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The University of British Columbia Calendar Aug 30, 1942

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CALENDAR
TWENTY-EIGHTH  SESSION
1942-1943
VANCOUVER,   BRITISH   COLUMBIA
1942
B B CHANGES IN CALENDAR REGULATIONS
Students are warned not to assume that regulations
remain unchanged from year to year. They should
note the regulations and outlines of courses as these
appear in this Calendar. Attention is called particularly to the following changes:
Removal of limitation of enrolment in Teacher
Training Course and in Nursing. New statement
concerning selection and admission of students in
Nursing (Pages 198 and 218-219).
New regulations concerning required courses in
language for science students in the Faculty of Arts
and Science (Pages 82, 83, Par. 7 and 8).
Revision of Pre-medical Course (Page 108).
New courses in Education for Graduates (Pages 99
and 148-150).
Addition of Double Course for the degrees of B.Com.
and B.S.A. (Page 304). ERRATA
PAGE 5.
September
7th Monday
PAGE 6.
April
23rd Fridav
Labour  Day.   University  closed  Septenrber  5th-
7th, inclusive.
Good Friday.   University closed.
PAGE 104.
Delete—"Registration for the Teacher Training Course is limited to sixty. W$t Untoersrttp
OF
prtttsSf) Columbia
CALENDAR
TWENTY-EIGHTH SESSION
1942-1943
VANCOUVER.   BRITISH  COLUMBIA
1942  CONTENTS
Page
Academic Year  - ..— 5
Visitor  7
Chancellor  7
President     7
The Board of Governors  7
The  Senate   7
Officers and  Staff - 8
Historical Sketch   17
The Constitution of the University  19
Location and Buildings  20
Endowments and  Donations  24
General  Information     28
Admission to the University  34
Registration and Attendance  36
Fees   89
Medals, Scholarships, Prizes, Bursaries, and Loans  43
Faculty op Arts and Science
Time Table of Lectures     70
Regulations in Reference to Courses:
Courses Leading to the Degree of B.A.     79
Course Leading to the Degree of B.Com.    93
Courses Leading to the Degree of M.A     96
Teacher Training Course  104
Course Leading to the Diploma in Social Work  107
Pre-Medical Courses   108
Examinations and Advancement  109
Courses of Instruction:
Department of Bacteriology and Preventive Medicine  Ill
" " Biology and  Botany  114
" Chemistry     121
" " Classics     127
" " Commerce     133
" " Economics, Political Science, and Sociology  135
" " Education    146
" English     150
" " Geology and Geography  155
" History     162
" " Mathematics     ,  168
" " Modern Languages   172
" " Philosophy and Psychology  177
" Physics  183
" " Zoology     189
Faculty of Applied Science
Foreword    197
Admission     198
Regulations in Reference to Courses  198
General Outline of Courses  201
Courses in
Chemical Engineering    205
Civil  Engineering    206
Electrical Engineering   208
Forestry and Forest Engineering  209
Geological Engineering   211
Mechanical Engineering  214
Metallurgical  Engineering   215
Mining Engineering   215 The University op British Columbia
Page
Nursing and Health 218
Courses Leading to the Degree of M.A.Sc  226
Examinations and Advancement  227
Courses of Instruction:
Department of Biology and Botany 229
" " Chemistry     232
" " Civil Engineering   236
" English     244
" " Forestry     244
" " Geology and Geography  249
" " Mathematics   254
" " Mechanical and Electrical Engineering  255
" " Mining and Metallurgy  263
" Nursing and Health   267
" Physics   270
" Zoology     271
Faculty of Agriculture
General Information   275
Regulations in Reference to Courses:
For the B.S.A. Degree  276
The Occupational Course, Short Courses, Extension Courses  277
Graduate Work   279
Teacher  Training Course  280
Examinations and Advancement   281
Courses of Instruction:
Department of Agricultural Economics     282
" " Agronomy   283
" Animal  Husbandry    286
" Dairying     287
" Horticulture   289
" Poultry Husbandry  291
Double Courses
For B.A. and B.A.Sc:
Arts and Science, and Nursing  301
Arts and Science, and Engineering  301
For  B.A. and  B.S.F.:  ^
Biology and Botany (Forestry Option), and Forestry  302
Economics or Political Science, and Forestry  302
For B.Com. and B.S.F. "  303
For B.A. and B.S.A.  304
For B.Com. and B.S.A.  304
List of Students in Attendance, Session 1941-42  305
Degrees Conferred, 1941  328
Medals, Scholarships, and Prizes Awarded, 1941  338
University Summer Session  345
Canadian Officers' Training Corps  348
Student Organization   349
Alumni Association   353
Summer Session Students' Association  354
Inter-University Exchange of Undergraduates  355
Affiliated Colleges:
Victoria College   355
Union College of British Columbia  356
The Anglican Theological College of British Columbia  357 August
15th Saturday
15th Saturday
14th Friday
15th Saturday
September
1st Tuesday
1st Tuesday
8th Tuesday to
15th Tuesday
16th Wednesday
18th Friday
18th Friday
21st Monday
28th Monday
October
3rd Saturday
5th Monday
7th Wednesday
9th Friday
14th Wednesday
15th Thursday
16th Friday
21st Wednesday
28th Wednesday
November
llth Wednesday
December
9th Wednesday
llth Friday
16th Wednesday
19th Saturday
25th Friday
ACADEMIC YEAR
19 4 2
Last day for submission of applications for Supplemental  Examinations.
Last day for submission of applications for admission to Second Year Nursing and to the
Teacher Training Course.
Supplemental Examinations—Second Year Nursing.
ACADEMIC YEAR begins.
Labour Day. University closed August 30th-
September 1st, inclusive.
Supplemental  Examinations.
Last day for Registration of all First and Second
Year Students. (See Aug. 15, above.)
Last day for Registration of all other undergraduates except students in Extra-Sessional
Classes and Directed Reading Courses.
First and Second Year Arts and Science, Applied
Science, Agriculture, Organization.
Lectures begin at 8:30 a.m.
Last day for change in Students' courses.
Last day for handing in graduation essays and
theses (Autumn Congregation).
Last day for payment of First Term fees of all
undergraduates except students in Extra-
Sessional Classes and Directed Reading
Courses. Payment of first instalment of
Scholarship money.
Thanksgiving Day.   University closed.
Last day for payment of fees for Autumn Graduation.
Meeting of the Faculty Council. (Subsequent
Meetings to be held at the call of the President.)
Meeting of the Faculty of Arts and Science.
Last day for Registration and payment of fees
of Graduate Students and of Students in Extra-
Sessional Classes and Directed Reading Courses.
Meeting of the Faculty of Agriculture.
Meeting of the Senate.
Congregation.
Remembrance  Day.    University  closed.
Meeting of the Faculty of Arts and Science.
Meeting of the  Faculty of  Agriculture.
Meeting of the Senate.
First term ends.
Christmas Day.  University closed December 24th-
26th, inclusive. The University of British Columbia
January
1st Friday
4th Monday
llth Monday
February
10th Wednesday
12th Friday
17th Wednesday
April
15th Thursday
15th Thursday
17th Saturday to
Friday,
April 30th
23rd Friday
30th Friday
May
1st Saturday
8th Saturday
10th Monday
llth Tuesday
13th Thursday
13th Thursday
24th Monday
June
July
1st Thursday
5th Monday
August
rGth Monday
20th Friday
27th Friday
27th Friday
31st Tuesday
19 4 3
New Year's Day. University closed December
31st-January 2nd inclusive.
Second Term begins.
Last day for payment of Second Term fees. Payment of second instalment of Scholarship money.
Meeting of the Faculty of Arts and Science.
Meeting of the Faculty of Agriculture.
Meeting of the Senate.
Last day of Lectures.
Last day for handing in graduation essays  and
theses.
Sessional Examinations.
Field work in Applied Science begins immediately
at the close of the examinations.
Good  Friday.   University closed April 23rd-26th
inclusive.
Last day for payment of Graduation fees.
Last day for handing in applications for Scholarships.
Meeting of the Faculty of Agriculture.
Meeting of the Faculty of Arts and Science.
Meeting of the Senate.
Congregation.
Meeting of Convocation.
Victoria Day.   University closed.
King's   Birthday.    University  closed.
Dominion Day.   University closed.
Summer session begins.
Last day for submission of applications for Supplemental Examinations.
Summer Session ends.
Meeting of the Faculty of Arts and Science.
Meeting of the Senate.
ACADEMIC YEAR ends. THE UNIVERSITY OF BRITISH COLUMBIA
VISITOR
Col. The  Hon. W.  C. Woodward, Lieutenant-Governor of
British Columbia.
CHANCELLOR
R. E. McKechnie, C.B.E., M.D., CM., LL.D., F.A.CS., F.R.C.S. (Can.)
PRESIDENT
L. S. Klinck, Esa., M.S.A., D.Sc, LL.D., Officier de l'Instruction Publique.
BOARD OF GOVERNORS
(a) Ex-officio:
R.   E.   McKechnie,   C.B.E.,   M.D.,   CM., LL.D.,  F.A.C.S.,  F.R.CS.
(Can.), (Chairman).
L. S.  Klinck, Esa., M.S.A., D.Sc, LL.D., Officier de l'Instruction
Publique.
(b) Elected by Senate:
Arthur E. Lord, Esa., B.A., Vancouver.
H. T. Logan, Esa., M.C, M.A., Duncan.
Terms expire 1944.
Mrs. Evlyn F. Farris, M.A., LL.D., Vancouver.
Term expires  1942.
(c) Appointed by the Lieutenant-Governor in Council:
William George  Murrin, Esa., Vancouver.   Term expires 1943.
Edward H. Barton, Chilliwack.   Term expires 1943.
The   Hon.   Mr.  Justice   Denis  Murphy,   B.A.,  LL.D.,  Vancouver.
Term expires 1945.
Joseph   Badenoch   Clearihue,   Esa.,   M.A.,   B.CL.,   K.C,   Victoria.
Term expires 1945.
Percy R. Bengough, Esa., Vancouver.   Term expires 1947.
George T. Cunningham, Esa., Vancouver.  Term expires 1947.
SENATE
(a) The Chancellor, R. E. McKechnie, C.B.E., M.D., CM., LL.D., F.A.CS.,
F.R.CS.  (Can.)
The President   (Chairman), L.  S.  Klinck, Esa., M.S.A., D.Sc, LL.D.,
Officier de l'Instruction Publique.
(b) Dean of the Faculty of Agriculture, F. M. Clement, Esa., B.S.A., M.A.
Dean of the Faculty of Applied Science, John Norison Finlayson, Esq.,
M.Sc, LL.D., M.E.I.C, M.Am.Soc.CE.
Dean of the Faculty of Arts and Science, Daniel Buchanan, Esa., M.A.,
Ph.D., LL.D., F.RS.C
Representatives of the Faculty of Agriculture:
Blythe Eagles, Esa., B.A., Ph.D.; D. G. Laird, Esa., B.S.A., M.S.,
Ph.D.    Terms expire 1942.
Representatives of the Faculty of Applied Science:
M. Y. Williams, Esa., B.Sc, Ph.D., F.G.S.A., F.RS.C; A. H. Finlat,
Esa., BA.Sc, M.S. in C.E. Terms expire 1942.
Representatives of the Faculty of Arts and Science:
F. H. Soward, Esa., B.A., B.Litt.; O. J. Todd, Esa., Ph.D.   Terms
expire 1942. The University of British Columbia
(c) Appointed by the Lieutenant-Governor in Council:
H. N. MacCorkindale, Esa., B.A., Vancouver.  Term expires 1942.
J. Newton Harvey, Esa., Vancouver.  Term expires 1942.
Mrs. Evlyn F. Farris, M.A., LL.D., Vancouver.  Term expires 1942.
(d) The Principal of Vancouver Normal School, A. R. Lord, Esa., B.A.
The Principal of Victoria Normal School, V. L. Denton, Esq., B.A., D.C.L.
(e) Representative of the High School Principals and Assistants, Arnold A.
Webster, Esq., M.A.  Term expires 1944.
(f) Representatives of Affiliated Colleges:
Victoria College, Victoria, P. H. Elliott, Esa., M.Sc.    Term expires
1942.
Union College of  British Columbia, Vancouver   (Theological),  Rev.
J. G. Brown, M.A., D.D.  Term expires 1942.
The Anglican  Theological College of  British Columbia, Vancouver,
Rev. H. R. Trumpour, M.A., B.D., D.D.  Term expires 1942.
(g) Elected by Convocation:
H. T. Logan, Esa., M.C, M.A., Duncan.
Miss M. L. Bollert, M.A., A.M., Vancouver.
G. G. Sedgewick, Esa., B.A., Ph.D., Vancouver.
Sherwood Lett, Esa., M.C, B.A., Vancouver.
Walter Noble Sage, Esa., M.A., Ph.D., F.R.Hist.S., F.R.S.C, Vancouver.
His Honour F. W. Howay, LL.B., LL.D., F.R.S.C, New Westminster.
P. A. Boving, Esq., Cand. Ph., Cand. Agr., LL.D., Vancouver.
Harry V. Warren, Esa.,  B.A.,  B.A.Sc,  B.Sc, D.Phil.,  Assoc.Inst.
M.M., F.G.S.A., Vancouver.
A. E. Lord, Esa., B.A., Vancouver.
Miss A. B. Jamieson, B.A., Vancouver.
Miss M. Dorothy Mawdsley, B.A., M.A., Ph.D.
Miss Isobel Harvey, M.A., Vancouver.
John  Fortune  Walker,  Esa.,  B.A.Sc,  Ph.D.,  F.RS.C,  F.G.S.A.,
Victoria.
His Grace The Most Rev. A.  U. de  Pencier, M.A.,  D.D., LL.D.,
O.B.E., Vancouver.
Charles Alfred Holstead Wright, Esq., M.Sc, Ph.D., Trail.
Terms expire 1942.
(h) Representative of the British Columbia Teachers' Federation:
Miss Florence S. Mulloy, B.A., Vancouver.   Term expires 1943.
OFFICERS AND STAFF
L. S. Klinck, B.S.A. (Toronto), M.S.A., D.Sc. (Iowa State College), LL.D.
(Western Ontario), Officier de l'Instruction Publique, President.
Daniel Buchanan, M.A. (McMaster), Ph.D. (Chicago), LL.D. (McMaster),
F.R.S.C, Dean of the Faculty of Arts and Science.
John Norison Finlayson, M.Sc. (McGill), LL.D. (Manitoba), M.E.I.C,
M.Am.Soc.CE., Dean of the Faculty of Applied Science.
F. M. Clement, B.S.A. (Toronto), M.A. (Wisconsin), Dean of the Faculty of
Agriculture.
Miss M. Dorothy Mawdsley, B.A. (McGill), M.A. (Brit. Col.), Ph.D. (Chicago), Dean of Women.
Maxwell A. Cameron, M.A. (Brit. Col.), Ph.D. (Toronto), Director of the
Summer Session.
Charles B. Wood,  B.A.   (Toronto), A.M.   (Columbia),  Registrar.
Angus MacLucas, Bursar.
William Kaye Lamb, M.A. (Brit. Col.), Ph.D. (London), Librarian.
Miss M. W. Johnston, B.A. (Brit. Col.), Secretary to the President. Officers and Staff
FACULTY COUNCIL
The President (Chairman), L. S. Klinck, Esa., M.S.A., D.Sc, LL.D., Officier
de l'Instruction Publique.
Dean of the Faculty of Agriculture, F. M. Clement, Esa., B.S.A., M.A.
Dean of the Faculty of Applied Science, John Norison Finlayson, Esa., M.Sc,
LL.D., M.E.I.C, M.Am.Soc.CE.
Dean of the Faculty of Arts and Science, Daniel Buchanan, Esq., M.A.,
Ph.D., LL.D., F.R.S.C.
Representatives of the Faculties: A. F. Barss, Esa., A.B., M.S., Ph.D.; A.
Lighthall,   Esq.,   B.Sc;   R.   H.   Clark,   Esa.,   M.A.,   Ph.D.,   F.R.S.C;
O.  J.   Todd,  Esa.,   Ph.D.;   H.  J.   MacLeod,   B.Sc,   M.Sc,  A.M.,   Ph.D.,
M.A.I.E.E., M.E.I.C, M.I.R.E.
Emeritus Professors
George E. Robinson, B.A. (Dal.), Emeritus Professor of Mathematics.
James Henderson, M.A. (Glasgow), Emeritus Professor of Philosophy.
P. A. Boving, Cand.Ph. (Malmo, Sweden), Cand.Agr. (Alnarp, Agriculture,
Sweden), LL.D. (Brit. Col.), Emeritus Professor of Agronomy.
C. McLean Fraser, M.A. (Toronto), Ph.D. (Iowa), F.R.S.C, Emeritus Professor of Zoology.
L. F. Robertson, M.A. (McGill), Emeritus Professor of Classics.
John Ridington, Emeritus Librarian.
Department of Agricultural Economics
F. M. Clement, B.S.A.  (Toronto), M.A.  (Wisconsin), Professor and Head
of the Department.
Department of Agronomy
G. G. Moe, B.S.A., M.Sc (McGill), Ph.D. (Cornell), Professor and Head of
the Department.
D. G. Laird, B.S.A. (Toronto), M.S., Ph.D. (Wisconsin), Professor.
Vernon C Brink, M.S.A.  (Brit. Col.), Ph.D.  (Wisconsin), Assistant Professor.
Department of Animal Husbandry
H. M. King, B.S.A. (Toronto), M.S. (Oregon Agricultural College), Professor
and Head of the Department.
Stanley N. Wood, B.S.A.  (Sask.), D.V.M.  (Iowa State College), Associate
Professor.
J.  C.  Berry,  M.S.A.   (Brit.  Col.),  Ph.D.   (Iowa  State  College), Assistant
Professor.
Department of Bacteriology and Preventive Medicine
C. E.  Dolman,  M.R.C.S.   (England),  M.B.,  B.S.,  M.R.C.P.,  D.P.H.,  Ph.D.
(London), Professor and Head of the Department.
D. C B. Duff, M.A., Ph.D. (Toronto), Assistant Professor.
Lawrence E. Ranta, M.D., D.P.H.  (Toronto), Assistant Professor.
D. Gordon B. Mathias, M.A.  (Brit. Col.), Instructor.
Department of Biology and Botany
Andrew H. Hutchinson, M.A. (McMaster), Ph.D. (Chicago), F.R.S.C, Professor and Head of the Department.
Frank Dickson, B.A. (Queen's), Ph.D. (Cornell), Associate Professor. 10 The University of British Columbia
John Davidson, F.L.S., F.B.S.E., Associate Professor.
John Allardyce, M.A.  (Brit. Col.), Ph.D.   (McGill), F.A.A.A.S., Assistant
Professor.
Mrs. Miriam R. Armstead, B.Sc.  (London), M.A. (Brit. Col.), Instructor.
Department of Chemistry
Robert H. Clark, M.A. (Toronto), Ph.D. (Leipzig), F.R.S.C, Professor and
Head of the Department.
E. H. Archibald, B.Sc. (Dal.), A.M., Ph.D. (Harvard), F.R.S.E.&C, Professor of Analytical Chemistry.
W. F. Seyer, B.A., M.Sc. (Alberta), Ph.D. (McGill), M.A.I.Ch.E., Professor.
M. J. Marshall, M.Sc. (McGill), Ph.D. (Mass. Inst, of Technology), F.RS.C,
Associate  Professor.
William Ure, M.A.Sc. (Brit. Col.), Ph.D. (Cal. Inst, of Technology),
F.A.A.A.S., Associate Professor.
J. Allen Harris, M.A. (Brit. Col.), Ph.D. (Illinois), Associate Professor.
John D. Leslie, B.A., M.A.Sc.  (Brit. Col.), Instructor.
Department  of Civil Engineering
John Norison Finlayson, M.Sc (McGill), LL.D. (Manitoba), M.E.I.C,
M.Am.Soc.CE., Professor and Head of the Department.
Allan H. Finlay, B.A.Sc. (Brit. Col.), M.S. in C.E. (Illinois), Associate Professor.
A. Lighthall, B.Sc. (McGill), Associate Professor.
J. Fred Muir, B.Sc. (Manitoba) Associate Professor.
Edward S. Pretious, B.A.Sc. (Brit. Col.), M.Sc. (Iowa), Assistant Professor.
Archie Peebles, B.A.Sc, B.A. (Brit. Col.), M.Sc. (Iowa State College),
Assistant Professor.
Alexander Hrennikoff, Grad., Inst, of Communication Engineering, Moscow,
Russia, M.A.Sc. (Brit. Col.), Sc.D. (Mass. Inst, of Technology), Assistant Professor.
J. B. Alexander, M.Sc. (New Brunswick), Honorary Lecturer.
Department  of Classics
O. J. Todd, Ph.D. (Harvard), Professor and Head of the Department.
Louis A. MacKay, M.A. (Toronto), B.A.  (Oxon.), Associate Professor.
Patrick C F. Guthrie, B.A. (Manitoba), M.A.  (Toronto), Instructor.
Geoffrey B. Riddehough, M.A.   (Brit. Col.), M.A.   (California), Lecturer.
Miss Jean M. Aiild, B.A. (Colorado), M.A. (McGill), Lecturer.
Department  of Commerce
Ellis H. Morrow, B.A. (Queen's), M.B.A. (Harvard), Professor and Head
of the Department.
Archibald W. Currie, B.A., B.Com. (Queen's), M.B.A., Dr.Com.Sc (Harvard), Associate Professor.
Frederick Field, C.A., Lecturer in Accountancy.
Reginald H. Tupper, LL.B., Lecturer in Commercial Law.
John L. Farris, B.A. (Brit. Col.), LL.B. (Harvard), Lecturer in Commercial Law.
Department of Dairying
Blythe Eagles, B.A. (Brit. Col.), Ph.D. (Toronto), Professor and Head of
the Department.
Miss Lois Campbell, M.S.A.  (Brit. Col.), Assistant. Officers and Staff 11
Department of Economics, Political Science, and Sociology
Henry F. Angus, B.A. (McGill), B.C.L., M.A. (Oxon.), F.R.S.C, Professor
and Head of the Department.   (On leave of absence.)
Daniel Buchanan, M.A. (McMaster), Ph.D. (Chicago), LL.D. (McMaster),
F.RS.C, Acting Head of the Department.
G. F. Drummond, M.A. (St. Andrew's), M.Sc. (Econ.), (London), Associate
Professor.
C. W. Topping, B.A. (Queen's), S.T.D. (Wesleyan Theol. College), A.M., Ph.D.
(Columbia), Associate Professor (of Economics and Sociology].)
Joseph A. Crumb, B.B.A. (Wash.), M.S., Ph.D.  (Calif.), Associate Professor.
Wm. J. Brockelbank, B.A.   (Haverford College, Penn.), LL.B.  (Harvard),
Docteur en Droit  (Paris), Lecturer in Government.
Department of Education
George M. Weir, B.A. (McGill), M.A. (Sask.), D.Paed. (Queen's), Professor
and Head of the Department.   (On leave of absence.)
Maxwell A. Cameron, M.A.   (Brit. Col.), Ph.D.   (Toronto), Professor and
Acting  Head  of  the  Department.
D. H. Russell, B.Sc, M.Ed. (Sask), Ph.D. (Columbia), Associate Professor.
Frederick T. Tyler, B.Sc, M.A., B.Ed. (Alberta), Ph.D. (California), Assistant Professor of Education and Psychology.
Department of English
G. G. Sedgewick, B.A.  (Dal.), Ph.D.  (Harvard), Professor and Head of the
Department.
W.  L.  MacDonald,  B.A.   (Toronto),  M.A.   (Wisconsin),  Ph.D.   (Harvard),
Professor.
Frederick G. C. Wood, B.A. (McGill), A.M. (Harvard), Professor.
Thorleif Larsen, M.A. (Toronto), B.A. (Oxon.), F.R.S.C, Professor.
Hunter Campbell Lewis, M.A. (Brit. Col.), Assistant Professor.
Miss Dorothy Blakey, M.A.  (Brit. Col.), M.A.  (Toronto), Ph.D.  (London),
Assistant Professor.
Edmund  Morrison,  B.A.   (Brit.  Col.),  A.M.,  Ph.D.   (California), Assistant
Professor.
F. E. L. Priestley, M.A.  (Alberta), Ph.D.  (Toronto), Assistant Professor.
Miss   M.   Dorothy   Mawdsley,    B.A.    (McGill),   M.A.    (Brit.    Col.),   Ph.D.
(Chicago), Assistant Professor.
John H. Creighton, M.A. (Toronto), Lecturer.
Rodney P. D. Poisson, M.A. (Brit. Col.), Assistant.
G. Philip V. Akrigg, M.A.  (Brit. Col.), A.M.   (California), Instructor.
Department of Forestry
John Edward Liersch, B.A., B.A.Sc. (Brit. Col.), M.F. (Washington), Professor and Head of the Department.   (On leave of absence.)
