mary Vancouver.
Campbell, Claude Lane Victoria.
Carrie, Janet Thompson Nelson.
Caspell, Jessie Marguerite Vancouver.
Casselman, Jessie Elizabeth Vancouver.
Cassidy,  Harry Morris Murrayville.
Chapman, Mary Isbell New Westminster.
Clandinin, Gladys Margaret Vancouver.
Clyne, John Valentine Vancouver.
Cornyn, Lillian Mary Vancouver.
Crandall, Mary Gordon Vancouver.
Crandlemire, Vera Kate Grindrod.
Crawford, Helen Couper Vancouver.
Dallas, Dorothy Frances Vancouver.
Dawson, David Collins Vancouver.
Dickson, Malcolm James Cruickshank Victoria.
Eaglesham, Jean Victoria.
Eveleigh, Evelyn Mary Southcott Vancouver.
Fitch,  Beatrice  Constance Vancouver.
Fleming, Everitt Samuel James Kelowna.
Fleming, George Herbert Vancouver.
Gibbon, Marion Evelyn Vancouver.
Gilbert, Evelyn Maude Vancouver.
Green,  Lucy  Ethel Chilliwack.
Griffiths, Mary Gertrude Elaine Grand Forks
Gross, Rowena Pauline Vancouver.
Hallett, Lawrence Trenery Steveston.
Harrison, William Elliott Vancouver.
Henderson,  Jean Vancouver.
Higginbotham, Margaret Webster Vancouver.
Home, Maurice Vancouver.
Hunter, Alan D Vancouver.
Jack,   Gladys  Gordon Marpole.
Johnson, Henry William Hope,
Johnston, Charlotte Islay North Vancouver.
Kerr, Gerald Clifford Graham Vancouver.
Kidd, Dorothy Elizabeth Vancouver.
Kirkpatrick, Gordon Mackay Vancouver. 234 The University of British Columbia.
Name. Home Address.
Kloepfer, Helen  Patricia Vancouver.
Lapsley,  Marie  Letticia Vancouver.
Lee, Doris Elizabeth Bonnington Falls.
LeNeveu, Allan Henry Vancouver.
Leveson, Kirsteen Mary Vancouver.
Lewis, Hunter Campbell Ladner.
Lindsay, Margaret Patterson Vancouver.
Lister,   Fraser Nanaimo.
Marett, Leila Margaret Vancouver.
Mathews,  Helen   Mary Vancouver.
Miller, Selwyn Archibald Vancouver.
Morden, Wilma Margaret North Vancouver.
Murphy, Kathleen Sallee Vancouver.
Mclntyre,  Donald  Manning West Summerland.
Mackay, Phyllis Isabel Vancouver.
Mackechnie,  Hugh Alexander Vancouver.
McLennan, Beth Dawson Vancouver.
MacNeill,  Alan  Roy Vancouver.
Offord, Harold Reginald Vancouver.
Osterhout, Mildred Jubilee.
Partridge,  Phyllis Cumberland.
Pedlow, Gladys Lillian Vancouver.
Peter, Constance Eleanor Vancouver.
Portsmouth, 'Kathleen Madge Mission City.
Quainton, Eric Hugh Victoria.
Ray, Arthur Hugo Vancouver.
Rees,  Catherine  Bertha New Westminster.
Robertson, Norman Alexander Vancouver.
Robson, Charles Young Vancouver.
Sanford, Osbert McLean Vancouver.
Sangster,  Norman Vancouver.
Shaw, Keith Duncan Vancouver.
Shier, John William Vancouver.
Smith, Gertrude May New Denver.
Smith, Grace Purvis Vancouver.
Southon, Henry Stewart Atkin Vancouver.
Steves, Jessie Lena Steveston.
Stewart, William Victoria.
Straus, Jean Lillian Vancouver.
Switzer,  Gerald   Breen New Westminster.
Taylor,  Clifford Nesbitt Vancouver.
Thompson, Willard Allen Vancouver.
Tupper, Mary Emily South Vancouver.
Turnbull, Frank Alexander Vancouver. List of Students. 235
Name. Home Address.
Upshall, William Charles Cecil Vancouver.
Walker, Robert Edward Vancouver.
Wallace, Fraser Melvin Vancouver.
Walsh,  Dorothy  Howard Oak Bay.
Weld, Gladys Noyes Vancouver.
Wilcox,   Marion Vancouver.
Wood, Elsie Doris Nanaimo.
Yonemoto,   Haruo Steveston.
Conditioned.
Ellis, Edgar Harrison Vancouver.
Hunter, Robert Vancouver.
Jardine, Agnes Alexandra Vancouver.
Kerr,   Margaret  Isobel Vancouver.
MacKenzie, Mary Isobel New Westminster.
Pittendrigh, Mary Aleda Vancouver.
Rae, Violet Jean Barnett.
Partial.
Baird, John Douglas Vancouver.
Drennan, Albert Alexander Vancouver.
Glenesk, Ernest John Jack Vancouver.
Holt, Violet Alice Vancouver.
Locklin, Lillian Ralston Vancouver.
Meyer, Victor Louis Vancouver.
McKee,  John  Rogers Vancouver.
McLoughry, Helen Vivian Vancouver.
Macpherson, Gordon Angus Cape Breton, N. £
Reeves,  William John Port Moody.
Thomson. Albert Otis Mt. Lehman.
Fourth Year.
Full Undergraduates.
Aconley,   Izeyle  Vera Vancouver.
Agnew, Marjorie Vancouver.
Anders, Victor Llewellyn Vancouver.
Argue, Ralph Starrat Vancouver.
Arkley, Jack MacDougall Vancouver.
Atherton, Marion Clara Vancouver.
Ballard, Edna Florence Vancouver.
Black, William Griffiths Vancouver.
Bolton, Lloyd Lawrence Vancouver.
Buell, Arthur Lightfoot North Vancouver.
Bullock, Winifred Amy Vancouver. 236 The University of British Columbia.
Name. Home Address.
Buxton, Mary Isabel Burnaby.
Campbell, Annie Louise. Vancouver.
Clark, Charles Augustus Fordyce Vancouver.
Clark, George Savage Vancouver.
Clarke,   Margaret  Isabella Vancouver.
Collard, Carlton Vancouver.
Coope, Geoffrey Vancouver.
Cox, Stafford Albert Vancouver.
