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The University of British Columbia Calendar Aug 30, 1928

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Array Itye Mnftiergitp
OF
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CALENDAR
FOURTEENTH SESSION
1928 - 1929
VANCOUVER.   BRITISH  COLUMBIA
1928
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OF
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CALENDAR
Fourteenth Session
1928-1929
VANCOUVER,   BRITISH  COLUMBIA
1928 ■PKPOPPiPiMi       i i ii
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CONTENTS
Page
Academic Year   6
Visitor    :  7
Chancellor     7
President     7
The Board of Governors  7
The Senate   7
Officers and Staff   8
Historical Sketch   15
The Constitution of the University  17
The Work of the University   18
Retiring Allowances   19
Endowments and Donations   20
Suggested Local Scholarships   23
The Library   24
New  Buildings    25
General Information   38
Admission to the University   41
Registration and Attendance   43
Fees     46
Medals, Scholarships and Prizes  m .^J.  48
Faculty of Arts and Science
Time Table of Lectures     62
Time Table of Supplemental Examinations     66
Regulations in Reference to Courses
First and Second Years     68
Third and Fourth Years—Pass     71
Third and Fourth Years—Honours     72
For the M.A. Degree     78
Examinations and Advancement  84
Courses of Instruction—
Department of Bacteriology     86
" Botany    88
" Chemistry      93
" Classics      98
" Economics, Sociology and Political Science  102
" Education    107
" English     112
" Geology and Geography   119
" History     124
" " Mathematics      131
" " Modern  Languages   :.... 135
" Philosophy     140
" " Physics     143
" Zoology     145
Faculty op Applied Science
Foreword   149
Regulations in Reference to Courses  151
General Outline of Courses     153
Courses in—
Chemical  Engineering    155
Chemistry   156
Civil Engineering   158
Electrical Engineering   160
JV
SB* """^PilPlF
The University of British Columbia
Forest Engineering   161
Geological Engineering   163
Mechanical Engineering   165
Metallurgical Engineering   166, 168
Mining Engineering  166, 169
Nursing and Health  170
Double Course in Arts and Applied Science  178
Courses Leading to the Degree of M.A.Sc  178
Examinations and Advancement   180
Courses of Instruction—
Department of Botany   182
" Chemistry      186
" " Civil Engineering   189
" Economics     200
" " Forestry     201
" " Geology and Geography  206
" Mathematics     211
" " Mechanical and Electrical Engineering   212
" " Mining and Metallurgy  224
" Physics     228
" Nursing and Health   230
" Zoology  235
Faculty of Agriculture
Time Table of Lectures   238
Regulations in Reference to Courses—
For the B.S.A. Degree  241
The Occupational Course   241
Short Courses   242
Extension Courses   242
Graduate Work   243, 248
Courses in—
Agronomy Major    245
Animal Husbandry Major   246
Dairying Major   246
Horticulture Major   247
Poultry Husbandry Major   247
Botany (Plant Pathology) Major   247
Zoology (Entomology) Major   248
Examinations and Advancement   249
Courses of Instruction—
Department of Agronomy   252
" Animal  Husbandry    255
" Dairying     258
" Horticulture     261
" Poultry Husbandry   264
" Agricultural Economics   267
List of Students in Attendance, Session 1927-28  269
Degrees Conferred, 1927   304
Medals, Scholarships and Prizes Awarded, 1927   309
Summer Session   313
Student Organization   314
Affiliated Colleges—
Victoria College   319
The Anglican Theological College of British Columbia   320
Union College of British Columbia  320 Academic Year
ACADEMIC YEAR 1928-1929
1928
Monday,
August 27th.
Wednesday,
September 12th.
Tuesday,
September 18th.
Wednesday,
September 19th,
Friday,
September 21st.
Monday,
September 24th.
Monday,
October 8th.
Saturday, 1
October 13th.
Wednesday,
October 17th.
Friday,
December 7th.
Monday,
December 10th.
Wednesday,
December 19th.
Thursday,
December 20th.
Matriculation Supplemental Examination!
begin.
Supplemental Examinations in Arts begin
Supplemental Examinations in Applied
Science begin.
Last day for Registration of First Year Students in the Faculties of Arts and Science,
and Agriculture.
Last day for Registration of all other students.
Lectures begin.
Last day for payment of First Term fees.
Last day for Change in Students' Courses.
Meeting of the Senate.
Last day of Lectures for Term.
Examinations begin.
Meeting of the Senate.
Examinations end. »^IW*«
The University of British Columbia
1929
Monday,
January 7th.
Monday,
January 21st.
Wednesday,
February 20th.
Thursday,
April llth.
Monday,
April 15th.
Thursday,
April 25th.
Wednesday,
May 8th.
Thursday,
May 9th.
Thursday,
May 9th.
Monday,
June 24th.
Friday,
August 30th.
Second Term begins.
L Last day for payment of Second Term fee&
Meeting of the Senate.
Last day of Lectures.
> Sessional Examinations begin.
Field Work in Applied Science begins immediately at the close of the Examinations.
} Last day for payment of Graduation fees.
J
Meeting of the Senate.
Congregation.
Meeting of Convocation.
Junior Matriculation Examinations begin.
(Date of Senior Matriculation Examinations to be arranged.)
Meeting of the Senate. THE UNIVERSITY OF BRITISH
COLUMBIA
VISITOR
The Hon. R. Randolph Bruce, Lieutenant-Governor of
British Columbia.
CHANCELLOR
R.  E.  McKechnie,  Esa., M.D., CM.,  LL.D.,  F.A.CS.
PRESIDENT
L. S. Klinck, Esa., M.S.A., D.Sc, LL.D.
BOARD  OF GOVERNORS
R. E. McKechnie, Esa., M.D., CM., LL.D., F.A.C.S. (ex officio).
L. S. Klinck, Esq., M.S.A., D.Sc, LL.D. (ex officio).
Mbs. Evltn F. K. Farris, M.A., LL.D., Vancouver.  Term expires 1929.
Denis Murphy, Hon. Mb. Justice, Vancouver.    Term expires  1929.
Henet C  Shaw, Esa., B.A., Vancouver.    Term  expires  1929.
Robie L. Reid, Esq., Vancouver.   Term expires 1931.
Campbell Sweeny, Esq., Vancouver.    Term expires 1931.
Christopher Spencer, Esq., Vancouver.    Term expires 1931.
B. C. Nicholas, Esq., Victoria.    Term expires 1933.
Joseph N. Ellis, Esq., B.C.L., K.C, Vancouver.    Term expires 1933.
W. H. Malkin, Esq., Vancouver.   Term expires 1933.
SENATE
(a) The Minister of Education, The Honourable John Duncan MacLean,
M.D., CM., LL.D.
The Chancellor.
The  President   (Chairman).
(6) Dean of the Faculty of Agriculture, F. M. Clement, Esq., B.S.A., M.A.
Dean of the Faculty of Applied Science, Reginald W. Brock, Esq.,
M.A, LL.D., F.G.S., F.R.S.C.
Dean of the Faculty of Arts and Science, H. T. J. Coleman, Esq.,
B.A., Ph.D.
Representatives of the Faculty of Agriculture: H. M. Kino, Esq.,
B.S.A., M.S.; A. F. Barss, Esq., A.B., B.S. in Agr., M.S.
Representatives   of   the   Faculty  of   Applied   Science:   William   E.
Duckering, Esq., A.B., B".S. in C.E., C.E.; R. H. Clark, Esq.,
M.A., Ph.D.
Representatives of the Faculty of Arts and Science: Henry F. Angus,
Esq.,    B.A.,   B.C.L.,   M.A.;   M.   Y.   Williams,   Esq.,    B.Sc.,
PhD., F.G.S.A., F.R.S.C The University op British Columbia
(c) Appointed by the Lieutenant-Governor in Council:—
His  Honour  Peter  S.  Lampman,  Victoria.
James Henderson, Esq., M.A., Vancouver.
James A. Campbell, Esq., B.A., Vancouver.
(d) The Superintendent of Education, S. J. Willis, Esq., B.A., LL.D.
The Principal of Vancouver Normal School, D. M. Robinson, Esq., B.A.
The Principal of Victoria Normal School, D. L. MacLaurin, Esq., B.A
(e) Representative of High School Principals and Assistants, 	
(/) Representatives  of  Affiliated  Colleges:—
Victoria College, Victoria, P. H. Elliott, Esq., M.Sc.
Union College of British Columbia, Vancouver (Theological),
Rev. J. G. Brown, M.A., D.D.
The Anglican Theological College of British Columbia, Vancouver, Rev. W. H. Vance, M.A., D.D.
(g) Elected by Convocation:—
T. H. Boggs, Esq., M.A., Ph.D., Vancouver.
G. G.  Sedgewick, Esq., B.A., Ph.D., Vancouver.
His Honour F. W. Howay, LL.B., F.R.S.C, New Westminster.
A. E. Lord, Esa., B.A., Vancouver.
Sherwood  Lett, Esa-,  B.A., Vancouver.
A. E. Richards, Esq., B.S.A., Agassiz.
Rev.  A.  H.  Sovereign,  M.A.,  B.D.,  F.R.G.S.,  Vancouver.
His Honour J. D. Swanson, B.A., Kamloops.
G. W. Scott, Esq., B.A., Vancouver.
Mrs. Beatrice Wood, B.A.Sc, Vancouver.
C Killam, Esq., M.A., LL.B., D.C.L., Vancouver.
Miss A. B. Jamieson, B.A., Vancouver.
The Most Rev. A. U. de Pencier, M.A., D.D., Vancouver.
Sydney Anderson, Esq., B.A.Sc, Vancouver.
W  B.  Bubnett, Esq., B.A., M.D., CM., F.A.CS., Vancouver.
OFFICERS AND STAFF
L.  S.  Klinck,  B.S.A.   (Toronto),  M.S.A, D.Sc.   (Iowa  State  College),
LL.D.   (Western Ontario), President.
H.  T.  J.  Coleman,  B.A.   (Toronto),  Ph.D.   (Columbia),  Dean  of  the
Faculty of Arts and Science.
Reginald W. Brock, M.A, LL.D.  (Queen's), F.G.S, F.R.S.C, Dean of
the Faculty of Applied Science.
F.   M.   Clement,   B.S.A.   (Toronto),   M.A.   (Wisconsin),   Dean   of   the
Faculty of Agriculture.
Miss M. L. Bollert, M.A. (Toronto), A.M. (Columbia), Dean of Women.
Stanley W. Mathews, M.A.  (Queen's), Registrar.
Miss E. B. Abernethy, B.A.  (Brit. Col.), Assistant Registrar.
F. Dallas, Bursar.
John Ridington, Librarian. —r~r~
Officers and Staff
Department of Agronomy
P. A. Boving, Cand. Ph. (Malmo, Sweden), Cand. Agr.  (Alnarp. Agriculture,  Sweden),  Professor  and   Head  of  the  Department.
G. G. Moe, B.S.A, M.Sc (McGill), Associate Professor.
D. G. Laird, B.S.A. (Toronto), M.S.  (Wisconsin), Assistant Professor.
Geo. B. Boving, B.S.A. (McGill), Assistant.
Cecil A. Lamb, B.S.A. (Brit. Col.), M.S.A. (McGill), Assistant
Department of Animal  Husbandry
H.  M.  King, B.S.A.   (Toronto),  M.S.    (Oregon   Agricultural   College),
Professor and Head of the Department.
R.   L.   Davis,   B.S.   (Montana),   M.S.   (Iowa   State   College),   Assistant
Professor.
H. R.  Hare, B.S.A  (Toronto), M.A.   (Wisconsin), Assistant Professor.
J.  G.  Jehvis,  V.S.   (Ont.  Vet.  Col.),  B.V.Sc.   (Toronto),  Lecturer  in
Veterinary  Science.
Department of Bacteriology
Hibbert Winslow Hill, M.B, M.D, D.P.H.  (Toronto), L.M.C.C.
Professor and Head of the Department. ▲
Miss Freda L. Wilson, M.A.   (Brit. Col.), Instructor.
Miss Helen M. Mathews, M.A. (Brit. Col.), Assistant
Department of Botany
Andrew H. Hutchinson, M.A. (McMaster), Ph.D. (Chicago), Professor
and Head of the Department.
John Davidson,  F.L.S,  F.B.S.E,  Assistant  Professor.
Frank Dickson, B.A. (Queen's), Associate Professor,
Miss Jean Davidson, M.A. (Brit Col.), Assistant.
R. W. Pillsbury, B.A. (Brit. Col.), Assistant.
Miss Dorothy Newton, B.S.A, M.Sc. (McGill), Assistant.
Department of Chemistry
Robert H. Clark, M.A. (Toronto), Ph.D. (Leipsig), Professor and Head
of the Department.
E. H.  Archibald,  B.Sc.   (Dal.),  A.M,  Ph.D.   (Harvard),   F.R.S.E.&C,
Professor of Analytical Chemistry.
W. F. Seyer, B.A, M.Sc (Alberta), Ph.D. (McGill), Associate Professor.
M.  J.  Marshall,  M.Sc.   (McGill),  Ph.D.   (Mass.   Inst,  of  Technology),
Associate Professor.
J. Allen Harris, M.A. (Brit. Col.), Ph.D. (Illinois), Assistant Professor.
John Allardyce, M.A. (Brit. Col.), Instructor.
D. F. Stedman, B.A.Sc  (Brit. Col.), Ph.D.  (London), Instructor.
A. F. Gallaugher, B.A. (Brit. Col.), Assistant.
R. H. Ball, B.A. (Brit Col.), Assistant.
H. R. L. Streight, B.A. (Brit. Col.), Assistant.
A. Ernest Morell, B.A.  (Brit Col.), Assistant
Hazes Nunn, B.A.Sc. (Brit. Col.), Assistant. 10 The University of British Columbia
Department of Civil Engineering
William E. Duckering, A.B, B.S. in C.E, C.E. (Washington), Professor
and Head of the Department.
E. G.   Matheson,   B.A.Sc.   (McGill),   M.E.I.C,   M.Am.S.CE,   Associate
Professor.
F. A. Wilkin, B.A.Sc. (McGill), Assistant Professor.
Allan H. Finlay, B.A.Sc. (Brit. Col.), M.S. in CE. (Illinois), Assistant
Professor.
A Lighthall, B.Sc. (McGill), Assistant Professor.
A. G. Stuart, B.Sc. (McGill), Instructor.
Arthur H. Lang, B.A. (Brit Col.), Assistant.
Department of Classics
Lemuel Robertson, M.A. (McGill), Professor and Head of the Department.
O. J. Todd, Ph.D.   (Harvard), Professor of Greek.
H. T. Logan, M.C, B.A. (McGill and Oxon), M.A. (Oxon), Associate
Professor.
Geoffrey B. Riddehough, B.A. (Brit. Col.), M.A. (California), Instructor.
H. R. Trumpour, M.A.  (Toronto), B.D, Assistant.
Miss Day Walker, B.A. (Brit. Col.), Assistant.
Miss Winifred E. Boyes, B.A. (Brit Col.), Assistant.
Department of Dairying
Wilfrid Sadler, B.S.A, M.Sc. (McGill), N.D.D, British Dairy Institute,
University College, Reading, England, Professor and Head of the
Department.
N. S. Golding, N.D.A, N.D.D, B.S.A. (Toronto), M.Sc. (Iowa), Associate
Professor.   I
Hugh L. A. Tarr, B.S.A. (Brit. Col.), Assistant.
Department of Economics, Sociology and Political Science
Theodore H. Boggs, B.A. (Acadia and Yale), M.A, Ph.D. (Yale), Professor and Head of the Department.
Henry F. Angus, B.A. (McGill), B.C.L, M.A. (Oxon), Associate Professor.
S. E. Beckett, M.A.  (Queen's), Associate Professor.
Mrs. Doris E. Lazenby, M.A. (Brit. Col.), Assistant
Department of Education
George   M.   Weir,   B.A.   (McGill),   M.A.    (Sask.),   D.Paed.   (Queen's),
Professor and Head of the Department.
Mrs. Jennie Benson Wyman,.B.A, M.Sc.   (New Zealand), A.M, Ph.D.
(Stanford), Associate Professor of Psychology and Education.
H. T. J. Coleman, B.A. (Toronto), Ph.D.  (Columbia), Special Lecturer.
Department of English
G. G. Sedgewick, B.A. (Dal.), Ph.D.  (Harvard), Professor and Head of
the Department.
W. L. MacDonald, B.A. (Toronto), M.A. (Wisconsin), Ph.D. (Harvard),
Professor. Officers and Staff 11
Frederick G. C Wood, B.A. (McGill), A.M.  (Harvard), Associate Professor.
Thorleif Larsen, M.A. (Toronto),   B.A.   (Oxon),   Associate   Professor.
Francis Cox Walker, B.A. (U.N.B.), A.M, Ph.D. (Harvard), Associate
Professor.
Miss M. L. Bollert, M.A. (Toronto), A.M. (Columbia), Assistant Professor.
Frank H. Wilcox, A.B, Ph.D.  (Calif.), Assistant Professor.
Philip Albert Child, B.A. (Toronto), A.M. (Harvard), Assistant Professor.
Charles G. D. Roberts, M.A, LL.D, Special Lecturer.
Miss Dorothy Blakey, M.A.  (Brit. Col.), M.A.  (Toronto), Assistant.
Miss M. D. Mawdsley, B.A. (McGill), Assistant.
Edmund Morrison, B.A. (Brit. Col.), Assistant
Department of Forestry
H. R. Christie, B.Sc.F. (Toronto), Professor and Head of the Department.
F. Malcolm Knapp, B.S.F. (Syracuse), M.S.F. (Wash.), Assistant Professor.
Department of Geology and Geography
R. W. Brock, M.A, LL.D. (Queen's), F.G.S, F.R.S.C, Professor and
Head of the Department.