F. Malcolm Knapp, B.S.F. (Syracuse), M.S.F. (Wash.), Associate Professor.
(Acting Head of the Department.)
Braham G. Griffith, M.A. (Brit. Col.), M.F. (Harvard), Ph.D. (Washington), Assistant Professor.
Thomas G. Wright, B.F. (Penn. State), M.F. (Duke), Special Lecturer.
R. M. Brown, B.Sc.F. (Toronto), Honorary Lecturer in Forest Products.
L. B. Dixon, Special Lecturer.
William Byers, Special Lecturer. 12 The University of British Columbia
Department of Geology and Geography
M. Y. Williams, B.Sc. (Queen's), Ph.D. (Yale), F.G.S.A., F.R.S.C, Professor
and Head of the Department.
Clarence Otto Swanson, M.A.Sc. (Brit. Col.), Ph.D. (Wisconsin), F.G.S.A.,
F.R.S.C, Professor of Mineralogy and Petrography.
Henry Cecil  Gunning,  B.A.Sc   (Brit.  Col.),  M.S.,  Ph.D.   (Mass.  Inst,  of
Technology), F.G.S.A., F.R.S.C, Professor of Economic Geology.
H.  V.  Warren,  B.A.,  B.A.Sc.   (Brit.  Col.),  B.Sc,  D.Phil.   (Oxon.),  Assoc.
Inst. M.M., F.G.S.A., Associate Professor of Mineralogy and Petrography.
Gordon   Davis,   B.A.   (Manitoba),   M.A.    (Brit.   Col.),   Ph.D.   (Princeton),
Instructor.
Department of History
W. N. Sage, B.A. (Toronto), M.A. (Oxon.), Ph.D. (Toronto), F.R.Hist.S.,
F.R.S.C, Professor and Head of the Department.
F. H. Soward, B.A. (Toronto), B.Litt. (Oxon.), Professor.
A. C Cooke, B.A. (Manitoba), M.A. (Oxon.), Associate Professor.
Miss Sylvia Thrupp, M.A. (Brit. Col.), Ph.D. (London), F.R.Hist.S., Instructor.
Department of Horticulture
A. F. Barss, A.B. (Rochester), B.S. in Agr. (Cornell), M.S. (Oregon Agricultural College), Ph.D. (Chicago), Professor and Head of the Department.
G. H. Habjus, B.S.A. (Brit. Col.), M.S. (Oregon State College), Ph.D. (Cali
fornia), Associate Professor.
Frank E. Buck, B.S.A. (McGill), Lecturer.
Department of Mathematics
Daniel Buchanan, M.A. (McMaster), Ph.D. (Chicago), LL.D. (McMaster),
F.R.S.C, Professor and Head of the Department.
F. S. Nowlan, B.A. (Acadia), A.M. (Harvard), Ph.D. (Chicago), Professor.
Ralph Hull, M.A. (Brit. Col.), Ph.D. (Chicago), Professor.
L. Richardson, B.Sc.  (London), Professor.
Walter H. Gage, M.A. (Brit. Col.), Associate Professor.
S. A. Jennings, M.A., Ph.D. (Toronto), Lecturer.
Miss May L. Barclay, M.A. (Brit. Col.), Instructor.
Department of Mechanical  and Electrical Engineering
Hector John MacLeod, B.Sc. (McGill), M.Sc. (Alberta), A.M., Ph.D. (Harvard), M.A.T.E.E., M.E.I.C, M.I.R.E., Professor and Head of the Department.
F. W. Vernon, B.Sc. Eng. (London), Wh.Sch., A.M.I.Mech.E., A.F.R.A.S.,
Professor of Mechanical Engineering.
S. C. Morgan, B.Sc. (Queen's), M.Sc. (Alberta), M.S. (Calif. Inst, of Tech.),
As.M.A.I.E.E., As.M.I.E.S., Associate Professor of Electrical Engineering.
W. B. Coulthard, B.Sc. (London), M.A.LE.E., A.M.I.E.E., Assistant Professor of Electrical Engineering.
W. O. Richmond, B.A.Sc. (Brit. Col.), M.S. (Pittsburg), Mem.A.S.M.E.,
Assistant Professor of Mechanical Engineering.
H. M. McIlroy, M.Sc. (Queen's), Assistant Professor of Mechanical Engineering.
D. W. Thomson, B.A.Sc. (Brit. Col.), M.A.Sc. (Illinois), Instructor. Officers and Staff 13
Department of Mining and Metallurgy
J. M. Turnbull, B.A.Sc. (McGill), Professor and Head of the Department.
George A. Gillies, M.Sc. (McGill), Professor of Metallurgy.
Frank A. Forward, B.A.Sc.  (Toronto), Associate Professor of Metallurgy.
Department of Modern Languages
David Owen Evans, M.A., D.Phil. (Oxon.), D.Lett. (Univ. of Paris), Professor
and Head of the Department.
A. F. B. Clark, B.A. (Toronto), Ph.D. (Harvard), Officier d'Academie, Professor of French.
Miss Isabel MacInnes, M.A. (Queen's), Ph.D. (California), Associate Professor of German.
Miss Janet T. Greig, B.A. (Queen's), M.A. (Brit. Col.), Officier d'Academie,
Assistant Professor of French.
Miss Dorothy Dallas, M.A. (Brit. Col.), D.Lett. (Univ. of Paris), Assistant
Professor of French.
Miss Joyce Hallamore, M.A. (Brit. Col.), Ph.D. (Munich), Assistant Professor of German.
Charles Ernest Borden, M.A., Ph.D. (California), Assistant Professor.
Madame Y. Darlington, Instructor.
Department of Nursing and Health
C. E. Dolman, M.RCS. (England), M.B., B.S., M.RC.P., D.P.H, Ph.D.
(London), Acting Head of the Department.
Miss Margaret E. Kerr, R.N., B.A.Sc. (Brit. Col.), M.A. (Columbia), Instructor.
Mrs. Geraldine Langton, R.N., B.A.Sc. (Brit. Col.), M. A. (Peabody), Instructor.
Miss Mary E. Henderson, B.A.Sc.  (Brit. Col.), Instructor.
Lawrence E. Ranta, M.D., D.P.H.  (Toronto), Lecturer.
Department of Philosophy and Psychology
John Allan Irving, M.A. (Toronto), M.A. (Cambridge), Professor and Head
of the Department.
Thomas Greenshields Henderson, M.A. (McGill), Ph.D. (Harvard), Associate Professor of Philosophy.   (On leave of absence.)
Joseph E. Morsh, B.A. (Brit. Col.), Ph.D. (Johns Hopkins), Assistant Professor.
Frederick T. Tyler, B.Sc, M.A., B.Ed. (Alberta), Ph.D. (California), Assistant Professor of Psychology and Education.
Alexander P. Maslow, A.B., A.M. (Michigan), Ph.D. (California) Lecturer.
Department of Physics
Gordon Merritt Shrum, M.A., Ph.D. (Toronto), F.R.S.C, Professor and
Head of the Department.
A. E. Hennings, M.A. (Lake Forest College, 111.), Ph.D. (Chicago), Professor.
A. M. Crooker, B.A. (McMaster), M.A., Ph.D. (Toronto), Assistant Professor.   (On leave of absence.)
Harold D. Smith, M.A. (Brit. Col.), Ph.D. (Toronto), Assistant Professor.
Kenneth C. Mann, B.A. (Sask.), Ph.D. (Toronto), Assistant Professor. (On
leave of absence.)
George Michael Volkoff, M.A. (Brit. Col.), Ph.D. (California), Assistant
Professor. 14 The University of British Columbia
Franklin  S.  Harris,  B.A., M.A.   (Brigham Young),  Ph.D.   (Cal.  Inst,  of
Technology),  Lecturer.
R. Eric Langton, M.A.  (Brit. Col.), Lecturer.
Andrew McKellar, B.A.  (Brit. Col.), Ph.D.  (California), Lecturer.
Department of Poultry Husbandry
E. A. Lloyd, B.S.A.  (Sask.), M.S.A.  (Washington State College), Professor
and Head of the Department.
Jacob Biely, M.S.A. (Brit. Col.), M.S. (Kansas State College), Instructor.
Department of Zoology
W. A. Clemens, M.A. (Toronto), Ph.D. (Cornell), F.R.S.C, Professor and
Head of the Department.
G. J. Spencer, B.S.A. (Toronto), M.S. (Illinois), Associate Professor.
Ian McTaggart Cowan, B.A. (Brit. Col.), Ph.D. (California), Assistant Professor.
Department of University Extension
Gordon Merritt Shrum, M.A. Ph.D. (Toronto), F.R.S.C, Director.
Robert T. McKenzie, B.A. (Brit. Col.), Assistant to the Director.
Miss Dorothy Somerset, A.B. (Radcliffe), Assistant in Dramatics.
Leonard Chatwin, Assistant for Radio and Visual Instruction.
University Health  Service
Stewart Murray, M.D., D.P.H. (Toronto), Medical Health Officer, Metropolitan Health Committee—University Health Officer.
J. S. Kitching, B.A., M.D., D.P.H. (Toronto), Assistant Senior Medical Health
Officer of the Metropolitan Health Department of Vancouver and Director
of the University Health Service.
C H. Gundry, M.D., Director of Mental Hygiene, Metropolitan Health Committee.    (On leave of absence.)
Mary Luff, M.D., B.S. (London), M.R.CS. (England), L.R.C.P. (London),
D.P.M., Acting-Director of Mental Hygiene, Metropolitan Health Committee.
George T. Cunningham, Esq., University representative on the Metropolitan
Health Committee.
Miss Muriel Upshall, R.N., B.A.Sc. (Brit. Col.), Public Health Nurse.
Physical Education
Miss Gertrude E. Moore, Instructor in Physical Education for Women.
Maurice Van Vliet, M.S.  (Oregon), Instructor in Physical Education for
Men. Officers and Staff 15
Assistants
Department
Anstey, Titos.  H.,  B.S.A.   (Brit. Col.) Biology and Botany
Badger, Miss Elizabeth, B.A.  (Brit. Col.) Biology and Botany
Barclay, William R., B.A.  (Brit. Col.) Chemistry
Barton, Norman, B.A.   (Brit. Col.) Physics
Bastin, Miss Hilary D., B.A. (Brit. Col.) Zoology
Boardman, Harold, B.A.  (Brit. Col.) Chemistry
Brown, Miss Victoria J., B.A.  (Brit. Col.) Mathematics
Bunyan, Donald E., B.A.  (Brit. Col.) Physics
Butler. Mrs. Jean C. B.A. (Brit. Col.), M.A. (Toronto) English
Clark, Robert M., B.Com.  (Brit. Col.) Economics
Cools, Miss Evelyn, B.A.  (Brit. Col.) Mathematics
Cooper, Wm.  Dewar,  B.A.   (Brit.  Col.) Biology and Botany
Cowan, T. Archie, B.A. (Brit. Col.) Bacteriology and Preventive Medicine
Cox, Lionel A., B.A.  (Brit. Col.) Chemistry
deCourville, Mlle M. C. S., Brevet Superieur (Ecole Normale,
Melun), Certificat d'Etudes Pedagogiques Modern Languages
Dickson, Bruce A., B.S.A.  (Brit. Col.) Horticulture
Eek,  Miss Catherine J.,  B.S.A.   (Brit. Col.) Biology and Botany
Elliott, Philip L., B.A.   (Brit. Col.) Education
Falls, Herbert D., B.S.A.   (Brit. Col.) Agronomy
Foskett, Dudley A., B.A.   (Sask.) Zoology
Gardner, Joseph A.  F., B.A.   (Brit. Col.) Chemistry
Gii.mour. Campbell G., B.S.A.  (Brit. Col.) Agronomy
Grassie.  Vernon  R.,  B.A.   (Brit.  Col.) Chemistry
Harris, Dr. Ethel, A.B.  (Columbia), M.A. (Toronto), D.Lett (Paris)
Modern Languages
Harrison,  Thos.  A.,  B.A.   (Brit.  Col.) Chemistry
Harvey, Ernest C,  B.Com.   (Brit. Col.) Economics
Hawkes,  Arthur  S.,  B.A Chemistry
Heeler, John  P.,  B.A.   (Brit. Col.), M.A.   (McGill) History
Hopwood, Victor G., B.A.   (Brit. Col.) Philosophy and Psychology
Kersey, Lorne R., B.A.Sc.   (Brit. Col.)
Civil, Mechanical and Electrical Engineering
Lamont-Havers, Ronald, B.A. (Brit. Col.)
Bacteriology and Preventive Medicine
Lawrence,  Miss Dorothy,  B.S.A.   (Sask.) Poultry  Husbandry
Lazenby,  Mrs.  F.  A.,  M.A.   (Brit.  Col.) Economics
Lourie, Dr. Marianne, Dr. Juris  (Vienna) Modern Languages
Lyle, Alfred G., B.A.Sc  (Brit. Col.) Mining and Metallurgy
Maxwell, John J., B.A.Sc.   (Brit. Col.) Mining and Metallurgy
Mitchell,  Leonard,   B.A.   (Brit.   Col.) Chemistry
Mizuhara, Shaw J., M.A.   (Brit. Col.) Chemistry
Monasch, Lorns B., B.A.Sc. (Brit. Col.)
Mechanical   and   Electrical   Engineering
Morris,  Miss Margaret C, B.A.   (Brit. Col.) Mathematics 16 The University of British Columbia
Munro, Miss Marjory, B.A. (Brit. Col.) Philosophy and Psychology
Murphy, Miss Mary, B.A. (Brit. Col.) Biology and Botany, and Zoology
Ney, Charles, B.A.Sc.  (Brit. Col.) Geology and Geography
Oldfield, James, B.S.A.   (Brit. Col.) Animal Husbandry
Parizeau, Paul H. D., B.A.  (Brit. Col.) Zoology
Pickering, Miss Eunice, B.A. (Brit. Col.) Biology and Botany, and Zoology
Potter,  Charles,  B.A.Sc.   (Brit.  Col.) Chemistry
Pratt, Miss Jean, B.A., B.S.A. (Brit. Col.) Biology and Botany
Rae, James A.,  B.Com.   (Brit.  Col.) Commerce
Shaw, Kenneth N. F., B.A.  (Brit. Col.) Chemistry
Taylor, Raymond R., M.A.Sc.  (Brit. Col.) - Mining and Metallurgy
Thompson, Robert M.,  B.A.Sc.   (Brit. Col.) Geology and Geography
Thomson, Miss Jean I., B.A.  (Brit. Col.) Mathematics
Todd, Miss Marjorie, M.A. (Brit. Col.)...Bacteriology and Preventive Medicine
Watt, Douglas C, B.A.  (Brit. Col.) Philosophy and Psychology
Wighton, John L., B.A.  (Brit. Col.) Physics, and Mathematics
Zotov, Gennady, M.A.  (Brit. Col.) Physics THE UNIVERSITY OF BRITISH COLUMBIA
HISTORICAL SKETCH
The creation of a university in British Columbia was first
advocated by Superintendent Jessop in 1877, but it was not until
1890 that the Provincial Legislature passed an act establishing
a body politic and corporate named "The University of British
Columbia." In 1891 this act was amended to require that a meeting of the Senate be held within one month after the election of
the Senators by Convocation. The Senators were elected, but a
quorum did not assemble on the date fixed by the Chancellor, Dr.
I. "W. Powell, of Victoria. Thus the first attempt to establish a
university in British Columbia failed.
However, some of the work normally done in a university was
begun in 1894, when an act was passed which permitted the
affiliation of high schools in the Province with recognized Canadian
universities. In 1899 Vancouver High School was affiliated with
McGill University in order to provide First Year work in Arts,
and took the name of Vancouver College. First Year work in
Arts was offered by Victoria High School when it became Victoria
College by affiliation with McGill University in 1902. In the same
year Vancouver College undertook the Second Year in Arts.
In 1906 an act was passed incorporating the Royal Institution
for the Advancement of Learning of British Columbia, which, in
the same year, established at Vancouver the McGill University
College of British Columbia. The scope of the work undertaken
by this college was gradually increased until at the time it was
taken over by the University of British Columbia it was giving
three years in Arts and Science and two years in Applied Science.
When the University of British Columbia opened in the autumn
of 1915, both the McGill University College of Vancouver and
Victoria College, which since 1907 had been a part of it, ceased to
exist. i
Definite steps to establish the University were taken by Dr.
H. B. Young, Minister of Education, in 1907, when he introduced
a "University Endowment Act." This act was followed in 1908
by an act establishing and incorporating the University of British
Columbia and repealing the old act of 1890-1. This act, with its
subsequent amendments, determines the present constitution of the
University.
As authorized by an act passed by the Provincial Legislature
in 1910, the Lieutenant-Governor in Council appointed a Site
Commission to decide upon a site for the proposed University. The
Commission held its first meeting on May 25th, 1910, in Victoria, 18 The University of British Columbia
and after a thorough examination of the Province recommended
the vicinity of Vancouver. In the autumn the Executive Council
decided to place the University at Point Grey—the site which the
Commission had named as its first choice. In 1911 the Legislature
passed an act authorizing the Lieutenant-Governor in Council to
grant this site to the University. The grant was increased in 1915,
so that it now consists of 548 acres at the extremity of Point Grey.
The waters of the Gulf of Georgia form more than half the
boundary of the University campus. A tract of some 3,000 acres
of Government land immediately adjoining the site, and lying
between it and the City of Vancouver, has been set aside by the
Government in order that University revenue may be provided by
its sale or lease.
In February, 1912, the Hon. H. E. Young, Minister of Education, called for competitive plans which should include plans in
detail for four buildings to be erected immediately, and a block
plan showing all the proposed buildings on the campus. Messrs.
Sharp and Thompson, of Vancouver, B. C, were the successful
competitors, and were appointed University Architects.
The first Convocation, held on August 21st, 1912, chose Mr.
F. L. Carter-Cotton as first Chancellor of the University. In March,
1913, the Lieutenant-Governor in Council appointed as President
of the University F. F. Wesbrook, M.A., M.D., CM., LL.D. On
April 4th, 1918, Dr. R. E. McKechnie was elected Chancellor.
Dr. McKechnie has been re-elected continuously since that date
and entered on his eighth term in May, 1939. On the death of
President Wesbrook, October 20th, 1918, L. S. Klinck, Dean of the
Faculty of Agriculture, was appointed acting President, and on
June 1st, 1919, President.
From its opening in 1915 till the Summer of 1925, the University
carried on its work in temporary quarters on part of the site of the
General Hospital in Fairview.
Construction work was commenced on the Science Building at
the permanent site in Point Grey in 1914, but was interrupted
because of war conditions. Work on this building was resumed in
1923, and in the autumn of the same year the contract was let for
the Library. These two buildings, which are of stone and are
fireproof, conform closely to the original plans as prepared by the
architects in 1914. The initial units of these structures, as well
as nine other buildings which are of a less permanent character,
were completed in 1925, and at the beginning of Session 1925-26
the University commenced work in its new quarters.
The inauguration of the new buildings was held on October 15th
and 16th, 1925, on which occasion honorary degrees were granted
by the University for the first time. Historical Sketch 19
THE  CONSTITUTION   OF   THE   UNIVERSITY
The Constitution of the University is governed by the British
Columbia University Act, B.C.R.S. 1936, c. 299, and Amending
Acts, which provide
That the University shall consist of a Chancellor, Convocation,
Board of Governors, Senate, Faculty Council, and the
Faculties; that the Convocation shall be composed of the
Chancellor, the Senate, all persons who became members
of the Convocation prior to the first day of January,
1919, all persons holding academic appointments within the
University and whose names are added to the roll of
Convocation by the Registrar of the University from time
to time upon instructions from the President, and all
persons who have become graduates of the University; that
the Chancellor shall be elected by the members of the
Convocation; that the Board of Governors shall consist of
eleven members—the Chancellor, who shall be the Chairman thereof, the President, three persons elected by the
Senate from among its members, and six members appointed
by the Lieutenant-Governor in Council; that the Senate shall
consist of: (a) The Chancellor, and the President of the
University, who shall be chairman thereof; (b) the deans
and two professors of each of the Faculties elected by
members of the Faculty; (c) three members to be appointed
by the Lieutenant-Governor in Council; (d) the principals
of the normal schools; (e) one member elected by the high
school principals and assistants who are actually engaged in
teaching; (f) one member to be elected by the governing
body of every affiliated college or school in this Province;
(g) fifteen members to be elected by Convocation from the
members thereof; (h) one member elected by the British
Columbia Teachers' Federation.
It is further provided that the University shall be non-sectarian.
The University Act gives the University full powers to grant
such degrees in the several Faculties and different branches of
knowledge as the Senate may from time to time determine. It
reserves for the University the sole right in this Province to confer
degrees, except in Theology, and it expressly enacts that "No other
university having corporate powers capable of being exercised
within the Province shall be known by the same name, nor shall
any such university have power to grant degrees." LOCATION AND BUILDINGS
Location
The University is situated on the promontory which forms the
western extremity of the Point Grey Peninsula. On three sides it
is bounded by the Gulf of Georgia. The site comprises an area of
548 acres, of which approximately one-half is campus. In all
directions appear snow-capped mountains, strikingly rugged and
impressive.
Buildings
The buildings, planned to meet the requirements of fifteen
hundred students, are of two classes, permanent and semi-permanent. The former were designed by the University architects,
Messrs. Sharp and Thompson, the latter by architects of the
Department of Public Works of the Provincial Government. The
permanent buildings have been erected in the location originally
assigned for them; the others in the quadrangle designated as
"unassigned" in the original plan. By utilizing the "unassigned"
area for the semi-permanent buildings, all the locations intended
for future expansion have been left available.
The entire mechanical equipment of these buildings was
designed after a close study had been made not only of present
requirements, but of the ultimate development of the institution.
This consideration accounts for the fact that only a part of the
present equipment is permanent. After a careful survey of the
whole situation, a forced hot water system was found to present
advantages that made its adoption advisable. Direct radiation with
a system of warmed air supply and extraction for ventilation is
used to take care of the heat losses in the buildings. A separate
system of ventilation is installed for all sanitary conveniences, and
a specially constructed system for fume closets. The various
services throughout these buildings, such as hot and cold water,
distilled water, gas and steam for laboratory purposes, compressed
air, etc., with the necessary apparatus, are all of a modern type.
An attempt has been made to reduce vibration and noise to a
minimum by installing all moving apparatus on floating slabs, with
a further insulation of cork.
Library
The University Library consists of more than 130,000 volumes,
and almost 100,000 pamphlets. It includes representative works
in all the courses offered by the University, and a growing collection
of books in other subjects.   It is notable for its high percentage Location and Buildings 21
of the transactions and proceedings of learned societies, and its
long runs of scholarly periodicals — the materials essential to
research.
It is one of three Canadian Depositories of the Library of
Congress Catalogue, a collection of 1,750,000 printed cards. The
catalogue is kept fully up to date, and between 50,000 and 60,000
new cards, issued each year, are interfiled as received.
The Library also possesses a College Art Teaching Equipment
Set, organized and presented by the Carnegie Corporation of New
York. This consists of about 185 specially selected works covering
the fine and applied arts, and of more than 2,000 reproductions,
photographed or coloured, illustrating these.
Another notable gift to the University, made by the Carnegie
Corporation of New York, is the College Music Set. This consists
of almost 1,000 records representing musical development in all
its forms, with reproducing instruments specially designed for a
large auditorium, and a collection of books on musical theory and
history, together with a large number of orchestral scores. The
Set is regularly used for student recitals, and to illustrate lectures
on the appreciation of music.
The  Library  receives  regularly  over  900  serial publications.
The book collection is classified throughout on the Congressional
system.
Books to which the teaching staff have specially referred their
students are placed in a "Reserved" class. These are shelved apart
from the main collection, and are loaned only for use in the building, and for a limited period.
Unbound periodicals are not loaned. Bound periodicals, and
books that are costly, rare, or unsuitable for general circulation,
are loaned only under special conditions.
While the Library is primarily for the staff and students of
the University, its resources are available to those of the general
public engaged in research or special study, and who make personal
application to the Librarian for the privilege of its use. Such
persons are known as "extra-mural readers." By order of the
Board of Governors a fee of $1.00 per calendar year is charged
such readers. In addition, they pay necessary mailing costs, a
deposit being required from those unable to call personally for
books loaned.
The Library also administers the book collection of the University
Extension Department. This consists of about 900 volumes, and
is increasing as the Department's work develops. 22 The University of British Columbia
The Extension Department's collection also includes more than
2,400 plays, for the service of the Dramatic Study Groups it has
organized throughout the Province.
The Extension Department's book and play collections are loanable only to those enrolled in its study groups or courses.