Crickmay, Colin H North Vancouver.
Cutler, Norman Leon Vancouver.
Cummings, Robert Edgar Vancouver.
Dauphinee,  James Arnold New Westminster.
Dowling,  Doris Ada Vancouver.
Duffy, James Co. Clare, Ire.
Eagles, Blythe Alfred New Westminster.
English, Mary Helen , . . Kaslo.
Fingland, Dorothy Ellen Trail.
Fraser,  George Wallace Bruce Vancouver.
Frith, Joscelyne Sylvia Vancouver.
Fulton, Doris Jessie Vancouver.
Gignac,   Mary Etoile  Patricia Vancouver.
Gill, Dorothy Alexandra Vancouver.
Gillis, Gwendolyn Christina Abercrombie.. . . Victoria.
Harris, Joseph Allen West Summerland.
Heaslip, Leonard William Vancouver.
Herd, James Fenton Vancouver.
Hopper, Dorothy Aileen Vancouver.
Hurst, Allan McLean Vancouver.
Imlah,  James Albert Henry New Westminster.
Johnston, Lyle Clinton South Vancouver.
Keir,   Helen Nortn Vancouver.
Keir,  Jeannie  McRae North Vancouver.
Kemp,   Gwendolyn   Muriel Vancouver.
Lanning, Roland John Ladner.
Lewis, Edward Dewart Ladner.
Lipson,  Barnett A Vancouver.
Lipson, Bertha Vancouver.
Metz, Cora Irma Vancouver.
Miles, Mona Collister Santa Monica, Cal.
Miller, Isobel Selina Victoria.
Monkman, Evelyne Ada Ladner.
Mortimer,   Helen Vancouver.
Munro,  Mary Vancouver.
McAfee, Weldon Robert Vancouver. List of Students. 237
Name. Home Address.
MacKinnon, Georgina Emily Vernon.
McLennan, Lester Winston Vancouver.
MacLeod, John Phee Gordon North Vancouver.
McLoughry, Muriel Alice Vancouver.
Purslow, Norah Kathleen Vancouver.
Pye, Dora Ellen Gertrude Vancouver.
Rankin, Agnes Helen Vancouver.
Reid,   Mary Lillian Vancouver.
Robson, Gwendolyn Vancouver.
Rogers, Edna Jessie Vancouver.
Stevenson,  Arthur   Lionel Vancouver.
Urquhart, Christine Margaret Eburne.
Verchere, Ruth Emilie Ladysmith.
Vogee, Arthur Edward Vancouver.
Watson, Annie Pirie Vancouver.
Weinberg, Dena Vancouver.
Weld, Charles Beecher Vancouver.
Wells,  Lewis Edelbert Carnduff, Sask.
Whitley, Paul N Lytton.
Willis, Norah Evangeline Vancouver.
Woodworth, Clifford Allen Chilliwack.
Conditioned.
Munro, Robert James Vancouver.
Stephens, Robert Noot Vancouver.
FACULTY OF APPLIED SCIENCE.
First Year.
Full Undergraduates.
Annand,  Harold Vancouver.
Arkley, Heileman Osborne Vancouver.
Bain, William Alexander Vancouver.
Bassett, Edward William Victoria.
Bennett, James Lingard North Vancouver.
Callander, Maitland Bruce Vancouver.
Campbell, John Middleton Vancouver.
Carter, Marshall Neal Vancouver.
Charlton, David  Berry Port Haney.
Cooper, Edwin Secord	
Davison, Harold Clyde Vancouver.
Demidoff, Peter Henry Trail.
Evans, Lacey Heintzman Vancouver. 238 The University of British Columbia.
Name. Home Address.
Evjen,  Ralph Walter Vancouver.
Gale, Stanley Vancouver.
Gibbs, Thomas Clifford Vancouver.
Gibson, Ernest Sydney Vancouver.
Gray, Roy Vancouver.
Greggor, Robert Douglas Vancouver.
Guernsey, Frederick William Vancouver.
Hatch, David Alfred Vancouver.
Herry, Herman A Vernon
Hicks,  Kenneth  Wade Vancouver.
Hincks, Drennan Victoria.
Israeli, Moshe Vancouver.
Jenson,  Ernest  Albert New Westminster.
Jones, Eric Greville Vancouver.
Jones, William  Alfred Vancouver.
Lambert, George Gordon Nelson.
Lazenby,  Frederic Arthur Port Hammond.
Lucas, Colen Cameron Vancouver.
Manning,  Samuel Mclntyre Vancouver.
Mordy,   George Cumberland.
Morgan, Frederick Stewart Vancouver.
Morton, Ralph McKenzie Vancouver.
Mosher, Harry E North Vancouver.
McDonald, Malcolm Vancouver.
McPherson, John Wallace Vancouver.
Niederman,  Otto  Emil Trail.
Noble,  John  Stephen • Cranbrook.
Parsons, Harold Ernest South Vancouver.
Peter, Eric Grant Vancouver.
Pollock, James Robert Vancouver.
Price, Peter Parksville.
Ramsell, John Lawrence Marpole.
Rees, Arthur Fred New Westminster.
Richardson,  Edward Roger  Gibson Penticton.
Richmond, Alexander Morton Nanaimo.
Saunders, Arthur Jackson Vancouver.
Steede, John Horsford Port Alberni.
Stevens, Ernest George Barlow South Vancouver.
Stevenson, Cecil Douglas Victoria.
Tanner, Dallas O'Malley South Vancouver.
Taylor, Ivan Marcus Vancouver.
Walsh, Harold Edgar Vancouver.
Woodhouse, Arthur Redvera Fernie. List of Students. 239
Conditioned.
Name. Home Address.
Abernethy, Gordon McKellar Vancouver.
Black, Thomas Bennet Prince Rupert.
Demidoff, Joseph Trail.
Groves,  Godfrey Francis Charles Kelowna.
Purdy, Harry Leslie Vancouver.
Robson, William Marshall  . Vancouver.
Woodard, Laurence H Vancouver.
Partial.
Bloomfield, Joan D'Ardry Vancouver.
Broadfoot, Walter Lundy Craig Vancouver.
Cox, George Charles Roland Kamloops.
Lambert, Arthur Alexander Nelson.
Weir, Carlton Morley Vancouver.
Wood,  William  Gordon  Oliver Burnaby Lake.
Second Year.