S. J. Schofield, M.A, B.Sc (Queen's), Ph.D. (Mass. Institute of
Technology), F.G.S.A, F.R.S.C, Professor of Physical and Structural Geology.
M. Y. Williams, B.S.c. (Queen's), Ph.D. (Yale), F.G.S.A, F.R.S.C,
Professor of Palaeontology and Stratigraphy.
T. C Phemister, B.Sc. (Glasgow), ScM. (Chicago), Ph.D. (Glasgow),
Associate Professor of Mineralogy and Petrology.
Joseph Kania, B.A.Sc.  (Brit Col.), Assistant.
Department of History
D. C Harvey, B.A.  (Dal.), M.A.  (Oxford), Professor and Head of the
Department.
W. N. Sage, B.A.   (Toronto and Oxon), M.A.  (Oxon), Ph.D.   (Toronto),
Professor.
F. H. Soward, B.A. (Toronto), B.Litt. (Oxon), Assistant Professor.
Francis Painter, B.A. (Brit. Col.), Special Lecturer.
Kaye Lamb, B.A.  (Brit. Col.), Assistant.
Walter Lanning, B.A. (Brit Col.), Assistant.
Department  of Horticulture
F.   M.   Clement,  B.S.A.   (Toronto),   M.A.   (Wisconsin),   Professor   and
Head of the Department.
A. F. Barss, A.B.  (Rochester), B.S. in Agr.  (Cornell),   M.S.   (Oregon
Agricultural College), Professor.
F. E. Buck, B.S.A. (McGill), Associate Professor. 12 The University of British Columbia
Department of Mathematics
Daniel Buchanan, M.A. (McMaster), Ph.D. (Chicago), F.R.S.C, Professor and Head of the Department.
F. S. Nowlan, B.A. (Acadia), A.M. (Harvard), Ph.D. (Chicago),
Professor.
George  E.  Robinson, B.A.   (Dal.),  Associate Professor.
E. E. Jordan, M.A.   (Dal.), Associate Professor.
L. Richardson, B.Sc.  (London), Associate Professor.
B. S. Hartley, M.A.  (Cambridge), R.N.   (retired), Assistant Professor.
Miss May  L.  Barclay, M.A.   (Brit.  Col.),  Assistant.
Miss C Islay Johnston, M.A. (Brit. Col.), Assistant.
A. P. Mellish, B.A. (Brit. Col.), Assistant.
H. D. Smith, B.A.  (Brit. Col.), Assistant.
C. G. Patten, B.A.  (Brit. Col.), Assistant.
Department  of  Mechanical  and  Electrical   Engineering
Herbert Vickers, M.E. (Liverpool), M.Sc, Ph.D. (Birmingham), Professor and Head of the Department.
F. W.   Vernon,   B.Sc.Eng.    (London),   Wh.Sch,   A.M.I.Mech.E,   A.F.
R.A.S, Associate Professor of Mechanical Engineering.
H. F. G. Letson, M.C, B.Sc  (Brit. Col.), Ph.D. Engineering  (London),
A.M.I. Mech.E, Assistant Professor of Mechanical and Electrical
Engineering.
Leonard B. Stacey, B.A.Sc. (Brit. Col.), Assistant Professor of Electrical
Engineering.
G. Sinclair Smith, M.A.Sc. (McGill), Lecturer in Mechanical Engineering.
John F. Bell, Eng. Capt. O.B.E, R.N, M.E.I.C, Instructor in Mechanical Engineering.
H. P. Archibald, B.A.Sc. (McGill), Assistant in Drawing.
Department  of  Mining and  Metallurgy
J. M. Turnbull, B.A.Sc.  (McGill), Professor and Head of the Department
H. N. Thomson, B.Sc.  (McGill),  Professor of Metallurgy.
George  A.  Gillies,  M.Sc.   (McGill), Associate Professor  of Mining.
W. B. Bishop,  Assistant in Metallurgy.
Department  of  Modern  Languages
H. Abhton, M.A. (Cantab), D. Lett. (Univ. Paris), D. Litt. (Birmingham), F.R.S.C, Officier de l'Instruction Publique (France), Professor and Head of the Department.
A. F. B. Clark, B.A. (Toronto), Ph.D. (Harvard), Associate Professor
of French.    (On leave of absence 1928-29).
Miss Isabel MacInnes, M.A. (Queen's), Ph.D. (Calif.), Associate Professor of Modern Languages.
Henri Chodat, M.A. (McGill and Harvard), Officier d'Academie (France),
Associate Professor of French. Officers anb Staff 13
Miss Janet T. Greig, B.A.  (Queen's), M.A. (Brit Col.), Assistant Professor of French.
E. E. Delavault, L. en D. (Paris), Assistant in French.
Madame G. Barry, Assistant in French.
Miss Madge Portsmouth, B.A.  (Brit. Col.), Assistant in French.
Miss S. J. Battle, M.A. (Brit. Col.), Assistant in German.
Miss Wessie Tipping, B.A. (Brit. Col.), Assistant in French.
Madame Yvonne Doriot, Assistant in French.
Department of Nursing and Health
Hibbert Winslow Hill, M.B, M.D, D.P.H.   (Toronto), L.M.CC, Professor and Head of the Department.
Miss Mabel F. Gray, R.N, CertP.H.N. (Simmons College), Assistant Professor of Nursing.
Department of Philosophy
H.  T.  J.  Coleman,  B.A.   (Toronto),  Ph.D.   (Columbia),   Professor  and
Head of the Department.
James Henderson, M.A. (Glasgow), Associate Professor.
Mrs. Jennie Benson Wyman, B.A, M.Sc.  (New Zealand), A.M., Ph.D.
(Stanford), Associate Professor of Psychology and Education.
Department of Physics
T. C Hebb, M.A,  B.Sc.   (Dal.),  Ph.D.   (Chicago), Professor and  Head
of the Department.  A
A.  E.   Hennings, M.A.   (Lake  Forest  College,   111.),   Ph.D.   (Chicago),
Associate Professor.
J. G. Davidson, B.A.  (Toronto), Ph.D.  (Cal.), Associate Professor.
Gordon Merritt Shrum, M.A, Ph.D.  (Toronto), Associate Professor.
H. W. Fowler, B.A. (Brit. Col.), Assistant.
Department of Poultry Husbandry
E. A. Lloyd, B.S.A.   (Sask.), M.S.A.   (Washington State College), Professor and Head of the Department.
V. S. Asmundson, B.S.A. (Sask.), M.S.A. (Cornell), Associate Professor.
W. J. Riley, B.S.A. (Brit. Col.), Assistant.
Department of Zoology
C McLean Fraser, M.A.  (Toronto), Ph.D.   (Iowa), F.R.S.C, Professor
and Head of the Department.
G. J. Spencer, B.S.A.  (Toronto), M.S.  (Illinois), Assistant Professor.
Miss Gertrude M. Smith, M.A (Brit Col.), Instructor.
Miss Mildred H. Campbell, B.A. (Brit. Col.), Assistant
Harold White, M.D, CM. (McGill), Medical Examiner to Students.
Mrs. C A. Lucas, R.N, Public Health Nurse. eP*   *  V THE UNIVERSITY OF BRITISH
COLUMBIA
HISTORICAL SKETCH
The creation of a University in British Columbia was first
advocated by Superintendent Jessop in 1877, but it was not
until 1890 that the Provincial Legislature passed an Act
establishing a body politic and corporate named '' The University
of British Columbia.'' In 1891 this Act was amended to require
that a meeting of the Senate be held within one month after
the election of the Senators by Convocation. The Senators were
elected, but a quorum did not assemble on the date fixed by
the Chancellor, Dr. I. W. Powell, of Victoria. Thus the first
attempt to establish a University in British Columbia failed.
However, some of the work normally done in a University
was begun in 1894, when an Act was passed which permitted
the affiliation of high schools in the Province with recognized
Canadian Universities. In 1899 Vancouver High School was
affiliated with McGill University in order to provide First Year
work in Arts, and took the name of Vancouver College. First
Year work in Arts was offered by Victoria High School when
it became Victoria College by affiliation with McGill University
in 1902. In the same year Vancouver College undertook the
Second Year in Arts.
. In 1906 an Act was passed incorporating the Royal
Institution for the Advancement of Learning of British Columbia, which, in the same year, established at Vancouver the
McGill University College of British Columbia. The scope of
the work undertaken by this college was gradually increased
until at the time it was taken over by the University of British
Columbia it was giving three years in Arts and Science, and
two years in Applied Science. "When the University of British
Columbia opened in the autumn of 1915, both the McGill University College of Vancouver and Victoria College, which since
1907 had been a part of it, ceased to exist. 16 The University of British Columbia
Definite steps to establish the University were taken by
Dr. H. B. Young, Minister of Education, in 1907, when he
introduced a "University Endowment Act." This Act was
followed in 1908 by an Act establishing and incorporating the
University of British Columbia and repealing the old Act of
1890-1. This Act, with its subsequent amendments, determines
the present constitution of the University.
As authorized by an Act passed by the Provincial Legislature
in 1910, the Lieutenant-Governor in Council appointed a Site
Commission to decide upon a site for the proposed University.
The Commission held its first meeting on May 25th, 1910, in
Victoria, and after a thorough examination of the Province
recommended the vicinity of Vancouver. In the autumn the
Executive Council decided to place the University at Point
Grey—the site which the Commission had named as its first
choice. In 1911 the Legislature passed an Act authorizing the
Lieutenant-Governor in Council to grant this site to the University. The grant was increased in 1915, so that it now consists
of 548 acres at the extremity of Point Grey. The waters of
the Gulf of Georgia form more than half the boundary of the
University Campus. A tract of some 3,000 acres of Government land immediately adjoining the site, and lying between
it and the City of Vancouver, has been set aside by the Government in order that University revenue may be provided by its
sale or lease.
In February, 1912, the Hon. H. E. Young, Minister of
Education, called for competitive plans which should include
plans in detail for four buildings to be erected immediately, and
a block plan showing all the proposed buildings on the Campus.
Messrs. Sharp and Thompson, of Vancouver, B. C, were the
successful competitors, and were appointed University architects.
The first Convocation, held on August 1st, 1912, chose Mr.
F. L. Carter-Cotton as first chancellor of the University. In
March, 1913, the Lieutenant-Governor in Council appointed as
President of the University F. F. Wesbrook, M.A, M.D, C.M,
LL.D.   On April 4th, 1918, Dr. B. E. McKechnie was elected «.S»l
Historical Sketch 17
Chancellor; on April 12th, 1921, he was re-elected for a second
term; on April 3rd, 1924, for a third term, and on April 7th,
1927, for a fourth term. On the death of President Wesbrook,
October 20th, 1918, L. S. Klinck, Dean of the Faculty of Agriculture, was appointed acting President, and on June 1st, 1919,
President.
From its opening in 1915 till the Summer of 1925, the
University carried on its work in temporary quarters on part
of the site of the General Hospital in Fairview.
Construction work was commenced on the Science Building
at the permanent site in Point Grey in 1914, but was interrupted because of war conditions. Work on this building was
resumed in 1923, and in the Autumn of the same year the
contract was let for the Library. These two buildings which
are of stone and are fire-proof, conform closely to the original
plans as prepared by the architects in 1914. The initial units
of these structures, as well as nine other buildings which are
of a less permanent character and are described at a later page
in this Calendar, were completed in 1925, and at the beginning
of Session 1925-26 the University commenced work in its new
quarters.
The Inauguration of the new buildings was held on
October 15th and 16th, 1925, on which occasion honorary degrees
were granted by the University for the first time.
THE CONSTITUTION OF THE UNIVERSITY
The Constitution of the University is governed by the British
Columbia University Act B.C.E.S. 1924 c. 265, which provides
That the University shall consist of a Chancellor, Convocation, Board of Governors, Senate, and the Faculties;
that the first Convocation shall consist of all graduates
of any university in His Majesty's dominions resident in
the Province two years prior to the date fixed for the
first meeting of Convocation, together with twenty-five
members selected by the Lieutenant-Governor in
Council. After the first Convocation it shall consist of
the Chancellor, Senate, members of the first Convoca- 18 The University of British Columbia
tion, and all graduates of the University; that the
Chancellor shall be elected by Convocation; that the
Board of Governors shall consist of the Chancellor,
President, and nine persons appointed by the Lieutenant Governor in Council; that the Senate shall consist of: (a) The Minister of Education, the Chancellor,
and the President of the University, who shall be Chairman thereof; (b) the deans and two professors of each
of the Faculties elected by members of the Faculty;
(c) three members to be appointed by the Lieutenant-
Governor in Council; (d) the Superintendent of Education, the principals of the normal schools; (e) one
member elected by the high-school principals and
assistants who are actually engaged in teaching; (/) one
member elected by the Provincial Teachers' Institute
organized under subsection (e) of section 8 of the
"Public Schools Act"; (g) one member to be elected
by the governing body of every affiliated college or
school in this Province; (h) fifteen members to be
elected by Convocation from the members thereof;
It is further provided that the University shall be non-
sectarian.
The University Act gives the University full powers to grant
such degrees in the several Faculties and different branches of
Knowledge as the Senate may from time to time determine.
It reserves for the University the sole right in this Province to
confer degrees, except in Theology, and it expressly enacts
that "No other university having corporate powers capable of
being exercised within the Province shall be known by the
same name, nor shall any such university have power to grant
degrees.''
THE WORK OF THE UNIVERSITY
The University of British Columbia is an integral part of
the public educational system of the Province, and its function
is to complete the work begun in the public and high schools. Retiring Allowances 19
It is the policy of the University to promote education in general,
and in particular to serve its constituency through three
channels—teaching, research, and extension work.
As regards teaching, the University furnishes instruction in
the various branches of a liberal education and in those technical
departments which • are most directly related to the life and
industries of the Province. The scope of the teaching activity
of the University is fully described in Sec. 9 of the Act.
In order to make the teaching of the University more vital
and for the advancement of knowledge, research is encouraged
in every department.
The people of the Province are informed of the results of
special work by the staff of the University through a system
of extension lectures. The University sends lecturers to various
parts of the Province during the examination weeks in December
and April. In the case of places which can be visited without
prejudice to the duties of the lecturer at the University, lectures
are arranged to take place during the University term. A list
of subjects and lecturers can be obtained on application to the
Secretary of the Extension Lecture Committee, through whom
all arrangements are made.
RETIRING ALLOWANCES
In March, 1924, the Board of Governors of the University
of British polumbia adopted the contributory plan of retiring
allowances for members of the teaching staff. Contracts are
placed with the Teachers' Insurance and Annuity Association
of America, a corporation made possible by the Carnegie Corporation "to provide insurance and annuities for teachers and
other persons employed by colleges, by universities, or by institutions engaged primarily in educational or research work."
In May, 1924, the University of British Columbia was
elected as a member of the list of institutions associated with
the Carnegie Foundation for the Advancement of Teaching
and received a grant of $50,000.00, payable in ten annual installments, for the purpose of providing supplementary annuities for the older professors of the institution. 20 The University of British Columbia
ENDOWMENTS AND DONATIONS
However well supported by public funds, a University must
depend to a great extent upon private benefactors. In anticipation of endowments the Act provides that:
"Any person or corporation may, with the approval of tha
Senate, found one or more professorships, lectureships,
fellowships, scholarships, exhibitions, prizes, or other
awards in the University, by providing a sufficient endowment in land or other property, and conveying the same
to the University for such purposes, and every such
endowment of lands or other property shall be vested in
the University for the purpose or purposes for which it
is given."
Only a limited number are in a position to make endowments, but many—including alumni and friends of higher
education—may add greatly to the usefulness of the University
by making contributions that lie within their power. It is
gratifying to note that the number of those who assist in this
way has been constantly growing.
The removal of the University to its permanent home in
Point Grey has greatly stimulated interest in its welfare and
progress, and within the last two years many valuable donations
have been received, especially in the form of equipment for the
various Laboratories.
Among donations received recently special mention should
be made of the very fine Ethnological collection representing
the arts, handicraft and weapons of Polynesia donated to the
University by Mr. Frank Burnett, Sr, and also of the estate
of the late Mr. David Thom, of Hammond, B. C, bequeathed by
him to the Faculty of Agriculture. Mr. Thom left his entire
estate, consisting of a farm of thirty-five acres and cash and
bonds amounting to fifty-five hundred dollars—a total net value
of approximately eleven thousand dollars, to be used for the
assistance and encouragement of students in the Faculty of
Agriculture.
The Royal Institution for the Advancement of Learning
of British  Columbia presented to  the University  a life-size Endowments and Donations 21
portrait of the late Francis Lovett Carter-Cotton, LL.D, first
Chancellor of The University of British Columbia. The painting is by Mr. F. Horsman Varley, A.R.C.A.
At a public ceremony presided over by the Chancellor of
the University, the Governor of the Hudson's Bay Company,
Mr. Charles V. Sale, presented to the University the collection
of paintings known as the Hudson's Bay Company and the
Native Sons of British Columbia Permanent Loan Collection.
These valuable historical canvasses, eight in number, represent
early scenes in the history of the Province of British Columbia.
The pictures were painted by Mr. John Innes, of Vancouver, and
are hung in the Library.
The subjects are:
1. Commander Vancouver's meeting with Spaniards off
Point Grey, A.D. 1792.
2. Alexander Mackenzie recording his arrival at the Pacific,
A.D. 1793.
3. Simon Fraser in the Fraser Canyon on his journey to
the sea, A.D. 1808.T    J   k V
4. The Hudson's Bay Company's fur brigade passing
down the Okanagan, A.D. 1825-35.