The University is deeply indebted to all who have made gifts to
the Library. These have been both valuable and numerous. Their
number prevents detailed acknowledgment, but recognition should
be made of a number of sets of transactions, and complete or partial
sets of scientific periodicals, given by societies and friends of the
University. The most interesting and valuable of these gifts are
listed in the annual report of the Library to the Senate.
Gymnasium
This building was completed in 1929 and presented to the
University by the Alma Mater Society. It is situated adjacent to
the tennis courts and conveniently close to the playing fields. The
style of architecture and exterior finish harmonizes well with that
of the other buildings on the campus. The playing floor has an
area of 6,000 square feet, and is surrounded on three sides by tiers
of benches which will accommodate 1,400 persons. In the space
behind these seats are located the dressing rooms, drying rooms,
locker rooms, and shower baths. Approximately one-third of this
space has been set aside for the exclusive use of the women
students. The offices of the instructors in physical education are
located in the gymnasium. In the building are included also a
properly equipped training and first-aid room, an equipment room,
and a kitchen. Facilities for general gymnasium and indoor athletic
work have been provided.
Stadium and Playing Fields
In accordance with the original landscape plan prepared by
Mawson in 1913, the main playing field area, consisting of about
16 acres, is situated east of the East Mall and north of the University Boulevard. Development work was started early in
January, 1931, as an aid to the acute unemployment situation, and
was made possible by funds provided chiefly by subscriptions from
the Faculty, students, and friends of the University. Much of the
labour was obtained through the courtesy of the Relief Department
of the City of Vancouver. Twenty thousand cubic yards of soil
and gravel were used to bring the track and field to grade.
In addition to the main playing field of the stadium, there are
three other full-size fields and a number of smaller areas set aside
for outdoor games. Location and Buildings 23
The first section of the grandstand for the stadium was erected
in the summer of 1937 on the west side of the main playing field.
It is a covered, reinforced concrete structure, 126 feet long and
provides seating accommodation for 1,600 spectators. On either
side are two wooden bleacher sections of 500 seats each. The plan
provides for the ultimate continuance of the main section around
the field and therefore the present bleachers are constructed in
movable sections. Underneath the present main stand there are
locker rooms, dressing rooms, showers, ticket booths, and specially
constructed drying rooms. Space is also provided for two squash
racket courts, which will be completed as soon as funds are available. Funds for the construction of the grandstand were provided
through a $40,000 bond issue by ths Alma Mater Society. The
Provincial Government has undertaken to assume the annual
charges for interest on the bonds.
The Brock Memorial Building
In connection with the celebration of the twenty-first anniversary of the opening of the University in 1936, it was decided
that a memorial be established by general appeal to students,
graduates, and friends of the University throughout Canada. A
committee representing all branches of the University decided
that the memorial should take the form of a student union building,
dedicated to the memory of the late Dean of Applied Science,
Reginald W. Brock, and Mrs. Brock, by whose tragic deaths as a
result of an aeroplane accident the University suffered a great loss.
The original fund for the construction of the building was
subscribed by relatives of Dean and Mrs. Brock, friends of the
University throughout Canada and the United States, alumni
and students of the University, and former colleagues of Dean
Brock. The balance of the amount required to complete construction was provided by the students in cash and through a bond
issue of the Alma Mater Society. Furnishings for the building
were provided from a fund raised over a period of years by the
Women's Union Building Committee of the University.
The building is situated adjacent to the playing fields and
gymnasium. In it are located the offices of the Alma Mater Society
and various clubs and student activities. The building contains,
also, common rooms, lunch and tea rooms, and accommodation for
social activities. In architectural design and exterior finish, it
harmonizes well with the other buildings on the campus.
The Brock Memorial Building was dedicated in January, 1940. 24 The University of British Columbia
Forest Products Laboratories
The Forest Products Laboratories of Canada, Vancouver Laboratory, which is maintained by the Forest Service of the Department
of Mines and Resources, Canada, occupies three buildings provided
and kept up through a co-operative agreement between the
University and the Dominion Government.
Plan of Campus
The plan at the back of the Calendar shows the buildings which
have been erected and indicates the nature of their construction.
It also shows their relation to the other groups of buildings which
are to be erected in the future.
ENDOWMENTS  AND  DONATIONS
It has become a tradition for each graduating class to make a
gift to the University. That of the Class of 1940 took the form of
a public address system for the Stadium.
A list of the other most important gifts received during last
year is given below under the various departments or in the Annual
Report of the Library.
Department of Biology and Botany
(For Herbarium and Botanical Garden)
I   SEEDS
CANADA Montreal Botanic Garden, Montreal.
J. W. Eastham, Vancouver.
B. O. Iverson, Yellowknife, N.W.T.
UNITED STATES       Boyce Thompson Arboretum, Yonkers, N. Y.
Hunting-ton   College   Botanical   Garden   and   Arboretum,
Huntington.
Lexington Botanic Garden, Lexington.
New York Botanical Garden, New York.
Morris Arboretum, Philadelphia.
Rex D. Pearce, Moorestown, N. J.
GREAT BRITAIN       Royal Botanic Gardens, Kew.
Botanical Gardens, University of St. Andrews, Scotland.
Royal Horticultural Society, London.
URUGUAY Botanical Garden, Montevideo.
PORTUGAL Botanical Gardens, University of Coimbra, Portugal.
SWEDEN Botanical Garden, Lund.
SWITZERLAND Botanical Garden, Basel.
RUSSIA Botanical Garden, Academy of Science, Leningrad.
JAPAN Botanic Garden, Taihoku Imperial University, Taiwan.
Botanic Garden, Hokaido Imperial University,  Sapporo.
Department of Civil Engineering
1. Chancellor R. E. McKechnie—Pictures of bridges.
2. Professor E. G. Matheson—Miscellaneous technical journals. Endowments and Donations 25
Department of Forestry
Dean Emeritus C. D. Howe, School of Forestry, Toronto University—Collection of forestry text-books  (many now out of print).
Caterpillar Tractor Company, Peoria, Illinois—Tractor reference material.
New York State College of Forestry, Syracuse, New York—Several dozen
sample blocks of North American woods.
Ernest Allen, Manager, Wrigley Printing Co., Vancouver, B. C.—Complete set
of bound volumes of "Western Lumberman", 1904-1929 inclusive.
U. S. Forest Service, Washington, D. C.—Several score of bulletins and miscellaneous publications.
Dominion Forest Service,  Ottawa,  Canada—Statistical  reports  and bulletins.
Department of Geology and Geography
1. Mrs. G. Cox—Oligocene fossils from Clo-oose, Vancouver Island.
2. Mrs. J. N. Drier, Vancouver—Kauri gum from New Zealand.
3. Mr. Alan L. Todd, Vancouver.—Elk horn adze handle, bone awl, and stone
sinker, all dug up at Qualicum Beach about one mile south of Little
Qualicum River on an old Indian camp site by C. A. White.
4. G.  B.  Leech,  Vancouver—Bottle  of nitrate and crystal  of nitrate  from
Chile;  fossil  wood from  Omineca.
5. Mr. R. M. Thompson and Mr. D. B. Burns—Devono-carboniferous fossils
from Kalzas Mts., Yukon.
6. Prof.   C.   A.   Arnold,   Ann   Arbor,   Michigan—Fossil   leaves   from   Endot,
B. C.; gastroliths, Morrison formation, Greyhull, Wyoming.
7. Mr.  W.  A.  MacLean.  Vancouver—Post-glacial  fossil  pectend from Reed
Is. opp. Campbell River.
8. Dr. R. E. McKechnie, Chancellor, University of British Columbia—Mam
moth tooth from Eldorado Creek, Klondyke.
9. Mr.  Len Turnbull, Vancouver—Monotis, Thormanby Island.
10. Mr.   W.   H.   Mathews,   Vancouver—Crinoid   columnal,   Nicola   formation,
Deadman Lake.
11. Mr. J. A. Wallace, Vancouver—Fusulina, Omineca River.
12. Mr.  H.   R.   Morris,  Vancouver—Dinosaur  bones  and  other  fossils  from
Alberta.   I
13. Mr. Geo. Reifel, Vancouver—Aucella and other fossils, collected at Harri
son Lake by Mr. Anderson.
14. Mr. F. D. Fournier—JCretaceous fossils from Sinai Peninsula.
15. Mr.  G. R. Hilchey, Vancouver—Fusulina from near northeast corner of
Trembleur Lake, B. C.
16. Mr.   R.   F.   Ohlson,   Calgary,   Alberta—Miocene   and   recent   shells   from
Colombia.
17. Mr. John Storey, Vancouver—Fossil fern and basket covered bottle from
Queen Charlotte Islands, and a beautiful oriental ivory fan.
18. Mr.  Fred  Soames,   Soames Point,   Grantham's  Landing,   B. C.—An  Indian
rubbing stone, a pestle, and two celts.
19. Mr.   B.   C.   Harrington,   Salmon   Arm—Three   books   from   Sir   "William
Dawson's library.
Department of Horticulture
Dominion Experimental Station, Summerland, B. C.—Shipments of fruit specimens of pears and apples for systematic study.
Dominion Experimental Station, Saanichton, B. C.—Two boxes of pear fruit
specimens for systematic study.
Mr. W. H. Robertson, Provincial Horticulturist, Victoria, B. C, and District
Horticulturists and Field Men—Twelve boxes of fruit variety specimens
for systematic study.
Department of Mechanical and Electrical Engineering
The Ford Motor Co. of Canada—One Ford V-8 95-horsepower engine on loan
for use in the Mechanical Engineering Laboratory. 26 The University of British Columbia
Department of Physics
British Columbia Telephone Company—(a) Three used motor generator sets;
(b)  Stranded cable, resistances, tubes, and miscellaneous equipment.
Department of Zoology
(For Museum of Zoology)
Insects:
Mr. H. Andison, Dominion Entomological Laboratory, Victoria—Mounted
insects of economic importance in B. C.
Mr. Allan Brooks, Okanagan Landing—Ectoparasites of birds.
Mr. H. L. Devick, Heffley Creek—A collection of mounted European and
Sumatran Lepidoptera, including six specimens of Attacus, the largest
moth  in  the world;  two large volumes,  illustrated with  magnificent
coloured plates, of Hoffman's Lepidoptera of Europe and their larvae.
Mr. G.  Hopping,  Dominion Forest Insect Laboratory, Vernon—A named
series of early stages of local Scolytidae.
Mr. Allen Mail, Eric Hearle Entomological Laboratory, Kamloops—Bulk
collections of native Phyllophaga and their larvae.
Mr. J. A. Munro, Okanagan Landing—Ectoparasitic fauna of birds' nests.
Dr. M. L. Prebble arrd Mr. K. Graham, Dominion Forest Insect Laboratory,
Victoria—Samples of insect injury to trees and timber.
Mr. K.  Racey, Vancouver—Ectoparasites of birds.
Mr. F.    C.    Whitehouse,    Vancouver—Several    rare    species    of   Odonata
(dragon flies), thus making the University collection of these insects
nearly complete.
Dr. M. Y. Williams, Vancouver—Ectoparasites of birds and mammals.
Mr. T. W. Young, Summerland—Ectoparasites of rodents.
Crustacea and Mollusca;
Mr.  H. B. Leech, Vernon—Various species.
Mr. R. W. Pillsbury, Vancouver—Various species.
Fishes:
Mr. G. V. Wilby, Vancouver—Several species; skull of wolf eel.
Amphibians and Reptiles:
Mr. Wm. Bailey, Vancouver—8 northwestern salamanders.
Dr. I. McT. Cowan, Vancouver—316 specimens of amphibians and reptiles
(private collection).
Mr. H. C. Dalziel, Okanagan Landing—1 Pacific boa.
Mr. George  Holland,  Kamloops—1  Pacific boa,  2  eggs of painted  turtle,
1 horned toad.
Mr. A. C. Mackie, Vernon—1 Pacific boa, 4 rattlesnakes.
Mr. A.  Peake,  Nanaimo—1   northwestern   toad.
Mr. R. W. Pillsbury, Vancouver—6 northwestern salamander's, 2 bullfrog
adults, and  10 larvae.
Mrs. T. L. Thacker, Hope—1 Pacific boa.
Dr. M. Y. Williams, Vancouver—2 Douglas horned toads, 2 garter snakes.
Birds and Mammals:
B. C. Game Commission, Vancouver—Skulls of 2 wolves, 1 Cascade red fox,
skin and skull of coyote, skeleton of 1 mute swan, 1 northwest coast
heron.
Dr. V. C Brink, Vancouver—1 poor-will.
Mr. E. R. Buckell, Kamloops—Skulls of 1 grizzly, 1 black bear, 1 mink,
1 coyote, 1 wolf, 2 skunk. -
Mr. D. Buckland, Vancouver—Skull of bison.
Dr. G. C. Carl, Victoria—Partial skeleton of king eider.
Mr. C. F. Connor, Vancouver—6 young shrew moles.
Dr. I. McT. Cowan, Vancouver—303 prepared specimens of North American birds (private collection).
Mr.  H. B. Leech, Vernon—3 Alaskan little brown bats. Endowments and Donations 27
Mr.  C. Lloyd, Vancouver—Skull  of 1  mule deer.
Mr. A. Lyon, Port Hardy—Skeletons of 1 otter, 1 raccoon, 6 mink.
Mr. W. S. Maguire, New Westminster—1 Alaskan longspur.
Mr. J. W. Plowden-Wardlaw, Vancouver—2 sanderling, 3 oyster catchers,
2 Brandt's cormorant, 2 farallone, 1 cormorant, 1 bald eagle, 1 shar-
shinned hawk.
Mr. K.  Racey,  Vancouver.—(1  western  tanager,  1  Kennicott  screech owl,
nests and eggs of 46 American birds.
Dr. G. Simpson, Vancouver—7 weeks' human fetus.
Mr. A. L. Todd, Vancouver—Skull of Salish Indian.
Mr. A. C. White, Vancouver—Skull of Salish Indian.
Dr. M.  Y.  Williams,  Vancouver—Skulls  of  Manitoba  elk  and  American
bison.
Mr. G. Van Wilby, Vancouver—1 large brown bat.
(General acknowledgments)
B. C. Packers, Vancouver—Materials for class use.
Dr. W.  J.  Brown,  Division  of  Entomology,  Ottawa—Identification  of  B.  C.
Coleoptera.
Mr. E.   R.   Buckell,   Dominion   Entomological   Laboratory,   Kamloops—Many
additions   to   the   card   index   catalogue   of   the   Journal   of   Economic
Entomology.
Canadian Fishing Company, Vancouver—Materials for class use.
Dr. F. M. Carpenter, Harvard University—Identification of B. C. Neuroptera.
Dr. C. H. Curran, American Museum of Natural History, New York—Identification of B. C. Diptera.
Mr. W. Downes, Dominion Entomological Laboratory, Victoria—Identification
of B. C. Homoptera and Hemiptera.
Mr. R. Glendenning, Dominion Entomological Laboratory, Agassiz—Identifica-
.   tion of B. C. Aphididae.
International Fisheries Commission,  Seattle—Loan of collection of deep sea
fishes.
Mr. H.   B.   Leech,   Dominion   Entomological   Laboratory,   Vernon—A   further
considerable  series of valuable entomological  books,  bulletins, and separates; identification of B. C. Coleoptera.
Mr.   K.   Racey,   Vancouver—Loan   of   many   specimens   of   birds  and   expert
assistance in the preparation of specimens.
School   of   Fisheries,   University   of   Washington,   Seattle—Loan   of   various
species of fish.
Dr. G. Simpson, Vancouver—Loan of books.
Gratefully acknowledged is the close co-operation and assistance of the
Provincial Museum, through Acting-Director Dr. G. C. Carl; of the Provincial Game Department, through Commissioners F. R. Butler and J. G. Cunningham; of the Pacific Biological Station, through Dr. R. E. Foerster; and of
the Dominion Division of Entomology, through Mr. E. R. Buckell of the
Kamloops laboratory. These organizations have contributed most valuable
assistance, particularly in supplying travelling and collecting facilities for
obtaining class, museum, and research materials, providing facilities for
research work, loaning books, donating and loaning class and research specimens, etc. 28 The University of British Columbia
GENERAL INFORMATION
The Session
The academic year begins on the first of September and ends
on the last day of August. The Winter Session is divided into two
terms—the first, September to December; the second, January to
May. The Summer Session consists of seven weeks' instruction in
July and August. For Admission to the University, see page 34,
and for Registration and Attendance, see page 36.
Courses of Study
For the Session of 1941-42 the University offers instruction in
each of the three Faculties, Arts and Science, Applied Science
(including Nursing), and Agriculture, leading to the degrees of
Bachelor of Arts, Bachelor of Commerce, Bachelor of Applied
Science, Bachelor of Science in Forestry, and Bachelor of Science in
Agriculture. A course is given in the Faculty of Arts and Science
leading to a Diploma of Social Service, and a Teacher Training
Course is given for graduates. Advanced courses of instruction
and facilities for research leading to a Master's degree are offered
in each Faculty. Admission to these advanced courses, or to the
privileges of research, does not in itself imply admission to
candidacy for a higher degree.
Academic Dress
The undergraduate's gown is black in colour and of the ordinary
stuff material, of ankle length, and with long sleeves and the yoke
edged with khaki cord. The graduate's gown is the same, without
cord. The Bachelor's hood is of the Cambridge pattern, black
bordered with the distinctive colour of the particular Faculty, the
Bachelor of Commerce hood being differentiated by the addition
of a white cord; the Master's hood is the same, lined with the
distinctive colour. The colours are, for Arts and Science, the
University blue; for Applied Science, red; for Agriculture, maize.
Department of University Extension
Under a grant from the British Dominions and Colonies Fund
of the Carnegie Corporation of New York, the University of
British Columbia organized early in 1936 a Department of University Extension. This department carries on most of the usual
University Extension activities, including a programme for adult
education.
The grant from the Carnegie Corporation enabled the University
to collect much valuable information on the special requirements
of adult education in British  Columbia.   Various experimental General Information 29
projects were tried, and, in accordance with the experience gained,
were rejected, modified, or accepted as the basis for a more permanent programme. As a result a practicable policy has evolved—
one adapted to local conditions, yet within the financial resources of
the University. Through the activities of the Department of
University Extension, the University is contributing enduring
benefits to the educational and economic life of the Province.
During the past year, the University, through the Department
of University Extension, has been co-operating with the Dominion
and Provincial Departments of Labour in the Dominion-Provincial Youth Training Plan. The Department of University Extension has also been co-operating with the Dominion Department of
Fisheries in providing an educational programme for British
Columbia fishermen.
The present activities of the Department include the following:
(a) Extension Lectures.
Through the Department arrangements are made for
members of the University teaching staff to give lectures
at various centres throughout the Province.
(b) Evening Classes.
Each year a number of evening classes on various subjects are held in the city of Vancouver.
(c) Dramatics.
During the winter, short courses in dramatics are held
at various centres in the Province. Each summer a longer
and more comprehensive course is given at the University.
A play loan library has been established.
(d) Visual Instruction.
(i) Lantern and Film Slide Service. Approximately 800
sets of lantern and film slides, many with lectures, are
available for loan to schools, churches, and other organizations. A catalogue of these may be obtained
upon request.
(ii) Motion Picture Service. A Film Library of up-to-
date motion picture films has been established. Films
from the National Film Board and the National Film
Society are distributed in British Columbia through
the Extension Department. A catalogue listing the
films may be obtained upon application.
(e) Study Groups.
Study group courses are offered each year. These include :
(i)  Canada and the Post "War "World. 30 The University of British Columbia
(ii) Modern Literature,
(iii) British Columbia History.
(iv) Practical Psychology.
(v)  Child Psychology for Parents.
(vi)  History of the Theatre,
(vii) Acting for Seniors,
(viii) Acting for Juniors.
(ix)  Public Speaking.
(x)  Co-operatives.
(xi)  Credit Unions,
(xii)  The Co-operative Buying Club,
(xiii) Marine Navigation.
(f) Short Courses.
Short courses in various subjects are offered by the Department during both the "Winter and Summer Sessions.
(g) Extension Library.
The University Extension Library is a special collection
designed to meet the needs of adults who wish to do systematic reading on any subject.
(h) Radio.
Each year the Department offers a series of educational
broadcasts.    During the U. B. C. Music Hour, recordings
from the Carnegie Music Set are played.
(i)   Art and Music.
The facilities supplied by the Carnegie Art Teaching Set
and the Carnegie Music Set enable the Department to offer
courses in this field.
A phonograph record loan service has been established
for the use of music appreciation groups.
(j) Educational Programme for British Columbia Fishermen.
Through assistance received from the Dominion Department of Fisheries, the University has been able to offer
courses   on   Credit  Unions   and   Co-operatives  to  British
Columbia fishermen.
(k) Public Relations.
Frequently items of interest to the public are prepared
and released to the press.    The Department of University
Extension offers its services to any individual, group, or
organization requiring information regarding the University.
Full particulars regarding any of the above services will be
furnished upon application to the Director, Department of University Extension. General Information 31
University Health Service
This service was begun in 1925 when the Lieutenant-Governor
in Council, upon the recommendation of the Provincial Health
Officer, appointed a Medical Health Officer for the University Area.
In the Fall of 1927, the Provincial Health Officer added to the
University Health Service a Public Health Nurse, thus commencing the continuous operation of a full-time local Health Department
on the campus and University Endowment Area.
In November, 1936, the University Endowment Area became
part of the Metropolitan Health Area under the direction of the
Metropolitan Health Committee, thus affording the University the
extra services and facilities enjoyed by the larger organization,
which provides through its Health Units a Public Health Service
to the entire Greater Vancouver Area. The University Area is
now Health Unit 3A of the Greater Vancouver Area.
The offices of the University Health Service are located in the
Auditorium Building. The first aid furniture and supplies for
this office were the generous gift of the Graduating Class of 1927.
Purposes of the University Health Service
The first purpose of the Health Service for Students is to supervise the physical and mental health of the student from the time
of admission to the University until graduation, so that as the
student takes his place in the outside world he will not be handicapped by physical defects or mental breakdown during the period
in which he is adjusting himself to his career.
On admission to the University, each student is given a complete
physical examination; also all students who have not had an examination by this University for more than four years. All students
who have been absent from the University for a year or more are
to report to the Health Service Office within a month of return.
All students who are to participate in strenuous athletics will be
given an examination to determine their status of physical fitness.
Later the Medical Officer has a personal conference during the
First Term with those who received examination. This conference
is for the purpose of individualizing the previous examination and
for the re-checking and "following-up" of any physical defects
which were found at the time. Evidence, satisfactory to the
medical officer, of successful immunization against smallpox is
required. Preventive vaccinations and inoculations are given by
the Health Service.
The Medical Officer is available at specified hours for consultations with students on health problems. Students having problems
dealing with emotional and personality difficulties may consult
with the Director of Mental Hygiene. 32 The University of British Columbia
One of the most important tasks of the Health Service is the
control of communicable disease. Much valuable time can be
saved the student body by the prompt and immediate application
of preventive measures in checking the spread of communicable
disease.
Tuberculosis  Control
Because tuberculosis occupies first place as a cause of death of
persons of college age, it is given special attention. The University
Health Service therefore gives to each new student at the time of
his entrance examination a tuberculin skin test and provides for
an X-ray of the chest to those showing a skin reaction to tuberculosis. This project is of very great value, for when tuberculosis
is diagnosed and treatment instituted before physical breakdown
occurs, the patient is saved from years of invalidism and perhaps
death, and his fellow students are protected from infection.
Rules Governing Communicable and Other Illnesses
Students developing any illness or suffering from any injury
while on the campus should apply for first aid to the University
Health Service. This is particularly required if the student
develops any illness of a communicable nature, including the
common cold.
Students developing any illness or suffering any injury while
at home, boarding house, fraternity house, etc., are required to
report the same to the University Health Service. The development of any communicable disease in a University Student or •
any person living in the same house, must be reported by the student
to the University Health Service without delay. Students exposed
to a communicable disease may be permitted, by special order of
the Medical Health Officer, to attend the University for a prescribed
period, despite the exposure.
Such students shall report daily (or oftener, at the discretion
of the Medical Health Officer) to the University Health Service
for such prescribed period. Failure to so report will result in
immediate exclusion from the University.
Students absent on account of illness must present medical certificates. If the absence occurs during the session, the student must
appear in person, with the certificate, at the University Health
Service immediately on return to the University, and before
attendance upon class work. The University Health Service will
examine the person concerned and will immediately forward the
certificate, with report thereon, to the Dean of the Faculty. // the
absence occurs during the examinations, the medical certificate
must be received by the Dean of the Faculty within two days after
the termination of the examination period.   A medical certificate General Information 33
must show the nature and the period of the disability.   Medical
report forms may be obtained from the Health Service office.
The Health Service is a preventive service and can not provide
treatment for sick students.
Summer Session
The University Health Service provides a health service for
students attending the Summer Session. Details of this service
may be found in the Announcement of the Summer Session.