Full Undergraduates
Albo, Frank John Paul Rossland.
Arnott,  Clarence Vancouver.
Baker, Wallace Risser Vancouver.
Barr, Percy Munson Vancouver.
Bell, John Gordon Vancouver.
Bickell,  Leslie Keith Victoria.
Bramston-Cook, Harold Edward North Vancouver.
Cameron, George Stuart Vancouver.
Cant, George Beattie North Vancouver.
Carlisle, Kenneth Wilfred Vancouver.
Charnley,  Frank Barnston Island.
Coffin,  Frederick Winfleld Vancouver.
Disney, Charles Norman Edmonds.
Elliott, Frederick George Genoa Bay
Falconer, Stuart Alexander Vancouver.
Ferguson, Royden Hamilton Vancouver.
Finlay, Allan Hunter Vancouver.
Foggo, Norman Oliphant Macaulay Vancouver.
Giegerich, Henry Cleburne Kaslo.
Graham, Roland Creelman Vancouver.
Gwyther, Valentine Mackenzie William Vancouver.
Hardie, Dudley Barrinton Esquimau.
Heaslip, Wilbur Jefferies Vancouver. 240 The University of British Columbia.
Name. Home Address.
Hedley, Robert Hale Vancouver.
Huggett, Jack Leslie North Vancouver.
Jackson, Gerald Christopher Arder Aldergrove.
Jackson, Robert Miller Vancouver.
Jure, Albert Edward Vancouver.
Lipsey, George Cherry Vancouver.
McCutcheon, James Creighton Greenwood.
McLean, Robert Leslie Vancouver.
Napier, Alan Jack South Vancouver.
Norman, George Hugh Charles Mirror Lake.
Osborne, Freligh Fitz Vancouver.
Pearcey, John Guy Vancouver.
Peele, Percy Frederick New Westminster.
Rear, James Carlton Vancouver.
Smitheringale,   William  Vickers Vancouver.
Stacey,  Leonard Brown Chilliwack.
Stockwell, Clifford Howard Vancouver.
Stroyan, Philip  Bateman Vancouver.
Sweny, George William Victoria.
Underhill, John Edward Vancouver.
Wallis, Hubert Douglas Cobble Hill.
Wilson, Clarence Harrison New Westminster.
Wolverton, Jasper Matthews Nelson.
Conditioned
Emery,;- Donald Joseph Edmonds.
Harkness John Alexander Charles Lozells.
Kagnoff, Morris Vancouver.
MacLaren, William James Roy Vancouver.
Sutherland, George Fraser Vancouver.
Trorey,   Lyle  Graeme Vancouver.
Woodworth, George Elden Chilliwack.
Partial
Braim, John Gordon Dundarave.
Ebbutt, Frank Creston.
Garman, Eric Heaton Vancouver.
McLachlan, Charles Gordon Vancouver.
McLachlan, Robert Angus Vancouver.
Rushbury, Henry George Boswell Vancouver.
Ternan, Chalmer Clifford Vancouver. List of Students. 241
Third Year.
Full Undergraduates
Name. Home Address.
Anderson,  Allan  Jardine Vancouver.
Berry,  Theodore Victor Vancouver.
Burton,   William  Donald Vancouver.
Cameron, Ralph King Vancouver.
Cock, Cecil James Vancouver.
Davidson, John Randolph Vancouver.
Dean,   Curtis  Milford Victoria.
Evans,   Charles  Sparling Vancouver.
Fraser,  Duncan Vancouver.
Giegerich, Joseph Rhinehardt Kaslo.
Graham, William Ernest Vancouver.
Gregg, Elwyn Emerson Vancouver.
Gross, George Clarence Vancouver.
Guernsey,   Tarrant Dickie Vancouver.
Gunning, Henry Cecil Vancouver.
Hanna, William Scott Vancouver.
Hodson, Reginald Victoria.
Hooper, Cleeve Woodward Vancouver.
Jenkins,  John Henry North Vancouver.
Jones,  Russell  Heber Blayde Victoria.
Lidgey, Ralph Christian Graham Vancouver.
Loveridge,  Gilbert Thomas Vernon.
Mathers, Cliffe St. John Vancouver.
McCallum, Neil Mitchell Vancouver.
McKee, Robert Gerald Vancouver.
McVittie, Charles Archibald Victoria.
Pearse, Hubert Arnold Atlin.
Rae, Douglas Henderson North Lonsdale P. O.
Rice, Harrington Molesworth Anthony Duncan.
Say, Stanley Rhys Fordingbridge, Eng.
Sivertz, Christian Victoria.
Somerville, Archibald Laurence Harold Vancouver.
Spargo, Thomas South Vancouver.
Stewart, Fredrick Choate Vancouver.
Ure,  William Vancouver.
Wilkinson, Elmo Clifford White Rock.
Conditioned
Parker, Raymond Whitfield Vancouver.
Partial.
Forrester, William Wallace New Westminster.
Jones, Cyril Vancouver.
Middleton, Campbell M Vancouver. 242 The University of British Columbia.
Fourth Year.
Full Undergraduates,
Name. Home Address.
Anderson,  Sydney Vancouver.
Banfield, William Orson Vancouver.
Bickell, William Albert Bird Vancouver.
Coates, Wells Wintemute Vancouver.
Coles, Eric Morrell Vancouver.
Fountain, George Frederick Vancouver.
Fournier, John Raymond Vancouver.
Gale, William Alexander Victoria.
Gray, William Henry Kamloops.
Hatch,  William   George Vancouver.
Hatt, Rona Alexandra Vancouver.
Jackson, Oscar Adalbert Edmund Aldergrove.
Jane, Robert Stephen Vancouver.
Meekison, Andrew Gordon Vancouver.
McColl, Eli Stuart Vancouver.
McDougall, Stewart Robertson New Westminster.
McLellan,  Norman  Wellington Vancouver.
McLuckie, Robert Macfarlane Vancouver.
Peck, Wallace Swanzey Vancouver.
Scott,  William  O.  C Vancouver.
Shaw, Lee Donald Vancouver.
Stedman, Donald Frank Vancouver.
Todd, Arthur Alison Vancouver.
Walker, John Fortune Vancouver.
Watson, James Vancouver.
Conditioned.
Doyle, Harold Birkenhead,  Eng.
Partial.
Emmons, Edward Frets Vancouver.
Goranson, Roy Walter New Westminster.