5. James Douglas building the Hudson's Bay Post at
Victoria, A.D. 1843.
6. James Douglas taking the oath as first Governor of
British Columbia, A.D. 1858.
7. Finding of placer gold by pioneer miners in the Cariboo,
about A.D. 1858.
8. The overland pioneers journeying through the Rockies,
A.D. 1862.
A list of the other most important gifts received during
last year is given below under the various departments. 22 The University of British Columbia
Department of Botany
(For Herbarium and Botanical Gardens)
SEEDS
Royal Botanic Gardens, Edinburgh.
Royal Botanic Gardens, Kew  (England).
New York Botanical Gardens.
Brooklyn Botanical Gardens.
Botanic Garden, Darjeeling.
Botanic Garden, Polonia.
Arnold Arboretum, Massachusetts.
Mr. John Hutchison, Victoria.
Dr. G. B. Sudworth, Washington, D.C.
Dr. O. Malte, Ottawa.
Prof. F. J. Lewis, Edmonton.
R. Salgues, Brignoles, France.
Odessa Botanical Gardens, Odessa.
HERBARIUM SPECIMENS
Prof. M. L. Fernald, Gray Herbarium.
J. W. Adams, University of Pennsylvania.
Dr. G. A. Purpus, Mexico.
Prof. W. L. Jepson, University of California.
Miss J. Bostock, Monte Creek, B. C.
Mrs. J. P. MacFadden, New Denver, B. C.
R. Glendenning, Esq., Agassiz.
A. E. Pickford, Esq., Victoria.
Department of Forestry
J. Fyfe Smith & Co., Ltd.—Exhibit woods. North American and foreign.
Dominion Forest Service—Hand specimen collection of Canadian woods; forestry
publications.
New York State College of Forestry—Hand specimen collection of American woods.
United States Forest Service—Hand specimen collection of American woods; forestry
publications.
Arthur Woodhouse—Six blueprints showing details of logging railroad structures.
Forests Department, Government of Western Australia—Exhibit specimens of commercial woods of Western Australia.
Department of Geology
Broken Hill Mining Managers' Association, Australia—Suite of ores.
Britannia Mines, B. C.—Suite of ores.
B. C. Nicholas—Geological survey of Canada reports.
Crow's Nest Pass Coal Co. Ltd.—Museum specimens of coal.
Major A. W. Davis—Suite of ores and rocks from the Monarch Mine and Kicking
Horse Mine at Field.
J. Giegerich—Suite of rocks and ores from Chuquicamata, Chili.
F. F. Osborne—Minerals from Eastern Ontario and New York.
Dr. S. J. Schofield—Suite of rocks and ores from the Galena Farm Mine, B. C.
C. H. Stockwell—Rocks and ores.
S. S. Saunders—Metallic arsenic.
Department of Mechanical and Electrical Engineering
Messrs.  The  B.  C.  Electric  Railway  Co.—Rotary  converter,   special  transformer,
switch panel and instruments complete.   All new and ordered by us.   The bill
paid by the B. C. Electric.
Messrs. The B. C. Electric Railway Co.—Single-phase rotary converter (used).
Messrs. The B. C. Electric Railway Co.—Standard bridge.
Messrs. The B. C. Electric Railway Co.—Siemens dynamometer and collection of
instruments.
Messrs. Park Royal Engineering Co., London, England—Two switch panels, switches,
circuit breakers and instruments to control Metropolitan Vickers generators.
Messrs.   Park   Royal   Engineering   Co.,   London,   England—Case   of   instruments,
ammeters, voltmeters, etc.
Messrs.  Ferranti,  Ltd.,   London,   England—Two  cases  of instruments,   ammeters,
voltmeters,  frequency meters, current- transformers.
Messrs. Brook Ltd., Huddersfield, England—Squirrel cage induction motor, 10 H.P.
Messrs. Brittain, Ltd., London, England—Slip ring induction motor, 5 H.P.
Messrs. Reyrolle & Co., Newcastle-on-Tyne—Switch-gear mining panel, with relays,
etc. Suggested Local Scholarships 23
Messrs. Reyrolle & Co., Newcastle-on-Tyne—Wall plugs and fittings.
Messrs. The British Insulated & Helsby Cable CO.—Two cases of cable samples.
The Provincial Government—Compound engine and boiler.
Mr. Robert Sweatt, Vancouver—Coppus blower.
Messrs. The Hart Accumulator Co., Quebec—Accumulator panel.
Messrs. The Prestolite Battery Co., Vancouver—Six large car batteries.
Messrs.   George  Ellison,   Birmingham,   England—Switch   gear,   auto   starters,   star
delta starters, slip-ring resistance starters and oil switches.
Messrs. Chas. Taylor & Co., Birmingham, England—Patent lathe, chuck and vice.
Dr. R. E. McKechnie, Vancouver—X-ray equipment.
In addition, the majority of the units in the Electrical and Mechanical Engt
neering Laboratories have been supplied by the makers at cost price.
SUGGESTED LOCAL SCHOLARSHIPS
As the number of Matriculation Scholarships offered at
present is quite inadequate to the needs of the Province, a
scheme which has great possibilities both for the growth of the
University and the prosperity of the Province is earnestly
recommended to consideration.
In the large universities, both of Great Britain and the
United States, local or district scholarships have proved a strong
bond between the community and the University, have brought
the University close to the life of the young, and opened up
the prospect of a University education to many who would not
otherwise have contemplated it.
Such local or district scholarships might be established as
Matriculation Scholarships, by City or Municipal Councils or
other public bodies, or by private benefactors. They would be
awarded by a local authority, but the University would reserve
the right of confirmation.
In awarding such scholarships, standing in the Matriculation Examination need not be the only consideration. It is
desirable that regard should be had also to financial circumstances, character, and intellectual promise. Scholarships may
be offered for students taking a particular course, and in this
way the study of such sciences and technical branches of knowledge as have special) importance for the industries of the
district may be encouraged. In short, local scholarships may be
arranged to meet local needs and to prepare the native sons
of the Province to play their part in the development of its
resources. 24 The University of British Columbia
THE LIBRARY
The University Library consists of 65,000 volumes and
about 10,000 pamphlets. It includes representative works in
all the courses offered by the University, and a growing collection of works on other subjects.
The Library receives regularly about 500 magazines and
periodical publications.
The book collection is classified throughout on the Congressional system.
Books can be borrowed by students for a period of seven
days, or for a shorter time should the work be in general demand. Books to which the teaching staff have specially referred their students are placed in a "Reserved" class. These
are shelved apart from the main collection, and are loaned
only for use in the building, and for a limited period of two
hours. They may, however, be taken from the Library for
over-night loan, or for any period in which the Library is
closed. In these cases they are returnable before 9 a.m., or, in
the case of students of classes meeting at 8:45 a.m., before 10 a.m.
Unbound periodicals are not loaned. Bound periodicals, and
books that are costly, rare, or unsuitable for general circulation,
are loaned only under special conditions.
While the Library is primarily for the use of the staff
and students of the University, its resources are available to
those of the general public engaged in research or special study,
and who make personal application to the Librarian for the
privilege of its use.
During the session the Library is open on week days from
8:45 a.m. to 9:45 p.m., except on Saturdays, when the hour
of closing is 5 p.m. In vacation it is open from 9 a.m. to 4 p.m.,
except on Saturdays, when the hours are from 9 a.m. to noon.
The University is deeply indebted to all who have made
gifts to the Library during the past year. These have been
both valuable and numerous. Their number prevents detailed
acknowledgment, but recognition should be made of a number
of sets of transactions, and complete or partial sets of scientific
periodicals, given by societies and friends of the University. NEW BUILDINGS
LOCATION
The new home of the University is situated on the promontory which forms the western extremity of the Point Grey
Peninsula. On three sides it is bounded by the Gulf of Georgia.
The site comprises an area of 548 acres, of which approximatley
one-half is campus. In all directions appear snow-capped
mountains, strikingly rugged and impressive.
BUILDINGS
The buildings, planned to meet the requirements of fifteen
hundred students, are of two classes, permanent and semipermanent. The former were designed by the University architects, Messrs. Sharp and Thompson, the latter by architects of the
Department of Public Works of the Provincial Government. The
permanent buildings have been erected in the location originally
assigned for them; the others in the quadrangle designated as
"unassigned" in the original plan. By utilizing the "unassigned"
area for the semi-permanent buildings, all the locations intended
for future expansion have been left available.
The entire mechanical equipment of these buildings was
designed after a close study had been made not only of present
requirements, but of the ultimate development of the institution.
This consideration accounts for the fact that only a part of the
present equipment is permanent. After a careful survey of the
whole system, a forced hot water system was found to present
advantages that made its adoption advisable. Direct radiation
with a system of warmed air supply and extraction for ventilation is used to take care of the heat losses in the buildings. A
separate system of ventilation is installed for all sanitary conveniences, and a specially constructed system for fume closets.
The various services throughout these buildings, such as hot and
cold water, distilled water, gas and steam for laboratory
purposes, compressed air, etc., with the necessary apparatus, are
all of a modern type.    An attempt has been made to reduce 26 The University of British Columbia
vibration and noise to a minimum by installing all moving
apparatus on floating slabs, with a further insulation of cork.
The plan at the back of the Calendar shows the buildings
which have been erected and indicates the nature of their
construction. It also shows their relation to the other groups
of buildings which are to be erected in the future.
PERMANENT BUILDINGS
Of the twelve buildings which have been erected, three
are of fire-proof construction, the Science Building, the Library,
and the Power House.
Science Building
The Science Building has been designed in the Tudor style,
this being a phase of English Gothic which lends itself fairly
readily to those adaptations which are necessary in order to meet
modern collegiate requirements. Externally, British Columbia
granite has been used throughout. Wherever possible plain wall
surfaces, consisting of the split faces of granite arranged
in random sizes with white joints, have been used. The
general grey tone is relieved by the use of a small quantity of
field stone of darker shades. All window openings are filled with
leaded glass in steel sashes. Internally, the building is finished
in brick work and tiles in pleasing tones of brown which harmonize with the oak panelled doors, the total effect in keeping
with that of the period it is designed to represent.
This building, which was designed for the sole use of
Chemistry ultimately, now accommodates the Departments of
Chemistry, Physics, Bacteriology and Nursing and Health. One
and one-half floors are devoted to Chemistry; an equivalent
assignment of space has been alloted to Physics, and half of one
floor has been set aside for Bacteriology, and Nursing and
Health. All lecture rooms and laboratories are well lighted,
and a system of forced ventilation has been installed throughout
the entire building. Distilled water, gas, steam, compressed air,
and electrical supply circuits have been provided wherever re- New Buildings 27
quired.   These services are carried in trenches in the floor, an
arrangement which facilitates any necessary repairs.
Ample provision has also been made for offices, balance
rooms, preparation rooms, apparatus rooms, supply rooms,
photographic rooms, technicians' rooms, and reading-room for
students.
Chemistry.—This Department is equipped with one large
and one small lecture room, a large laboratory for general
chemistry accommodating three hundred and forty students,
laboratories for elementary and advanced qualitative and
quantitative analysis, an elementary organic laboratory, an advanced organic laboratory and an organic combustion laboratory. A laboratory is available for agricultural chemistry,
another for industrial chemistry, and a commodious laboratory
for physical chemistry with an adjoining dark room for work
in photo-chemistry is found on the third floor. There are
also several small laboratories well equipped for research work.
Physics.—The Department of Physics has two large lecture
rooms, four large and several smaller laboratories, a constant temperature room and a battery room. Three of the
large laboratories are equipped for the study of Elementary
Physics, Mechanics, and Heat and Electricity. The fourth is
specially designed for the conducting of experiments requiring
the use of highly sensitive apparatus. Smaller laboratories are
designed for light and X-ray experiments.
Bacteriology.—Provision has been made in this Department'
for four laboratories. Two of these are for general student use,
one is for serological work and one is for advanced research.
In addition to laboratory and lecture room accommodation, an
office, a preparation room and a sterilization room have been
provided.
Nursing and Health.—The three rooms assigned to this
Department constitute a teaching unit such as is provided in
modern training schools for the instruction of nurses. All the
equipment necessary   for   the   demonstration   of   elementary
r.i. 28 The University of British Columbia
nursing procedure is available, and can be used for practice
teaching purposes.
Library Building
The central unit of the Library Building is a massive
structure of British Columbia granite which harmonizes with
the Science Building in its Gothic architectural lines. Owing
to the exigencies of the plan, however, the massing is more broken,
and thus better effects of light and shade are obtained. Some
tracery and stained glass in the upper portion of the building is
employed to obtain in a restricted manner the richness of detail
characteristic of this style of architecture.
Internally, the same effect has been striven for, wherever
such an end was possible with due regard to economy. The
Main Entrance Hall has a groined ceiling with arches and wall
surface finished in Caen Stone plaster. This treatment is carried
up to the Main Concourse floor through the staircase Hall; the
lower portion of the Concourse walls is plastered with Caen
Stone, the quoins to windows and doors, and corbels to roof
trusses being finished in the same material. The roofs of the
Concourse and of the two reading rooms adjacent are finished
in native woods stained a dark brown, with patterae and shields
picked out in bright heraldic colours. Windows throughout the
building are of leaded glass. In the Concourse and the inner
hall this is of a pale amber shade, with the coats of arms of the
Canadian Universities worked into the centre light. On the
window above the Loan Desk on the East Side of the Concourse
the armorial bearings of Oxford and Cambridge, as the oldest
universities of the Empire, are used as flanking emblems to those
of the University of British Columbia. The floors of the Main
Entrance Hall staircases and of the Concourse are finished with
large marbled rubber tiles which harmonize with the general
colour scheme, and ensure quietness in the principal parts of the
building. Plain oak of simple detail, stained to represent old
fumed oak, is used throughout for doors and other wood finish.
The principal reading room has a floor space of 100 ft. by 50
ft. and is 60 ft. in height. Two other reading rooms, each 60 ft. by New Buildings 29
30 feet, open off the main reading room. These rooms provide
accommodation for 250 students. The sixth and seventh tiers
of the stack, not being required at present to house the University book collection, are used as a periodical room, and will
accommodate about fifty readers. The Stack, which occupies
the entire rear of the building, consists of seven tiers, four of
which are fully equipped with steel stacks of the latest design.
Here fifty-two semi-private study "carrels" facilitate research
for advanced students. The offices of the Librarian and the
Library Staff provide ample accommodation for receiving,
cataloguing and accessioning. The Faculty common room, the
"Browsing" room, and the Frank Burnett museum are also
located in this building. The Burnett collection represents the
arts, handicraft and weapons of Polynesia. This collection, which
has been presented by Mr. Burnett to the University, is the result
of numerous voyages made by him to the Central and South
Pacific Islands. It constitutes one of the finest collections of this
class of material yet accumulated by any private collector.
Power House
The Power House has been placed in the centre of the space
which will ultimately be the Engineering Quadrangle, and will
therefore eventually be masked by the future permanent buildings towards the Mall. For this reason it does not pretend to
follow very closely the style of the other permanent buildings
except in mass, being finished in rough case of broken texture,
relieved with red quarry tiles as diapers, copings and offsets,
with windows grouped as far as possible to give pleasing proportions of voids and solids.
The ultimate development of this plant will be 2500 horse
power at normal rating. The present installation consists of
three units, each of 250 horse power normal rating, capable of
developing 100 per cent, in excess of this. Each unit, so equipped
aa to operate independently of the others, may act as a service
as well as an experimental station. In other words, on any one
boiler an experimental test may be conducted while the rest 30 The University of British Columbia
of the plant is cut in on the service lines. Instruments are provided to record every operation so that close checking and
comparisons of the performance of the different types of boilers
may be made to a degree.
The B. & W. Unit is equipped with B. & W. Natural Draft
Stoker, the Sterling Boiler with forced draft Coxe Travelling
Grate. The Kidwell with forced draft Coxe Travelling Grate is
also equipped with air pre-heater, by-passed, so that tests may
be conducted with or without pre-heated air. Induced draft is
used with individual forced draft fans; separate boiler feed
lines and pump with Linehart Scale provide boiler feed for
tests. A travelling weigh scale records the amount of coal used,
while a steam jet ash conveyor elevates the ashes to an overhead
bunker.
The efficiency and flexibility of the plant lends itself to
economical operation, while the knowledge gained in the use of
different appliances will be of interest and value to power plant
users.
SEMI-PERMANENT BUILDINGS
In this group there are nine buildings in all,—Administration, Auditorium and Grill room, Arts, Applied Science, Agriculture; three Engineering Buildings—Mechanical, Electrical;
Mining, Metallurgy and Hydraulics; and the Forest Products
Laboratory Building. These buildings, which are set on concrete
foundations, are of frame construction with stucco finish, and
are designed for a life of forty years. Their exterior design
harmonizes with the permanent buildings so far as materials
of construction will permit. With the exception of a part of the
Engineering Laboratories, these buildings have been finished
internally with plaster and fir trim.
Administration Building
On the ground floor of this building are situated the offices
of the President, the Dean of the Faculty of Arts and Science,
the Registrar, and the Bursar.    On the second floor are two
large rooms, one for meetings of the Board of Governors and New Buildings 31
the  Senate,   and  the   other  for  meetings  of   Faculties  and
Committees.
Auditorium Building
The Auditorium Building is designed in a pleasing treatment of Renaissance architecture and is furnished with the most
modern equipment. It has a seating capacity of 1029, a large
and admirably equipped stage for the encouragement of dramatic presentations, an orchestra pit and adequate off-stage
dressing rooms. Provision has been made for the operating of
moving pictures and the stage is equipped with a cyclorama and
all necessary electrical illumination devices.