Physical Education
Physical Education was organized at the University during the
session 1935-36. The work for the present is under the general
supervision of a committee appointed by the President of the
University. There are divisions for both men and women conducted
on a voluntary basis without University credit.
The Physical Education programme contributes to the mental
and physical health of the student body. Participation is encouraged
in physical activities which will be useful as a health measure and
in providing social opportunities in adult life. The activities are
limited by the accommodation at the gymnasium. They include
for men: badminton, basketball, boxing, cross-country running,
golf, tumbling, volleyball, wrestling, track, and field, football, and
rugby. The women's activities are: archery, badminton, basketball, dancing, gymnastics, group games, light apparatus, and volleyball.
A course in recreational leadership is given for those who are
interested in play leadership in schools, playgrounds, social centres,
and leisure time organizations.
The geographic location of the University precludes the possibility of any extensive intercollegiate athletic competition and
consequently great emphasis is placed for both men and women
upon intramural athletics.
University Employment Bureau
The objects of the Employment Bureau are to provide students
with summer employment, to provide part-time work for students
during the Winter Session, and to help students in obtaining
positions after graduation. This service is for employers seeking
help and for students desiring employment. Those who know of
positions vacant are requested to notify the Bureau. Correspondence
relating to employment of women students may be sent to the Dean
of "Women's office. General correspondence relating to employment
should be addressed to the Employment Bureau, Registrar's office. 34 The University of British Columbia
Dean of Women
During the session the Dean of "Women may be consulted by
parents and students on matters pertaining to living conditions,
vocational guidance, and other questions that directly affect the
social and intellectual life of the women1 students.
Board and Residence
A list of boarding-houses which receive men or women students,
but not both, may be obtained from the Registrar. Men and women
students are not permitted to lodge in the same house, unless they
are members of the same family, or receive special permission from
the Senate. Residence accommodation arranged by women students
must meet with the approval of the Dean of "Women. Women
students under twenty-five years of age are permitted to occupy
suites in apartment houses only when accompanied by some older
person. The Dean of Women undertakes the inspection of all
boarding houses and housekeeping rooms listed for the accommodation of women students.- The cost of good board and lodging is
from $30 to $40 a month; of a room alone, $10 to $15 a month.
A grill is operated under the supervision of the University, and
lunch, afternoon tea, and light supper may be obtained there at
very reasonable prices. Refreshments at social functions are also
supplied.
General Conduct
The University authorities do not assume responsibilities which
naturally rest with parents. This being so, it is the policy of the.
University to rely on the good sense and on the home training of
students for the preservation of good moral standards.
ADMISSION TO THE UNIVERSITY
All enquiries relating to admission to the University should be
addressed to the Registrar.
The accommodation for students in the University is limited.
The University, therefore, reserves the right to limit the attendance.
The Faculty of Applied Science reserves the right of selection
and admission of students entering the Second Year of the Combined Course and the Third Year of the Double Course in Arts
and Science and Nursing.
The University reserves the right to limit the registration in, or
to cancel, any of the courses listed. Limitation may be imposed if
the numbers desiring any course are found to be too large for the
lecture rooms, and laboratories available for that course, or for
the number of instructors in the department concerned, or for the Admission to the University 35
equipment and supplies which can be obtained. Certain courses
may be cancelled if the numbers of instructors in the departments
concerned prove to be inadequate to offer all the courses listed.
1. Except under special circumstances, no student, under the
age of sixteen is admitted to the University. For admission to the
Second Year of the course in Nursing (or the Third Year of the
Double Course in Arts and Nursing) a student must be eighteen
years of age, and for admission to any course in Social Service,
twenty-one years of age.
2. Candidates for admission to the courses in the First Year of
the Faculty of Arts and Science or the Faculty of Agriculture
and to the course in Nursing in Applied Science are required to
pass the University Entrance (Junior Matriculation) examination
of the Province of British Columbia or to submit certificates showing that they have passed an equivalent examination elsewhere.
Students over 18 years of age with full'' Normal Entrance'' standing, who hold normal school certificates, are admitted to the
University as having full University Entrance standing. Special
regulations are prescribed for admission to courses in Applied
Science, and are given under the heading of Admission in the
Applied Science section of the Calendar.
3. Students who have passed the Senior Matriculation examination are admitted to the courses of the Second Year in the
Faculty of Arts and Science. Students who have partial Senior
Matriculation standing, obtained in 1927 or subsequently, will be
granted credit in the First Year in each subject in which they have
made 50 per cent, or over, or in each paper in which they have
made 50 per cent, or over, in so far as these papers correspond
with those of the First Year.
4. A student who has a failure in a subject of the University
Entrance examination standing against him will not be admitted
to the University.
5. The University Entrance and Senior Matriculation examinations of the Province of British Columbia are conducted by the
High School and University Matriculation Board of the Province.
This Board consists of members appointed by the Department of
Education and by the University. The requirements for these
examinations are stated in the publication, Requirements for
University Entrance and, Senior Matriculation, issued by the University. The courses of study for the various grades in the high
schools are given in the Programme of Studies for the High Schools,
issued by the Provincial Department of Education.
6. Certificates or diplomas showing that a candidate has passed
the matriculation examination of another university will be
accepted in lieu of the University Entrance or Senior Matriculation 36 The University of British Columbia
examinations if the Faculty concerned considers that the examination has covered the same subjects and required the same standards. If, however, the examinations cover some but not all of
the necessary subjects, the candidate will be required to pass the
examinations in the subjects not covered.
7. A candidate who wishes to enter by certificates other than a
Matriculation or University Entrance certificate issued in British
Columbia should submit to the Registrar the original certificates.
If he wishes these returned to him, he must present also a copy of
each certificate for record at the University. He should under no
circumstances come to the University without having first obtained
from the Registrar a statement of the value of the certificates he
holds, as these may lack one or more essential subjects, or the work
done in a subject may not be adequate, or, again, the percentage
gained may not be sufficiently high. Moreover, it must be remembered that a certificate may admit to one Faculty and not to
another. When an applicant's diploma or certificate does not show
the marks obtained, in the several subjects of the examination, he
must arrange to have a statement of his marks sent to the Registrar
by the Education Department or University issuing such diploma
or certificate. The fee for examination of certificates is $2.00. This
fee must accompany the application.
8. A student of another university applying for exemption from
any subject or subjects which he has already studied is required
to submit with his application a calendar of the university in
which he has previously studied, together with a complete statement of the course he has followed and a certificate of the standing
gained in the several subjects.* The Faculty concerned will determine the standing of such a student in this University. The fee for
the examination of certificates is $2.00. This fee must accompany
the application.
REGISTRATION AND ATTENDANCE
Those who intend to register as students of the University are
required to make application to the Registrar, on forms to be
obtained from the Registrar's office. This application should be
made in person or by mail early in August, or as soon as the results
of the matriculation examinations are knoivn, and must be accompanied by the registration fee of $5.00. (See regulations in reference to Admission to the University, page 34.)
The Faculty of Applied Science reserves the right of selection.
and admission of students entering the Second Year of the Com^
bined Course and the Third Year of the Double Course in Arts and
Science and Nursing.
*For the conditions urrder which exemption is granted in the Faculty of Arts and
Science, see Courses Leading to the Degree of B.A. Registration and Attendance 37
Application for admission to Second Year Nursing or the Teacher
Training Course must be made to the Registrar on or before August
15th. A selection of candidates will be made immediately thereafter
on the basis of qualifications. Forms of application for admission to
these courses may be obtained from the Registrar's office.
The last days for registration are: for First and Second Year
students, Wednesday, September 16th; for other undergraduate
students of the regular Winter Session, Friday, September 18th;
for graduate students, and for students in Extra-Sessional, Classes
and Directed Reading Courses, Thursday, October 15th.
1. There are four classes of students:
(a) Graduate students—Students who are pursuing courses of
study in a Faculty in which they hold a degree, whether
they are proceeding to a Master's degree or not. Students,
however, who are proceeding to a Bachelor's degree in
another course in the same Faculty in which they hold a
degree, or in another Faculty, will register as undergraduates.
(b) Full undergraduates—Students proceeding to a degree in
any Faculty who have passed all the examinations precedent
to the year in which they are registered.
(c) Conditioned undergraduates — Students proceeding to a
degree with defects in their standing which do not prevent
their entering a higher year under the regulations governing Examinations and Advancement of the Faculty in
which they are registered.
(d) Partial students—Students not belonging to one of the
three preceding classes.   (See 7, below.)
2. All students are required to register at the office of the
Registrar on or before the last day for registration, to furnish the
information necessary for the University records, to enroll for
the particular classes which they wish to attend, and to sign the
following declaration: ,
'' I hereby accept and submit myself to the statutes, rules, regulations, and ordinances of The University of British Columbia, and
of the Faculty or Faculties in which I am registered, and to any
amendments thereto which mayybe made while I am a student of
the University, and I promise to observe the same.''
In the information furnished for the University records, students
are requested to state what church they propose to make their place
of worship. This information is available for any of. the city
churches desiring it.
3. A late registration fee of $2.00 will be charged all students
who register after the above dates. 38 The University of British Columbia
No registration for undergraduate students of the regular Winter
Session will be accepted after Monday, September 28th, without the
special permission of the Faculty concerned, and a candidate so
accepted for registration may be required to take fewer courses
than the regular year's work.
4. Students registering for the first time must present the
certificates which constitute their qualification for admission to
the course of study for which they wish to register. The Registrar
is empowered to register all duly qualified students. Doubtful'cases
will be dealt with by the Faculty concerned.
5. Students doing work in two academic years will register in
the lower year and fill out their course cards in such a way as to
make clear which courses are required to complete the lower year.
6. Students desiring to make a change in the course for which
they have registered must apply to the Registrar on the proper
form for a "change of course." Except in special circumstances,
no change will be allowed after the first week of the session. If the
application is approved by the Faculty concerned, the Registrar
will give the necessary notifications.
7. Partial students, who are not proceeding to a degree, are not
normally required to pass an examination for admission, but before
registering they must produce a certificate showing that they have
satisfied the Dean and the heads of the departments concerned
that they are qualified to pursue with advantage the course of
study which they propose to undertake.
8. Students are required to attend at least seven-eighths of the
lectures in each course that they take. Admission to a lecture or laboratory and credit for attendance may be refused by the instructor
for lateness, misconduct, inattention, or neglect of duty. Absence
consequent on illness or domestic affliction may be excused only by
the Dean of the Faculty concerned, and medical certificates or other
evidence must be presented. If the absence occurs during the session,
the student must appear in person, with the certificate, at the University Health Service immediately on return to the University,
and before attendance upon class work. The University Health
Service will examine the person concerned and will immediately
forward the certificate, with report thereon, to the Dean of the
Faculty. // the absence occurs during the examinations, the
certificate must be sent to the Dean of the Faculty within two
days after the termination of the examination period. A medical
certificate must show the nature and the period of the disability.
Medical report forms may be obtained from the Dean's office. In
cases of deficient attendance students may (with the sanction of
the Dean and the head of the department concerned) be excluded Registration and Attendance 39
from the Christmas or the final examinations in a course; but, in
the case of a final examination, unless the unexcused absences
exceed one-fourth of the total number of lectures in a course, such
student may be permitted to sit for supplemental examination.
(See regulation in each Faculty in reference to Examinations and
Advancement.)
9. All candidates for a degree must make formal application-
for graduation at least one month previous to the Congregation at
which they expect to obtain the degree. Special forms for this
purpose may be obtained from the Registrar's office.
FEES
All cheques must be certified and made payable to "The University of British Columbia.''
The registration fee is not returnable.
If fees are not paid when due an additional fee of $2.00 will be
charged.
Fees are not transferable from one session to another.
A request for a REFUND OF FEES must be made by the
student to the BURSAR within FOUR WEEKS after the student
has discontinued his work; and fees for which a refund has not
been so requested WILL NOT BE RETURNED.
The Sessional Fees are as follows:
For Full and Conditioned Undergraduates
in arts and science :
Registration—Payable  before  registration $    5.00
First Term—Payable on or before October 5th:
Sessional Fee     ___..   __ $ 75.00
Alma Mater Fee     13.00
Caution Money       5.00
     93.00
Second Term—Payable on or before January llth     75.00
$173.00
IN SOCIAL SERVICE COURSE :
Registration—Payable  before   registration $    5.00
First Term—Payable on or before October 5th :
Sessional Fee   $ 75.00
Alma Mater Fee       13.00
Caution Money        5.00
     93.00
Second Term—Payable on or before January llth     75.00
$173.00 40 The University of British Columbia
in teacher training course :
Registration—Payable before  registration $    5.00
First Term—Payable on or before October 5th:
Sessional Fee    $ 75.00
Alma Mater Fee     13.00
Caution Money          5.00
    93.00
Second Term—Payable on or before January llth.—      75.00
$173.00
IN APPLIED SCIENCE:
Registration—Payable before  registration  $    5.00
First Term—Payable on or before October 5th:
Sessional Fee ____       . $100.00
Alma Mater Fee        13.00
Caution  Money   ._              5.00
  118.00
Second Term—Payable on or before January llth  100.00
$223.00
IN NURSING AND PUBLIC HEALTH :
Registration—Payable  before   registration $    5.00
First Term—Payable on or before October 5th:
Sessional Fee  $75.00
Alma Mater Fee     13.00
Caution Money    __._   5.00
    93.00
Second Term—Pavable on or before Januarv llth     75.00
$173.00
NOTE.    Social   Service   workers   taking   any   of   Courses   1-13,   and   these
courses only, are relieved from paying the Alma Mater fee.
For Third and Fourth Year students in Nursing (i.e.. students in the
affiliated hospital) the Sessional fee is $1.00, payable with an Alma Mater
fee of $8.00, on or before October 5th.
Students admitted to a one-year course for graduate nurses and proceeding to the Certificate on a basis of part-time attendance over two or more
years will pay $!(.00 per unit. Fees 41
in agriculture:
Registration—Payable  before  registration $    5.00
First 'Term—Payable on or before October 5th:
Sessional Fee  $75.00
Alma Mater Fee      13.00
Caution Money      5.00
——   93.00
Second Term—Payable on or before January llth            75.00
$173.00
OCCUPATIONAL COURSE :
Registration—Payable  before  registration        $    5.00
First Term—Payable on or before October 5th:
Sessional Fee  $30.00
Alma Mater Fee..    13.00
Caution Money         5.00
    48.00
Second, Term—Payable on or before January llth     30.00
$ 83.00
For Partial Students
Fees per "Unit"     - $12.00
Registration—Payable before registration
For 6 units or less     2.00
For over 6 units           5.00
First half payable on or before October 5th, along
with
Alma Mater Fee  13.00
Caution Money        5.00
Second Half payable on or before January llth.
For Students in Extra-sessional Classes and
Directed Reading Courses
Registration—Payable before registration $ 2.00
Fees per 3-Unit Course  36.00
First Half Unit Fees payable on or before October 15th.
Second Half Unit Fees payable on or before January llth. 42 The University of British Columbia
For Graduates*
Registration—Payable  before  registration $    5.00
First Term—Payable on or before October 15th:
Sessional Fee $62.50
Caution  Money       5.00
     67.50
Second Term—Payable on or before January llth     62.50
$135.00
Each Subsequent Session:
Registration    1 .'. $ 5.00
Caution Money      5.00
    10.00
Late Registration
See page 36 $    2.00
The Alma Mater Fee is a fee exacted from all students for the
support of the Alma Mater Society. It was authorized by the Board
of Governors at the request of the students themselves.
The Caution Money is a deposit from which deductions will be
made to cover breakages, wastage, and use of special materials in
laboratories, Library, etc. If the balance to the credit of a student
falls below $1.50, a further deposit of $5.00 may be required.
Caution Money will be refunded after the 30th day of April.
Immediately after the last day for the payment of fees, students
whose fees have not been paid will have their registrations cancelled,
and will be excluded from classes. Such students will not be permitted to register again during the term until they obtain the
consent of the Dean, pay all fees, and present to the Registrar a
statement from the Bursar certifying that fees have been paid.
Students registering after October 5th shall pay their fees at
the time of registration, failing which they become subject to the
provisions of the preceding regulation.
Students borrowing books from the University Library for
preparatory reading courses will be required to make the usual
deposit of $2.00 with the Librarian to cover mailing cost.
For Summer Session Students
Fees are payable on registration, otherwise an additional fee of
$2.00 will be exacted.
Registration—Payable  before   registration $ 2.00
Minimum Class Fee    25.00
Per "Unit"   .:  12.00
Summer  Session   Association :     2.00
*For registration fee for graduates taking 0 units or less see above under Partial
Students. Fees 43
Special Fees
Regular supplemental examination, per paper $ 5.00
Special examination (Applied Science and Agriculture),
per paper      7.50
Re-reading, per paper _'       2.00
Graduation      15.00
Supplemental examination fees must be paid by August 15th
when application for examination is made. Special examination
fees and fees for re-reading are payable with application.
Graduation fees must be paid two weeks before Congregation.
(See regulation in reference to application for a degree, page 39.)
MEDALS,  SCHOLARSHIPS,  PRIZES,  BURSARIES,
AND LOANS FOR  1942-43
GENERAL REGULATIONS
1. Scholarships, prizes, and bursaries which are not based solely
on academic standing are indicated by an asterisk. Unless other
instructions are given in the Calendar notice, intending candidates
must make application to the Registrar not later than the last day
of the final examinations on forms provided for the purpose.
2. All awards of medals, scholarships, prizes, and bursaries are
made by Senate, unless otherwise provided for by special resolution
of Senate.
The award of a medal, prize, scholarship, or bursary is final when
announced by the University.
3. Medals, scholarships, prizes, bursaries, and loans are open to
Winter Session students only, unless otherwise stated, and marks
obtained in Summer Session courses are not taken into account in
awarding them.
4. If the award of a medal, scholarship, or prize is based on an
examination, no award will be made to a candidate who obtains
less than 75 per cent, of the possible marks.
5. To be eligible for a General Proficiency Scholarship a student
must take the full year's course, which must include the required
courses for the year in which he is registered, except that in the
Faculty of Arts and Science and in Agriculture other subjects
may be substituted for the required courses if credit for these has
already been obtained. 44 The University of British Columbia
The standing of students taking more than the required number
of units will be determined on the basis of the required number of
units to be chosen in a manner most advantageous to the students.
6. Unless otherwise specified in the Calendar notice, no student
may enjoy the proceeds of more than one scholarship in the same
academic year, and the scholarships thus relinquished will be
awarded to the candidates next in order of merit. Winners of more
than one scholarship will be given recognition in the published lists.
7. Winners of scholarships who desire to do so may resign the
monetary value. Nevertheless, their names will appear as winners
in the University lists. Any funds thus made available will be used
for additional scholarships, bursaries, or student loans.
8. Scholarships under the jurisdiction of the University are
payable in two instalments—on the last day for the payment of
fees in each term. Undergraduate winners must continue their
courses to the satisfaction of the Faculty concerned during the
session following the award. The payment for the Second Term
may be withheld in the case of an undergraduate scholarship
holder whose work in the First Term has been unsatisfactory. A
Faculty is authorized to permit a scholarship to be reserved for
one year, provided the student shows satisfactory reasons for
postponing attendance. In the case of University Entrance and
Senior Matriculation scholarships, postponement will be granted
on medical grounds only. Application for reservation should be
made to the Registrar.
9. In awarding bursaries consideration will be given to the
financial need of applicants.
10. Endowed scholarships and bursaries will be paid provided
the invested funds produce the necessary revenue.
If the invested funds do not produce the revenue required for the
amount of scholarships and bursaries as named in the Calendar,
these scholarships and bursaries will be correspondingly reduced.
11. The University does not guarantee the payment of any prizes
or scholarships other than those from the funds of the University.
With respect to prizes or scholarships based upon the gifts of individuals or associations other than the University, no award will
be made unless the funds required for the same have been actually
received from the private donor or donors.
12. The Senate of the University of British Columbia reserves
the right so to change the terms under which any exhibition,
scholarship, or prize may be established at the University of British
Columbia that the terms may better meet new conditions as they
arise and may more fully carry out the intentions of the donor and
maintain the usefulness of the benefaction.    The right so reserved Medals, Scholarships, and Prizes 45
shall be exercised by a resolution of the Senate duly confirmed by
the Board of Governors, provided always that a year's notice shall
be given in Senate of any proposed change and that the donor or
his representatives, if living, shall be consulted about the proposed
change.
13. Limited funds are provided from which loans, not to exceed
$100, may be made to undergraduate students who have completed
satisfactorily two years' University work and who can show that they
are in need of pecuniary assistance. Interest at the rate of 5 per
cent, per annum is charged on these loans. They must be secured
by approved joint promissory note given for a definite term and
signed by the applicant and his parent or guardian. Loans are not
granted to graduate students nor to students in diploma courses.
Applications for loans should be addressed to the Bursar of the
University.
14. The University is in possession of a great deal of information
regarding graduate scholarships, fellowships, and assistantships
which other universities and various research bodies make available.
This information may be obtained from the Registrar.
MEDALS
The Governor-General's Gold Medal
A gold medal, presented by His Excellency the Governor-General
of Canada, will be awarded to the student standing at the head of
the graduating class for the B.A. degree. Honours, and General
Course students are eligible for this medal.
The Kiwanis Club Gold Medal
A gold medal, given by the Kiwanis Club of Vancouver, will be
awarded to the student standing at the head of the graduating class
for the B.Com. degree.
The French Government Medals
A bronze medal and a silver medal offered by the French Consul
for Western Canada on behalf of the French Government will be
awarded to students of the French language on the recommendation
of the Head of the Department of Modern Languages.
The United Empire Loyalists' Association Medal*
The Vancouver Branch of the United Empire Loyalists' Association of Canada is offering a silver medal, and a book prize to
the value of $10, for the best essay received during the session
*See paragraph  1,  page  43. 46 The University of British Columbia
1942-43 on any topic dealing with the history of the United Empire
Loyalists and their influence on the development of Canada.
The award will be made on the recommendation of the Department of History. The competition is open to all undergraduates
of the University, but preference is given to students enrolled in a
Canadian History course.
The Lefevre Gold Medal and Scholarship
Out of funds provided by the late Mrs. Lefevre in memory of her
husband, Dr. J. M. Lefevre, a gold medal and scholarship will be
awarded annually to the student standing highest in general proficiency and research ability in one of the following courses: (a)
Honours in Chemistry in the Faculty of Arts and Science; (b)
Chemical Engineering in the Faculty of Applied Science. The
award will be based upon the work of the last two years in these
courses. The value of the scholarship is approximately $150. The
winning of this scholarship will not preclude the holder from
enjoying the proceeds of a further award.
The Wilfrid Sadler Memorial Gold Medal
A gold medal, given by Sigma Tau Upsilon Honorary Agricultural Fraternity in memory of Professor Wilfrid Sadler,
Professor and Head of the Department of Dairying, 1918-33, will
be awarded to the student standing at the head of the graduating
class for the B.S.A. degree.
SCHOLARSHIPS FOR GRADUATES
University Graduate Scholarship*
A scholarship of $200 may be awarded to a student of the
graduating class who shows special aptitude for graduate studies
and who is proceeding in the following year to graduate study in
this or any other approved university.
The Anne Wesbrook Scholarship*
This scholarship of $125, given by the Faculty Women's Club
of the University, is open to a student of the graduating class of
this University who is proceeding in the following year to graduate
study in this or any other approved university.
The Dr. F. J. Nicholson Scholarships*
Out of the proceeds of a fund donated by Dr. Francis John
Nicholson, the following scholarships will be awarded annually
*See paragraph 1,   page  43. Medals, Scholarships, and Prizes 47
for the purpose of enabling students to do graduate study in the
University of British Columbia or in any other approved university: (1) One scholarship of the value of $500 for graduate
work in Chemistry. Applicants must be Honours graduates in
Chemistry of the Faculty of Arts and Science, with the degree of
B.A. or M.A., or graduates in Chemical Engineering of the Faculty
of Applied Science, with the degree of B.A.Sc. or M.A.Sc. (2)
One scholarship of the value of $500 for graduate work in Geology.
Applicants must be graduates of the Faculty of Applied Science
in Geological or Mining Engineering, with the degree of B.A.Sc.
or M.A.Sc.
Normally the scholarships will be payable in two instalments
of $250 each to provide for two years of graduate work. The
payment of the second instalment will be subject to approval by
the University of British Columbia of the first year's graduate
work. In exceptional circumstances the full sum of $500 may be
made available for work to be completed in a single year.
Recipients must be qualified to undertake graduate and research
work, in respect of scholarship, ability, character, and health. These
scholarships will be granted with due consideration for the financial
status of the candidate. The spirit of the endowment is to aid those
to whom financial help is necessary or of material assistance in
furthering their studies.