Double Course.
Fifth Year
Laird, Frederick William Vancouver. List of Students. 243
NURSING.
First Year.
Full Undergraduate.
Name. Home Address.
Armstrong, Norah Eileen Fort a la Corne, Sask.
Creelman, Florence Mary Leigh Vancouver.
Creelman, Pauline Fingley Vancouver.
Foerster, Marion Edith Vancouver.
Innes,  Florence  Alfreda  Irene Vancouver.
Laffere,  Olive May South Vancouver.
Conditioned.
Smith, Ida Letitia Vancouver.
Partial. ^
Hedley, Anne Vancouver.
Taylor, Dorothy Gladys New Westminster.
Second Year.
Full Undergraduate.
Bennet, Helen Margaret Victoria.
Wilson, Everilda New Westminster.
Conditioned.
Carson, Leila Audrey Victoria.
Rogers, Dorothy Matilda Seattle, Wash.
Partial.
Bulman, Kathryn Frances Beryl Kelowna.
Cook,  Louise Chemainus.
Pearce,   Beatrice  A Victoria. 244 The University of British Columbia.
FACULTY OF AGRICULTURE.
First Year.
Full Undergraduates.
Name. Home Address.
Argue, Charles William Vancouver.
Atkinson, Lyle Alexander New Westminster.
Aylard, Arthur William Victoria.
Buckley, Hubert Leslie North Vancouver.
Caple,  Kenneth  Percival Vancouver.
Challenger, George Woolner Vancouver.
Fraser, Edward Bruce Nanaimo.
Gutteridge, Harry Stoneman Vancouver.
Hood-Barrs, Beatrice South Vancouver.
Keenan, David Prosser Vancouver.
Laing,   Arthur Eburne.
Murphy, Laurence Arthur New Westminster.
McKay, Leslie  Walton Agassiz.
McKenzie,  George  Grant Marpole.
Newcombe, Frederick Ellis Vancouver.
Townsend, Charles Thorcan London, Eng.
Wilkinson, Thomas  George Victoria.
Wolfe-Jones,  Cecil North Vancouver.
Zoond,   Alexander London, England.
Conditioned
Maclntyre, Hugh Campbell West Summerland.
Thompson, David William Eburne.
Partial
Calder, James Norman Jamaica.
Carpenter,  Kathleen Point Grey.
Chester,  Herbert Cranbrook.
Darling,  John W Vancouver.
DesBrisay,   Eileen Vancouver.
Godwin, Edward Charles New Westminster.
Goldie, James Alexander Vancouver.
Harper, Henry Neville Durban, South Africa.
Hartley, Thomas Sutherland Vancouver.
Lambly, Wilfred Thomas Penticton.
Singleton, Lora Marinda Vancouver.
Spicer, Erie Daniel Vancouver. List of Students. 245
Second Year.
Full Undergraduates.
Name. Home Address.
Barton, Charles MacKenzie Chilliwack.
Eby, Victor James Abbotsford.
Hope, Ernest Charles Langley Fort.
MacCallum, Hugh Crawford Agassiz.
Russell, Hugh McLaren Marpole.
Steves, Harold Leslie Steveston.
Partial.
Etter, Harold Clinton Penticton.
McKay,   John  Joseph Kongmoon,  S.  China.
Ogilvie, Alvin Easton Agassiz.
Philip, William Pearson Kamloops.
Plummer, Arthur Howard Vancouver.
Rowley, Gordon Wilford Vancouver.
Wilcox, John Carman Salmon Arm.
Wilcox, Ralph Victor Salmon Arm.
Third Year.
Full Undergraduate.
Barry,  Sidney Clifford Vancouver.
Bennett, Leslie North Vancouver.
Blair, Archibald Steveston.
Cavers, Raymond Vere Cloverdale.
Landon, Gordon Lome Armstrong.
Richards, Albert Edward New Westminster.
Woods, John Jex North Vancouver.
Conditioned.
Fulton, Harry Graham Chilliwack.
Mathers, William Graham Vancouver.
Pye, William John Serson Vancouver.
Partial.
Phillips, Sperry Shea Camp Lester.
Welland, Frederic James South Gait, Ont.
Fourth Year.
Full Undergraduates
Fisher, Raymond Anderson Prince Rupert.
Greenwood, Harold Day Vancouver.
Harris, George Howell West Summerland. 246 The University of British Columbia.
Name. Home Address.
Kelly, Clifford Darton Vancouver.
Leavens, John Bruce Vancouver.
McKechnie,   Martha   Stirling Armstrong.
Riddell, William Hugh Coleman, Alta.
Riley, William John Celista.
Sweeting, Bertram  Stanley Vancouver.
Partial
Clarke, George Ernest Wesley Vancouver.
GRADUATES
Faculty of Arts and Science.
Blakey, Dorothy Vernon.
Boss, Arthur E Vancouver.
Clemens,   Isabella Vancouver.
Crute,  Ebenezer Agassiz.
Dunbar, Violet E Vancouver.
Dunlop, Henry A Vancouver.
Fisher, Lacey J New Westminster.
Foerster, Russell E Vancouver.
Gill, Bonnie H North Vancouver.
Hamilton, George H Vancouver.
Handford, Freda M Vancouver.
Harris, Ethel Vancouver.
Kerr, Donna E Duncan.
Kilpatrick, Myrtle E Victoria.
King, Herbert B Vancouver.
Morgan, William North Vancouver.
Morrison, Loyle A Vancouver.
Morrison, Margaret R Vancouver.
McConnell, Hazel E Victoria.
McDongall,  Helen Vancouver.
McKay, Katharine Cornwall, Ont.
MacKinnon, Flora G Calgary, Alta.
Peck, Kathleen  M Vancouver.
Rogers, Wilbur S Vancouver.
Schell, Joseph McL Vancouver.
Shumizu, Kosaburo Vancouver.
Stirk, Louie Vancouver.
Studer, Frank J Vancouver.
Suttie, Ethel G Vancouver.
Wilson, Freda L Vancouver.
Wilson, Grace A Vancouver. List of Students. 247
Faculty of Applied Science.
Name. Home Address.
Gillie, Kenneth B Victoria.
Melville,  John Vancouver.
Swanson, Clarence O Vancouver.
Faculty of Agriculture.
Lothian, David E Loanstone, Penicuik,
Scotland..