The Grill room is situated in the basement and is designed
to accommodate 400 students at one time. There is also a small
dining room for the Faculty. The kitchen is furnished with the
latest cooking and baking equipment. I   .
The bookstore, post office, medical offices, women's rest
room, students' council offices, and numerous committee rooms
for subsidiary organizations are also located in this building.
Arts Building
In the Arts Building, which forms the centre of the semipermanent group, are located the lecture rooms and offices for
the following Departments in the Faculty of Arts and Science:
Classics, Economics, Sociology and Political Science, Education, English, History, Mathematics, Modern Languages and
Philosophy.
The lecture rooms, 16 in number, are well designed and
exceptionally well lighted. The largest room accommodates 250
students; the seating capacity of the others ranges from 32 to 64.
Four common rooms for the undergraduates in Arts and Science
are located in this building, as is also the office of the Dean
of Women.
Applied Science Building
This building houses the Departments of Geology, Botany,
Zoology, Forestry and the drafting rooms and offices for Civil 32 The University of British Columbia
Engineering. All the laboratories have been equipped with the
essential services. One large lecture room, providing accommodations for 250 students, and 11 smaller lecture rooms with a
seating capacity ranging from 25 to 112, are located in this
building. These will be used by the different Departments
jointly as class requirements may determine. Extensive provision has been made for drafting .rooms and for the necessary
offices, preparation rooms, storage rooms, and photographic
rooms. A geological museum, a reading room and a common
room for students have also been provided.
Geology.—In addition to the necessary lecture rooms, the
Department of Geology has three large and well equipped
laboratories, the Mineralogical, the Petrological and the Geological. There are also two small research laboratories, one for
graduate students and one for the staff.
The Department workroom is well equipped for the preparation of specimens. The museum contains valuable collections of
illustrative material which supplements the extensive working
collections in the laboratories. The reading room is equipped
with books, separates, maps, photographs and slides for reference.
Botany.—The Botanical laboratories include a large junior
laboratory, a senior laboratory, two student research laboratories
and three private research rooms. These laboratories are used
for practical work in Botany and General Biology. A Herbarium
of over 15,000 sheets and a botanical garden containing over
1000 specimens of native plants furnish an abundance of material
for class room and laboratory purposes.
Zoology.—This Department, which includes courses in
Entomology, has two large laboratories, a small research laboratory and two private laboratories, all well equipped. There is
also a room for class material, which will serve for a time as a
repository for museum collections and for specimens to be used
for illustration.
Forestry.—While the Department of Forestry has its own
laboratory for work in wood technology, its own class room New Buildings 33
and offices, it uses the laboratories of other Departments quite
extensively, notably those in Biology, Civil Engineering and
Forest Products. The Department possesses, in the forest belt
which nas been preserved on the campus as a natural park, a
very valuable outdoor laboratory for forestry students.
Civil Engineering.—Well equipped and well lighted
draughting and designing rooms are available for all classes in
drawing, mapping, machine design and computation work. The
equipment necessary for all types of Civil Engineering work ia
available. The hydraulic laboratory, which is situated in the
Mining, Metallurgy and Hydraulics Building, is well equipped
for demonstrations and tests covering the main field of hydraulic
principles and machinery; while in the Forest Products Laboratory, which is at the disposal of students in Civil Engineering,
excellent facilities are available for extensive tests of timber,
cement and steel.
Agriculture Building
This building accommodates the Departments of Agronomy,
Animal Husbandry, Dairying, Horticulture and Poultry Husbandry. The office and record rooms for the Farm Survey
studies are also located in this building.
The lecture rooms, of which there are four, are exceptionally
well lighted. The largest accommodates 112 students, while the
seating capacity of the others ranges from 36 to 54.
In addition to lecture and laboratory accommodation, provision has been made for the necessary offices, preparation rooms,
storage rooms and also for a photographic dark room, a herd
book room, and a students' common room.
Agronomy.—This Department is provided with a combined
laboratory and lecture room which is equipped with water, gas
and electricity. While this room will be used for studies in
crop production, for the judging of specimens of plants and for
the determination of soil samples, the main emphasis will be laid
on the work conducted in the Department's outdoor laboratory—
the Agronomy fields. 34 The University of British Columbia
Animal Husbandry.—The different classes and types of
livestock constitute the main laboratory material of this department. In this material and in the farm survey records, the
Department possesses a wealth of data for teaching and illustration in farm management, livestock management, feed and
nutrition, and studies in pedigree and breeding.
Dairying.—The new laboratories of the Department of
Dairying provide facilities for conducting researches on the bacterial flora of milk, butter and cheese, and the relation of the flora
to the production and sale of high quality products. Excellent
provision is made for the instruction of students in the work
indicated. Cheese-making and butter-making will be conducted
in the temporary dairy building; but the new laboratories permit
of closer contact of the various activities of the Department.
Horticulture.—In the laboratory provided for this Department, comprehensive studies supplement the practical experience
of the students in the propagation, planting, pruning and care of
horticultural crops. Materials for these purposes are provided
from the orchard, the ornamental trees, shrubs and flowers, and
from plants grown in the glass propagating house.
Poultry Husbandry.—In the poultry laboratory in the
Agriculture Building, facilities and equipment are provided to
assist in the study of poultry nutrition, disease, and other problems related to the industry. On the poultry plant, which is the
main laboratory of the Poultry Department, ten pure breeds of
commercial importance are tested and bred for egg and meat
production. Experiments in management and marketing are
conducted with these birds and their products.
Mechanical and Electrical Buildings
The Department of Mechanical and Electrical Engineering
is housed in two large buildings. In both will be found the
most-up-to-date equipment, enabling students to obtain a
thorough experimental knowledge of all phases of the work in
these departments. The mechanical laboratory contains a
modern 3-ton CO* refrigerating plant; a large Corliss engine; a New Buildings 35
two-stage air-compressor with inter-cooler; a 50 H.P. Mirrlees
Bickerton & Day -pure Diesel engine with Froude water brake;
a De Laval Steam Turbine and D. C. generator with condenser;
a gasoline engine and generator; a Crossley two-stroke oil
engine and a National gas engine. A complete equipment exists
for testing calorific values of fuel oils and coals, and also for
testing exhaust gases of engines. There are also two steam
engines, one a single cylinder engine and the other a compound
engine. The mechanical students have available also the powerhouse equipment for testing, which consists of three 250 H.P.
boilers—a Kidwell, a Babcock & Wilcox, and a Sterling. In
addition, a 250-K.W. compound engine and generator and every
variety of pump is available for experimental work.
The Electrical laboratory is entirely modern, and contains
a 3-phase synchronous motor, driving a 75-K.W. compound
wound generator with static balancer. There is a three-phase
rotary converter with reactance control and panels, and a Deri
brush-shifting repulsion motor; a three-phase series commutator motor of the Schrage type, several squirrel cage and slip-
ring induction motors, a three-phase alternator and D.C. motor;
two-level compound D.C. generators on the same base.
There are also series, shunt and compound wound D.C.
motors and an induction regulator, a single-phase rotary converter; a Winter-Eichberg single-phase commutator motor;
several transformers; a mercury-arc rectifier; an oscillograph;
a Campbell inductometer and complete equipment for high
frequency bridge-testing. An alternating current potentiometer made by Tinsley, Gall's patent, exists for standardizing
work, and also vacuum tube instruments for obtaining characteristics of tubes. In addition, a large amount of equipment is
available for carrying out all the junior tests, including potentiometers, standard bridges, iron testing, Epstein iron tester,
ballistic galvanometers and other instruments.
Mining, Metallurgy and Hydraulics Building
The Mining and Metallurgical laboratories cover a total
area of 5000 square feet.   The Ore Dressing laboratory, which 36 The University of British Columbia
includes a workshop, storage room and flotation room, is well
equipped with a variety of small scale machines, including
crusher, rolls, screens, jigs, ball mill and tables. The laboratory
is fully wired for power and light, and has large water mains
and drains, and a two-ton travelling crane. The Metallurgical
laboratory includes a fire assay room, with oil, gasoline and
gas furnaces; a wet assay room, with large fan-draught hood,
and work benches fitted for electric and gas heating; two
balanee rooms; a photographic dark room; and ample storage
space.
The Hydraulics laboratory is well equipped for tests and
demonstrations of high and low pressure hydraulic machines
and pumps. A 60-horse-power D.C. motor is utilized to drive
either a 10-inch single stage centrifugal pump having a capacity
of 2400 gallons per minute against a 70-foot head, or to drive
a 4-inch two stage pump having a capacity of 525 gallons per
minute against a 325-foot head. The water from the large
pump can be used to drive a 10-inch vertical reaction turbine,
while the flow from the high pressure pump can be used to
drive an 18-inch Pelton Wheel, thus providing students with
actual working demonstrations of all the ordinary types of
machines. Installations include apparatus for weir, nozzle,
and orifice measurements, flow in pipes, tests and demonstrations of Venturi, current and service meters. One section
of the laboratory is set apart for making the standard tests of
cement and sand.
Forest Products Laboratory Buildings
The three buildings included in this group were erected
by the University for the use of the Vancouver Forest Products
Laboratory of the Dominion Forest Service. They consist of
a main building for offices and laboratories, an air-seasoning
building, and an experimental dry-kiln building.
Under a joint agreement between the University and the
Department of the Interior, the University, besides providing
the buildings, furnishes heat, light, and power, without cost to
the Dominion Government.   The Dominion Forest Service has New Buildings 37
undertaken to supply the personnel and to furnish all equipment.
Facilities already established include a large timber
testing laboratory, a special building for lumber seasoning, an
experimental dry-kiln building equipped with oil-fired steam
plant and automatic temperature and humidity controller, a
combined photographic and pathological laboratory, a carpenter
shop, and suitable offices. Accommodation is also provided for
an entomologist of the Federal Department of Agriculture. The
testing laboratory is equipped with machines ranging from a
200,000-pound Olsen Universal to the most delicate balances.
^^    >  W 38 The University of British Columbia
GENERAL INFORMATION
The Session
The University Year or Session is divided into two terms—
the first, September to December; the second, January to May.
For "Admission to  the  University,"  see  page  41,  and for
"Registration and Attendance," see page 43.
Courses of Study
For the Session of 1928-29 the University offers instruction
in the four years of each of the three Faculties, Arts and Science,
Applied Science (including Nursing), and Agriculture, leading
to the degrees of Bachelor of Arts, Bachelor of Applied Science
and Bachelor of Science in Agriculture. It is also possible to
proceed to a Master's degree in each Faculty. Advanced courses
of instruction and facilities for research are offered to students
who are graduates of any University or College of recognized
standing. Admission to these advanced courses, or to the
privileges of research, does not in itself imply admission to
candidacy for a higher degree.
Academic Dress
The undergraduate's gown is black in colour and of the
ordinary stuff material, of ankle length, and with long sleeves
and the yoke edged with khaki cord. The graduate's gown is the
same, without cord. The Bachelor's hood is of the Cambridge
pattern, black bordered with the distinctive colour of the particular Faculty; the Master's hood is the same, lined with the
distinctive colour. The colours are, for Arts and Science,
the University blue; for Applied Science, red; for Agriculture,
maize.
Physical Examination
In order to promote the physical welfare of the student
body, every student, on entering the University, will be
required to undergo a physical examination, to be conducted
by, or under the direction of, the University Medical Examiner.
Physical defects and weaknesses, amenable to treatment, may General Information 39
thus be discovered, and the student is advised to apply to his
physician for such remedial measures as his case may require.
About 10 to 15 per cent, of the students are re-examined in their
second year.
University Health Service
The University Campus is situated within the Point Grey
Reserve, which, as unorganized territory, comes under the direct
control of the Provincial Government. Shortly after the opening
of the present University Buildings in 1925, the Lieutenant-
Governor in Council, by the recommendation of the Provincial
Health Officer, appointed a Medical Health Officer for the Reserve, including the University Campus. This Health Officer
has on the Campus and in the Reserve all the powers of any
Health Officer anywhere. k^
In the fall of 1927, the Provincial Health Officer added to
the University Health Service a Public Health Nurse, whose
presence permits the continuous operation of a local Health
Department on the Campus and Reserve.
In addition, the Public Health Nurse is engaged by the
University for the general supervision of the individual health
of the students, first aid, etc., and gives a voluntary course of
lectures to the students on health subjects. An office for the
Public Health Nurse is provided in the Auditorium Building
and, by the gift of the Graduating Class of 1927, has been
equipped with first aid furniture and supplies.
Students developing any illness or suffering from any
injury while on the Campus should apply for first aid to the
Public Health Nurse. This is particularly required if the student
develops any illness of an infectious nature. Provision is made
also for the diagnosis of the infectious cases and their safe removal to suitable quarters.
Students developing any illness or suffering any injury
while at home, boarding house, fraternity' house, etc., are required to report the same to the Public Health Nurse. The
development of any infectious disease in a University student
must be reported by the student to the Health Officer of the
University without delay. 40 The University of British Columbia
Dean of Women
During the session the Dean of Women may be consulted by
parents and students on matters pertaining to living conditions,
vocational guidance, and other questions that directly affect the
social and intellectual life of the women students.
Board and Residence
A list of approved boarding-houses which receive men or
women students, but not both, may be obtained from the
Registrar after September 1st. Men and women students are
not permitted to lodge in the same house, unless they are
members of the same family, or receive special permission from
the Senate. The cost of good board and lodging is from $35 per
month upwards; of a room alone, $8 to $12 per month. A grill
is operated under the supervision of the University, and lunch,
afternoon tea and light supper may be obtained there at very
reasonable prices. Refreshments at social functions are also
supplied.
General Conduct
The University authorities do not assume responsibilities
which naturally rest with parents. This being so it is the
policy of the University to rely on the good sense and on the
home training of students for the preservation of good moral
standards. I Admission to the University 41
ADMISSION TO THE UNIVERSITY
All inquiries relating to admission to the University should
be addressed to the Registrar.
1. Except under special circumstances no student under
the age of sixteen is admitted to the First Year Courses in the
Faculty of Arts and Science, and no student under the age of
seventeen to the Second Year Courses in the Faculty of Arts
and Science nor to the First Year Courses in the Faculties of
Agriculture and Applied Science, including Nursing.
2. Candidates for admission to the courses in the First
Year of the Faculty of Arts and Science or the Faculty of
Agriculture and to the course in Nursing in Applied Science are
required to pass the Junior Matriculation Examination of the
Province of British Columbia or to submit certificates showing
that they have passed an equivalent examination elsewhere.
Special regulations are prescribed for admission to courses in
Applied Science, and are given under the heading of "Admission" in the Applied Science Section of the Calendar.
3. Students who have passed the Senior Matriculation
Examination are admitted to the courses of the Second Year
in the Faculty of Arts and Science. Students who have partial
Senior Matriculation standing will be granted credit in First
Year Arts in each subject in which they have made 50 per cent
or over, or in each paper in which they have made 50 per cent
or over in so far as these papers correspond with those of
First Year Arts.
4. Certificates or diplomas showing that a candidate has
passed the Matriculation Examination of another University will
be accepted in lieu of the Junior or Senior Matriculation Examinations if the Faculty concerned considers that the examination
has covered the same subjects and required the same standard.
If, however, the examination covers some but not all of the
necessary subjects the candidate will be required to pass the
Matriculation Examination in the subjects not covered.
5. A candidate who wishes to enter by certificates other
than a Matriculation certificate  issued in British  Columbia 42 The University of British Columbia
shoidd submit to the Registrar the original certificates. If he
wishes these returned to him, he must present also a copy of
each certificate for record at the University. He should under
no circumstances come to the University without having first
obtained from the Registrar a statement of the value of the
certificates he holds, as these may lack one or more essential
subjects, or the work done in a subject may not be adequate, or,
again, the percentage gained may not be sufficiently high.
Moreover, it must be remembered that a certificate may admit
to one Faculty and not to another. When an applicant's
diploma or certificate does not show the marks obtained in the
several subjects of the examination he must arrange to have a
statement of his marks sent to the Registrar by the Education
Department or University issuing such diploma or certificate.
The fee for examination of certificates is $2.00.
6. A student of another University applying for exemption
from any subject or subjects which he has already studied is
required to submit with his application a Calendar of the
University in which he has previously studied, together with a
complete statement of the course he has followed and a certificate
of the standing gained in the several subjects* The Faculty
concerned will determine the standing of such a student in this
University.   The fee for the examination of certificates is $2.00.
7. No candidate under 18 years of age will be admitted to
the University without complete Junior Matriculation; and no
candidate over 18 years of age who has deficient Matriculation
standing will be admitted without the special permission of the
Faculty concerned.
8. The Junior and Senior Matriculation Examinations of
the Province of British Columbia are conducted by the High
School and University Matriculation Board of the Province.
This Board consists of members appointed by the Department
of Education and by the University. The requirements for
Matriculation may be obtained in the publication, "Requirements for Matriculation," issued by the University, or in the
"Courses of Study," issued by the Department of Education
*For the conditions under which exemption is granted in the Faculty of Arts
and Science, see "Courses Leading to the Degree of B. A." Registration and Attendance 43
REGISTRATION AND ATTENDANCE
Those who intend to register as students of the University
are required to make application to the Registrar, on forms to
be obtained at the Registrar's office. This application should be
made early in August, or as soon as the results of the Matriculation examinations are known. For First Year students in the
Faculties of Arts and Science, and Agriculture, and for other
students coming to the University for the first time, the last day
for registration is Wednesday, September 19th, and for all other
undergraduate students, Friday, September 21st, 1928. (See
regulations in reference to '' Admission to the University,'' page
41.)