Applicants must be graduates of the University of British
Columbia, have British citizenship, and be not more than 30 years
of age on the last day for receiving applications. Preference will be
given in making awards to native-born British Columbians.
The John and Annie Southcott Memorial
Scholarship*
A scholarship of the value of $100, given annually by Mrs.
Thomas H. Kirk, will be awarded to that student who, possessing
exceptional aptitude for research, either intends to pursue, or is
already pursuing some approved investigation in the field of British
Columbia history. The award will be made on the recommendation
of the Head of the Department of History.
The scholarship will normally be awarded to a Fourth Year
student or to a graduate proceeding to a higher degree, but may be
awarded to a student of the Third Year.
The Native Daughters of British Columbia
Scholarship*
A scholarship of $50 is given by the Native Daughters of British
Columbia to a Canadian-born graduate student for research work
*See paragraph  1,  page  48. 48 The University of British Columbia
in the early history of British Columbia, such work to be carried
on in the Provincial Archives in Victoria, B. C. The award will
be made on the recommendation of the Head of the Department
of History.
The B'nai B'rith District No. 4 Hillel Foundation
Scholarships*
From the sum of $250 made available by District Grand Lodge
No. 4, B'nai B'rith, through Vancouver Lodge, Vancouver, B.C.,
two scholarships of the value of $125 each were awarded in the
session 1941-42. The terms of award were as follows: These scholarships will be awarded to outstanding graduate students in any of the
three Faculties — Arts and Science, Agriculture, and Applied
Science. The winners shall indicate satisfactory plans for graduate
study at the University of British Columbia or at any other university approved by the Joint Faculty Committee on Prizes, Scholarships, and Bursaries. Only one scholarship shall be available in any
one Faculty in one year. Applications must be made on forms available at the Registrar's office.   (These terms are subject to revision.)
The Standard Oil Company of British Columbia
Limited Scholarship*
For research in petroleum engineering the Standard Oil Company of British Columbia Limited offers a scholarship of $600
open to Honours graduates in Chemistry in the Faculty of Arts
and Science or graduates in Chemical Engineering in the Faculty
of Applied Science. A portion of the scholarship not to exceed $100
may be used for special equipment for the research problem. The
topic of research shall be chosen after consultation with the Department of Chemistry of the University and the Standard Oil Company.
Recipients must be qualified to undertake graduate and research
work in respect of scholarship, research ability, personality, and
health.
The Britannia Mining and Smelting Company Limited
Scholarship*
For research in mineralography the Britannia Mining and
Smelting Company Limited, offers a scholarship of $250, open to
graduates in Geological, Mining, or Metallurgical Engineering in
the Faculty of Applied Science. A portion of the scholarship not
to exceed $50 may be used for special equipment for the research
problem.   The topic of research shall be chosen after consultation
*See paragraph 1, page 43. Medals, Scholarships, and Prizes 49
with the Geology Department of the University of British Columbia
and the Britannia Mining and Smelting Company. Applications
should be in the hands of the Registrar by December 10th. Recipients must be qualified to undertake the research work not only in
respect of scholarship and research ability but also in personality
and health.
The Cariboo Gold Quartz Mining Company Limited
Scholarship*
A scholarship of $100, given by the Cariboo Gold Quartz Mining
Company Limited, for research in mineralography, was awarded
in the session 1941-42. The terms of award were as follows: This
scholarship will be awarded to a graduate in Geological, Mining,
or Metallurgical Engineering in the Faculty of Applied Science.
A portion of the scholarship not to exceed $20 may be used for
special equipment for the research problem. The topic of research
shall be chosen after consultation with the Geology Department of
the University of British Columbia and the Cariboo Gold Quartz
Mining Company Limited. Applications should be in the hands
of the Registrar by December 10th. Recipients must be qualified
to undertake the research work not only in respect of scholarship
and research ability but also in personality and health.
Kelowna Exploration Company Limited Scholarship*
A scholarship of $200, given by the Kelowna Exploration Company Limited, for research either in Reduction Metallurgy or in
Physical Metallurgy, was awarded in the session 1941-42. The
terms of award were as follows: This scholarship will be awarded
to a graduate student in Metallurgy. Applications should be in the
hands of the Registrar by December 10th. Recipients must be
qualified to undertake the research work not only in respect of
scholarship and research ability but also in personality and health.
SCHOLARSHIPS  FOR  UNDERGRADUATES
1. IN ALL FACULTIES
University Great War Scholarships*
Two scholarships of $175 each may be awarded, on the basis of
the work of the First Year, to returned soldiers, their dependents,
and the children of deceased soldiers, proceeding to a higher year.
*See paragraph 1,  page  43. 50 The University of British Columbia
2.     IN ARTS AND SCIENCE
University Scholarships in Arts and Science
Two scholarships in Arts and Science of $175 each will be
awarded to students proceeding to the Fourth Year, the award
to be based on the work of the Third Year. These scholarships will
be awarded respectively: 1. To the student standing highest with
majors in group (1). (See page 83.) 2. To the student standing
highest with majors in group (2). (See page 83.) Students taking
full Honours in Mathematics will be classified in group (1).
Two scholarships in Arts and Science of $175 each will be
awarded on the basis of the work of the Second Year to students
proceeding to a higher year.
The Shaw Memorial Scholarshipf
This scholarship of $125, founded by friends of the late James
Curtis Shaw, Principal of Vancouver College, and afterwards of
McGill University College, Vancouver, will be awarded upon the
results of the examinations of the Second Year in Arts and Science
to the undergraduate student standing highest in any two of three
courses, English 2, Latin 2, Greek (Beginners' Greek, Greek 1, or
Greek 2), and proceeding to a higher year.
The McGill Graduates'  Scholarshipf
A scholarship of $125, founded by the McGill Graduates' Society
of British Columbia, will be awarded to the student standing
highest in English and French of the Second Year in Arts and
Science and proceeding to a higher year.
The Terminal City Club Memorial Scholarship
This scholarship of $100, founded by the members of the Terminal
City Club as a memorial to those members of the Club who lost their
lives in the Great War, will be awarded to the student standing
highest in English 2 and Economics 2 in the Second Year in Arts
and Science, and proceeding to a higher year.
Royal Institution Scholarship in Arts and Science
A scholarship of $175§ will be awarded to the student taking first
place in the examinations of the First Year in Arts and Science,
and proceeding to a higher year.
fOriginally donated to the Royal Institution (see Historical Sketch), this has been
transferred by that body, with the consent of the donors, to the University of British
Columbia.
§Students winning general proficiency scholarships in the First Year of Arts and
Science and proceeding to the Second Year of Applied Science will be given scholarships of a value of $225.00. Medals, Scholarships, and Prizes 51
University Scholarships in Arts and Science
Two scholarships of $175f each will be awarded to the students
taking second and third places in the examinations of the First
Year in Arts and Science, and proceeding to a higher year.
The Beverley Cayley Scholarship
A scholarship of $100, in memory of Beverley Cayley, Arts '18,
given under the terms of the will of his mother, the late Mrs. Cayley,
will be awarded to the male student standing highest in English 1
in the First Year of the Faculty of Arts and Science.
The N. Leo Klein Memorial Scholarship
A scholarship of $50, in memory of N. Leo Klein, given by I. J.
Klein, Esq., Vancouver, B. C, will be awarded to the student
obtaining first place in the examinations of the Third Year of the
course in Commerce.
The Vancouver Women's Canadian Club Scholarship
(The terms of award are under consideration.)
The Ahepa Scholarship
A scholarship of $75, given by the Gladstone Chapter No. 6, C.J.,
Order of Ahepa, will be awarded on the recommendation of the
Head of the Department of Classics to the student of the Third or
Fourth year who has shown the greatest promise in Greek studies.
If possible, the award will be made to an Honours student, but
if there is no outstanding Honours student the scholarship may be
given to a Pass student.
The John and Annie Southcott Memorial
Scholarship*
As on page 47.
The Summer Session Students' Association
Scholarship*
A scholarship of $30, given by the Summer Session Students'
Association, will be awarded at the close of the Summer Session to
the Summer Session student who in that session completes the
Second Year with the highest standing. To be eligible a student must
tStudents  winning  general   proficiency   scholarships   in   the   First   Year  of   Arts   and
Science and proceeding to the Second Year of Applied Science will be given scholarships of a value of $225.00.
*See paragraph  l,  page  43. 52 The University of British Columbia
have taken his entire Second Year in the University of British
Columbia Summer Session, extra-sessional classes, or reading
courses and must be proceeding to a higher year in the University
of British Columbia.
The British Columbia Teachers' Federation
Scholarship*
A scholarship of $50 given by the British Columbia Teachers'
Federation will be awarded at the close of the Summer Session to
the Summer Session student who, having been an active member
of the British Columbia Teachers' Federation for the three years
previous to the granting of the scholarship, completes, in that
session, the Third Year of his University work with the highest
standing in that year. To be eligible a student must have taken his
entire Third Year in the University of British Columbia Summer
Session, extra-sessional classes, or reading course^, and must continue in his Fourth Year at the University of British Columbia.
3.    IN APPLIED SCIENCE
University  Scholarship  in  Nursing  and  Health*
A scholarship of $175 will be awarded for general proficiency
in previous work of university grade (which must include a
minimum of two years' work in the Province of British Columbia),
to a student proceeding to the Third Year (or in the Double Course,
proceeding to the Fourth Year) of the Course in Nursing and
Health and having successfully completed the hospital probationary
period. Applications shall be made to the Registrar not later than
December 1st.
The Vancouver Women's Canadian Club Scholarship
(The terms of award are under consideration.)
The Dunsmuir Scholarshipf
A scholarship of $150, founded by the Hon. James Dunsmuir,
will be awarded to the undergraduate student standing highest in
the Mining Engineering Course of the Fourth Year in Applied
Science, and proceeding to the Fifth Year.
*See paragraph  1,   page  43.
tOriginally donated to the Royal Institution (see Historical Sketch), this has been
transferred by that body, with the consent of the donors, to the University of British
Columbia. Medals, Scholarships, and Prizes 53
University Scholarship in Applied Science
A scholarship of $225 will be awarded to the student who obtains
the highest marks in the Third Year in Applied Science and who
is proceeding to the Fourth Year in that Faculty.
Royal Institution  Scholarship in Applied Science
A scholarship of $225 will be awarded for general proficiency in
the work of the Second Year in Applied Science to a student who
is proceeding to the Third Year in that Faculty.
The G. M. Dawson Scholarship
A scholarship of $50 will be awarded to the undergraduate
student standing highest in the Geological Engineering course, in
Geological subjects, in the Fourth Year of the Faculty of Applied
Science, and proceeding to the Fifth Year.
The B'nai B'rith Auxiliary No. 77 Scholarship
A scholarship of $50, given by the Women's Auxiliary No. 77 of
the B'nai B'rith, will be awarded to the student in Fourth Year
Applied Science standing highest in the class of Chemical Engineering or Chemistry and proceeding to the Fifth Year.
4.    IN AGRICULTURE
University Scholarship in Agriculture
A scholarship in Agriculture of $175 will be awarded to a student
proceeding to a higher year, the award to be based on the work of
the First Year.
The  David  Thom  Scholarship
A scholarship in Agriculture of $100 will be awarded to a
student proceeding to a higher year in that Faculty, the award to
be based on the work of the Second Year.
The British Columbia Fruit Growers'
Association Golden Jubilee Scholarship*
This scholarship, of the annual value of $100, donated by the
British Columbia Fruit Growers' Association, will be awarded to
a student taking the horticultural options of the Third Year. To
qualify for this scholarship candidates must obtain scholarship
standing, not only in horticultural subjects, but also in the work
of the year, and must be proceeding to the Horticultural Course
of the Fourth Year—the year in which the scholarship shall be
enjoyed.
*See paragraph  l,  page  43. 54 The University of British Columbia
UNIVERSITY ENTRANCE AND SENIOR
MATRICULATION SCHOLARSHIPS
University and Royal Institution Scholarships for
University Entrance
Fifteen general proficiency scholarships will be awarded on the
result of the University Entrance examinations: (a) $175 to the
candidate of highest standing in the Province, and (b) $175 each
to the two candidates of next highest standing in each of the
following districts: (1) Victoria District, (2) Vancouver Island
(exclusive of Victoria District), and Northern Mainland (exclusive
of North Vancouver and West Vancouver), (3) Vancouver Central
District (comprising the former limits of the City of Vancouver),
together with West Vancouver and North Vancouver, (4) the part
of the Lower Mainland in the Fraser Harbour area, (5) the Fraser
Valley, (6) Yale, (7) the Kootenays.        l^k
University and Royal Institution Scholarships for
Senior Matriculation
Six general proficiency scholarships will be awarded on the
result of the Senior Matriculation examinations: (a) $175 to the
candidate of highest standing in the Province, (b) $175 to the
candidate of next highest standing in the Province, (c) $175 to
the candidate of next highest standing in all school districts of
the Province other than the City of Vancouver, the City of North
Vancouver, the District Municipalities of North Vancouver, West
Vancouver, and Burnaby, and the City of New Westminster, and
(d) $175 each to the three candidates of next highest standing in
Districts (2) Vancouver Island (exclusive of Victoria District),
and Northern Mainland (exclusive of North Vancouver and West
Vancouver), (5) the Fraser Valley, (6) Yale, and (7) the
Kootenays.
These scholarships will be paid only to students in attendance
at the University of British Columbia, with the exception that the
Victoria District University Entrance Scholarships will be paid to
any winners of those scholarships in attendance at Victoria College.
Winners of all University Entrance and Senior Matriculation
scholarships must notify the Registrar before September 1st of
their intention of attending the University (or Victoria College
in the case of the Victoria District University Entrance Scholarships) during the following session; failing such notification, the
winner's rights will lapse.
Postponement of University Entrance and Senior Matriculation
scholarships will be granted only on medical grounds. Medals, Scholarships, and Prizes 55
PRIZES
1.    IN ALL FACULTIES
The University Essay Prize*
A book prize of the value of $25 will be awarded to a Fourth
Year student for the best essay presented in any of the courses
regularly given by the Department of English. The award will
be made on the recommendation of the Head of the Department of
English.
The Players' Club Prize*
A prize of $50, given by the Players' Club, is offered for an
original play suitable for the Club's Christmas performance. The
award will be made on the recommendation of the Faculty members
of the Advisory Board of the Players' Club. All entries for this
prize must be in the hands of the Honorary President of the
Players' Club not later than September 30th.
The Dorothy and William Dorbils Prize
The Dorothy and William Dorbils Prize of $50.00 will be
awarded annually to the registered undergraduate or graduate
student who writes the best essay on a subject in Canadian
Literature.
The subject will be set or approved by the Head of the Department of English, and the prize will be awarded on his recommendation.
The essay must be 3000 words or more in length; it must be typed,
and a copy of it forwarded to the donors of the prize.
If in any year no essay of sufficient merit is presented, the sum
of $50.00 will be used, or funded for use, in purchasing for the
University an item or items of Canadiana, the selection to be made
by the Head of the Department of English and the University
Librarian.
2.    IN ARTS AND SCIENCE
The French Government Book Prize
A book prize, offered by the French Consul for Western Canada
on behalf of the French Government, will be awarded to a student
of the French language on the recommendation of the Head of the
Department of Modern Languages.
The University Graduate Historical Society Prize
A book prize of the value of $25, given by the University
Graduate Historical Society, will be awarded to the student of the
*See paragraph 1,  page 43. 56 The University of British Columbia
final year who has done the most outstanding work in History
during the Third and Fourth Years. The award will be made on
the recommendation of the Head of the Department of History.
If in any year no student reaches the required standard, the
award will be withheld and may be given as an additional prize
the following year. Both Honours and Pass students are eligible
for the award.
Frances Willard Prize*
A prize of $50, given by the Woman's Christian Temperance
Union of British Columbia, will be awarded to Third or Fourth
Year undergraduates or to graduate students for an essay in the
field of Economics, History, Psychology, or Sociology, on a subject
to be approved by the department concerned in consultation with
a committee of the Woman's Christian Temperance Union.
The award will be made for the session 1942-43 on recommendation of the Head of the Department of Economics, Political Science,
and Sociology, essays to be submitted by April 10th, 1943.
If in any year no student reaches the required standard the
award will be withheld.
The David Bolocan Memorial Prize
A prize of $25 given by Mr. and Mrs. J. L. Bolocan will be
awarded to the student in the Fourth Year of the Faculty of Arts
and Science who is regarded by the Department of Philosophy
and Psychology as the outstanding student in that subject in the
graduating year. The award will be made on the recommendation
of the Head of the Department of Philosophy and Psychology.
Ontario Paper  Company Prize
The Ontario Paper Company offered for the session 1941-42 a
prize of $100 for the best report submitted on some phase of the
newsprint industry by a student in the graduating year. The
subject of the report was approved by the donor and the award
made on the recommendation of the Head of the Department of
Commerce.
3.     IN APPLIED SCIENCE
The Convocation Prize
A prize of $50, given by Convocation of the University of British
Columbia, will be awarded to the student in the Fifth Year of
Applied Science whose record, in the opinion of the Faculty, is the
most outstanding.
*See paragraph  1,  page  43. Medals, Scholarships, and Prizes 57
Engineering Institute of Canada (Vancouver Branch)
Walter Moberly Memorial Prize
A book prize of the value of $25, given by the Vancouver Branch
of the Engineering Institute of Canada in memory of the late
Walter Moberly, will be awarded for the best engineering thesis
submitted by any Fifth Year student in the Faculty of Applied
Science.
The Association of Professional Engineers' Prizes
Five book prizes, each of the value of $25, are offered by the
Association of Professional Engineers of the Province for competition by those students in the Fourth Year of the Faculty of
Applied Science who are enrolled as engineering pupils in the
Association.
These prizes are awarded for the best summer essay in each of
any five branches of engineering to be selected by the Faculty.
The successful essays may be made available by the Faculty to
the Council and members of the Association.
The Provincial Board of Health Prizes
The Provincial Board of Health of the Province of British
Columbia offers the sum of $100 to be given as prizes in the Public
Health Nursing Course.
The Engineering Institute of Canada Prize
The Engineering Institute of Canada offers an annual prize of
$25 to each of eleven Canadian universities of which the University
of British Columbia is one.
The prize will be awarded to a student of the Fourth Year in
Applied Science on the basis of the marks made in his academic
work in that year. His activities in the students' engineering
organization or in the local branch of a recognized engineering
society will also be considered.
The British Columbia Lumber and Shingle Manufacturers' Association Prize*
A prize of the value of $25, given by the British Columbia
Lumber and Shingle Manufacturers' Association, will be awarded
to the student enrolled in the course, Structural Design 1 (C.E. 9),
submitting the design judged to be the best, of a wooden roof truss.
The award will be made upon the recommendation of the Dean
of the Faculty of Applied Science in collaboration with the instructor in charge of the course and the donor. Applications should be
forwarded to the Registrar not later than January 20th, 1943.
*See paragraph  1,  page 43. 58 The University of British Columbia
The Highland-Bell Prizes
The Highland-Bell Mining Company offered for the session
1941-42 the sum of $250 to be given as prizes to students in Ore
Dressing 3 and Geology 9, the awards to be made on the recommendations of the departments concerned.
Kelowna Exploration  Company Limited Prize
A Prize of $100 was offered by the Kelowna Exploration Company Limited, in the session 1941-42, for the student having the
highest average marks in the Fourth Year in the course in Metallurgical Engineering, and obtaining the recommendation of the
Department of Mining and Metallurgy.  \
BURSARIES
The Captain LeRoy Memorial Bursary*
This bursary of the annual value of $150 was given by the
Universities Service Club in memory of their comrades who fell
in the Great War. It is named after Captain 0. E. LeRoy, who
commanded the overseas contingent from this University and who
was killed at Passchendaele in 1917.
It will be awarded to a student, or students, requiring financial
assistance to enable him, or them, to attend the University. For
this purpose it may be awarded to a matriculant, to a student of
any year, or to a graduate student of the University proceeding to
graduate work in this or any approved university. In making the
award preference will be given first to returned soldiers, then to the
dependents of soldiers, and finally to suitable candidates from the
student body at large.
Application must contain a statement of the academic record
and special circumstances of the applicant, with two supporting
references, and, in the case of the preferred categories, of the war
record of the soldier.
The award will be made by the Senate upon the recommendation
of the Faculties acting in consultation with the executive or
accredited representatives of the Universities Service Club.
The Khaki University and Young Men's Christian
Association Memorial Fund Bursaries*
A sum of money given to the University by the administrators
of the Khaki University of Canada provides a fund from which are
awarded annually ten bursaries of the value of $100 each, known
as the Khaki University and Young Men's Christian Association
Memorial Bursaries.
*See paragraph  1,  page  43. Medals, Scholarships, and Prizes 59
Under conditions specified by the donors these bursaries may be
used for undergraduate purposes only, and in making the awards a
preference is given to the sons and daughters of soldiers of the
Great War. The financial necessities of candidates are also taken
into account.
To be eligible for an award a soldier's dependent must obtain
at least Second Class standing, i.e., 65 per cent.; for all others 75
per cent, is required.
Dependents of soldiers and others who have expectations of
attaining standing as stated above and who are in need of financial
assistance should apply to the Registrar not later than the last day
of the final examinations.
These bursaries are open to students from Victoria College proceeding to a course of study in the University.
Application forms may be obtained in the Registrar's office.
The American Woman's Club Bursary*
A bursary of $100, given by the American Woman's Club of
Vancouver, will be available for the session 1942-43 to assist a
woman undergraduate who has completed at least one year in Arts
and Science with satisfactory standing, and who could not otherwise
continue her course. Application must be made to the Registrar not
later than September 1st.
The University Women's Club Bursary*
A bursary of $100 given by the University Women's Club of
Vancouver will be available for a woman student of high scholastic
standing in the Third Year of the Faculty of Arts and Science who
is proceeding to the Fourth Year.
The Inter-Sorority Alumnae Club Bursary*
A bursary of $200, given by the Inter-Sorority Alumnae Club
of Vancouver, will be awarded to a woman student of satisfactory
academic standing, proceeding to her Third Year or any higher
year or to the Education Class, or, if a graduate, to the course leading to the Diploma in Social Work. The award will be made on the
recommendation of the Dean of Women, to whom applications should
be sent not later than September 1st on forms available in the
Registrar's office.
The Mildred Brock Memorial Bursary*
A bursary of $75, given by the Delta Gamma Fraternity, will
be available for a woman student of high scholastic standing
proceeding to the Third or Fourth Year of her undergraduate
*See paragraph  1,  page  43. 60 The University of British Columbia
studies; or, if a graduate, to the Teacher Training Course, or to the
course leading to the Diploma in Social Work. Application must be
made to the Registrar not later than September 1st.
The Frances Milburn Bursary  (Vancouver P.E.O.
Sisterhood)*
A bursary of $150, given by the Vancouver Chapters of the
P. E. 0. Sisterhood in memory of the late Frances Milburn, will
be available for the session 1942-43 to assist a woman undergraduate
who has completed at least one year in Arts and Science with high
standing in English, and who could not otherwise continue her
course. The award will be made on the recommendation of the
Dean of Women, to whom applications should be sent not later than
September 1st on forms available in the Registrar's office.
The Lady Laurier Club Bursary*
A bursary of the value of $50, given by the Lady Laurier Club
of Vancouver, will be awarded to a woman student in the Teacher
Training Course, or to a woman student in Third or Fourth Year
Arts and Science in the event of there not being an applicant in
the Teacher Training Course who can qualify; such student should
have real need of financial assistance. Applications must be made
to the Registrar not later than September 15th, and must be on
forms available at the Registrar's office.
The Alliance Francaise Bursary*
A bursary of not less than $25 will be awarded on a basis of merit
and need to a student specializing in French at the University. The
bursary will normally be awarded to a student who has completed
his Second Year and is proceeding to his Third Year. The award
will be made on the recommendation of the Joint Faculty Committee on Prizes, Scholarships, and Bursaries. Applications, on
forms available in the Registrar's office, must be received by the
Registrar not later than September 15th.
The Faculty Women's Club Bursary*
A bursary of the value of $75, given by the Faculty Women's
Club of Vancouver, will be awarded to a Third Year woman student,
such student to have scholastic ability and real need of financial
assistance. The award will be made on the recommendation of the
Joint Faculty Committee on Prizes, Scholarships, and Bursaries.
Applications, on forms available in the Registrar's office, must be
received by the Registrar not later than September 15th.
*See paragraph  1,   page  43. Medals, Scholarships, and Prizes 61
The Alumni Association Bursary*
A bursary of the value of $50, given by the Alumni Association
of the University of British Columbia, will be awarded to a First
Year student on the basis of scholarship and need. The award
will be made on the recommendation of the Joint Faculty Committee on Prizes, Scholarships, and Bursaries. Applications, on
forms available in the Registrar's office, must be received by the
Registrar not later than September 15th.