Robinson, Victor B Vernon.
Palmer, Richard C Summerland.
Traves, Charles W Grand Forks. 248
The University of British Columbia.
REGISTRATION FOR 1921-22.
Faculty of Arts and Science.
Women
First Year      155
Second Year        77
Third Year        67
Fourth Year        40
Men
Total
180
335
83
160
53
120
38
78
693
Faculty of Applied Science.
Women Men Total
First Year          1 68 69
Second Year          0% 60 60
Third Year a     0 40 40
Fourth Year f     1 27 28
Double Course.
Women
Fifth  Year
Men
1
197
Total
1
Nursing.
First  Year   .
Second Year
len
Men
Total
9
0
9
7
0
7
16
Faculty of Agriculture.
Women Men Total
First  Year              4 29 33
Second Year          0 14 14
Third Year           0 12 12
Fourth Year          1 9 10
69 Registration for 1921-22. 249
Graduates.
Women
Arts and Science        18
Applied Science    0
Agriculture  0
Men
Total
13
31
3
3
4
4   "
38
1014
Short Courses (Session 1921-22).
Summer School    134
Public Health Nursing  14
Botany  64
Mining      5
217 250 The University of British Columbia.
EXAMINATION   RESULTS   (Session  1920-21).
DEGREES CONFERRED
Faculty of Arts and Science.
Conferring the Degree of Master of Arts
(Names in alphabetical order)
William John Allardyce, B.A Chemistry (major)
Biology (minor)
Olive Edmondson Maclean, B.A Bacteriology   (major)
Chemistry   (minor)
Roy Lars Vollum, B.A Bacteriology   (major)
Chemistry   (minor)
Conferring the Degree of Bachelor of Arts.
With Honours.
(Names in alphabetical order)
Blakey, Dorothy (1st class honours in English)
Boss, Arthur Evan (2nd class honours in Chemistry)
Crozier, Isabella Elliott (1st class honours in English)
Dunbar, Violet Evelyn (2nd class honours in Biology
and Chemistry)
Fournier, Leslie Thomas (2nd class honours in Economics)
Goldstein, Cyril Moss (2nd class honours in French)
Goldstein, Sylvia (2nd class honours in French)
Handford, Freda Mary (2nd class honours in Chemistry)
McConnell, Hazel Erma (2nd class honours in French)
Peardon, Thomas Preston (1st class honours in History and
Latin)
Pratt, Bernard Dodge (2nd class honours in Economics)
Rive, Alfred    (1st class honours in Economics
and History)
Russell, Alan Macpherson (1st class honours in Economics)
Scott, Seaman Morley   (1st class honours in  Latin and
History)
Solloway, Edgar Dunn (2nd class honours in Biology
and Chemistry)
Studer, Frank John (1st class honours in Mathematics)
In Pass Course.
(Names in order of merit)
Class I.
Craig, Ruth Dyke Coates, Lila F.
Cowling, Florence Galbraith, Samuel Tait
Smith, Annie Marie Degrees Conferred.
251
Class II.
MacKinnon, Flora Grace
Herman, Victoria
Munro,  Muriel Rose
Ingledew,  Harold Garfield
Matheson, Marjorie Crawford
Cribb, Reginald Edward
McKee, Enid Muriel
Bowes, Dorothy Margaret
Lawrence, Marion Evangeline
MacBeth, Jessie Alexandra
Lawrence, James Lyle
Rogers, Wilbur Stuart
Wilson, Freda Lenore
Adams, Dorothy Isobel
Barnwell, George Francis
Clarke, Margaret
McLean, Eleanor May
Harrison, Ruth
Kilpatrick, Myrtle Esther
Wilson, Grace Agnes
Cross, George Carmichael
Mathers, Nina Adell
Suttie, Ethel Gwendolyn
Carson, Miriam Barbara
Foerster, Russell Earl
Lord, Arthur Edward
McKee, Greta Hope
Ure,  Agnes  Margaret
Edwards, Sadie
Hobson, Lillian Belle
Lett, Jessie Katrina
McGregor, Norma Isabel
Schell, Joseph McClure
McAfee, Irene Davin
MacArthur, Donald Moulton
McArthur, Hattie May
Robson, Margaret Watt
Greenwood, Julia Elizabeth
Fisher, Lacey Julian
Healy, Agnes Coupland
Passed.
Jones, Norah Vivian
Lewis, Kathleen Gwynneth
Lyne, Dorothy Elizabeth
McLean, Harold William
Sauder,  Marion Eleanor  Martha
Usher, Alexander Murray
Wilks, Arthur Frederick
Crute, Ebenezer
Shannon,  Myrtle Evelyn
Gill, Bonnie Helen
Milley, Chesley Ernest
Brenchley, Dorothy Ann Bennett
Lyness, Ruth Emily
Wilby, George Van
Kirby, Judson Orville Coates
McTavish, Janet Lu Edna
Kelman, Mildred Alice
Reid, Georgina Agnes
Munn, Nina Vivian
Wright,  Thomas  Hall
Passed with Supplemental*.
Smith, Charles Duncan
Barlow, Edith Charlotte Irene
Osborne, Dwight Hillis
Aegrotat.
McDougall, Wilfrid Robinson 252 The University of British Columbia.
Faculty of Applied Science.
Conferring the Degree  of Bachelor of Science.
(Names in order of merit)
Chemical Engineering.
Class I.
Douglas Archibald Wallace
Class II.
Clifford Ervin Stone Kenneth Beresford Gillie
Donald McKay Morrison Edward  Murdie White
John Melville Stephen Becher Plummer
Chemistry.
Class I.
Wilfrid Reid Payne
Mining Engineering.
Class I.
Clarence  Otto  Swanson   (Aegrotat)
Class II.
Howard Turnbull James Joshua Rowland Kingham
Harold Glover Bell Robert Griffith Anderson
Passed.
Hedley Alexander Rose Roland McPhee
Douglas Lionel Thompson ^ Bayard Marshal Carter
Metallurgical Engineering.
Class II.
Pharic Donald Innes Honeyman
Faculty of Agriculture.
Conferring the Degree of Bachelor of Science in Agriculture.
(Name* in order of merit)
Class I.
Richard Claxton Palmer Claude Perrin Leckie
Marion  Jean  Mounce,  B.A. Cecil Alexander Lamb (Aegrotat)
Class II.