1. There are four classes of students:—
(a) Graduate students—Students who are pursuing courses
of study in a Faculty in which they hold a degree,
whether they are proceeding to a Master's degree or
not.
(b) Full undergraduates—Students proceeding to a degree
in any Faculty who have passed all the examinations
precedent to the year in which they are registered.
(c) Conditioned undergraduates—Students proceeding to
a degree with incomplete entrance qualifications or
with defects in their standing which do not prevent
their entering a higher year under the regulations
governing "Examinations and Advancement" of the
Faculty in which they are registered.
(d) Partial students—Students not belonging to one of the
three preceding classes.    (See 7, below.)
2. All students other than graduate students are required
to register at the office of the Registrar on or before the last day
for registration, to furnish the information necessary for the
University records, to enrol for the particular classes which they
wish to attend, and to sign the following declaration:
"I hereby accept and submit myself to the statutes, rules,
regulations, and ordinances of The University of British Colum- 44 The University of British Columbia
bia, and of the Faculty or Faculties in which I am registered,
and to any amendments thereto which may be made while I
am a student of the University, and I promise to observe the
same."
In the information furnished for the University records,
students are requested to state what churches they propose to
make their place of worship. This information is available for
any of the city churches desiring it.
3. After the above dates a fee of $2.00 will be charged for
late registration.
4. Students registering for the first time must present the
certificates which constitute their qualification for admission
to the course of study for which they wish to register. The
Registrar is empowered to register all duly qualified students.
Doubtful eases will be dealt with by the Faculty concerned.
5. Students doing work in two academic years will register
in the lower year and fill out their course cards in such a way
as to make clear which courses are required to complete the
lower year.
6. Students desiring to make a change in the course for
which they have registered must apply to the Registrar on the
proper form for a "change of course." Except in special circumstance, no change will be allowed after the fifteenth day of
the session. If the application is approved by the Faculty
concerned, the Registrar will give the necessary notifications.
7. Partial students are not normally required to pass an
examination for admission, but before registering they must
produce a certificate showing that they have satisfied the Dean
and the Heads of the Departments concerned that they are
qualified to pursue with advantage the course of study which
they propose to undertake.
8. Students are required to attend at least seven-eighths
of the lectures in each course that they take. Lectures will commence on the hour, and admission to a lecture or laboratory Registration and Attendance 45
and credit for attendance may be refused by the Instructor for
lateness, misconduct, inattention or neglect of duty. Absence
consequent on illness or domestic affliction may be excused only
by the Dean of the Faculty concerned, and medical certificates
or other evidence must be presented immediately on return to
University work. A medical certificate must show the nature
and the period of the disability. Medical report forms may be
obtained from the Dean's office. In cases of deficient attendance
students may (with the sanction of the Dean and the Head of
the Department concerned) be excluded from the final examination in a course; but unless the unexcused absences exceed
one-fourth of the total number of lectures in a course, such
students may sit for supplemental examination.
*?*   *  V 46 The University of British Columbia
FEES
All cheques must be certified and made payable to "The
University of British Columbia."
1. The sessional fees are as follows:
For Full and Conditioned Undergraduates
In Arts and Science—
First Term, payable on or before Oct. 8th $50.00
Second Term, payable on or before Jan. 21st  50.00
 $100.00
In Teacher Training Course—
First Term, payable on or before Oct. 8th $30.00
Second Term, payable on or before Jan. 21st  30.00
 $ 60.00
In Applied Science—
First Term, payable on or before Oct. 8th $75.00
Second Term, payable on or before Jan. 21st  75.00
 $150.00
In Nursing and Public Health—
First Term, payable on or before Oct. 8th $50.00
Second Term, payable on or before Jan. 21st...... 50.00
 $100.00
NOTE.—For Third and Fourth Year students in Nursing the Sessional fee is
$1.00, payable, with the Alma Mater fee of $10.00, on or before October 8th.
Students admitted to Nursing B or C and proceeding to the Certificate on
a basis of part-time attendance over two or more years, will pay the regular fee
for the whole course, but the amount payable each year will be pro-rated to
correspond with the proportion of work taken in that year.
In Agriculture—
First Term, payable on or before Oct. 8th $50.00
Second Term, payable on or before Jan. 21st  50.00
 $100.00
Alma Mater Fee—Payable on or before Oct. 8th $ 10.00
Caution Money—Payable on or before Oct. 8th       5.00 Fees 47
For Partial Students
Fees per "Unit"—Payable on or before Oct. 8th $ 10.00
Alma Mater Fee—Payable on or before Oct. 8th    10.00
Caution Money—Payable on or before Oct. 8th      5.00
For Graduates
Registration and Class Fees — Payable on or before
Oct. 15th  $ 25.00
After these dates an additional fee of $2.00 will be exacted
of all students in default.
The Alma Mater Fee is a fee exacted from all students
for the support of the Alma Mater Society. It was authorized
by the Board of Governors at the request of the students themselves, m- 4tni>
The Caution Money is a deposit from which deductions will
be made to cover breakages, wastage, and use of special materials
in laboratories, etc. If the balance to the credit of a student
falls below $1.50, a further deposit of $5.00 may be required.
2. Immediately after October 8th and January 21st, the
Bursar will notify students who have not paid their fees that
steps will be taken to ensure their exclusion from classes while
the fees remain unpaid.
3. Students registering after October 8th shall pay their
fees at the time of registration, failing which they become subject to the provisions of Regulation 2.
4. Special fees are:—
Regular supplemental examination, per
paper $ 5.00
Special examination, per paper    7.50
Graduation    20.00
Supplemental examination fees must be paid two weeks
before the examination, special examination fees when application for examination is made, and graduation fees two weeks
before Congregation. 48 The University of British Columbia
MEDALS, SCHOLARSHIPS, PRIZES, BURSARIES AND
LOANS FOR 1928-29
MEDALS
The Governor-General's Gold Medal
A gold medal, presented by His Excellency the Governor-
General of Canada, will be awarded to the student standing at
the head of the graduating class in the Faculty of Arts and
Science. Honour and pass students may compete for this medal.
The Historical Society Gold Medal
A gold medal, donated by E. W. Keenleyside, Esq., and
known as the Historical Society Gold Medal, will be open to the
members of the graduating class. The award will be made by
the Department of History, on the basis of the student's standing in the courses in History which he has taken during his
undergraduate course, and the general interest he has shown in
the subject.
SCHOLARSHIPS FOR POST-GRADUATE STUDIES
University Scholarship
A scholarship  of $200 may be awarded to  a  graduate
student who shows special aptitude for post-graduate studies.
Application should be made to the Registrar not later than the
last day of the final examinations.
The Anne Wesbrook Scholarship
This scholarship of $100, given by the Faculty Women's
Club of the University, is open to graduates of this University
who intend in the following year to pursue post-graduate study
in this or any other approved university. Application should
be made to the Registrar not later than the last day of the final
examinations.
The Captain LeRoy Memorial Scholarship
This   scholarship   of  $250,   donated  by   the   Universities
Service Club, will be awarded for the academic year 1928-29
to a returned soldier student in attendance at The University of
British Columbia. Applications may be made by returned soldier Medals, Scholarships and Prizes 49
students who intend doing Second, Third, or Fourth Year work
at The University of British Columbia, or post-graduate work at
any approved institution. Each application must contain a
statement of the academic record, the war record, and the special
claims of the applicant, with two supporting references, and
must be made to the Registrar not later than the last day of the
final examinations.
The award will be made by Senate, upon recommendation
of Faculty acting in consultation with the Executive of the
Universities Service Club.
The French Government Scholarship
A scholarship of 10,000 francs is donated by the French
Government for one year's postgraduate study in French. It
is tenable for one year and is contingent upon the voting of the
credits for the year by the French Chambers. (This contingency
applies to every item of the French budget and, practically, the
scholarship may be considered as permanent.)
The award is made by the French Consul for Western
Canada, residing in Vancouver, on the recommendation of the
Head of the Department of French in the University. Applications should be made to the Registrar not later than the last
day of the final examinations.
The Nichol Scholarship
By the generosity of the Hon. Walter Nichol—Lieutenant-
Governor of the Province, 1921 to 1926,—five three-year
scholarships, each of the annual value of $1,200, have been made
available for study in the University of France, or at one of the
other institutions of higher education in France. With each
scholarship will be given a gold medal, the permanent possession
of the successful candidate. These scholarships will be open to
graduates of the University of British Columbia who intend to
take up teaching as a profession. The fourth scholarship will
be awarded in 1928.
The intention of the donor being the development in
Canada, and particularly in this Province, of a wider knowledge
of the people of France, their ideals, literature, art and science, 50 The University of British Columbia
and the promotion thereby of a better mutual understanding
between French and British in this country, each successful
candidate must undertake to return to British Columbia to
practise his profession for such time as seems reasonable in the
opinion of the Senate of the University.
Each scholarship may be held for three years, provided the
bolder can show from year to year satisfactory progress in the
course of study undertaken. Application must be made to the
Registrar not later than the last day of the final examinations.
The Brock Scholarship
A scholarship of $100, donated by Dean R. W. Brock, may
be awarded to a graduate student in Applied Science who shows
special aptitude for post-graduate studies. Applications should
be made to the Registrar not later than the last day of the
final examinations.
The 1851 Exhibition Scholarship
Under the revised conditions for the award of the 1851
Exhibition Scholarship in Science, The University of British
Columbia is included in the list of universities from which
nominations for scholarships allotted to Canada may be made.
These scholarships of £250 per annum, are tenable, ordinarily,
for two years. They are granted only to British subjects under
26. years of age, who have been bona fide students of pure or
applied science of not less than three years' standing. Application should be made to the Registrar not later than the last day
of the final examinations.
SCHOLARSHIPS FOR UNDERGRADUATES
1. IN ALL FACULTIES
The Rhodes Scholarship
An annual scholarship at one of the colleges of Oxford is
assigned by the trustees of the late Mr. Cecil J. Rhodes to the
Province of British Columbia.   Each scholarship is tenable for
three years, and is of the value of £400 a year.  In accordance
with the wish of Mr. Rhodes, the election of candidates will
depend upon:   (1) Force of character, devotion to duty, courage, Medals, Scholarships and Prizes 51
sympathy, capacity for leadership; (2) Ability and scholastic
attainments; (3) Physical vigor, as shown by participation in
games or in other ways. A candidate must be a British subject,
with at least five years' domicile in Canada, and unmarried.
He must have passed his nineteenth but not his twenty-fifth
birthday on October 1st of the year for which he is elected. He
must be at least in his Sophomore Year in some recognized
degree-granting university or college of Canada, and (if elected)
complete the work of that year before coming into residence at
Oxford. He may compete either in the province in which he has
acquired any considerable part of his educational qualification,
or in the province in which he has his ordinary private domicile,
home, or residence. T  ^1
Candidates for the 1929 scholarship must have their applications, with all the required material, in the hands of the
Secretary of the Selection Committee not later than October
20th, 1928.
The Khaki University and Young Men's Christian Association
Memorial Fund Scholarships
The suta of $12,000, given to the University by the administrators of the Khaki University of Canada, provides a fund
which has so far been used to assist returned soldiers in actual
need of money to complete their courses. Out of the income
from this fund, ten scholarships of $75 each are now to be
offered each year for a period of five years, beginning with the
spring of 1927. They are to be awarded, on the results of
examinations in the First, Second, and Third Years in all
faculties, to such returned soldiers or dependents of soldiers as
have the requisite academic standing; failing such, to the student
body at large. All returned soldiers and all children of soldiers
of the Great War who have any expectation of attaining scholarship standing in these years should apply to the Registrar on a
special form not later than the last day of the final examinations.
The Captain Leroy Memorial Scholarship
(See Page 48) 52 The University of British Columbia
University Scholarships
Two scholarships of $150 each may be awarded to returned
soldiers taking the work of the First Year, the award to be
based on the work of the year.
2. IN ARTS AND SCIENCE
University Scholarships
Two scholarships in Arts and Science of $150 each will be
awarded to students proceeding to the Fourth Year, the award
to be based on the work of the Third Year.
Two scholarships in Arts and Science of $150 each will be
awarded to students proceeding to the Third Year, the award
to be based on the work of the Second Year.
The Shaw Memorial Scholarship*
This scholarship of $137.50, founded by friends of the late
James Curtis Shaw, Principal of Vancouver College, and afterwards of McGill University College, Vancouver, will be paid
throughout his undergraduate course to any child of the late
Principal Shaw who is in regular attendance at the University
as a fully matriculated student; when there is no such candidate,
it will be awarded upon the results of the examination of the
Second Year in Arts and Science to the undergraduate student
standing highest in any two of the following three subjects,
English, Latin, Greek, and proceeding to the work of the Third
Year.
The McGill Graduates' Scholarship*
A scholarship of $137.50, founded by the McGill Graduates'
Society of British Columbia, will be awarded to the undergraduate student standing highest in English and French of
the Second Year in Arts and Science and proceeding to the
work of the Third Year.
The Terminal City Club Memorial Scholarship
This scholarship of $110, founded by the members of the
Terminal City Club as a memorial to those members of the
♦Originally donated to the Royal Institution, this has been transferred by that
body, with the consent of the donors, to the University of British Columbia. Medals, Scholarships and Prizes 53
Club who lost their lives in the Great War, will be awarded
to the undergraduate student standing highest in English and
Economics of the Second Year in Arts and Science and proceeding to the work of the Third Year.
The Scott Memorial Scholarship
This scholarship of $110—the proceeds of an endowment
of $2,000—founded by the Imperial Order of the Daughters of
the Empire of the City of Vancouver, in memory of Captain
Robert Falcon Scott, the Antarctic explorer, who sacrificed his
life in the cause of Science, will be awarded for general proficiency in biological subjects to the student who has completed
his Second Year in Arts and Science, and who is proceeding
in the Third Year to Honour work either in Biology or in a
course including Biology. \
Royal Institution Scholarship
A scholarship of $150 will be awarded to the student taking
first place in the examinations of the first year in Arts and
Science.
University Scholarships
Two scholarships of $150 each will be awarded on the examinations of the first year in Arts and Science, one to the student
taking second place and the other to the student taking third
place in general proficiency.
The P. E. O. Sisterhood Scholarship
A scholarship of $75, given by Vancouver Chapters of the
P. E. O. Sisterhood, will be awarded to the woman student
standing highest in English in the First Year of the Faculty
of Arts and Science.
The Vancouver Women's Canadian Club Scholarship
A scholarship of $110 is offered by the Club to be awarded
to the student obtaining first place in the subject, Canadian
History. 54 The University of British Columbia
3. IN APPLIED SCIENCE
University Scholarship
A scholarship of $150.00 will be awarded, for general proficiency in previous work in this University, to a student proceeding to the Third Year of the Course in Nursing and Health
and having successfully completed the hospital probationary
period. Applications shall be made to the Registrar not later
than September 1st.
The Vancouver Women's Canadian Club Scholarship
A scholarship of $100 is offered by the Club to be awarded
to the student who attains the highest standing in the first four
years' training, academic and practical, of the Nursing and
Health course.
The Dunsmuir Scholarship*
A scholarship of $165, founded by the Hon. James Dunsmuir, will be awarded to the undergraduate student standing
highest in the Mining Engineering Course of the Third Year
in Applied Science and proceeding to the work of the Fourth
Year. ,
University Scholarship
A scholarship of $150 will be awarded to a student proceeding to the Third Year in Applied Science, the award to be
based on the work of the Second Year.
Royal Institution Scholarship
A scholarship of $150 will be awarded for general proficiency in the work of the First Year in Applied Science.
4. IN AGRICULTURE
The British Columbia Fruit Growers' Association Scholarship
This scholarship of $100, donated by the British Columbia
Fruit Growers' Association, will be awarded to a student, preferably of the Third Year, who is specializing in Horticulture.
The award will be based on proficiency not only in horticultural
subjects, but in the entire work of the year.
"Originally donated to the Royal Institution, this has been transferred by that
body, with the consent of the donors, to the University of British Columbia. Medals, Scholarships and Prizes 55
University Scholarship
A scholarship in Agriculture of $150 will be awarded to a
student proceeding to the Second Year, the award to be based
on the work of the First Year.
The David Thom Scholarship
A scholarship in Agriculture of $100.00 will be awarded to
a student proceeding to the Second Year, the award to be based
on the work of the First Year.
MATRICULATION SCHOLARSHIPS
University Scholarship
One scholarship of $150 will be awarded upon the results of
the Senior Matriculation Examination.
Royal Institution Scholarships
Seven General Proficiency scholarships will be awarded on
the result of the Junior Matriculation examinations: (a) $150
to the candidate of highest standing in the Province, and (b)
$100 to the candidate of next highest standing in each of the
following districts: (1) Victoria District, (2) Vancouver Island
(exclusive of Victoria District) and Northern Mainland, (3)
Vancouver District, (4) Fraser Delta (exclusive of Vancouver
District but including Agassiz), (5) Yale, (6) Kootenays.
These scholarships will be paid only to students in attendance at the University of British Columbia. Under certain
conditions they may be reserved for limited periods. A winner
who is completing Senior Matriculation in a high school of the
same district may have the scholarship reserved for one year,
subject to obtaining satisfactory standing in the Senior Matriculation examination. Also a winner who completes the first two
years of the Arts course in an affiliated institution may have
the scholarship reserved for two years. Sums accruing from
unpaid scholarships may be used in the form of bursaries or
loans. 56 The University of British Columbia
PRIZES
1. IN ALL FACULTIES
The University Prize
A book prize of the value of $25, open to all students of the
University, will be awarded for an essay on a special literary
subject, to be announced at the beginning of the Session by the
Department of English.
The Players' Club Prize
A prize of $50, donated by the Players' Club, is offered for
an original play suitable for the Club's Christmas performance.