The William MacKenzie Swan Memorial Bursary*
A bursary of the annual value of $250, given by Major and Mrs.
W. G. Swan in memory of their son, William MacKenzie Swan, an
outstanding all-round undergraduate student and popular athlete
who died July 28th, 1937, as a result of injuries received in a fall
from the Pattullo Bridge at New Westminster on which he was
engaged as Assistant Engineer, will be awarded to a student or
students registered in the Third, Fourth, or Fifth Year of the
Faculty of Applied Science, requiring financial assistance to enable
him or them to continue studies at the University. In making the
award, consideration will be given to the academic record of the
applicant and to his participation in undergraduate affairs.
Applications on forms available in the Registrar's office must be
filed with the Registrar not later than September 15th.
The award will be made by the Senate upon the recommendation
of the Faculty of Applied Science.
The Phil Wilson Bursary in Forestry*
A bursary of $225, given by the British Columbia Loggers'
Association, will be awarded to a student registered in Fifth Year
Forestry. To be eligible for the award a student must have been
a resident in British Columbia for the previous two years, must
have a scholastic average of at least 65 per cent, in the work of the
Third and Fourth Years at the University of British Columbia,
and must give evidence of leadership, sterling character, and
physical vigour.
Applications, on forms available in the Registrar's office, must
be received by the Registrar not later than October 5th.
The David Thom Bursaries
From the funds of the David Thom Estate a sum of $235 is
available annually for the following bursaries:
1. A sum of $87.50 to be awarded to the student who has passed
University Entrance or Senior Matriculation with the highest
standing and who is registering for the first time in the Faculty
*See paragraph  1,  page  43. 62 The University of British Columbia
of Agriculture. In the awarding of this bursary regulation 9
under General Regulations for Medals, Scholarships, and Prizes
does not apply.
*2. A sum of $50.00 to be awarded to a student who has satisfactorily completed the work of the First Year in Agriculture and
is proceeding to a higher year in that Faculty. Application must
be made to the Registrar not later than September 15th.
*3. A sum of $60.00 to be awarded to a student who has satisfactorily completed the work of the Third Year in Agriculture and
is proceeding to the Fourth Year in that Faculty. Application
must be made to the Registrar not later than September 15th.
Delta Gamma Bursary for the Blind*
A bursary of $100.00 will be awarded to a blind student requiring
financial assistance to enable him or her to enter the University or
to proceed to further studies.
The award will be made by the Senate upon recommendation of
the Joint Faculty Committee on Prizes, Scholarships, and Bursaries
acting in consultation with the Principal of the B. C. School for
the Deaf and Blind, the Superintendent of the Canadian National
Institute for the Blind of Vancouver, and an accredited representative of Delta Gamma Fraternity.
Applications should be in the hands of the Registrar by September 15th.
The Geldart Riadore Bursary*
A sum of $175 will be awarded to a student who has completed
at least one year of work in the Faculty of Agriculture, who is
proceeding to a higher year in the Faculty, and who has given
evidence of possessing those qualities necessary for community
leadership.
The award is to be made on the recommendation of the Joint
Faculty Committee on Prizes, Scholarships, and Bursaries in consultation with the Dean of the Faculty of Agriculture.
Special Bursaries Fund*
For the Session 1942-43 a Special Bursaries Fund has been made
available by the Board of Governors to enable students to- attend
the University who would not otherwise be able to do so. To be
eligible for an award from this fund a student must have attained
at least Second Class standing in the examinations last written, and
must give evidence of need.
Applications for these bursaries must be in the hands of the
Registrar not later than September 15th. Application forms may
be obtained in the Registrar's office.
*See paragraph 1, page  43. Medals, Scholarships, and Prizes 63
LOANS
General Loan Fund
The General Loan Fund is maintained by annual grants made
by the Board of Governors. Its operation is described in paragraph
13 under General Regulations for Medals, Scholarships, Prizes, etc.
The Wheatley Memorial Loan Fund
The Association of Professional Engineers of the Province of
British Columbia has established a loan fund in memory of Edward
Augustus Wheatley, who, as Registrar of the Association during
the years 1921 to 1938, exerted a vital influence on the engineering
profession, not only in this Province but throughout Canada.
The fund is available to engineering pupils of the Association
in attendance at the University, and all applicants for loans must
be recommended by the Dean of the Faculty of Applied Science.
The fund is distributed on the recommendation of the Joint Faculty
Committee on Prizes, Scholarships, and Bursaries.
The Roy Graham Memorial Loan Fund
In memory of Roy Graham, M.A.Sc. (Brit. Col.), Ph.D. (Chicago), a loan fund has been established to assist students in the
Faculty of Applied Science. Preference will be given to students
in the Second and Third Years of that Faculty. All applicants for
loans must be recommended by the Dean of the Faculty of Applied
Science. This fund is distributed on the recommendation of the
Joint Faculty Committee on Prizes, Scholarships, and Bursaries.
The Canadian Institute of Mining and Metallurgy,
B. C. Division, Fund
This is a fund of $100, given by the Canadian Institute of Mining
and Metallurgy to the University as a trust to be used for loans to
students taking the mining course. Applicants for loans must be
recommended by the Departments of Geology and of Mining and
Metallurgy.
The David Thom Fund
From the David Thom Estate funds a sum of $1500 has been
set aside for loans to students in Agriculture who have been unable
to borrow from the General Loan Fund or who have obtained loans
from that fund insufficient for their needs; of this amount, $300 is
available for students in the Occupational Course and the balance
for Third and Fourth Year students. 64 The University of British Columbia
The Alma Mater Loan Fund
This fund was established by the graduating classes of 1937 as a
trust to be used for loans to undergraduates who have completed at
least one year at the University and who have attained satisfactory
academic standing. The fund is admistered by the University and
distributed by the Joint Faculty Committee on Prizes, Scholarships,
and Bursaries. Applications for assistance under this fund must
be made to the Bursar.
The University Chapter I.O.D.E. Loan Fund
This fund was established by the University Chapter of the
I.O.D.E., to assist women students of the Second, Third, and Fourth
Years. Loans are to be made on the basis of scholarship and
financial need, and are to be distributed by the Joint Faculty
Committee on Prizes, Scholarships, and Bursaries, in consultation
with the Dean of Women. Applications for assistance under this
fund should be made to the Bursar.
The T. Sato Loan Fund
This fund has been established by Tsutae Sato, Esq., for students
of Second Class standing, or better, in the Third or Fourth Years
in the Faculties of Arts and Science and Agriculture, or in the
Fourth and Fifth Years of the Faculty of Applied Science, or for
students in the Fifth Year of a Double Course. For such loans the
regulations in paragraph 13 of the General Regulations for Medals,
Scholarships, Prizes, Bursaries, and Loans are applicable. The fund
is distributed on the recommendation of the Joint Faculty Committee on Prizes, Scholarships, and Bursaries.
SCHOLARSHIPS ANNOUNCED BY
THE UNIVERSITY BUT AWARDED BY
OTHER INSTITUTIONS
The Rhodes Scholarship*
A Rhodes Scholarship is tenable at the University of Oxford
and may be held for three years. Since, however, the majority
of Rhodes Scholars obtain standing which enables them to take a
degree in two years, appointments are made for two years in the
first instance, and a Rhodes Scholar who may wish to remain for
a third year will be expected to present a definite plan of study for
that period satisfactory to his college and to the Rhodes Trustees.
*See paragraph  1,   page  43. Medals, Scholarships, and Prizes 65
Rhodes Scholars may be allowed, if the conditions are approved
by their own college and by the Oxford Secretary to the Rhodes
Trustees, either to postpone their third year, returning to Oxford
for it after a period of work in their own countries, or to spend
their third year in graduate work at anyuniversity of Great Britain,
and in special cases at any university on the continent of Europe,
in the overseas Dominions, or in the United States, but not in the
country of their origin.
The stipend of a Rhodes Scholarship is fixed at £400 per year.
At most colleges, and for most men, this sum is sufficient to meet a
Rhodes Scholar's necessary expenses for term-time and vacations,
but Scholars who can afford to supplement it by, say, £50 per year
from their own resources will find it advantageous to do so.
A candidate to be eligible must:
1. Be a British subject, with at least five years' domicile in
Canada, and unmarried. He must have passed his nineteenth,
but not have passed his twenty-fifth birthday on October 1st
of the year for which he is elected.
2. Have reached such a stage in his course at one of the universities of Canada that he will have completed at least two
years at the university in question by October 1st of the year
for which he is elected.
Candidates may apply either for the Province in which they
have their ordinary private domicile, home, or residence, or for
any Province in which they have received at least two years of their
college education before applying.
In that section of the will in which he defined the general type
of scholar he desired, Mr. Rhodes wrote as follows:
"My desire being that the students who shall be elected to the
Scholarships shall not be merely bookworms, I direct that in the
election of a student to a Scholarship regard shall be had to:
1. His literary and scholastic attainments.
2. His fondness for and success in manly outdoor sports such as
cricket, football, and the like.
3. His qualities of manhood, truth, courage, devotion to duty,
sympathy for and protection of the weak, kindliness, unselfishness, and fellowship, and
4. His exhibition during school days of moral force of character
and of instincts to lead and to take an interest in his schoolmates, for those latter attributes will be likely in after life
to guide him to esteem the performance of public duties as
his highest aim.'' 66 The University of British Columbia
Except in special cases, all Scholarships (to which elections
are made in war-time) will, until further notice, be suspended until
after the war. Should any Scholar-elect wish to make a special
application to be allowed to come to Oxford during the war, he
should apply to the Rhodes Trustees, through the General Secretary
of the Rhodes Scholarships in the country in which he is elected.
Each application will be considered on its merits, and the Rhodes
Trustees reserve complete discretion in deciding each case, but, as
general indications of the policy which the Trustees are likely to
adopt, the following points may be noted:
1. In the absence of exceptional considerations, such as those
mentioned under (5), permission will not be given to come to
Oxford in order to take Final Honours Schools or Special
(War) Courses in non-scientific subjects, such as Literae
Humaniores, Law, Modern Greats, or History, or to undertake
research in these subjects.
2. The same applies to Final Honours Schools, or Special (War)
Courses, in the ordinary scientific or mathematical subjects,
but application to engage in special and approved scientific
research will be more favourably considered.
3. Medical students and researchers will normally be given permission to take up their Scholarships, subject, however, to
the advice of the authorities of Oxford Medical School upon
the advisability of Overseas students entering upon medical
courses in England, and subject, further, in the case of
researchers, to the facilities which may exist at Oxford for
research in the particular investigation proposed by the applicant.
4. Permission will in no case be granted if the policy of the
government of the Scholar's country of origin opposes his
leaving his country. If, for example, conscription or compulsory military training has been introduced in that country,
permission will be granted only as explained under (5).
5. The Trustees will be prepared to take into consideration
special personal circumstances, e.g., disqualification for military or other war service, disablement through war service,
or the urgency or importance of the work which the Scholar
proposes to take up at Oxford.
The Trustees hope when peace is restored to revive all suspended
Scholarships, but cannot definitely bind themselves to do so until
the time has arrived and the practical possibilities are known. The
Trustees reserve the right to cancel any suspended Scholarship if
circumstances shall have supervened which, in their opinion, make
it undesirable that the Scholar should hold his Scholarship. Medals, Scholarships, and Prizes 67
Should a Scholar-elect, whose Scholarship has been suspended,
marry before he applies to take up his Scholarship, although the
Trustees will not consider the Scholarship as automatically forfeited, they will not be prepared to confirm it except in special
circumstances.
Suspended Scholarships, if revived, will be tenable for the
normal period. Applications will be entertained from Scholars
who wish to spend a shorter time at Oxford, although no tenure
of less than one year will be permitted, save in exceptional circumstances.
The selection for any year is normally made in the previous
December, and each candidate is required to make application to
the Secretary of the Committee of Selection of the Province in
which he wishes to compete not later than October 31st. Application forms may be obtained from the Registrar's office, from the
Secretary of the Committee of Selection, or from the General
Secretary for Canada, D. R. Michener, Esq., 372 Bay Street,
Toronto, Ontario.
For the duration of the war no award is being mad© and therefore no applications are being accepted until further notice.
The French Government Scholarship*
. A scholarship of 18,000 francs is donated by the French Government for one year's graduate study in France. It is tenable for
one year and is contingent upon the voting of the credits for
the year by the French Chambers. As this contingency applies to
every item of the French budget, the scholarship may be considered
as permanent.
The award is made by the French Consul for Western Canada,
residing in Vancouver, on the recommendation of the Head of the
Department of Modern Languages in the University.
This scholarship is suspended for the time being and therefore
no applications are being accepted until further notice.
The Exhibition of 1851 Scholarship*
Under the revised conditions for the award of the Exhibition
of 1851 Scholarship in Science, the University of British Columbia
is included in the list of universities from which nominations for
scholarships allotted to Canada may be made.    These scholarships
*See paragraph 1, page 43. 68 The University of British Columbia
of £275 per annum are tenable, ordinarily, for two years. Scholarship winners with special needs may receive additional money
grants during the year of their tenure. They are granted only to
British subjects of not more than 26 years of age who have already
completed a full university course and given evidence of capacity
for scientific investigation. The scholarships are open to graduates
of any university who have spent not less than three years in the
study of science. It is not the intention of the Commissioners to
invite recommendations for their Overseas Research Awards during
the continuance of hostilities.
Imperial Order Daughters of the Empire War
Memorial Scholarship (Overseas)*
This fund was established by the I.O.D.E. in order to perpetuate
the memory of the men and' women who gave their lives in the
defence of the Empire in the Great War. Nine graduate scholarships to the value of $1400 each are offered annually, one in each
province of the Dominion. The conditions under which they are
awarded may be obtained from the Registrar. Applications must
be submitted by October 15th of each vear.   Not available in 1942-43.
*See paragraph 1, page  43. THE
FACULTY
OF
ARTS AND SCIENCE
TWENTY-EIGHTH SESSION
1942-1943 TIME   TABLE
FACULTY OF ARTS
KEY TO BUILDINGS: A, Arts; Ag, Agr
Mornings
8.30
9.30
Monday
Biology 2 a & b	
Biology 3	
Botany 6 e	
Economics 6	
Education 9	
English 1, Sec. 1	
English 13	
French 2, Sec. 1	
Geology 4	
Geology 11	
Geology 23	
Latin 1, Sec. 1	
Latin   7.._	
Mathematics 10	
Physics 1, Sec. 1	
Psychology A	
Bacteriology 5 Lab	
Biology 1, Sec. A	
Botany 5 a & c	
Chemistry 3	
Economics 1, Sec. 1
Economics   11	
Economics 12	
Education 12	
English 9	
French 3 b	
French 4 b.	
Geography 3	
Geology i a & c.	
History 17	
Mathematics 1, Sec. 1
Mathematics 13	
Mathematics 16	
Philosophy 9	
Physics 1, Sec. 2	
Social Work 13	
Sociology 4	
Room
Ap 101
Ap237
Ap 233
A20S
Ag 100
A 101,
A 103.
106, 203,
206, 208
A 100
A 104,
105, 108
Ap 102
Ap 120
Ap 106
A 102
A 207
A 204
S 200
Ap 100
Ap 202
Ap 111
S 300
S 400
A 201
Ap 204
A 204
A 100
A 104
A 105
Ap 102
Ap 100
A 203
A 106,
205, 206
Ag 100
A 102
A 101
A 103
S200
A 208
A 207
Tuesday
Botany 4	
Botany   7a	
Chemistry 2 Lab...
Commerce 4	
English 1, Sec. 3	
English 21 a	
French 2, Sec. 2
Geology 5	
German 1(a), Sec. L
German 3 c .■
Latin 2, Sec   1       1
Latin  5 1
Physics A |
Physics   4,	
Social Work 12	
Zoology 2	
Zoology 3	
Bacteriology 1	
Bacteriology 5	
Biology 2 d	
Botany 3 a	
Botany 6 c	
Chemistry 2 Lab.	
Chemistry 9	
Commerce 11	
Economics 4	
English 10	
French 4 a	
Geology 2 a & b	
German 1(a), Sec.
German 1(b)	
Government 1
History   2	
History  25	
Latin 2, Sec. 2	
Mathematics 1,
Sec. 2	
Mathematics 12	
Mathematics 14..	
Philosophy  5	
Social Work 4 & 8...
Sociology   1 _	
Room
Ap 235
A 204
A 100.
103, 106,
205, 206,
208
A 108
A 101,
104, 105
Apl02
A 203
A 201
A 207
A 102
S 200
S 210
Ap 237
Ap 101
Ap 101
S 400
Ap 101
Ap 101
S 413
Ag 102
Ap 204
A 207
A 104
Ap 102
A 203
A 208
A 108
A 204
A 200
A 102
A 100,
105, 106,
205
A 101
A 201
A 108
Wednesday
Biology 2 a	
Biology 2 b, Lab.
Biology 3	
Botany 6 e	
Economics 6	
Education 9	
English 1, Sec. 1
English 13	
French 2, Sec. 1
Geology 4	
Geology 11	
Latin 1, Sec. 1...
Latin  7	
Mathematics 10	
Physics 1, Sec. 1.
Psychology A	
Biology 1, Sec. A	
Biology 2 b, Lab	
Botany 5 a	
Chemistry 3	
Economics 1, Sec. 1
Economics 11	
Economics 13	
Education 12	
English 9	
French 3 b	
French 4 b	
Geography 3	
Geology 1 a & c	
Geology 7	
History 17	
Mathematics 1,
Sec. 1	
Mathematics 13	
Mathematics 16	
Philosophy 9	
Physics 1, Sec. 2
Sociology 4	
Room
Ap 101
Ap237
Ap 233
A 205
AglOO
A 101,
A 103.
106, 203,
206, 208
A 100
A104.105
108
Ap 102
Ap 120
A 102
A 207
A 204
S200
Ap 100
Ap 202
Ap 111
S 300
S400
A 201
Ap 204
A 204
A 100
A 104
A 105
Ap 102
Ap 100
Ap 106
A 203
A 106,
205, 206
AglOO
A 102
A 101
A 108
S 200
A 207
CONSULT DEPARTMENT HEADS FOR - - - 1942 - 1943
AND SCIENCE
iculture; Ap, Applied Science;  S, Science.
Mornings
Thursday
Botany 7 a _	
Chemistry 2 Lab..
Commerce 4  	
English l. Sec. 8	
English 21 a...	
French 2, Sec. 2...
German 1(a), Sec. 1
German 8 c	
Latin 2, Sec. 1	
Latin  5	
Physics A _
Physics 4	
Social Work 2...
Zoology 2	
Zoology 8	
Bacteriology 1, Lab.
Sec. i	
Bacteriology 5	
Biology 2 d	
Botany 8 a	
Botany 6 c	
Chemistry 2 Lab...
Chemistry 9	
Commerce 11	
Economics 4	
English 10	
French 4 a.	
Geology 2 a & b	
Geology 6	
German 1(a), Sec. 2.
German 1 b 	
Government 1	
History   2	
History  25	
Latin 2, Sec. 2
Mathematics 1.
Sec. 2	
Mathematics 12	
Mathematics 14	
Philosophy   5	
.Social Work 4 & 8...
Sociology 1	
Room
Ap 235
A 204
A 100,
108,106.
205, 206,
208
A 108
A 101,
104, 105
A 203
A 201
A 207
A 102
S200
S210
Ap287
Ap 101
Ap 101
Ap 101
Ap 101
S418
Ag 102
Ap 204
A 207
A 104
Ap 102
Ap 120
A 203
A 208
A 108
A 204
A 206
A 102
A 100,
105, 106,
205
A 101
A 201
A 108
Friday
Bacteriology 9 Lab	
Biology 2 a & b, Labs.
Economies 6	
Education 9	
English 1, Sec. 1	
Room
English 18	
French 2, Sec. 1
Geology 4	
Latin 1, Sec.
Latin   7	
Mathematics 10	
Physics 1, Sec. l.
Psychology A	
Zoology 11	
A 205
AglOO
A 101,
A103,106.
203, 206,
208
A 100
A 104,
105, 108
Ap 102
A 102
A 207
A 204
S 200
Ap 100
Ap 101
Bacteriology 9 Lab	
Biology 2 a & b. Labs.
Botany 5 b _	
Chemistry 2	
Economics 1, Sec. 1...
Economics   11	
Economics 13	
Education 12	
English 9	
French 3 b	
French 4 b	
Geography 8	
Geology 7	
History 17	
Mathematics 1,
Sec. 1	
Mathematics 13..
Philosophy 9 ..
Physics 1, Sec. 2...
Sociology 4	
S800
S400
A 201
Ap 204
A 204
A 100
A 104
A 105
Ap 102
Ap 106
A 203
A 106,
205, 206,
AglOO
A 102
A 108
S 200
A 207
Saturday
Chemistry 5 Lab.,
Sec. b	
Commerce 4	
Education  14	
English I, Sec. 3	
French 2, Sec. 2	
German 1(a), Sec. l
German 8 c	
Latin 2, Sec. 1	
Latin   5 ,	
Physics A	
Physics 4	
Room
A 204
Ag 100
A 100.
103,106,
205, 206,
208
A 101,
104, 105
A 203
A 201
A 207
A 102
S200
S 210
Botany 5 b Lab	
Chemistry 5 Lab-
Sec, b	
Commerce 11	
Economics 4	
Education 14	
English 10	
French 4 a	
German 1(a), Sec. 2.
German 1(b) —
Government 1	
History   2	
History  25	
Latin 2, Sec. 2	
Mathematics 1,
Sec. 2	
Mathematics 14
Philosophy  5	
Sociology   1	
Ag 102
Ap 204
Ag 100
A 207
A 104
A 203,
A 208
A 108
A 204
A 206
A 102
A 100.
105, 106,
205
8.30
9.30
SUBJECTS NOT IN THIS TIME TABLE Mornings
TIME TABLE
10.30
11.30
Monday
Agricultural
Economics 1	
Bacteriology 5 Lab.
Biology l, Sec. B	
Biology 1, Sec. C	
Botany 8 d	
Chemistry 1, Sec. 1
Chemistry 7	
Economics 1, Sec. 2
English 18	
French 1, Sec. 1	
French 3 c	
Geology 8	
German, Beg.,
Sees. 1 & 2	
Government o	
History 4	
History 11	
History 19	
Mathematics 2 a.
Sec. 1	
Physics 5	
Psychology 5	
Zoology 1	
Zoology 4	
Zoology 7	
Agricultural
Economics 2	
Biology 4	
Economics 5	
Economics 7
(Com. 9)	
English 1, Sec. 2	
English   22 _	
German, Beg., Sec,
German 2, Sec. 1	
German 3 a	
Greek 14 	
History 10	
History   15	
Mathematics 8.	
Nursing  BIT. 	
Philosophy   6	
Physics 2	
Psychology 1	
Psychology 7	
Social Work 11	
Room
Ag 100
Ap 100
AplOl
S300
S 413
S 400
A 106
VI04,105,
108
A 102
Ap 102
A205.207
A 208
A 103
A 203
A 101
A 204
S 210
A 206
Ap 202
Ag 100
Ap 101
A 104
A 106
A 200
A 108
A 205
A 105
A 201
A 102
A 208
A 203
A 204
S210
A 108
S 200
A 100
A 207
A 101
Tuesday
Bacteriology 1 Lab.
Sec. 1	
Botany 1 a	
Chemistry 1, Sec. 3
Chemistry 2 Lab	
Chemistry 4	
Economics 10
(Com. 5)	
English 19 	
French 1, Sec. 2	
French 3 a	
Government 2	
History   12 _,
History 13 ]
Latin 1, Sec. 2 ]
Mathematics 2 a.
Sec. 2    	
Philosophy  8	
Social Work 1	
Bacteriology 1,
Lab. Sec. 1	
Botany 1 b	
Commerce 6
Economics 2	
Economics 8	
English 17	
Geography   4	
German, Beg.,
Sees. 2, 4, 5	
Latin Beg	
Mathematics I,
Sec. 3	
Mathematics 15 b
Philosophy   20	
Room
Ap 101
S 300
S 400
A 100
A 206
A 103
A 104,
105
A106.208
A 201
A 108
A 207
A 102
A 204
A 205
A 101
Ap 101
A 106
A 100 -
A 201
A 101
Ap 102
A203.205,
•207
A 102
A 204
A 208
A 206
Wednesday
Agricultural
Economics 1 	
Bacteriology   9	
Biology 1, Sec. B	
Biology 1, Sec. C	
Botany 6 d   	
Chemistry 1, Sec. 1
Chemistry 7	
Economics 1, Sec. 2
English 18	
French 1, Sec. 1
Geology 8	
German, Beg.,
S*S.  1 & 2   	
Government 6	
History 4	
History 11	
History 19	
Mathematics 2 a,
Sec. 1	
Physics 5	
Psychology 5	
Zoology 1	
Zoology 4	
Zoology 7	
Agricultural
Economics 2 	
Bacteriology 10	
Biology 4	
Economics 5	
Economics 7
(Com. 9)	
English 1. Sec. 2	
English 24 a	
German, Beg., Sec.