George Stanley Coward, B.A.        Henry Roy L. Davis
Passed.
Frederick Francis McKenzie Charles Wesley Traves Medals, Scholarships, and Prizes Awarded.        253
MEDALS, SCHOLARSHIPS, AND  PRIZES.
Awarded May, 1921.
Faculty of Arts and Science.
Fourth Year.
1. The Governor-General's Gold Medal Dorothy Blakey
2. The Historical Society Gold Medal Alfred Rive
3. The Wesbrook Prize, $50.00 Ruth Dyke Craig
Third Year.
1. University Scholarship, $75.00 Lester Winson McLennan
2. University Scholarship, $75.00—
Charles Augustus Fordyce Clark    "j
Weldon Robert McAfee >   Equal
Awarded to Charles Augustus Fordyce Clark
3. The Arts '19 Scholarship, $150.00 Weldon Robert McAfee
4. The Gerald Myles Harvey Prize, $50.00 Book Prize. .
 Weldon Robert  McAfee
5. The Historical Society Silver Medal Annie Pirie Watson
Second Year.
1. The McGill Graduates' Scholarship, $137.50	
 Kathleen Madge Portsmouth
2. University Scholarship, $75.00. . . .Kathleen Madge Portsmouth
by reversion to
Annie Margaret Anderson
by reversion to
Joseph Frederick Brown
3. University Scholarship, $75.00 Joseph Frederick Brown
by reversion to
Marjory Emma Bell
4. The Terminal City Club Memorial Scholarship, $100.00—
Divided between
Harry Morris Cassidy
and
Frank John Cunningham
5. The Scott Memorial Scholarship, $110.00	
 Gertrude May Smith
6. The Shaw Memorial Scholarship, $137.50	
 Kathleen Madge Portsmouth
by reversion to
Annie Margaret Anderson 254 The University of British Columbia.
First Year.
1. Royal Institution Scholarship, $75.00 Roy Gray
2. Royal Institution Scholarship, $75.00 Lucy Ingram
3. Royal Institution Scholarship, $75.00. . .Flora Magdalene Aske
4. University Scholarship for Returned Soldiers,  $75.00
 Arthur Geoffrey Bruun
5. University Scholarship for Returned Soldiers, $75.00
   Robert Topper
6. The Women's Liberal Association Prize, $25.00	
 Ruth Askew MacWilliam
7. The Women's Conservative Association Prize,  $25.00
 Edwin Secord Cooper
Post-Oraduates.
1. University Scholarship, $200.00 Dorothy Blakey
2. The Anne Wesbrook Scholarship, $100.00 Alfred Rive
Faculty of Applied Science.
Post-Oraduate Scholarship in Applied Science.
1.    The Dean Brock Scholarship, $100.00. . .Clarence Otto Swanson
Fourth Year.
1.    The Convocation Scholarship, $50.00.. .Clarence Otto Swanson
Third Year.
1.    The Dunsmuir Scholarship, $165.00	
 Oscar Adalbert Edmond Jackson
Second Year.
1.    University Scholarship,  $75.00 William Ure
First  Year.
1.    University Scholarship, $75.00 Cyril Jones
Nursing—Short Course of Public Health.
1. Red Cross Prize, $100.00 Muriel Carolina Harman
2. Provincial Board of Health Prize, $60.00	
 Helena Gladys Munslow
3. Provincial Board of Health Prize,  $40.00	
 Louise Marian Usher
Faculty of Agriculture.
Fourth Year.
1.    The R. P. McLennan Gold Medal Richard Claxton Palmer Medals, Scholarships, and Prizes Awarded.        255
Third Year.
1. The R. P. McLennan Scholarship, $75.00	
 William John Riley
2. The B. C. Fruit Growers' Association Scholarship, $100.00
Not awarded
Special.
1.    The B. C. Dairymen's Association Prizes:
First Prize, $50.00 Bertram Stanley Sweeting
Second Prize, $30.00 William Hugh Riddell
Third Prize, $20.00 Marion Jean Mounce
Second Year.
1.    The R. P.  McLennan Scholarship,  $75.00	
 Albert Edward Richards
by reversion to
Raymond Vere Cavers
First  Year.
1. University Scholarship, $75.00 Ernest Charles Hope
2. The R. P. McLennan Scholarship, $75.00. . .Herbert Edwin West
General (Open).
1. University Book Prize, $25.00 No competition
2. University Book Prize, $25.00 No competition
3. The Women's Canadian Club Scholarship, $75.00. . . .
 Weldon  Robert McAfee
by reversion to
James Fenton Herd and     \
Annie Pirie Watson r   E1ual
4. The Historical Society Prize, $25.00 Ruth Emilie Verchere
5. The Captain LeRoy Memorial Scholarship, $300.00..
 Albert Edward  Richards
6. The Vagabonds' Club Prize, $25.00 Arthur Geoffrey Bruun
7. The Applied Sociology Prize Essay, $25.00	
 Ethel Gwendolyn Suttie
Returned Soldier Scholarships.
S. T.  Galbraith    Arts '21
Alfred Rive    Arts '21
S. M. Scott Arts *21
M.  Home    Arts '23
W.   A.   Gale Sc. '22
C. S. Evans Sc. '23
C.  Sivertz    Sc. *23
C. P. Leckie    Agric. '21
R. C. Palmer Agric. '21 256 The University of British Columbia.
UNIVERSITY SUMMER SESSION, 1922.
Six Weeks—July 3rd to August 12th.
With the Session of 1922 The University Summer School
for Teachers becomes The University. Summer Session. Teachers
and others who possess full Matriculation standing may pursue
University courses and receive credit therefor towards the B.A.
degree. During the forthcoming Session, however, no University-
courses will be offered beyond those of the first two years.
The University Summer Session will, in co-operation with
the Provincial Department of Education, continue to provide
special courses for teachers of High School subjects (including
Commercial subjects), and also courses in Educational Theory
and Method of a similar character to those which have been given
during the past two years.
No student registered during the "Winter Session of the
University will be admitted to the ensuing Summer Session,
except for purposes of general culture or for the purpose of
preparation for the regular University supplemental examinations.
Inquiries and applications should be addressed to the
Director of the Summer Session, The University of British Columbia, Vancouver, B. C. Student Organization. 257
STUDENT ORGANIZATION
In order that the activities of the student body may be
effectively carried on, the Alma Mater Society has been organized, with a governing executive called the Students' Council.