The award will be made on the recommendation of the Faculty
members of the Advisory Board of the Players' Club.
2. IN ARTS AND SCIENCE
The Gerald Myles Harvey Prize
A book prize of the value of $50, given by Mr. J. Newton
Harvey in memory of his son, Gerald Myles Harvey, who died
on active service, wil be awarded to the student in Arts and
Science who submits the best essay on a subject in Economics
or Political Science which concerns British Columbia or Canada
as a whole. A list of suggested subjects for 1928-29 may be
obtained from the Department of Economics, but competitors
may write on any subject approved by the Department and by
the donor of the prize, and essays written in the course of
University work, if so approved, may be submitted for the
prize. Intending competitors must notify the Department of
Economics before the 31st of December, 1928, of their intention
to compete.
The Historical Society Prize
Through the generosity of R. L. Reid, Esq., K.C., the
Historical Society of the University has been able to offer,
annually, a prize of $25, open to all students in Arts and Science,
for the best essay on an assigned subject. Medals, Scholarships and Prizes 57
The Vancouver Women's Conservative Association Prize
This prize of $25, given by the Vancouver Women's Conservative Association, is open to students taking the Mathematics
of the First Year in the Faculty of Arts and Science. In
awarding it preference will be given to the son or daughter of
a deceased soldier, provided satisfactory standing is secured in
the subject.
The Letters Club Prize
A prize of $25, presented by R. L. Reid, Esq., K.C., honorary member of the Letters Club, is offered annually for the
best essay by an undergraduate student in Arts on an assigned
subject in Canadian literature. The award will be made on the
recommendation of the Department of English. The subjects
for the Session 1928-29 are as follows:
1. Isabella Valancy Crawford.
2. Sir Gilbert Parker.
3. Stephen Leacock.
3. IN APPLIED SCIENCE
The Convocation Prize
A prize of $50, donated by Convocation of The University
of British Columbia, will be awarded annually to the student
obtaining first place in the Fourth Year of Applied Science.
The Walter Moberly Memorial Prize
A book prize of the value of $25, donated by the Vancouver
Branch of the Engineering Institute of Canada in memory of
the late Walter Moberly, will be awarded for the best engineering thesis submitted by any Fourth Year student in the Faculty
of Applied Science.
The Professional Engineers' Prizes
Five book prizes, each of the value of $25, are offered by
the Association of Professional Engineers of British Columbia
for competition by those students in the Third Year of the 58 The University of British Columbia
Faculty of Applied Science who are registered as pupils with
the Association. The prizes are awarded for the best summer
essays in five branches of engineering.
The Provincial Board of Health Prizes
The Provincial Board of Health of the Province of British
Columbia offers the sum of $100 in prizes for competition in
the Course in Public Health Nursing.
BURSARIES
The Canadian Club of Vancouver Bursary
Through the generosity of the Canadian Club of Vancouver,
a sum of $300 will be available in 1928-29 to assist worthy male
matriculants who would not otherwise be able to enter upon the
University course. Candidates must be British subjects. They
should make application for the award as soon as possible after
the announcement of matriculation results, and not later than
September 1st.
The American Women's Club Bursary
Through the generosity of the American Women's Club of
Vancouver a sum of $110 will be available for 1928-29 to assist
a student who has satisfactorily completed the First Year in
Arts and Science, and who could not otherwise continue the
course in the Second Year. Application should be made to
the Registrar not later than September 1st.
The David Thom Scholarship
From the funds of the David Thom Estate a sum of $60.00
is available annually to a student who has satisfactorily completed the work of the First Year in Agriculture and is proceeding to the work of the Second Year.
LOANS
Funds are provided from which loans, not to exceed $100,
may be made to undergraduate students who have completed Medals, Scholarships and Prizes 59
one year's University work and who are in need of pecuniary
assistance. Loans are not granted to graduate students nor to
students taking the Teacher Training Course. Applications for
loans should be addressed to the President of the University.
General Loan Funds
The General Loan Fund is maintained by annual grants
made by the Board of Governors.
The Canadian Institute of Mining and Metallurgy
B. C. Division Fund
This is a cumulative fund of $50 per year, given by the
Institute to the University as a trust, to be used for loans to
students taking the mining course. Applicants for loans must
be recommended by the Departments of Geology, Mining and
Metallurgy.
The David Thom Scholarship
From the David Thom Estate funds a sum of $500.00 has
been set asides for loans to Third and Fourth Year students in
Agriculture.   A loan from this fund will supplement one from
the existing University loan funds.
GENERAL REGULATIONS
1. Scholarships, medals, and prizes will be awarded at the
close of the session, and, in case of Matriculation Examinations,
after the June examination.
2. If the award of a medal, scholarship, or prize is based
on an examination, no award will be made to a candidate who
obtains less than 75 per cent, of the possible marks.
3. Candidates are not permitted to hold more than one
scholarship each, although they may win more and will be given
credit in the published lists if they do. Scholarships thus won
but not held will pass to candidates next in order of merit,
provided they have made the required marks.
4. Scholarships under the jurisdiction of the University are
paid in three instalments—on the 15th of November, the 15th 60 The University of British Columbia
of January and the 15th of March. Normally this is during the
session following their award, and undergraduate winners must
continue their courses to the satisfaction of the Faculty concerned. But Faculty may permit a scholarship to be reserved a
year, provided the student shows satisfactory reasons for postponing attendance.
5. Winners of scholarships who desire to do so may resign
the monetary value, while the appearance of their names in the
University list enables them to retain the honour. Any funds
thus made available will be used for additional scholarships or
student loans.
6. Medals, scholarships, prizes, bursaries and loans are open
to winter session students only, unless otherwise stated, and
marks obtained in summer session courses are not taken into
account in awarding them.
7. The University is in possession of a great deal of information regarding postgraduate scholarships, fellowships and
assistantships in other Universities, or as given by various
research bodies. Places are available in practically all departments of University work. Students wishing to pursue postgraduate work outside this University are advised to consult
the Registrar for information.
w THE
FACULTY
OF
ARTS AND SCIENCE TIME TABLE
FACULTY OF ARTS
KEY TO BUILDINGS: A, Arts; Ag, Agriculture;
MORNINGS
10
11
Monday
Biology 2	
Biology  8	
Botany 6e	
Economics 6 	
English 1 a.. _..
Sees. 7, 8, 9, 10,
11, 12	
English 13	
French 2 	
Sees, a, b, c
French 4 c	
Geology 3 and 4...
Greek 1	
Mathematics  10...
Mathematics 17 ....
Philosophy 1 a	
Physics 1 a	
Botany 6 a	
Botany 6 d	
Chemistry 3	
Economics 1 a	
English 1, Sec. 13
English 9	
French 8 b	
French 4 b	
Geology 1	
History 5 	
Mathematics 1    ...
Sees. 8, 9, 10, 11,
12, 13	
Philosophy 1 C
Philosophy 8 1
Sec. B 	
Physics 1 b	
Physics 8	
Agricultural
Economics	
Biology  1	
Chemistry 7	
Economics 1 b	
English 14 	
French 1 	
Sees, a, b, c, d..
French 3 c	
French 4d 	
Geology 8	
German, Beg. A..
Government 3	
History 2	
History 7	
Latin 1 a. 	
Mathematics 2	
Philosophy 3	
Physics 4	
Zoology 1	
Room
AplOl
AplOl
AplOl
S300
A 103,
106,205,
203, 206
207
A 100
A 101,
104,105
A 202
Apl02
A 102
A 201
A 208
AplOO
S200
AplOl
AplOl
S417
A 103
A 204
A 100
A 104
A 105
AplOO
A 101
A 106
108, 203,
205, 206,
207
A 208
S400
S200
S210
Ag 104
AplOO
S417
S400
A 203
A 105,
108,204
207
A 208
A 104
Apl02
A 201
S200
A 100
A 101
A 103
A 106
A 102
S210
AplOl
Tuesday
Botany 2	
Botany 4 	
Economics 2	
English  I b	
Sees.  1, 2, 3, 4,
5, 6 	
French 2  	
Sees, d, e, f	
Geology 5 and 12..
Latin 2 	
Latin 5 	
Mathematics 1 	
Sec. 1 	
Mathematics 16 ....
Physics 2 a	
Zoology 2  ,
Zoology 3 	
Botany 3  	
Botany 6 c 	
Chemistry 9 	
Economics 1 c 	
Economics 4	
English 17 	
French 4 a 	
Geology 2 	
German 1 	
Government I 	
Greek 2 	
History 6 	
Mathematics 1	
Sees. 2, 3, 4, 5,
* 6. 7	
Philosophy 2
Physics 2 b ...
Botany 1 	
Botany 6 b 	
Chemistry  1 c  ....
Chemistry 4 	
Economics 1 d 	
French  1   	
Sees, e, f, g, h..
French 8 a 	
French 4 d..:	
Geology 6 	
Government 2
History 3 	
History 9 	
Latin 1 b 	
Philosophy 8,
Sec. A	
Zoology 4	
Zoology 7 	
Room
AplOl
A 108
A 100,
106, 205,
206,207,
208
A 101,
104,105
Apl02
A 108
A 102
A 203
AglOl
S200
AplOl
AplOl
AplOl
AplOl
S417
A 103
A 100
A 203
A 104
A 201
A 108
A 102
A 101
A 105,
106,205
206,207
208
A 204
S200
AplOl
Ap235
S300
S417
AplOO
A 104,
105,108,
203
A 100
A 202
Apl02
A 102
A 106
A 101
A 103
A 205
AplOl
Ap 101
Wednesday
Room
AplOl
Ap 101
Biology 3  _	
Botany 6 e 	
AplOl
S300
Economics 6 	
English 1 a 	
A 103,
Sees. 7, 8, 9, 10,
106, 203
12, 12	
205, 206
207
English 13 	
A 100
French 2  	
A 101,
Sees, a, b, c	
104,105
French 4 c	
A 202
Geology 3 and 4	
Apl02
Greek   1    _
A 102
Mathematics 10 .	
A 201
Mathematics 17 	
A 208
Philosophy 1 a 	
AplOO
Physics 1 a 	
S200
Botany 6 d 	
AplOl
S417
Chemistry 3 	
A 103
English 1, Sec. 13.
A 204
English 9 	
A 100
French 3 b 	
A 104
French 4 b  	
A 105
Geology 1 	
AplOO
History 5	
A 101
Mathematics 1	
A 106
Sees. 8, 9, 10, 11,
108,203,
12, 13	
205,206,
207
Philosophy 1 C	
A 208
Philosophy 8,
Sec. B	
S400
Physics 1 b 	
S200
Physics 3   	
S210
Agricultural
Economics   	
Ag 104
Biology 1  	
AplOO
Chemistry 7 ..._	
S417
Economics 1 b 	
S400
English 14 	
A 203
French 1 	
A 105,
Sees, a, b, c, d...
108,204,
207
A 208
French 4 d 	
A 104
Apl02
A 201
German, Beg. A....
Government 3	
S200
History 2 	
A 100
History 7 	
A 101
Latin  1 a  	
A 103
Mathematics 2	
A 106
Philosophy 3	
A 102
Physics 4 	
S210
Zoology I 	
AplOl -1928-29
AND SCIENCE
Ap, Applied Science;  S, Science.
MORNINGS
Thubsday
Botany 2	
Economics 2	
English 1 b	
Sees. 1, 2, 3, 4,
5, 6	
French 2 .....	
Sees, d, e, f	
Geology 5 and 12..
Latin 2  	
Latin 5  >	
Mathematics 1,
Sec. 1	
Mathematics 16 	
Physics 2 a .	
Zoology 2	
Zoology 3	
A 108
A 100,
106,205
206,207,
208
A 101,
104,105
Apl02
A 103
A 102
A 203
AglOl
S200
AplOl
AplOl
Botany 3	
Botany 6 c 	
Chemistry 9 	
Economics 1 c 	
Economics 4	
English 17 	
French 4 a  	
Geology 2 	
German 1 	
Government 1 	
Greek 2 	
History 6 	
Mathematics 1	
Sees.  2, 3, 4, 5
6, 7	
Philosophy 2
Physics  2b   .
Botany 1  	
Chemistry  1 c  	
Chemistry 4 	
Economics 1 d 	
French  1   	
Sees, e, f, g, h..
French 8 a 	
French 4 d	
Geology 6 	
Government 2 	
History 3 	
History 9 	
Latin lb 	
Philosophy 8,
Sec. A	
Zoology 4 	
Zoology 7 	
Room
AplOl
AplOl
S417
A 103
A 100
A 203
A 104
A 201
A 108
A 102
A 101
A 105,
106,205,
206,207,
208
A 204
S200
AplOl
S300
S417
AplOO
A 104,
105,108,
203
A 100
A 202
Apl02
A 102
A 106
A 101
A 103
A 205
AplOl
AplOl
Botany 6f 	
Botany 7 a 	
Economics 6 	
English 1 b	
Sections 7, 8, 9,
10, 11, 12	
Friday
English 13 	
French 2 	
Sees, a, b, c .	
French 4 c	
Geology 3 and 4.
Greek 1 	
Mathematics 10 ...
Mathematics 17 ...
Philosophy 1 a .	
Physics 1 a 	
Botany 5 a 	
Chemistry 2 	
Economics 1 a 	
English 1, Sec. 13..
English 9 	
French 3 b	
French 4 b 	
Geology 7 	
History 5 	
Mathematics 1 	
Sees. 8, 9, 10, 11,
12, 13	
Philosophy 1 C
Philosophy 8,
Sec. B	
Physics 1 b 	
Agricultural
Economics   	
Economics 1 b ....
English 14 	
French   1   	
Sees, a, b, c, d..
French 3 c	
French 4 d 	
Geology 8	
German, Beg. A..
Government 3	
History 2 	
History 7 	
Latin 1 a	
Mathematics 2	
Philosophy 8	
Zoology 6 	
Zoology 5	
Room
AplOl
S300
A 103,
106, 203.
205, 206,
207
A 100
A 101,
104,105
A 202
Apl02
A 102
A 201
A 208
AplOO
S200
AplOl
S300
A 103
A 204
A 100
A104
A105
A 101
A 106
108, 203.
205, 206
207
A 208
S400
S200
Ag 104
S400
A 203
A 105,
108,204,
207
A 208
A 104
Apl02
A 201
S200
A 100
A 101
A 103
A 106
A 102
AplOl
AplOl
Botany 5 b Lab	
Chemistry 9 Lab	
Economics 2 	
English 1 a 	
Sees. 1, 2, 3, 4,
5, 6 	
French 2 	
Sees, d, e, t ...
Geology 10 	
Latin 2 	
Latin 5 	
Mathematics 1,
Sec. 1  	
Mathematics 16
Physics 2 a 	
Saturday
A 108
A 100,
106.206,
206.207,
208
A 101,
104,105
Botany 5 b Lab	
Chemistry 9 Lab-
Economics 1 c 	
Economics 4	
English 17   	
French 4 a 	
Geology 10 	
German 1  _	
Government 1 	
Greek 2 	
History 6	
Mathematics 1 	
Sees.  2, 3,  4,  5,
6, 7 	
Philosophy 2
Physics 2 b ....
Botany 5 b Lab....
Chemistry 1 c 	
Chemistry 9 Lab..
Economics 1 d .	
French 1 	
Sees, e, f, g, h...
French 3 a 	
French 4 d	
Geology 10 	
Government 2
History 8 	
History 9 	
Latin  1 b  	
Philosophy 8,
Sec. A	
Room
A 103
A 102
A 203
AglOl
S200
A 103
A 100
A 203
A 104
A 201
A 108
A102
A 101
A 105,
106,205,
206,207,
208
A 204
S200
S300
AplOO
A 104,
105,108,
203
A 100
A 202
A 102
A 106
A 101
A 103
A 205
10
11 AFTERNOONS
TIME TABLE
Monday
Room
Tuesday   •
Room
Wednesday        Room
Botany 8 Lab	
Botany 5 Lab	
Economics 5 	
English 2 b	
S300
A 208
A 100,
Ap 100,
S400
A 104,
105,108,
203
A 204
A 106
A 102
A 205
S200
Bacteriology 1 	
Botany 6 b and e
A 201
A 101
A 105,
106,203,
205,206,
207, 208
A 204
Biology 1 Lab. 3..
Botany 8 Lab.	
Chemistry 1 a 	
Economics 5 	
English 2 a  	
English 5 	
S300
Mathematics 1
Sees. 1, 2, 3, 4, 5,
6, 7 	
A 208
French 1 	
A 100
French 1 	
A 104,
Sees, i, j, k, 1	
French 4 c 	
105,108,
1
Sees, i, j, k, 1	
French 4 c	
Philosophy 6 	
Zoology 8 Lab.
203
A 204
History 4 	
History 4	
A 106
Latin 3 	
Philosophy 9 	
Sociology   	
A 102
Philosophy 9 	
Sociology   	
A 205
S200
Zoology 6 Lab	
Botany 5 Lab
Chemistry 7 Lab....
English 10	
S300
A 206
A 104
A 105,
203, 204
AplOO
A 100
A 101
S210
A 103
Bacteriology  1
Biology 1 Lab. 1....
Botany 2	
A 103,
105,106,
205, 206,
207, 208
A 100
A 208
Biology 3 Lab. 3....
Botany 3 Lab.
Botany 6 c Lab
Chemistry 1 b 	
English 10 ....
Botany 6 b and e
Lab	
S800
English 16	
French I 	
A 206
Chemistry 1 Lab. 2
English 1 b 	
English 16 .
A 104
Sees, m, n, o	
Geography 1	
French 1 	
A 105,
Sees. 7, 8, 9, loJ
11, 12, 13
English 2 c 	
Sees, m, n, o
Geography I
History 1 	
203,204
2
History 1	
History 8 	
AplOO
Physics 4 Lab.