German 2, Sec. 1
German 3 a	
Greek 14	
History 10	
History 15	
Mathematics 3	
Philosophy  6	
Physics 2	
Psychology 1	
Psychology 7	
Social Work 11...
Rooirr
Ag 100
Ap 100 ■
Ap 101
S 300
S 413
S 400
A 106
A 104.
105, 108
Ap 102
A205.207
A 208
A 103
A 203
A 101
A 204
S 210
A 201)
Ap202
Ag 100
S 413
Ap 101
A 101
A 106
A 206
A 103
A 205
A 105
A 201
A 102
A 208
A 203
A 204
A 108
S 200
A 100
A 207
A 101
CONSULT DEPARTMENT HEADS FOR -Continued
Mornings
Thursday
Bacteriology 1,
Lab. Sec. 1	
Bacteriology 9
Botany 1
Chemistry 1, Sec.
Chemistry 2 Lab.
Chemistry 4
Economics 10
(Com. 5)	
English 19	
Frencli 1, Sec. 2...
French 3 a
Government 2
History  12	
History 18	
Latin 1, Sec. 2
Mathematics 2 a.
Sec. 2	
Philosophy  3	
Social Work 1	
Botany 1 b
Commerce 6	
Economics 2
Economics 8
English 17.	
Geography   4
German Beg.,
Sees. 1, 3	
I ,atin, Beg	
Mathematics 1,
Sec. 3	
Mathematics  15 b....
Social Work 7	
Room
Ap 101
S 300
S400
A 100
A 206
A103, 104
105
A106.208
A 201
A 108
A 207
A 102
A 204
A 205
A 101
Ap 101
A 106
A 100
A 201
A 101
Ap 102
A 205
A 207
A 102
A 204
A 208
A 104
Friday
Agricultural
Economics 1	
Botany 6 b	
Chemistry 1, Sec. 1
Economics 1, Sec. 2
English 18	
French 1, Sec. 1
Geology 8	
German, Beg.,
Sees. 1 & 2	
Government 6	
History 4 	
History 11	
History 19	
Mathematics 2 b,
Sec. 1	
Physics 5    	
Psychology 5	
Zoology 5	
Zoology 6	
Agricultural
Economics 2	
Economics 5	
Economics 7
(Com. 9)	
English 1, Sec. 2   	
English 22	
German, Beg., Sec.
German 2, Sec. 1	
German 8 a	
Greek 14	
History 10	
History   15	
Mathematics 3
Nursing B27	
Philosophy  6	
Physics 2	
Psychology 1   	
Psychology 7	
Room
Ag 100
S 800
S 400
A 106
A 104,
105, 108
Ap 102
A205.207
A 208
A 103
A 203
A 101
A 204
S 210
A 206
Ap 101
Ap 101
Ag 100
A 104
A 100
A 206
A 103
A 205
A 105
A 201
A L02
A 208
A 208
A 204
S210
A 108
S 200
A 100
A 207
Botany 5 b Lab.....
Chemistry 1, Sec.
Chemistry 5 Lab.,
Sec. b	
Commerce 2	
Economics 10
(Com. 5)	
English 19	
French 1, Sec. 2
Saturday
French 3 a	
Government 2	
History  12	
History 13	
Latin 1, Sec. 2	
Mathematics 2 b.
Sec. 2	
Philosophy   3	
Botany 5 b Lab.
Commerce 6	
Economics 2	
Economics 8	
English   17	
German 2,
Sci. Rdg.	
Latin,   Beg.	
Mathematics 1,
Sec. 3	
Room
S300
Ap 102
A 100
A 206
A 108
A 104
A 105
A106.208
A 201
A 108
A 207
A 102
A 204
A 205
A 106
A 100
A 201
A 101
A 105
A 102
A 204
10.30
11.30
SUBJECTS NOT IN THIS TIME TABLE Afternoons
TIME TABLE
1.30
2.30
Monday
Botany 3 a Lab	
Botany 4 Lab	
Botany 5 a & c Lab.
Chemistry 1, Sec. 2...
Chemistry 5	
Chemistry 7 Lab.	
Economics 12 Lab.,
Sec. A	
Education  14	
English 2	
French 1, Sec. 3...
Geology 11	
German, Beg.,
Sec. 4	
Latin  3	
Philosophy 8	
Physics  5 Lab....
Zoology 5	
Zoology 6	
Bacteriology 3	
Botany 3 a Lab.	
Botany 4 Lab	
Botany 5 a & c Lab.
Chemistry 7 Lab	
Commerce 2	
Economics 12 Lab..
Sec. A	
Education 10	
English 16	
French 2, Sec. 3	
Geography 1	
German, Beg., Sec. 5.
German 2, Sec. 2	
History. 1 	
History 14 	
Philosophy 1	
Physics 5 Lab	
Social Work 9 & 10
Zoology 1 Lab. Sec. 3
Zoology 5 Lab	
Zoology 6 Lab	
Room
S300
A 103
A 100,
Ap 100
A 104.
105, 206
Ap 102
A 205
A 207
A 201
Ap 120
A 204
A 106
A 104
A 105
Ap 102
A 205
A 203
A 100
A 101
S200
A 201
Tuesday
Bacteriology 1
Sec. 2	
Lab.,
Biology 1 Lab., Sec. 1
Botany 6 c & e Lab.
Chemistry 4 a Lab.,
Sec. a	
Chemistry 9 Lab	
Commerce 1	
Economics 13 Lab	
English 20	
French 8 c	
Geology 1 b & d Lab.
Sec. 1	
Geology 7 Lab	
Latin 8, Sec. b 	
Mathematics 1,
Sec. 1	
Room
Physics 4 Lab., Sec.
Psychology 2 ..A4m
Zoology 2 Lab.	
Zoology 8 Lab.	
Zoology 4 Lab	
Zoology 7 Lab	
Bacteriology 1 Lab.,
'   Sec. 2	
■iology 1 Lab., Sec. 1
Botany 6 c & e Lab.
Chemistry 4 a
Lab., Sec. a	
Chemistry 5 Lab.,
Sec. a	
Chemistry 9 Lab	
Economics 13 Lab	
Education 10	
English 1, Sec. 3	
English 20	
Geology 1 b & d Lab.
Sec. 1 „
Geology 7 Lab	
Physics 4 Lab., Sec. 1
Psychology 2 Lab	
Zoology 2 Lab.	
Zoology 3 Lab.	
Zoology 4 Lab.	
Zoology 7 Lab	
A 103
A 108
A 105
Ap 120
Ap 106
A 201
A 106,
205, 206,
AglOO
A 184
A 204
A 100.
103, 106,
205, 206,
208
A 108
Ap 120
Ap 106
Wednesday
Botany 3 a Lab	
Botany 4 Lab	
Botany 5 c Lab	
Botany 6 b Lab	
Chemistry 1, Sec. 2
Economics 12 Lab.,
Sec. B	
Education  14	
English 2	
French 1, Sec. 3	
Geology 7 Lab	
German, Beg.,
Sec. 4	
Latin  s,.	
Philosophy 8	
Social Work 3	
Zoology 5 Lab	
Zoology 6 Lab	
Bacteriology 10 Lab.
Botany 3 a Lab.
Botany 4 Lab.	
Botany 5 c I.ab. 	
Botany 6 b Lab	
Commerce 1 I.ab.
Economics 12 Lab.,
Sec. B	
English 16 	
French 2, Sec. 3	
Geology 7 Lab.	
Geography 1	
German, Beg.,
Sec. 5	
German 2, Sec. 2	
History 1	
History 14	
Philosophy 1
Social Work :i
Zoology 5 Lab	
Zoology 6 Lab	
Room
S 300
A 103
A 100.
Ap 100
A 104.
105, 206
Ap 106
A 205
A 207
A 201
A 102
A 106
A104.105,
Ap 106
Ap 102
A 205
A 203
A 100
A 101
S 200
A 102
CONSULT DEPARTMENT HEADS FOR -Continued
Afternoons
Thursday
Bacteriology 1 Lab.,
Sec. 2	
Biology 1 Lab.,
Sec. 8	
Botany 6 c & e Lab...
Chemistry 8 Lab.,
Sec. b 	
Commerce 1	
Economics 13 Lab	
English  20	
French 8 c	
Room
A 103
Geology 1 b & d
Lab., Sec. 2	
Geology 9	
Latin 8, Sec. a	
Mathematics 1,
Sees. 2 & 8	
Physics 4 Lab.,
Sec. 2	
Psychology 2	
Zoology 1 Lab.,
Sec. 1	
Zoology 2 Lab.	
Bacteriology 1 Lab.
Sec. 2	
Biology 1 Lab.,
Sec. 8	
Botany 6 c & e Lab.
Chemistry 3 Lab.,
Sec. b	
Chemistry 5 Lab.,
Sec. a	
Economics 13 Lab..
English 1, Sees.
.  1  & 2	
English   20	
Geology 1 b & d,
Lab., Sec. 2	
Geology 9	
Philosophy 20	
Physics 4 Lab.,
Sec. 2	
Zoology 1 Lab.,
Sec. 1 _._	
Zoology 2 Lab.	
A 108
A 105
Ap  120
Ap 112
A 201
A100, 105J
106, 204
205
Friday
Biology  1,
Sec.  5	
Lab.,
Botany 6 d Lab	
Chemistry 1, Sec. 2...
Chemistry 3 Lab.,
Sec. a	
Chemistry 4a Lab.,
Sec. b	
Chemistry 5 Lab.,
Sec. b...	
Education 14	
English 2	
A 104
1-100, 105,
A108, 106,
203, 206,
208
A 108
Ap 120
Ap 112
A 205
French 1,
Sec. 3	
Geology 2  Lab-
Geology 6	
German,   Beg.,
Sec.   4	
Latin   3	
Philosophy 8 i
Zoology 11 Lab-
Bacteriology 3 Lab-
Biology 1 Lab.,
Sec. 5	
Biology 3 Lab	
Botany 6 d Lab	
Chemistry 3 Lab.,
Sec.   a.	
Chemistry 4 a Lab.,
Sec. b	
Chemistry 5 Lab.,
Sec. b	
Education 10	
English 16	
French 2, Sec. 3 	
Geography 1	
Geology 2 Lab	
Geology 8	
German Beg., Sec. 5
German 2, Sec. 2	
History 1	
History 14	
Philosophy 1	
Zoology 11 Lab.	
Room
S 300
A 103
A 100,
Ap
100
A 104,
105, 206]
Apl02
A 205
A 207
A 201
A 204
A 106
A 104
A 105
Ap 102
Ap 120
A 205
A 208
A 100
A 101
S200
1.30
2.30
SUBJECTS NOT IN THIS TIME TABLE TIME TABLE
Afternoons
Monday
Room
Tuesday
Room
Wednesday
Room
Bacteriology 8 Lab.
Botany 1 a Lab.
Botany 4 Lab	
Botany 7 a Lab	
Chemistry 1 Lab.,
Sec. a	
Chemistry 7 Lab	
Commerce 2	
Geology 5    	
Nursing  B5...._	
Bacteriology 2 Lab.
Biology 1 Lab., Sec. 2
Chemistry 1 Lab.,
Sec. b	
Bacteriology 10 Lab.
Botany 4 Lab	
Psychology 6	
A 104
Chemistry 2 Lab.
Chemistry 4 a Lab.,
Ap 120
Ap 102
S400
Chemistry 5 Lab.,
Sec. a	
Chemistry .9 Lab.
3.30
Ap 120
Physics 4 Lab., Sec. 1
Psychology 2 Lab.   W
Zoology 2 Lab ■
Zoology 3 Lab 1
Zoology 4 Lab 1
Zoology 7 I.ab.	
A 104
Zoology 1 Lab.,
Sec. 3	
Zoology 5 Lab.	
Zoology 6 Lab.
Botany 1 a Lab.
Botany 7 a Lab	
Chemistry 1 Lab.,
Sec. a
Chemistry 7 Lab.
Zoology 5 Lab	
Zoology 6 I.ab.
Bacteriology 2 Lab.
Biology 1 Lab., Sec. 2
Chemistry 1 Lab.,
Sec. b 	
Chemistry 2 Lab.
Chemistry 4 a Lab.,
Sec. a	
Chemistry 5 Lab.,
Sec. a	
Chemistry 9 Lab.
Geology 6 Lab	
Zoology 2 Lab	
Zoology 3 Lab	
Zoology 4 Lab.
Zoology 7 Lab-
Bacteriology 10 Lab.
Chemistry 2 Lab.
4.30
Ap 120
Chemistry 1 Lab.,
Chemistry 1 I.ab..
Sec. b 	
Chemistry 2 Lab.
Chemistry 9 Lab.
Chemistry 2 Lab.
5.30
CONSULT DEPARTMENT HEADS FOR —Continued
Afternoons
Thursday
Bacteriology 2 Lab.
Biology 1, Lab.,
Sec. 4	
Biology 4 Lab	
Botany 1 b Lab	
Chemistry 1 Lab.,
Sec. c	
Chemistry 2 Lab	
Chemistry   8   Lab.,
Sec.  b	
Chemistry  5  Lab.,
Sec. a	
Philosophy  20	
Physics 4 Lab., Sec. 2
Zoology 1 Lab., Sec. 2
Bacteriology 2, Lab-
Biology 1 Lab.,
Sec. 4	
Biology 4 Lab	
Botany 1 b Lab.	
Chemistry  1  Lab.,
Sec. c	
Chemistry 2 Lab	
Chemistry 3 Lab.,
Sec. b	
Chemistry 5 Lab.,
Sec. a	
Zoology   1   Lab.,
Sec. 2	
Chemistry 1 Lab.,
Sec. c _	
Chemistry  2   Lab.
Chemistry 3 Lab.,
Sec. b	
Room
A 205
Bacteriology 3 Lab.
Biology  l  Lab.,
Sec. 6	
Biology 3 Lab	
Botany 6 d Lab.	
Chemistry 1 Lab.,
Sec. d	
Chemistry 3 Lab.,
Sec. a	
Chemistry 4a Lab.,
Sec. b	
Chemistry 5 Lab.,
Sec b.	
English 24 b	
Psychology 6	
Zoology 11 Lab	
Friday
Biology 1 Lab., Sec
Biology 3 Lab.	
Botany 6 d Lab	
Chemistry 1 Lab.,
Sec. d	
Chemistry 3 Lab.,
Sec. a	
Chemistry 4a Lab
Sec. b 	
English 24 b	
Zoology 11 Lab.	
Chemistry 1 Lab.,
Sec. d	
Chemistry 3 Lab.,
Sec. a	
Room
3.30
A 108
A 104
A 103
4.30
5.30
SUBJECTS NOT IN THIS TIME TABLE  FACULTY OF ARTS AND SCIENCE
The degrees offered in this Faculty are Bachelor of Arts (B.A.),
Bachelor of Commerce (B.Com.), and Master of Arts (M.A.).
Courses which do not lead to degrees are offered in Teacher
Training and Social Work.
COURSES LEADING TO THE DEGREE OF B.A.
The degree of B.A. is granted with Honours or as a General
Course degree. A General Course degree will be granted on completion of courses amounting to 60 units chosen in conformity
with Calendar regulations. No distinction is made between General
Course and Honours students in the First and Second Years,
except as regards prerequisites for later work, but in the Third and
Fourth Years there are special requirements for Honours students.
Students holding the degree of B.Com. from this University may
proceed to the degree of B.A. in one year by completing 15
additional units of work open to students in their Third and
Fourth Years, provided that their additional units are chosen so
as to complete the requirements for the B.A. degree.
It is possible to obtain the B.A. and B.Com. degrees concurrently
in five years on completion of 75 units chosen so as to cover the
requirements for both degrees.
Double courses are offered in Arts and Science and Applied
Science leading to the degrees of B.A. and B.A.Sc, B.A. and
B.A.Sc. (in Nursing), B.A. and B.S.F., and B.Com. and B.S.F.,
and in Arts and Science and Agriculture leading to the degrees of
B.A. and B.S.A., and B.Com. and B.S.A. For the regulations
governing these, see the section Double Courses at the end of the
Calendar.
Credits obtained at the Summer Session (see University Summer Session) may be combined with Winter Session credits to
complete the 60 units required for the degree of B.A. The degree
of B.A. will not be granted within three years from Senior
Matriculation nor within four years from University Entrance.
The maximum credit for Summer Session work in any one
calendar year is 6 units; and the maximum credit for work other
than that of the regular Summer and Winter Sessions is 3 units
in each academic year, and 15 units in all subsequent to Senior
Matriculation or First Year Arts.
No credit will be granted for work done at other universities in
the same academic year in which work has been attempted at this
University, whether in the Summer Session or in the Winter Session
or otherwise. Extra-mural work done at other universities prior
to registration at this University may be accepted, if approved by 80 Faculty of Arts and Science
the Faculty, but may not exceed 3 units in respect of any one
academic year or 15 units in all subsequent to Senior Matriculation.
If a student is granted credit for extra-mural work taken elsewhere,
the number of units which he may take at this University without
attendance at a Winter or Summer Session will be correspondingly
reduced.
Pending the establishment of a department of Music in the
. University of British Columbia, six units of undergraduate credit
towards a B.A. degree may be granted for music to a student who
holds at the time of graduation any one of the following diplomas:
Associate of the Toronto Conservatory of Music (A.T.C.M.), Licentiate of McGill Conservatorium (L.Mus.), Licentiate of the Royal
Schools of Music, London (L.R.S.M.), Licentiate of Trinity College,
of Music, London (L.T.C.L.), or an equivalent diploma or certificate from other schools of Music which may be accepted by the
University of British Columbia, If the student's work in music is
done concurrently with the usual University work of the Third and
Fourth Years, the credit will be assigned in the Fourth Year; if a
student enters Third Year University having already acquired the
diploma, the credits will normally be assigned evenly between the
Third and Fourth Years. No credits for music will be granted in
the First and Second Years and no student may get credit for music
until the other requirements for the B.A. degree have been satisfied.
Candidates for the degree of B.A. are advised to attend at least
one Winter Session, preferably that of the Fourth Year.
Courses are described in terms of units. A unit normally consists
of one lecture hour (or one continuous laboratory period of not less
than two or more than three hours) each week throughout the
session, or two lecture hours (or equivalent laboratory periods)
throughout a single term.
Note 1. Students in any of the affiliated Theological Colleges
who file with the Registrar a written statement expressing their
intention of graduating in Theology will be allowed to offer in each
year of their Arts course, in place of optional subjects set down in
the Calendar for the year and the course in which they are registered, Religious Knowledge options, to the extent of three units
taken from the following list: Hebrew, Biblical Literature, New
Testament Greek, Church History, Christian Ethics, and Apologetics.
Note 2. Students intending to enter Normal School are advised
to consult Regulations for Admission to Normal Schools, issued by
the Department of Education, Victoria.
First and Second Years
1. The requirements of the first two years consist of 30 units,
15 of which must be taken in each year. Courses must be chosen in First and Second Years 81
conformity with the requirements that follow.  Details of courses
are given under the various departments.
•Each student must take: Units
(a) English 1 in the First Year and English 2 in the
Second Year    6
■\(b) The first two courses in a language offered for University Entrance, one course in each year     6
(c) Mathematics 1, in the First Year    3
(d) Economics  1   or  2,   or  History   1,  2,  3,  or  4,  or
Psychology A or 1, or Philosophy 1, or Sociology 1____    3
(e) Biology   1,  or  Botany   1   (b),  or   Chemistry   1,   or
Geology 1, or Physics A, or Physics 1     3
(f) Three courses—not already chosen—selected from the
following:
Bacteriology 1, Biology 1, Botany 1 (a), Botany
1 (b), Chemistry 1, Chemistry 2, Chemistry 4,
Economics 1, Economics 2, Commerce 5 (Economics 10), French 1, French 2, Geography 1,
Geology 1, Geology 2, JBeginners' German, German 1, German 2, JBeginners' Greek, Greek 1,
Greek 2, Greek A (see Calendar, 1935-1936)**,
Greek 2 (see Calendar 1936-37)**, History 1,
History 2, History 3, History 4, JBeginners' Latin,
Latin 1, Latin 2 (a), Latin 2 (b), Mathematics 2,
Mathematics 3, Mathematics 4, Philosophy 1,
Physics A, Physics 1, Physics 2, Physics 4,
Psychology A, Psychology 1, Sociology 1, Zoology 1    9
Notes
Bacteriology 1, Botany 1 (a), Zoology 1, Geology 1 and 2, Geography 1, Economics 1, Commerce 5 (Economics 10), History 4,
Philosophy 1, Psychology 1, and Sociology 1 are not open to First
Year students.
History 2 is open to First Year students only if they are preparing
for entrance to the Normal School. Geography 1, Geology 1, and
Philosophy 1 are normally Third Year subjects, but may be taken by
Second Year students (full undergraduate and conditioned).
Chemistry 4 is open to Second Year students providing that the
prerequisites have been taken.
Geology 1 must be taken in the Second Year by students intending
to take the Honours course in Geology.
*For  credit  that   can   be   given ,for   Senior   Matriculation   standing,   complete   or
partial, see page 85.
tSee regulations 2, 7, and 8.
tSee regulations 4, 5, 7, and 8.
**These courses are offered only by Victoria College. 82 Faculty of Arts and Science
Botany 1 (b) and Civil Engineering 2 are required of students
intending to take the double degree B.A., B.S.F., except students
taking major or Honours in Biology (Forestry option), for whom
Botany 1 (a) and Civil Engineering 2 are required.
2. Students who have not presented German or Greek or Latin
for University Entrance may fulfil the language requirements for
the degree by taking Beginners' German or Beginners' Greek or
Beginners' Latin, to be followed respectively by German 1 and
German 2 or Greek 1 and Greek 2 or Latin 1 and Latin 2 to complete 63 units.   The extra three units may be taken in any year.
Students who have completed German III of the high school
course of study, or its equivalent, may fulfil the language requirements by taking German 2 for the First Year and German 3 (a) for
the Second Year.
3. Students who offer either French IV or Latin IV of Senior
Matriculation under Group 1 of the Optional Courses of University
Entrance may fulfil the language requirements for the First and
Second Years by taking French 2 or Latin 2 respectively in either
the First or the Second Year. If the Second Year language is taken
in the First Year, a Third Year course in this language may be taken
in the Second Year.
4. No student in his First Year may elect more than one beginners' course in a language, and no beginners' course in a language
will count towards a degree unless followed by a second year's work
in that language.
5. Except in the case of beginners' courses, no course in a
language may be taken by a student who has not offered that
language for entrance to the University. A beginners' course in
a language may not be taken for credit by a student who has
obtained credit for that language at entrance.
6. A student taking three languages in the first two years (18
units) may defer the course selected under section 1 (e) to the
Third or Fourth Year, and a student taking four science courses
(12 units) may defer the course selected under section 1 (d) to
the Third or Fourth Year.
7. Students offering four science courses (12 units) in the First
and Second Years may fulfil the language requirement indicated
above in section 1 (b) by taking any two of the following:
French 1, French 2; Beginners' Latin, Latin 1, Latin 2;
Beginners' German, German 1, German 2; Beginners' Greek,
Greek 1, Greek 2, Greek A (see Calendar, 1935-36)*, Greek 2
(see Calendar 1936-37)*.
Only one beginners' course may be selected.
"These courses are offered only by Victoria College. First and Second Years 83
8. Students offering six science courses (18 units) in the First
and Second Years may postpone the second course in a language
under section 7 until the Third or Fourth Year.
The science courses in sections 7 and 8 may be selected from the
following:
Bacteriology,   Biology,   Botany,   Chemistry,   Geology   (not
Geography), Physics, Zoology.
Note. Students thinking of entering Applied Science are referred to the list
of subjects required to be taken by them in First Year Arts and to the regulations in reference to these, given under Admission and General Outline of
Courses in Faculty of Applied Science. They are advised to attend the noon
hour talks on the choice of a profession and on the life and work in vocations
likely to appeal to Applied Science graduates.
Third and Fourth Years
The requirements of the Third and Fourth Years consist of 30
units, of which students must take in their Third Year not less
than 15 units. The graduation standing is determined by the results
of the Third and Fourth Years combined.
A. General Course Curriculum
1. For the General Course a student must select two major
subjects according to either of the following schemes :*
a. A minimum of 9 units in one subject and a minimum of 6
units in another subject, both subjects to be chosen from
one of the following groups:
(1) Bacteriology, Biology and Botany, Chemistry, Geology
and Geography, Mathematics, Physics, Psychology,
Zoology.
(2) Economics, Education (not more than six units and only
for those who have completed their Normal Training),
English, French, Geography, German, Government,
Greek, History, Latin, Mathematics, Philosophy, Psychology, Sociology, Music  (6 units).