It is the duty of the Students' Council to control all the activities
of the societies subsidiary to the Alma Mater Society.
The members of the Students' Council are Undergraduates
of the Junior and Senior Years, and are elected at the close of
the Session preceding their term of office.
In order that the work may be carried on to the best advantage, considerable funds are necessary, and the Alma Mater fee
of $7.00, compulsory for all students, is designed to cover the
expenses incurred.
Students upon entering the University have an opportunity
to take part in practically all lines of sport, as well as to participate in debating and public speaking, and various other
activities which are more clearly indicated below.
Publications Board.
The Publications Board is best known from the Handbook,
"Ubyssey" and the "Annual." In the first of these an attempt
is made to compile information valuable to the Undergraduate.
"The Ubyssey," the College paper, is published weekly. The
members of the Staff are students selected as a result of voluntary competition. "The Annual" is published at the close of
the Spring Term. It is intended to epitomize the spirit of the
year, in all its phases.
Literary and Scientific Department.
The Literary and Scientific Department co-ordinates the
workings of its constituent Societies, which are indicated below.
In the Players' Club, those whose talents lie in the direction of the drama may find medium of expression.
The Musical Society includes the Men's Glee Club, the
"Women's Glee Club, and the University Orchestra. 258 The University of British Columbia.
For those interested in public speaking and debating there
are the Men's Literary Society and the "Women's Literary Society, the Agriculture Discussion Club, and Sigma Delta Kappa
Society.
The Chemistry Society, the Engineering Discussion Club,
and the Social Science Club offer a field for discussion of Scientific and Social problems.
Women's Athletics.
The "Women's Athletic Association comprises all the
"Women's Athletic Clubs of The University. Prominent among
them is the "Women's Basketball Club, the "Women's Gymnasium
Club, the "Women's Grass Hockey Club, and the Women's Swimming Club. Last year the Ice Hockey Club was inactive owing
to the impossibility of securing the Arena.
Men's Athletics.
The Men's Athletic Association endeavors to foster all
branches of clean and manly sport.
The season for the Rugby Club begins with the opening of
the Fall Term. Practices are held and three teams are chosen,
one for the McKechnie Cup League, provincial; one for the
Miller Cup League, city; and one for the Intermediate League,
also of the city.
The Basketball season follows that of Rugby. Three teams
are chosen and entered in the various city leagues.
The Soccer Club enters a team in one of the city leagues.
The team is chosen early in the fall.
The Track Club takes charge of all field events, its big
features being the Annual Track Meet and the Arts' 20 relay
race.
The Rowing Club is affiliated with the Vancouver Rowing
Club, and retains its identity as a University Club.
The Ice Hockey Club selects teams each year and enters
these in the city series.
The Outdoors Club takes charge of all picnics, hikes, mountain climbing, excursions, and outdoor parties. Student Organization. 259
The Tennis Tournament takes place after the opening of
the Fall Term, and the championship games are played in men's
and women's singles and doubles, and also mixed doubles.
The Badminton Club holds practices and games in the evenings throughout the winter.
The Boxing and the Swimming Clubs meet once a week
during the winter, under capable instructors.
The Lacrosse Club carries on throughout the summer, and
is chiefly for those who are in the city during that time.
Alumni Association.
This organization was formed in May, 1917. It is composed of Honorary, Active, and Associate members. Honorary
membership includes all members of the Faculty. Active Membership includes all Associate Members who have paid their
annual fee of $2.00. All graduates of the University automatically become Associate Members on graduating.
The purpose of the Association is to further the interests of
The University and the Alumni. To accomplish this purpose
the Association aims to keep its members interested in The University and the Alma Mater, so that they may know their college
not only as it was, but as it is, and can be.
There are several subsidiary organizations within the Association, such as: "The Curtain Club," which offers a field to
graduates who are interested in the drama; '' The Alumni Employment Bureau," whose aim is to help provide employment
for undergraduates and graduates; and "The Alumni Athletic
Club,'' which aims to foster sport at The University, and to give
the Alumni an opportunity of continuing in various sports after
leaving The University. VICTORIA  COLLEGE
(In affiliation with the University of British Columbia)
Principal
Edward B. Paul, M.A. (Aberdeen)
Registrar
E. Howard Russell, B.A. (Queen's)
The College at Victoria, B. C, gives instruction in the first
two years of the Arts Course.   The courses offered are:
First and Second Years.
The work of the first two years in Arts and Science is
arranged according to the following scheme, involving ten
courses:
1, 2.    English 1  (a and b), 2  (a and b), one course in
each year, i (6 units)
3, 4.    The first two  courses in  a language offered  for
matriculation, one course in each year.        (6 units)
5. The first course (3 units) in Mathematics.    (To be
taken in the First Year.)
6. A first course in Physics. (3 units)
7-10.    Four courses (12 units) to be chosen from the following groups of studies:
1. Mathematics, Chemistry, Physics.
2. Latin, Greek, French.
3. Philosophy, History (Economics, if
possible.)
The rules and regulations governing the College are the
same as those in force in the University. WESTMINSTER HALL
(Presbyterian)
VANCOUVER, B. C.
(In affiliation with The University of British Columbia)
Principal
Rev. W. H. Smith, M.A., Ph.D., D.D.
Registrar and Secretary
Rev. J. A. Logan, D.D.
Westminster Hall offers courses in Theology, and, under the
general regulations of the University in reference to affiliated
Theological Colleges, provides classes for which credit is given in
the Arts Course for the B.A. degree.   (See page 69.)
For further information in reference to Faculty, Courses
of Study, etc., see calendar of Westminster Hall.
THE   ANGLICAN  THEOLOGICAL
COLLEGE OF BRITISH COLUMBIA
VANCOUVER, B. C.
(In affiliation with The University of British Columbia)
Principal
Rev. W. H. Vance, M.A.
Registrar
Rev. C. H. Shortt, M.A.
The Anglican Theological College offers courses in Theology
leading to the Diploma of Licentiate in Theology and the Degrees
of B.D. and D.D., and, under the general regulations of the
University in reference to affiliated colleges, provides Theological
options for which credit is given in the course leading to the
B.A. degree.   (See page 69.)