Sociology	
A 100
A101
Mathematics 4
Physics 3 Lab,
Zoology 3 Lab	
Philosophy 1 b
Sociology 	
S210
Zoology 5 Lab.
A 103
Zoology 6 Lab.
3
Bacteriology 1
Botany 5 Lab	
Chemistry 1 Lab. 1
Chemistry 2 Lab. a
Chemistry 7 Lab	
English 12 	
A 201
Apl02
A 102
Biology 1 Lab. 1....
Botany 2 Lab.,
Botany 4 Lab.
Chemistry 1 Lab. 2
Chemistry 2 Lab. b
A 101
A 102
Geology 5	
Latin 7 	
Physics 3 Lab
Zoology 2 Lab	
Zoology 3 Lab	
Physics 4 Lab.
Zoology 5 Lab.	
4
Bacteriology   	
Botany 5 Lab	
Chemistry 1 Lab. 1
Chemistry 2 Lab. a
Chemistry 7 Lab....
Physics 4 Lab.
Biology 1 Lab. 2...
Botany 2 Lab	
Botany 4 Lab.   .....
Chemistry 1 Lab. 2
Chemistry 2 Lab. b
Physics 3 Lab.	
5
Bacteriology	
Chemistry 1 Lab. I
Chemistry 2 Lab. a
S400
Biology 1 Lab. 2...
Botany 2 Lab	
Chemistry 2 Lab. fc —Continued
AFTERNOONS
Thursday
Room
Friday
Room .
Botany 6 c and e
Lab	
English 8	
A 201
A 101
A108
106, 203,
205, 206,
207
A 204
Chemistry 1 a 	
English 2 a	
French 1 	
S300
A 208
A 100
A 104,
105,108,
203
A 204
A 106
A 102
A 205
S200
English 7 	
Geology 1 Lab.	
Sees. 8, 9, 10, 11,
12, 13	
Sees, i, j, k, 1	
French 4 c 	
History 4 	
Philosophy 6	
1
Zoology 1 Lab.	
Latin 3	
Philosophy 9  _	
Sociology   	
Zoology 7 Lab	
Botany 6 c and e
Lab	
Chemistry 8 Lab. b
Sees.  1, 2, 8, 4,
5, 6  _..	
A 100,
106,205,
206,207,
208
A208
Bacteriology 1
Biology 1 Lab. 5..
Botany 6d Lab	
Chemistry 1 b   	
Chemistry 3 Lab. a
English 10 	
S300
A 206
A 104
A 105,
203,204
AplOO
A 100
A 101
S210
>A 103
English 16  	
French 1 	
Geology 1 Lab.	
Mathematics 4 	
Sees, m, n, o	
Geology 2 Lab	
History 1 	
History 8	
2
Philosophy 1 b	
Sociology	
Biology I Lab. 4....
Chemistry 1 Lab. 8
Chemistry 2 Lab. b
Chemistry 8 Lab. b
English 15 	
A 101
A 102
Bacteriology 1 	
Biology 1 Lab. 5....
Botany 6d Lab.	
Chemistry 1 Lab. 4
Chemistry 2 Lab. a
Chemistry 3 Lab. a
English 12	
A 201
3
Latin 7	
Zoology 7 Lab.	
Geology I Lab.	
Biology I Lab. 4....
Chemistry 1 Lab. 8
Chemistry 2 Lab. b
Chemistry 8 Lab. b
Zoology 1 Lab.	
Biology 1 Lab. 6..
Chemistry 1 Lab. 4
Chemistry 2 Lab. a
Chemistry 8 Lab. a
	
4
Chemistry 1 Lab. 8
Chemistry 2 Lab. b
	
Biology 1 Lab. 6....
Chemistry 1 Lab. 4
Chemistry 2 Lab. a
5 Faculty of Arts and Science Supplemental Examinations
SEPTEMBER, 1928
OS
Date
Hour
First  Year
Second  Year
Third Year
Wednesday,
9  A.M.
2  P.M.
9  A.M.
2  P.M.
9 A.M.
2 P.M.
9 A.M.
9 A.M.
2  P.M.
9 A.M.
2  P.M.
9 A.M.
2 P.M.
History 1, 2, 3  	
History 1, 2, 3	
September 12th
Thursday,
English Literature	
September 13th
Friday,
September 14th
Chemistry 1   	
French	
H
Greek   	
Saturday,
Physics 1
Physics 1, 2, 3  	
9
September 15th
Philosophy 1	
a
*«
Monday,
September 17th
a
9
Zoology 1   	
a.
Tuesday,
English Composition   	
September 18th
Wednesday,
September 19th
►
Q
O
3
03
w
a
i—t
H
O
H FACULTY OF ARTS AND SCIENCE
The degrees offered in this Faculty are Bachelor of Arts
(B.A.) and Master of Arts (M.A.).
COURSES LEADING TO THE DEGREE OF B.A.
The degree of B.A. is granted with Honours or as a Pass
degree. A Pass degree will be granted on completion of courses
amounting to 60 units chosen. in conformity with Calendar
regulations. No distinction is made between Pass and Honour
students in the First and Second Years, except as regards prerequisites for later work, but in the Third and Fourth Years
there are special requirements for Honour students.
A double course is offered in Arts and Science and Applied
Science leading to the degrees of B.A. and B.A.Sc. (See
"Double Course.")
Credit will not be given for more than 15 units in the
First or Second Year of the Winter Session; nor for more than
18 units in the Third or Fourth Year.
Credits obtained at the Summer Session (see University
Summer Session) may be obtained with Winter Session credits
to complete the 60 units required for the degree of B.A.; but
not more than 30 units of credit may be obtained in the two
academic years subsequent to Junior Matriculation nor more
than 15 in the academic year subsequent to Senior Matriculation.
The degree of B.A. will not be granted within three years
from Senior Matriculation nor within four years from Junior
Matriculation.
The maximum credit for Summer Session work in any one
Calendar year is 6 units; and the maximum credit for work
other than that of the regular Summer and Winter Sessions is
3 units per academic year, and 15 units in all subsequent to
Senior Matriculation or First Year Arts.
No credit will be granted for work done at other universities
in the same academic year in- which work has been attempted
at this university, whether in the Summer Session or in the 68 Faculty of Arts and Science
Winter Session or otherwise. Extra-mural work done at other
universities prior to registration at this university may be
accepted, if approved by the Faculty, but may not exceed 3
units in respect of any one academic year or 15 units in all
subsequent to Senior Matriculation. If a student is granted
credit for extra-mural work taken elsewhere the number of units
which he may take at this university without attendance at a
Winter or Summer Session will be correspondingly reduced.
Candidates for the degree of B.A. are advised to attend at
least one Winter Session, preferably that of the Fourth Year.
A student seeking the degree of B.A. without attending a Winter
Session in his Fourth Year will be required to write, in addition
to the examinations in each course, one paper in each of the two
departments in which his major work has been done. This paper
will be on the whole of the student's work in the department
during his Third and Fourth Years.
Courses are described in terms of units. A unit normally
consists of one lecture hour (or one continuous laboratory period
of not less than two or more than three hours) per week
throughout the session, or two lecture hours (or equivalent
laboratory periods) throughout a single term.
Note.—Students in any of the affiliated Theological Colleges
who file with the Registrar a written statement expressing their
intention of graduating in Theology will be allowed to offer,
in each year of their Arts course, in place of optional subjects
set down in the Calendar for the Year and course in which
they are registered, Religious Knowledge options, to the extent
of three units taken from the following list: Hebrew, Biblical
Literature, New Testament Greek, Church History, Christian
Ethics and Apologetics.
FIRST AND SECOND YEARS
1. The requirements of the first two years consist of 30
units, 15 of which must be taken in each year. Courses must
be chosen in conformity with the requirements that follow.
Details of courses are given under the various departments. First and Second Years 69
Each student must take: Units
(a) English   1   in   the   First  Year   and
English 2 in the Second Year    6
*(&) The first two courses in a language
offered for Matriculation, one course
in each year    6
(c) Mathematics 1, in the First Year    3
(d) Economics 1, or History 1 or 2 or 3,
or Philosophy 1    3
(e) Biology 1, or Chemistry 1, or Geology 1, or Physics 1, or Physics 2    3
(/) Three courses!—not already chosen—
selected from the following:—
Biology 1, Botany 1, Chemistry 1,
Chemistry 2, Economics 1, Economics 2, French 1, French 2, Geography 1, Geology 1, Geology 2,
f Beginners' German, German 1,
German 2, f Beginners' Greek, Greek
1, Greek 2, History 1, History 2, History 3, Latin 1, Latin 2, Mathematics 2, Mathematics 3, Mathematics 4, Philosophy 1, Physics 1 or
Physics 2, Physics 3, Zoology 1    9
Note.—Botany 1, Zoology 1, Geology 1 and
2 and History 3 are not open to
First Year students. Economics 1,
and Philosophy 1 are open to First
Year students only if the permission
of the Heads of these departments is
obtained. History 2 is open to
First Year students  only  if  they
♦See Regulation "2."
tSee Regulations "3" and "4.' 70 Faculty op Arts and Science
are preparing for entrance to the
Normal School. Geology 1, normally
a Third Year subject, may be taken
in the Second Year and must be so
taken by students intending to take
the Honour course in Geology.
2. Students, who have not matriculated in Greek, may take
Beginners' Greek in their First Year as a matriculation subject
and follow it up with Greek 1 and Greek 2 to satisfy the language
requirements under 1 (b).
3. No student in his First Year may elect more than one
beginners' course in language, and no beginners' course in
language will count towards a degree unless followed by a second
year's work in that language. t
4. Except in the case of beginners' courses, no course in
language may be taken by a student who has not offered that
language at Matriculation. A beginners' course in language
may not be taken for credit by a student who has obtained
credit for that language at Matriculation.
5. A student taking three languages in the first two years
may defer the course selected under 1 (e) to the Third or Fourth
Year, and a student taking four science courses may defer the
course selected under 1 (d) to the Third or Fourth Year.
Note :—The following special conditions affecting admission
to Applied Science are given for the information of students
intending to enter that Faculty:
(a) Nursing and Health courses require Junior Matriculation or equivalent (as for Arts).
(b) All other courses require:
(i) Junior Matriculation or equivalent,
(ii) Also a First Year Arts Course or equivalent,
which shall include the following subjects:
Chemistry 1; Mathematics 1, (Algebra, Geometry
and Trigonometry); Physics 1, or 2; English 1;
Latin 1, or French 1, or German B. Pass Courses 71
The passing grade is 50 per cent, for Chemistry, Physics
and each of the Mathematics subjects; but in the others a pass
grade of 40 per cent, will be accepted, provided an average
of 50 per cent, has been obtained in the total.
Biology 1 may be taken as an optional extra subject, and, if
passed with a grade of at least 50 per cent., need not be taken
in Applied Science. Economics 1 taken in Arts is accepted in
lieu of Economics in Applied Science. A reading kuowledge of
French and German is desirable for students in Engineering.
No student may enter with any outstanding supplemental
in Junior Matriculation or in any of the Chemistry, Mathematics
or Physics subjects listed above; or with supplementals in other
subjects to the extent of more than three units.
Students who have failed to complete the above requirements may apply for permission to take the September Supplemental Examinations in Arts.
To ensure the conformity of their courses to Calendar regulations, all students in their Second Year are advised to submit
to the Dean of the Faculty, on or before March 31st of each year,
a scheme of the courses they propose to take during their last
two years.
THIRD AND FOURTH YEARS
The requirements of the Third and Fourth Years consists
of 30 units, of which students must take, in their Third Year,
not less than 15 units.
PASS CURRICULUM
1. A minimum of 15 units must be taken in two Major
subjects, not less than 6 units in either, and a minimum of 6
units in some other subject or subjects. Work in the First or
Second Year is required in each of the Major subjects, except in
the case of Bacteriology. Both Major subjects must be chosen
from one of the following groups:
(a) Chemistry, Bacteriology, Botany, Geology, Physics,
Zoology.
(6) Chemistry, Physics, Mathematics.
(c) Economics, Philosophy, Mathematics. 72 Faculty Of Arts and Science
(d) English,   Greek,   Latin,   French,   German,   History,
Economics, Philosophy.
2. Details of courses available in the Third and Fourth
Years are given under the various departments.
•First and Second Year courses may be taken in the Third
or Fourth Year, but only with the consent of the Department
concerned and of the Department in which the candidate is
doing his major work, and no such course (with the exception
of Third and Fourth Year subjects which are open to Second
Year students) will be counted for more than 2 units in the
Third or Fourth Year. But the Department in which such
a course is taken may supplement it by a reading course or
special course counting one unit.
No credit will be given for a language course normally
taken in the First Year unless it is taken in the Third Year and
continued in the Fourth Year. Some courses, however, are
intended for Honour students only.
3. During the Fourth Year one course of private reading,
to count not more than 3 units, may be taken with the consent
of the department concerned. A student will, for the purpose of
this rule, be deemed to be in his Fourth Year if he has completed his First and Second Years and 15 units in Third and
Fourth Year courses. Credit for a course of private reading is
part of the maximum of 15 units which may be taken in addition
to the regular work of Winter and Summer Sessions and no
other additional work may be taken in the same academic year.
HONOURS
1. Students whose proposed scheme of work involves Honour
courses must obtain the consent of the departments concerned
and of the Dean before entering on these courses; and this consent will normally be granted only to those students who have a
clear academic record at the end of their Second Year with at
least Second Class standing in the subject or subjects of special-
•This regulation applies to students in Pass courses only, and
an exception is made in the case of Greek 1 and German 1. Honour Courses 73
ization.   (Cards of application for admission to Honour courses
may be obtained at the Registrar's office.)
2. Certain departments offer Honour courses either alone
or in combination with other departments. For Honours in a
single department, at least 18 of the requisite 30 units must be
taken in the department concerned, and at least 6 outside it. For
Honours in combined courses, at least 12 units are required in
each of two subjects. Particulars of these courses are given below.
3. All candidates for Honours may, at the option of the
department or departments concerned, be required to present a
graduating essay embodying the results of some investigation
that they have made independently. Credit for the graduating
essay will be not less than 3 or more than 6 units.
4. Candidates for Honours are required, at the end of their
Fourth Year, to take a general examination, oral or written, or
both, as the department or departments concerned shall decide.
This examination is designed to test the student's knowledge of
his chosen subject or subjects as a whole'and is in addition to
the ordinary class examinations of the Third and Fourth Years.
5. Honours are of two grades—First Class and Second Class.
Students who, in the opinion of the department concerned, have
not attained a sufficiently high ranking may be awarded a pass
degree. If a combined Honour course is taken, First Class
Honours will be given only if both the departments concerned
agree; and an Honour degree will be withheld if either department refuses a sufficiently high ranking.
6. The following Honour courses are regularly offered, and
other Honour courses may be arranged with the department
or departments concerned.
HONOUR COURSES IN SINGLE DEPARTMENTS
Biology (Botany Option)
Prerequisites:—Biology   1,   Chemistry   1,   and  Botany   1.
Physics 1 and Zoology 1 are required before completion of the
course and should be taken as early as possible.   Students are
advised to take Chemistry 2 and 3. 74 Faculty of Arts and Science
Required Courses:—Botany 3, 4, 5 (a), and 6 (c).
Optional Courses:—Biology 2 and 3; courses in Botany not
specifically required; and courses in Zoology. Optional courses
should be selected in consultation with the department.
Biology (Zoology Option)
Prerequisites:—Biology 1, Zoology 1, Chemistry 1.
Physics 1 and Botany 1 are required before completion of
the course and should be taken as early as possible. Students
are advised to take Chemistry 2 and 3.
Required Courses:—Zoology 2, 3, 5, 6.
Optional Courses:—Zoology 4, 7, 8; courses in Botany,
Geology 6. These optional courses should be selected in consultation with the Head of the department.
Chemistry
Prerequisites:—Chemistry 1; Physics 1 or 2, and Mathematics 2.
Course:—Candidates are required to complete the following
courses: Chemistry 2, 3, 4, 5, 7, 9 and 10.
Classics
Course:—Any three of Greek 3, 5, 6, 7, and any three of
Latin 3, 4, 5, 6.
As proof of ability to write Greek and Latin prose, candidates must attain not less than Second Class standing in Greek
8 and Latin 8. During the candidate's Fourth Year, papers will
be set on sight translation; and the candidate is advised to
pursue a course of private reading under the supervision of the
department.
There will also be a general paper on Antiquities, Literature
and History.
Economics
Prerequisite:—A reading knowledge of French or German.
Course:—Economics 2 if not already taken, any 15 further
units in the department, and a graduating essay which will
count 3 units. (Tutorial instruction will be arranged in connection with the essay.) Honour Courses 75
Students must pass an oral examination and, if required,
address a general audience on a designated subject.
Work in this department should be supplemented by a
course in Ethics and by the foundational courses in History.
English Language and Literature
Prerequisite:—A reading knowledge of French or German.
Course:—English 19 (involving an examination on the life,
times, and complete works of some major English author), 20,
21 (a), 21 (b), 22, 24 (the seminar, which must be attended in
both years, though credit will be given only for the work of the
final year), and a graduating essay which will count 3 units.
Candidates will be required to take a final Honours examination, written or oral, or both, on the History of English
Literature. In the award of Honours special importance will
be attached to the graduating essay and to the final Honours
Examination.
If the candidate's work outside the department does not
include a course in English History, he must take an examination
in that subject.