Or
b. A minimum of 9 units in each of two subjects to be chosen
from the following:
Biology (including Botany and Zoology), Chemistry, English,
French, Geography, German, Greek, History, Latin, Mathematics, Physics.
Work in the First or Second Year is required in each of the
major subjects, except in Education, Government, and Music.
*Those who intend to  enteir the Teacher  Training Course  should  consult section  8,
page  104. 84 Faculty of Arts and Science
In certain cases, however, this requirement may be fulfilled by
taking a First or Second Year course in the Third Year (see
section 3), but a course thus taken may not count towards the
required units for a major.
In addition to the major subjects a minimum of 6 units must
be chosen from some other subject or subjects.
2. Details of courses available in the Third and Fourth Years
are given under the various departments.
3. Only two subjects (6 units) of the First or Second Year
courses may be taken in the combined Third and Fourth Years.
In a number of these courses extra reading will be required of
Third and Fourth Year students.
When two First or Second Year subjects, other than a Beginners'
Language or Language 1, are taken in the Third and Fourth Years,
not more than one of these subjects may be outside the departments
in which the student is doing his major work.
For the purpose of this regulation the following subjects are
considered Third and Fourth Year subjects: Botany 1 (a) or
Zoology 1 (if both are taken), Chemistry 4*, Geography 1, Geology
1, Geology 2, German 2 if preceded by Beginners' German and
German 1, Greek 2 if preceded by Beginners' Greek and Greek 1,
Latin 2 if preceded by Beginners' Latin and Latin 1, Mathematics
4, and Philosophy 1; also the subjects under 1 (d) or 1 (e) postponed to the Third or Fourth Year, as provided for under paragraph 6, page 82.
4. Mo credit will be given for a language course normally taken
in the First Year unless it is taken in the Third Year and continued
in the Fourth Year.
5. Students in the Third and Fourth Years, with the consent
of the departments concerned, may take one or two courses of
private reading (each to count not more than 3 units), provided
that:
a. (1) The candidate for a reading course shall have completed
his First and Second Years and shall have taken at least
6 units either of Second or Third Year work or of Second
and Third Year work in the subject in which the reading
course is taken; and
(2) Shall have made an average of at least Second Class in
the 6 units in question.
b. Both reading courses shall not be chosen in the same subject.
c. A reading course shall not be taken concurrently with Extra-
Sessional or with Summer Session courses except by a student
in the Fourth Year.
*See prerequisite for Chemistry 4. Honours Courses 85
Credit for a course of private reading is part of the maximum
of 15 units which may be taken in addition to the regular work of
Winter and Summer Sessions; and no other additional work may
be taken in the same academic year.
B. Honours Curriculum
1. Students whose proposed scheme of work involves Honours
courses must obtain the consent of the departments concerned and
of the Dean before entering on these courses; and this consent will
normally be granted only to those students who have a clear
academic record at the end of their Second Year with at least
Second Class standing in the subject or subjects of specialization.
(Cards of application for admission to Honours courses may be
obtained at the Registrar's office.)
2. Certain departments offer Honours courses either alone or
in combination with other departments. For Honours in a single
department, at least 18 of the requisite 30 units must be taken in
the department concerned, and at least 6 outside it. For Honours
in combined courses, at least 12 units are required in each of two
subjects.  Particulars of these courses are given below.
3. Candidates for Honours, with the consent of the department
concerned, may offer a special reading course (to count not more
than 3 units) in addition to the reading courses offered above under
General Course Curriculum, section 5.
4. All candidates for Honours, at the option of the department
or departments concerned, may be required to present a graduating
essay embodying the results of some investigation that they have
made independently. Credit for the graduating essay will be not
less than 3 or more than 6 units. The latest date for receiving
graduating essays in the Second Term shall be the last day of
lectures; and the corresponding date for the Autumn Congregation
shall be October 1. ,
5. Candidates for Honours are required to take at the end of
their Fourth Year a general examination, oral or written, or both,
as the department or departments concerned shall decide. This
examination is designed to test the student's knowledge of his
chosen subject or subjects as a whole, and is in addition to the
ordinary class examinations of the Third and Fourth Years.
6. Honours are of two grades, First Class and Second Class.
Students who, in the opinion of the department concerned, have
not attained a sufficiently high ranking, may'be awarded a General
Course degree. If a combined Honours course is taken, First Class
Honours will be given only if both the departments concerned
agree; and an Honours degree will be withheld if either department
refuses a sufficiently high grade. 86 Faculty of Arts and Science
7. It is hoped to offer the following Honours courses during the
session 1942-43. But if it is found impossible to do so, the University reserves the right to refuse new registrations in any of them.
SINGLE HONOURS COURSES
Bacteriology and Preventive Medicine
Prerequisites: Chemistry 1, Biology 1.
Required Courses: Bacteriology 2. Candidates must select the
remaining 15 units required in consultation with the Head of the
Department.
Biology  and Botany
Prerequisites:  Biology 1, Chemistry 1, Botany 1 (a).
Chemistry 2 and 3, Physics 1*, and Zoology 1 are required before
completion of the course and should be taken as early as possible.
Required Courses.- Botany 3 (a), 4, 5 (a), and 6 (c) or 6 (e).
Optional Courses: Biology 2 and 3; courses in Botany not specifically required; and courses in Zoology. Optional courses should
be selected in consultation with the Department.
Biology  and  Botany   (Forestry Option)
Prerequisites: First Year, Biology 1; Second Year, Botany 1 (a),
Civil Engineering 2; Zoology 1, Physics If, and Chemistry 1, 2,
and 3 (to be taken as early as possible).
Required Courses: Botany 3 (a), Botany 4, Botany 5 (a), 5 (b),
Botany 6 (c) or 6 (e), Botany 7, Zoology 4, a thesis; and the
following courses which are common to all Third and Fourth Year
options leading to a degree in Forestry: Botany 1 (c) and Civil
Engineering 5, in the Third Year; Forestry 16, in the Fourth Year.
Botany 5 (b) should be taken in the Third Year.
Other courses to complete the requirements to be arranged in
consultation with the heads of the two departments. Agronomy 15
and Botany 6 (b) are recommended.
Students completing this course for the B.A. degree may qualify
for the degree of B.S.F. by taking the Fifth Year in Forestry (see
Faculty of Applied Science).
Chemistry
Prerequisites: Chemistry 1 and 2, Physics 1, Mathematics 2.
Course:   Candidates  are-required  to  complete  the  following
courses: Chemistry 3, 4, 5, 7, 9, 10.
*0r, with the consent of the Department of Biology and Botany, Physics A.
fOr, with the consent of the departments concerned, Physics A. Honours Courses 87
Classics
Prerequisites: Greek 2, Latin 2.
Course.- Any three of Greek 3, 5, 6, 7; any three of Latin 3, 4,
5, 6; and either Greek 9 or Latin 7.
As proof of ability to write Greek and Latin prose, candidates
must attain not less than Second Class standing in Greek 8 and
Latin 8. During the candidate's Fourth Year, papers will be set
in sight translation, and the candidate is advised to pursue a course
of private reading under the supervision of the Department.
There will also be a general paper on antiquities, literature, and
history.
Economics
Prerequisite:  A reading knowledge of French or German.
Course: Economics 2, if not already taken, any 15 further units
in the Department, to include Economics 4, 9, and 12, and two
from the following group:
Economics 3, 5, 6, 7, 11, 13, Government 1, Sociology 1.
Also a graduating essay which will count 3 units. (Tutorial instruction will be arranged in connection with the essay.)
Students must pass an oral examination, and, if required, address
a general audience on a designated subject.
Attendance at the seminar in Economics is required in the Third
and Fourth Years.
For the regulations governing the double course leading to the
degrees of B.A. (Economics) and B.S.F., see the section Double
Courses at the end of the Calendar.
English Language and Literature
Students who intend to take Honours must have the permission
of the Department before beginning the course.
Prerequisites: (1) A First Class or high Second Class in English
2. Ordinarily, special work is required of students who intend to
take Honours. Such work, if required, is announced at the beginning
of the session. (2) A reading knowledge of French or German. The
Department may require candidates to write a paper in translation
at the end of the Fourth Year.
Course: English 25 (involving an examination on the life, times,
and complete works of some major English author), 20, 21 (a) (in
the Third Year), 22 (in the Fourth Year), 24 (a) and (b) (the
seminars, of which 24 (b) must be attended in both years), and
a graduating essay which will count 3 units. 88 Faculty of Arts and Science
Candidates will be required to take the following final Honours
examinations on the history of English literature.:
1. From the beginning to 1500.
2. From 1500 to 1660.
3. From 1660 to 1780.
4. From 1780 to 1890.
One of these examinations will be oral.
In the award of Honours special importance will be attached to
the   graduating   essay   and   to   the   final   Honours   examinations.
If the candidate's work outside the Department does not include
a course in English history, he must take an examination in that
subject.
French
Prerequisite: French 2.
Course: French 3 (a), 3 (b), 3 (c) in the Third Year.
French 4 (a), 4 (b), 4 (c) in the Fourth Year.
A graduating essay (in French) which will count 3 units.
Geology
Prerequisites: Geology 1. If possible, Geology 2 and Geography
4, also, should be taken in the Second Year. Chemistry 1 and if
possible Physics 1 should be taken in the First Year, as these are
required for Geology 2 and 7 and are of great value in Geology 1.
Biology 1 is recommended in the Second Year, as it is prerequisite
to Zoology 1, which should be taken in the Third Year as a valuable
preparation for Geology 6.
Course: Eighteen units to be chosen from Geology 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9,
10, and 23a. If Geology 2 has not been taken in the Second Year
it must be taken in the Third Year, as it is prerequisite to Geology
7 and 8.
History
Prerequisites: (1) A First Class or high Second Class average
in the History course or courses taken in the First and Second Years.
(2) A reading knowledge of French or German.
Students whose standing in Honours History during the Third
Year is inadequate may, at the discretion of the Department, be
required to discontinue the Honours course.
Course: History 10 and twelve other units which normally must
be chosen from courses offered in the Third and Fourth Years plus
a graduating essay which will count three units. The seminar
(which carries no credit) must be attended in the Third and
Fourth Years.
An Honours paper will be set at the end of the Fourth Year on
the work of the seminar and of the courses studied in the Third and
Fourth Years. There will be an oral examination on the field
covered in the graduating essay. Honours Courses 89
Latin
Prerequisite: Latin 2.
Course: Latin 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, and Greek 9. The candidate must
also take Latin 8 in both years, obtaining at least Second Class
standing. His general knowledge will be tested by papers on antiquities, literature, and history at the end of the Fourth Year.
Mathematics
Prerequisites: Mathematics 2, Physics 1.
Course: Any 18 units in Mathematics (except that of Mathematics
3 and 4 only one may be counted), and Physics 4 and 5. A final
Honours examination, written or oral, is required.
Philosophy
Prerequisites:   Philosophy 1, Psychology 1.
Course:  Psychologv 2, and 15 units chosen from Philosophy 2,
3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 20.
Physics
Prerequisites: Mathematics 2, Physics 1, Chemistry 1.
Course: Mathematics 10, 12, 16; Physics 4 and 5, and 15 additional units. Students are advised to take Chemistry 4 and 7, if
possible.
Political Science
Prerequisite: A reading knowledge of French or German.
Course: Economics 2, if not already taken, any 15 further units
in the Department, to include Government 1, Economics 12, and
three from the following group:
Sociology 1 and 2, Government 2, 3, 4, Economics 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 9,13.
Also a graduating essay which will count 3 units. (Tutorial
instruction will be arranged in connection with the essay.)
Students must pass an oral examination and, if required, address
a general audience on a designated subject.
Attendance at the seminar in Economics is required in the Third
and Fourth Years.
For the regulations governing the double course leading to the
degrees of B.A. (Political Science) and B.S.F., see the section
Double Courses at the end of the Calendar.
Psychology
Prerequisites: Psychology 1, Philosophy 1, Biology 1, Mathematics 2, Physics A or 1.
Course: Philosophv 8, and 15 units chosen from Psychology 2,
3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 20. 90 Faculty of Arts and Science
Sociology
Prerequisite:  A reading knowledge of French or German.
Course: Sociology 2, 3, and 4; Economics 8 or 12; any six additional units selected from Third and Fourth Year courses offered in
the Department; a graduating essay which will count three units.
(Tutorial instruction will be arranged in connection with the essay.)
Students must pass an oral examination and, if required, address
a general audience on a designated subject.
Attendance at the seminar in Economics is required in the Third
and Fourth Years.
Zoology
Prerequisites:  Biology 1, Chemistry 1, Zoology 1.
Physics 1*, Botany 1 (a), and Chemistry 2 and 3 are required
before completion of the course and should be taken as early as
possible.
Required Courses: Zoology 2, 3, 5, 6.
Optional Courses: Zoology 4, 7, 8, 9,10,11,12; courses in Botany;
Biology 2 and 3; Geology 6. These optional courses should be
selected in consultation with the Head of the Department of
Zoology.
COMBINED HONOURS COURSES
(a) Any two of:
Bacteriology and Preventive Medicine, Biology and Botany,
Chemistry, Geology, Mathematics, Physics, Zoology.
(b) Any two of:
Economics, English, French, German, History, Latin or Classics,
Philosophy, Political Science, Psychology, Sociology.
(c) Other combinations not listed above may be taken with the
consent of Faculty.
The requirements in each of these subjects in such combinations
are as follows.
Bacteriology and Preventive Medicine
Prerequisites: Bacteriology 1, Biology 1, Chemistry 1.
Course: Bacteriology 2, 5, 9, and 10, and a thesis.
Biology and Botany
Prerequisites: Biology 1, Chemistry 1, Bdtany 1 (a).
Course:  Twelve units to  be  selected in consultation with  the
Head of the Department.
*Or, with the consent of the departments concerned, Physics A. Honours Courses 91
Chemistry
Prerequisites: Chemistry 1 and 2, Physics 1, Mathematics 2.
Course: To be arranged in consultation with the Head of the
Department.
Classics
Prerequisites: Greek 2, Latin 2.
Course: Latin 8; any two of Greek 3, 5, 6, 7; any two of Latin
3, 4, 5, 6.
Economics
Prerequisite:  A reading knowledge of French or German.
Economics 2 is not available as an option in Economics to students taking combined Honours courses including either History 16
or History 17.
Course: Twelve units, including Economics 4, 9, 12, and Economies 2, if not already taken.
English
Students who intend to take Honours must have the permission
of the Department before beginning the course.
Prerequisites: (1) A First Class or high Second Class in English
2. Ordinarily, special work is required of students who intend to
take Honours. Such work, if required, is announced at the beginning of the session. (2) A reading knowledge of French or German.
The Department may require candidates to write a paper in translation at the end of the Fourth Year.
Course: English 20 and 24, and any three of the English courses
specified for the Third and Fourth Years. The seminar must be
attended during both the final years, but credits which count for
the B.A. degree will be given only for the work of the Fourth Year.
Candidates will be required to take the following final Honours
examinations on the history of English literature:
1. From 1500 to 1660.
2. From 1660 to 1780.
3. From 1780 to 1890.
In the award of Honours special importance will be attached to
these examinations. One of them will be oral.
French
Prerequisite: French 2.
Course: If the graduating essay is written on a French subject,
3 (a) and 3 (c), 4 (a) and 4 (c); otherwise either these courses or
3 (a) and 3 (b), 4 (a) and 4 (b). 92 Faculty of Arts and Science
Courses 3 (b) and 4 (b) are intended primarily for Honours
students and should be taken whenever possible, even if they are
not required to make up the minimum number of units.
Geology
Prerequisite: Geology 1.
Course: Twelve units to be selected in consultation with the Head
of the Department. Geography 4 may be taken as a course in
Geology.
German
Prerequisite: A First Class or high Second Class in German 2.
_Course: German 3 (a), 3 (b), 4 (a), and 4 (b) or 5 (a).
In  addition,  a  comprehensive  examination in  the  history  of
German literature.
History
Prerequisites: (1) First Class or high Second Class average in
the History course or courses taken in the First and Second Years.
(2)  A reading knowledge of French or German.
Students whose standing in Honours History during the Third
Year is inadequate may, at the discretion of the Department, be
required to discontinue the Honours course.
Course: History 10 and any nine additional units, of which the
graduating essay, if written in History, will count three units. The
seminar (which carries no credit) must be attended in the Third
and Fourth Years.
An Honours paper will be set at the end of the Fourth Year on
the work of the seminar and of the courses studied in the Third
and Fourth Years. There will be an oral examination on the field
covered by the graduating essay.
Latin
Prerequisite: Latin 2.
Course: Latin 8 and any four of 3, 4, 5, 6, 7. In the final year
candidates must pass an examination (a) in sight translation, and
(b) in Latin literature, history, and antiquities. Private reading
under the direction of the Department is recommended.
Mathematics
Prerequisite: Mathematics 2.
Course: Any twelve units, except that of Mathematics 3 and 4
only one may be counted. Honours Courses "      93
Philosophy
Prerequisites:   Philosophy 1, Psychology 1.
Course: Twelve units chosen from Philosophy 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8,
9,20.
Physics
Prerequisites: Mathematics 2, Physics 1.
Course: Physics 4, 5, and 8 and four units from the following:
Physics 6, 7, 11, 12, and 13.
Political  Science
Prerequisite:  A reading knowledge of French or German.
Course:  Twelve units, including at least six in Government.
Psychology
Prerequisites:   Psychology 1, Philosophy 1.
Course:  Twelve units chosen from Psychology 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8,
9, 20.
Sociology
Prerequisite:   A reading knowledge of French or German.
Course:   Twelve  units,  including   Sociology   2,   3,   and   4,   and
Sociology 5 or Economics 12.
Zoology
Prerequisites: Chemistry 1 and 2, Biology 1, Zoology 1.
Course: Zoology 2, 3, 5, and 6.
COURSE LEADING TO THE DEGREE OF B.Com.
i
The degree of B.Com. will be granted on completion of courses
amounting to 60 units chosen in conformity with Calendar regulations.
Honours standing will be accorded those students who obtain an
average standing of 80 per cent, in the Fourth Year and 75 per
cent, in the Third Year, and who do not fail in any subject taken
in the Third and Fourth Years.
It is also possible to obtain the B.A. and B.Com. degrees concurrently in five years on completion of 75 units chosen so as to
cover the requirements of both degrees. While the B.A. degree may
be completed in one year by students holding the B.Com. degree,
the converse may not be true, because prerequisites in some of the
Commerce courses involve two years of consecutive work.
For the regulations governing the double courses leading to the
degrees of B.Com. and B.S.F., and B.Com. and B.S.A., see the
section Double Courses at the end of the Calendar. 94 Faculty of Arts and Science
The regulations as to Summer Session credits, number of units
to be taken in any academic year, etc., apply to courses leading to
the degree of B.Com. in the same way as to courses leading to the
degree of B.A.
Before graduation each student must submit to the Department
a major report indicating his ability to carry out on his own
initiative a constructive piece of work of an industrial or commercial character. If possible this report should be associated
with the student's summer employment. Every student is advised
to obtain as much business experience as possible during the
summer vacations.
As the student progresses in his course he will be expected to
do an increasing amount of field work in the business community
available to him. In this way he will learn to work on his own
initiative and will acquire a first hand knowledge of business practice.
Periodic written reports are an important part of the different-
courses, and students are warned that demands upon their time
will be sustained throughout the course.
- First Year
The following courses comprising 15 units:
English 1.
The first course in a language offered for University Entrance
(Latin, French, German, or Greek).
Mathematics 1.
Elective, 3 units, preferably Economics 2.
One course selected from the following: Biology 1, Chemistry
A or 1, Physics A or 1.
Second Year
.   The following courses comprising 15 units:
English 2.
Mathematics 2 or 3, or an additional course in the language
taken in the First Year. Students who contemplate taking advanced work in Statistics shoidd take Mathematics 2 or 3.
Economics 1.
Commerce 5.
Elective, 3 units, preferably Commerce 1.
A clear academic record at the end of the Second Year will be
required of students proceeding to the Third Year.
In view of the importance which rightly attaches to the capacity
for adequate and clear expression in writing, Regulation 12, on
page 110 of the Calendar, will be rigidly enforced at the end of
the Second Year, and reasonable legibility in handwriting will be
insisted upon. Course Leading to the Degree of B.Com. 95
Third Year
The following courses comprising 15 units:
An additional course in English or an additional course in a
language already taken for credit in the first two years, that is,
Latin, French, German, or Greek (to be taken in the Third Year).
Economics 4.
Economics 12, or a third course in the language elected in the
Second Year.
Commerce 6.
Commerce 1, if not already taken; otherwise one course to be
selected from the elective list in consultation with the Department.
Fourth Year
The following courses comprising 15 units:
Economics 6.
Commerce 4.
Commerce 9.
Two courses, not already chosen, to be selected from the elective
list in consultation with the Department. Students who select the
language option will be required to take in the Fourth Year an
additional course in the language selected.
The major report required for graduation must be submitted
on a date specified by the instructor and entails regular attendance
in a seminar discussion group held for one hour each week.
Students in the Fourth Year should not under any circumstances plan to carry more than the prescribed fifteen units of
work. If for any reason they do not enter the Fourth Year with
a complete Third Year they must expect to attend an extra year
in order to satisfy the requirements of graduation.
Electives for Third and Fourth Years:
Commerce 11.
Commerce 2.
Commerce 3.
Commerce 13.
Economics 13.
Economics 11.
Economics 5.
Government 1.
Government 4.
Government 5.
Mathematics 2, 3.
Additional course in Latin, French, German, or Greek, provided
that the language was taken in the Second and Third Years.
Psychology 1, 3, or 7.
Agricultural Economics 1.
Mining (3 units). 96                          Faculty of Arts and Science
 c_ _
COURSES LEADING TO THE DEGREE OF M.A.
1. Candidates for the M.A. degree must hold the B.A. degree
from this University, or its equivalent. Students, however, who
have not more than six units of the undergraduate course to complete will be allowed to take courses counting towards a graduate
degree; but these courses will not be counted as graduate credits
until the students have registered as graduate students.
2. A graduate of another university applying for permission
to enter as a graduate student is required to submit with his application, on or before September 1, an official statement of his graduation together with a certificate of the standing gained in the several
subjects of his course. The Faculty will determine the standing of
such a student in this University. The fee for examination of certificates is $2.00. This fee must accompany the application.
3. Candidates with approved degrees and academic records who
proceed to the Master's degree shall be required:
(a) to spend one year in resident graduate study; or
(b) to do two or more years of private work under the supervision of the University, such work to be equivalent to
one year of graduate study; or
(c) to do one year of private work under University supervision and one term of resident graduate study, the total
of such work to be equivalent to one year of resident
graduate study.
4. A major, including a thesis, and a minor will be required. In
general the minor shall be taken outside the department in which
the student is taking his major, but special permission may be given
to take both major and minor in the same department, provided the
subjects are different and are under different professors. The major
or the minor, with the consent of the department or the departments
concerned, may be extended to include work in an allied subject.
Both major and minor must be taken in the Faculty of Arts
and Science.
Candidates must have their courses approved by the heads of
the departments concerned*, by the Committee on Graduate
Studies, and by the Dean. Special forms entitled Application for
a Course Leading to the Master's Degree may be obtained from
the Registrar's Office.
5. Two typewritten copies of each thesis, on standardized thesis
paper, shall be submitted. (See special circular entitled Instructions for the Preparation of Masters' Theses.) The latest date for
receiving Masters' theses in the Second Term will be the last day
*lt should  be  noted  that  not  all  the courses  designated  as  offered  primarily  for
graduate students are certain to be given. Courses Leading to the Degree of M.A. .97
of lectures; and the corresponding date for the Autumn Congregation will be October 1.
6. Application for admission as a graduate student shall be made
to the Registrar on or before October 1.
7. The following minimum requirements apply to all departments. For the details of the special requirements of the various
department see pages 98-103.
Prerequisites:
For a minor at least six units and for a major at least eight units
of courses regularly offered in the Third and Fourth Years.
A standing of at least Second Class must have been obtained in
each course.
Students who have not fulfilled the requirements outlined above
during their undergraduate course may fulfil them by devoting
more than one academic year's study to the M.A. work.
M.A. Courses:
For a minor five or six units and for a major nine or ten units
(totalling at least fifteen units) chosen from courses regularly
offered in the Third and Fourth Years, or from graduate or reading
courses.
At least Second Class standing is required in the work of the
major and in the work of the minor.
The thesis shall count from three to six units.
There will be a general examination on the major field.
Examinations may be written or oral or both.
Languages: No candidate shall receive the degree of M.A. who
has not satisfied the head of the department in which he is majoring of his ability to read technical articles either in French or in
German, except a candidate majoring in certain subjects, where a
knowledge of Latin may be accepted