For further information in reference to Faculty, Courses
of Study, etc., see calendar of the College.  INDEX
Page
Academic Dress    34
Academic Year      10
Administrative Officers   3, 4
Admission—
To Advanced Standing (ad eundem stalum)      50
Of Partial  Students     S3
Of Students from other Universities   36, 37
By Matriculation      35
Advanced Degrees  220
Age for Admission    50
Agriculture—
Courses in  199
For Matriculation     43
Agronomy  207
Algebra—
Courses in   119
For Matriculation  39, 47
Anglican Theological College of British Columbia, The   261
Animal Husbandry   209
Applied Science, Information for Students in  -  135
Arithmetic for Matriculation     39
Arts and Science—
Information for Students in  -    69
Course for B.A.      69
Assaying  191
Attendance—
Rules regarding  -  52, 53
Summary of (1921-22)    248
B.A. Degree    69
B.A.Sc. Degree   69, 135
B.S.A. Degree   199
Bacteriology   85, 213
Biology      86 264 Index.
Page
Board of Governors   3
Board and Residence   33
Botanical Gardens   30
Botany—
Courses in    87
For Matriculation   40
Short Courses   89
Building and Grounds  22
Buildings, Plans for   21
Calculus   120
Caution-money    54
Certificates Accepted for Matriculation   36
Chemical  Engineering   138
Chemistry—
Courses in Arts   90
Courses in Applied/ Science  139
For Matriculation   40, 47
Laboratories  32
Church Attendance   33
Civil  Engineering  141
Classics    94
Classification of Students   53
Conditioned Undergraduates   53
Constitution of the University  17
Convocation,   First     21
Dates for Session 1922-23   10
Dairying    212
Dean of Women   33
Degrees Granted1 by the University  32
Descriptive  Geometry    163
Donations   68
Double Course, Arts and Applied Science   158
Drawing  180
Dynamics  183
Economics—
Arts   98
Engineering   170 Index. 265
Page
Electricity   195
Endowments      27
English—
Courses in  101
For  Matriculation  38, 46
Entrance Examinations—
Fees    37
Regulations       35
Subjects     38
Equivalent Standing for Students from other Universities   36, 50
Equipment        32
Ethics   127
Examinations—
For Entrance     38
In Arts and Science     82
In Applied Science   160
In Agriculture   200
Results, Session 1920-21   250
Exemptions from Matriculation Examination    36
Expenses of Board and Residence    33
Extension Lectures     26
Fees—
For Matriculation  -    37
In Applied Science     54
In Arts     54
In Agriculture     54
Special      55
Fire Assaying   191
Forest   Engineering    145
Forest Products Laboratories   147
Forestry     174
Foundations  and  Masonry  167
Freehand Drawing, Courses in   180
French—
Courses in -  123
For Matriculation   45, 49 266 Index.
Page
Funds for Loans     58
Geodesy   171
Geography for Matriculation     39
Geological Engineering   148
Geology   108
Geometry—
Courses in  119
Analytic   119, 179
Descriptive   163
For Matriculation   40, 47
German—
Courses in   125
For Matriculation  45, 49
Government of the University     17
Governors, Board of      3
Graphical Statics   165
Greek-
Courses in    94
For Matriculation  •  45, 48
Herbarium and Botanical Gardens      30
Historical Sketch of University      15
History—
Courses in   113
For Matriculation   39, 47
Of the University  —-     15
Honour  Courses      75
Horticulture   215
Hydraulics     168
Instruction, Officers of      4
Khaki University Memorial Scholarship Fund     66
Laboratories    32
Latin—
Courses in    96
For Matriculation  44, 48
Lettering  180
Library       28 Index. 267
Page
List of Students (1921-22)   221
Living  Expenses   -     33
Loan Funds     58
Lodgings     33
Logic    126
M.A., M.A.Sc, and M.S.A. Degrees   220
Magnetism    195
Mapping     165
Materials of Engineering   165
Mathematics—
Courses in Arts and Science   118
Courses in Applied Science   179
For Matriculation   39, 47
Matriculation Examination—
Junior     38
Senior     46
Certificates Accepted for     36
Details of Work in Each Subject   38, 46
Fees for     37
Regulations       35
Time-table    -     12
Matriculation Scholarships     57
McGill University College of British Columbia    16
Mechanical  Engineering   150
Mechanical  Drawing    180
Mechanics   194
Medals, Prizes and Scholarships   56-67
Metallurgical  Engineering    151
Mineralogy     109, 178
Mining Engineering   151
Modern Languages  123
Nursing, Department of -  155, 193
Officers and Staff       4
Opening  Date    10, 32
Ore-dressing     192
Organic  Chemistry     91 268 Index.
Partial Students— Page
Definition  of  -■--.     53
Regulations for Entrance      53
Philosophy     126
Physical Chemistry      92
Physical Examination     33
Physics—
In Arts    129
In Applied  Science   194
For Matriculation   40, 48
Political   Economy       98
Poultry Husbandry   217
Prizes, Medals and Scholarships   56-67
Professors, List of       4
Psychology     126
Public Health, Department of  195
Qualitative Analysis     91
Quantitative Analysis     91
Railway Engineering   168
Red Cross Chair of Public Health       9
Register of Students (1921-22)   221
Registration       51
Requirements for Entrance     35
Residence and Board      33
Rhodes  Scholarship      64
Royal Institution      16
Scholarships, Prizes and Medals   56-67
Selection  of Site   ~     19
Senate—
Names of Members       3
Composition of      17
Senior Matriculation      46
Session,  Duration  of       32
Shop-work     181
Short Courses—
Botany     89
Mining      154
Agriculture   199 Index. 269
Page
Sociology     100
Spanish     126
Statics    194
Graphical     165
Strength of Materials   167
Structures, Theory of   173
Students—
Classes of     53
Lists of (1921-22)   221
Summer Session   256
Summer Work in Surveying  136
Supplemental Examinations—
Time-tables    12, 13
Fees   37, 55
Surveying    166
Thermodynamics     185
Trigonometry— M ,   |
For Matriculation, Senior     47
Courses in  119
Undergraduates, Definition of     53
Unit, Definition of     69
University Buildings     22
University Extension      26
University, Government of      17
University Library, The    28
Victoria College—
Staff        9
Courses     260
Visitor         3
Westminster  Hall   261
Workshops, Instruction in   181
Zoology   131 THE   SUN   PUBLISHING   COMPANY   LTD.,
VANCOUVER,   B. C.

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