Geology
Prerequisites:—Geology 1. If possible Geology 2 should be
taken. Chemistry 1 and Physics 1 should be taken in the First
Year. Zoology 1, to which Biology 1 is prerequisite, should be
taken in the Third Year in preparation for Geology 6.
Course:—18 units to be chosen from Geology 3, 4, 5, 6, 7,
8, 10, 12.
History
Course:—Any 18 units, of which the graduating essay will
count 3 units. The seminar (which carries no credit) must be
attended in either the Third or the Fourth Year. A reading
knowledge of French is required.
French
Course:—French 3 (a), 3 (b), 3 (c) in the Third Year.
French 4 (a), 4 (&), 4 (c) in the Fourth Year.
A graduating essay (in French) which will count 3 units. 76 Faculty of Arts and Science
Mathematics
Prerequisites:—Mathematics 2, Physics 1 or 2.
Course:—Any 18 units in Mathematics, and Physics 3 and
4.   Mathematics 3 or 4, but not both, may be taken among the
requisite 18 units.   A final Honours Examination is required.
Physics
Prerequisites:—Mathematics 2, Physics 1 or 2.
Course.«—-Mathematics 10, 16, 17. Physics 3 and 4, and 12
additional units.
COMBINED HONOUR COURSES
(a) Biology (Botany and Zoology) and Bacteriology
Prerequisites:—Chemistry 1 and 2; Biology 1; Botany 1,
or Zoology 1. #" ^
Course:—Bacteriology 1, 2 and 5; the required courses for
either the Botany option or the Zoology option of the Honour
course in Biology.
(b) Biology (Botany and Zoology) and Geology
Prerequisites:—Chemistry 1; Biology 1; Geology 1.
Course:—Geology 2, 3 and 6; the required courses for either
the Botany option or the Zoology option of the Honour course
in Biology.
(c) Chemistry and Biology (Botany and Zoology)
Prerequisites:—Chemistry   1   and   2;    Physics   1   or   2;
Biology 1.
Course:—Chemistry 3, 4, 5, 7 and 9; the required courses for
either the Botany option or the Zoology option of the Honour
course in Biology.
(d) Chemistry and Physics
Prerequisites:—Chemistry 1; Physics 1 or 2, and Mathematics 2.
Course:—Chemistry 2, 3, 4, 5 and 7, and Physics 3, 4, 7
or 9, and 8 or 10. Candidates are advised to take Mathematics 10. Honour Courses 77
(e) Chemistry and Geology
Prerequisites:—Chemistry 1; Physics T or 2, and Geology 1.
Course:—Chemistry 2, 3, 4, 5 and 7, and at least 12 units
in Geology.
(f) Chemistry and Mathematics
Prerequisites:—Chemistry  1;  Physics  1;  Mathematics  1
and 2.
Course:—Chemistry 2, 3, 4, 5, 7, and at least 12 units in
Mathematics, including Mathematics 10.
(g) Mathematics and Physics
Prerequisites:—Mathematics 1 and 2; Physics 1 or 2.
Course:—Mathematics, at least 12 units, including Mathematics 10, 16 and 17. ^stuir
Physics, at least 12 units, including Physics 3 if not already
taken, and Physics 4.
(h) Any two of:
Economics, English, French, History, Latin, Philosophy.
Economics
Prerequisite:—A reading knowledge of French or German.
Course:—Any  12  units,  including  Economics 2,  if  not
already taken.
English
Prerequisite:—A reading knowledge of French or German.
Course:—English 20 and 24, and any three of the English
courses of the first division. The seminar must be attended
during both of the final years, but credits which count for the
B.A. degree will be given only for the work of the Fourth Year.
A final Honours Examination, written or oral, or both, is
required on the History of English Literature since 1500.
French
Course:—If the graduating essay is written on a French
subject, 3  (a) and 3 (c), 4  (a) and 4 (c); otherwise either
these courses or 3 (a) and 3 (6), 4 (a) and 4 (b). 78 Faculty of Arts and Science
Courses 3 (6) and 4 (6) are intended primarily for Honour
students and should be taken whenever possible, even if they
are not required to make up th6 minimum number of units.
History
Prerequisite:—A reading knowledge of French.
Course:—History 4 or 5 and any 9 additional units, of
which the graduating essay, if written in History, will count
3 units.
The seminar (which carries no credits) must be attended
in either the Third or Fourth Year.
Latin tk
Course:—Latin 8 and any four of 3, 4, 5, 6, 7. In the
final year candidates must pass an examination (a) in sight
translation, and (b) in Latin Literature, History and Antiquities.
Private reading under the direction of the department is
recommended.
Philosophy
Course:—Any 12 units besides Philosophy 1, six units in
each year. \ty
COURSES LEADING TO THE DEGREE OF M.A.
1. Candidates for the M.A. degree must hold the B.A. degree
from this University, or its equivalent.
2. A graduate of another university applying for permission
to enter as a graduate student is required to submit with his
application an official statement of his graduation together with
a certificate of the standing gained in the several subjects of
his course. The Faeulty will determine the standing of such
a student in this University. The fee for examination of
certificates is $2.00.
3. Candidates with approved degrees and academic records
who proceed to the Master's degree shall be required:
To spend one year in resident graduate study; or Courses Leading To the Degree of M.A. 79
(i)   To do two or more years of private work under the
supervision of the University, such work to be
• equivalent to one year of graduate study; or
(ii) To do one year of private work under University
supervision and one term of resident graduate
study, the total of such work to be equivalent to
one year of resident graduate study.
4. One major and one minor shall be required.
5. Two typewritten copies of each thesis, on standard-sized
thesis paper, shall be submitted. (See special circular of
"Instructions for the Preparation of Masters' Theses.")
6. Application for admission as a graduate student shall be
made to the Registrar by October 15th.
7. The following requirements apply to all Departments:
Prerequisites:
Minor:—For a minor, at least six units of work regularly
offered in the Third and Fourth years shall be
prerequisite.
For details  or  requirements,  see  regulations  of
the several Departments.
Major:—For a major, at least eight units of work regularly
offered in the Third and Fourth years shall be
prerequisite.
For details of requirements, see regulations of the
several  Departments.
Students who have not fulfilled the requirements outlined
above during their undergraduate course may fulfil the same
by devoting more than one academic year's study to the
M.A. work.
M. A. Courses:
Minor:—Five or six units of regular Third or Fourth year
work, or equivalents in reading courses.   Examina- 80 Faculty of Arts and Science
tions to be written, or oral, or both at the discretion
of the Department concerned.
At least second class standing is required in the
subjects of the minor.    \
Major:—Nine or ten units of regular Third or Fourth year
work, or equivalents in reading courses, of which
units three to six shall be counted for the thesis.
All candidates must submit to a general examination on the major field.    This examination may
be written, or oral, or both, at the discretion of
the Department concerned.
At least second class standing is required in the
work of the major.
Languages:—No candidate will receive the degree of M.A.
who has not satisfied the Head of the Department with which he
is majoring of his ability to read technical articles either in
French or in German.
Students doing tutorial work shall not be allowed to come
up for final examination in less than two academic years after
registration as M.A. students.
The following special   requirements   are   prescribed   by
different departments:
Biology (Botany Option)
Prerequisites:
Minor:—Biology 1, and six additional units in Botany and
Zoology.
Major:—Biology 1, Botany 1, and eight additional units
including Zoology 1.
M. A. Course:
Minor:—A minimum of five units chosen in consultation
with the Department.
Major:—Thesis, at least five units, and other courses to complete required units. Courses Leading to the Degree of M.A. 81
Biology (Zoology Option)
Prerequisites:
Minor:—Biology 1, and six additional units in Botany and
Zoology.
Major:—Biology 1, Zoology 1, and eight additional units,
including Botany 1.
M.A. Course:
Minor:—A minimum of five units chosen in consultation
with the Department.
Major:—Thesis, at least five units, and other courses to
complete the required number of units.
Economics
Prerequisites:
Minor:—The B.A. degree involving credit for at least fifteen
units of work in subjects in the Department, or an
equivalent. #"■ "^^^
Major:—The B.A. degree with Honours in Economics; or in
Economics in combination with some other subject;
or an equivalent.
M.A. Course:       \       \^^
All candidates for the Master's degree in this Department
must attend the Honour Seminar.
English
Prerequisites:
Minor:—At least nine units of credit for English courses
elective in the Third and Fourth years of the
undergraduate  curriculum.
Major:—At least fifteen units of credit for courses elective
in the Third and Fourth years.
M.A. Course:
Minor:—Six units of credit in advanced courses in English
not already taken. 82 Faculty of Arts and Science
Major:—(a) Twelve units of credit in advanced courses
not already taken, one of which courses must
be English 21a, or its equivalent, if this has
not been previously offered for credit.
(b) A graduating essay which will count as an
advanced course involving three units of credit.
(c) Oral examinations on the history of English
Literature.
(d) A reading knowledge of either French or
German. A student who offers both languages
will be allowed three units of credit towards the
M.A. degree.
French
Detailed Study:
(a) O.F.—Aucassin and Nicolette.
(b) XVIth Century—Montaigne, Essais (Hatier). Chefs-
d'oeuvre poetiques du XVIe siecle (Hatier).
Less Detailed:
(c) XVIIth Century and after—The evolution of the French
Novel, particularly the novels treated in Le Breton's
Roman au XVIIe sidcle—Roman au XVIIIe siecle, and
the chief Romantic Novels.
(d) XVIIIth Century—Beaumarchais, Barbier de Seville.
Rousseau, La Nouvelle Heloise—Emile. Diderot, Le
Neveu de Rameau.   Voltaire, Les Lettres philosophiques.
(e) XlXth Century—Auzas, La poesie au 19e siecle.
(Oxford). Alfred de Musset, Theatre. (Oxford).
Rostand, Cyrano de Bergerac.    (Fasquelle).
(f) A general knowledge of French literary history from
XVIth Century to end of XlXth. This not to be
detailed, but to treat of main movements.
(g) A thesis in French on a subject to be approved by the
Head of the Department. Courses Leading to the Degree of M.A. 83
Note :—It is' expected that the candidate will have read
and will be able to discuss three plays of Moliere, three of
Corneille, three of Racine, and something of Boileau, Bossuet,
Chateaubriand, La Fontaine, Lamartine, Victor Hugo, Balzac,
Flaubert, Anatole France.
Some help will be given by lectures, explanations of texts,
and advice in reading, but the Department cannot undertake to
cover the whole or any considerable part of the syllabus.
History
Prerequisites:
Minor:—Two courses (six units) to be chosen from History
4 to 9 inclusive.
Major:—Three courses (nine units)   to  be   chosen  from
History 4 to 9 inclusive. 4
M.A. Course:
Minor:—Two courses (6 units) to be chosen from History
4 to 9 inclusive; or the equivalent in reading
courses. All candidates for a minor in History
must attend the Honour Seminar.
Major:—Two courses (six units) to be chosen from History
4 to 9 inclusive. A thesis embodying original
work to which 3 units of credit is given. All candidates for a major in History must attend the
Honour Seminar. Examinations shall be written
and oral. Candidates for a major will be examined
orally on their thesis and their major field. An
average of 75 per cent, is required to qualify in
the work of a major.
Mathematics
Prerequisites:
Minor:—Mathematics 10 and at least two other Honour
Courses.
Major:—Candidates   must   have   completed   the   Honour
Course in Mathematics, or its equivalent. 84 Faculty of Arts and Science
MA.. Course:
Minor:—Mathematics 16 and an additional three units to
be chosen from the Honour Courses.
Major:—Any four of the graduate courses and a thesis.
EXAMINATIONS AND ADVANCEMENT
1. Examinations in all subjects, obligatory for all students,
are held in December and in April. Applications for special
consideration on account of illness or domestic affliction must be
submitted to the Dean not later than two days after the close
of the examination period. In cases where illness is the plea
for absence from examinations, a medical certificate must be
presented on the appropriate form which may be obtained from
the Dean's Office.
2. The passing mark will be 50 per cent, in each subject,
except in the case of the First and Second Years when the work
of either year is taken as a whole in one session, in which case an
aggregate of 50 per cent, will be required and not less than 40
per cent, in each subject. In Beginners' Greek and Beginners'
German, however, the passing mark is 50 per cent. In any course
which involves both laboratory work and written examinations,
students may be debarred from examinations if they fail to
present satisfactory results in laboratory work, and they will be
required to pass in both parts of the course.
3. Successful candidates will be graded as follows: First
Class, an average of 80 per cent, or over; Second Class, 65 to 80
per cent.; Passed, 50 to 65 per cent.
4. If a student's general standing in the final examinations
of airy year is sufficiently high, the Faculty may grant him
supplemental examinations in the subject or subjects in which
he has failed, but a student obtaining less than 30 per cent, in
a subject will not be granted a supplemental examination in that
subject, except by special permission of the Faculty. Notice will
be sent to all students to whom such examinations have been
granted. Examinations and Advancement 85
5. Supplemental Examinations will be held in September
in respect of Winter Session examinations, and in June or
July in respect of Summer Session examinations. They will not
be granted at any other time except by special permission of the
Faculty, and on payment of a fee of $7.50 per paper. To pass
a supplemental examination a candidate must obtain at least
50 per cent. A candidate with a supplemental examination
outstanding in any subject which is on the Summer Session
curriculum may clear his record by attending the Summer
Session course in the subject and passing the required examinations.
6. If a student fails in two Supplemental Examinations
(whether on the regular date or by way of special examination)
in respect of the same Summer Session course, no further Supplemental Examination will be granted to that student in respect
of that course.
7. Applications for supplemental examinations, accompanied
by the necessary fees (See schedule of Fees) must be in the
hands of the Registrar at least two weeks before the date set
for the examinations.
8. No student may enter a higher year with supplemental
examinations still outstanding in respect of more than 3 units of
the preceding year, nor with any supplemental examination outstanding in respect of the work of an earlier year or of Matriculation unless special permission to do so is granted by Faculty.
Such permission will be granted only when Faculty is satisfied
that the failure to remove the outstanding supplemental examinations had an adequate cause.
9.' A student may not continue in a later year any subject
in which he has a supplemental examination outstanding from
an earlier year, except in the case of compulsory subjects in the
Second Year.
10. A student who is not allowed to proceed to a higher year
may not register as a partial student in respect of the subjects
of that higher year.   But a student who is required to repeat 86 Faculty of Arts and Science
his year will be exempt from attending lectures and passing
examinations in subjects in which he has already made at least
50 per cent. In this case he may take, in addition to the subjects of the year which he is repeating, certain subjects of the
following year.
11. A student who fails twice in the work of the same year
may, upon the recommendation of the Faculty, be required by
the Senate to withdraw from the University.
12. Any student whose academic record, as determined by
the tests and examinations of the first term of the First or
Second Year, is found to be unsatisfactory, may, upon the
recommendation of the Faculty, be required by the Senate to
discontinue attendance at the University for the remainder of
the session. Such a student will not be readmitted to the
University as long as any supplemental examinations are outstanding.
13. Term essays and examination papers will be refused a
passing mark if they are noticeably deficient in English, and,
in this event, students will be required to pass a special examination in English to be set by the Department of English.
DEPARTMENTS IN ARTS AND SCIENCE
Department of Bacteriology
Professor:    Hibbert Winslow Hill.
Instructor:  Freda L. Wilson.
Assistant:  Helen M. Mathews.
1. General Bacteriology:—A course consisting of lectures,
demonstrations, and laboratory work.
The history of bacteriology, the place of bacteria in nature,
the classification of bacterial forms, methods of culture and
isolation, and various bactericidal substances and conditions will
be studied. The relationship of bacteria to agriculture, household science, and public health will be carefully considered.
Text-book:—Buchanan, Agricultural and Industrial Bacteriology, Appleton. Bacteriology 87
Students proceeding to Bacteriology 2 need procure Jordan
only (see Bacteriology 2).
Prerequisites:—Chemistry 1, and Biology 1.
Seven hours a week.   First Term. 2 units.
2. Special Bacteriology:—A course consisting of lectures,
demonstrations, and laboratory work.
The more common pathogenic bacteria will be studied, together with the reaction of the animal body against invasion by
these bacteria. The course will include studies in immunity
and the various diagnostic methods in use in public health
laboratories.
Text-book:—Jordan, General Bacteriology, Latest Edition,
Saunders.
Prerequisite:—Bacteriology 1.
Seven hours a week.   Second Term. 2 units.
3. As in Dairying 3 (under Faculty of Agriculture.)
1}£ units.
4. As in Dairying 5 (under Faculty of Agriculture.)
IV2 units.
5. Advanced Bacteriology:—A reading and laboratory
course, including immunology. Tutorial instruction of one hour
per week; laboratory and demonstration hours to be arranged
with the class.
Text-books:—Kolmer, Infection and Immunity. Jordan,
General Bacteriology, Latest Editions, Saunders.
Prerequisites:—Bacteriology 1 and 2. 3 units.
6. Soil Bacteriology:—A laboratory and lecture course, in
which the bacteria of soils are studied qualitatively and quantitatively, with special reference to soil fertility.
Text-book:—Lohnis and Fred,  Text-book of Agricultural
Bacteriology, Latest Edition, McGraw-Hill.
Prerequisite:—Bacteriology 1.
Five hours a week.   First term. 2 units.
7. As in Dairying 7 (under Faculty of Agriculture).
3 units. 88 Faculty of Arts and Science
Department of Botany
Professor:  A. H. Hutchinson.
Associate Professor: Prank Dickson.
Assistant Professor:   John Davidson.
Assistant: Jean Davidson.
Assistant: R. W. Pillsbury.
Assistant: Dorothy Newton.
Biology
1. Introductory Biology.—The course is introductory to
more advanced work in Botany or Zoology; also to courses
closely related to Biological Science, such as Agriculture, Forestry, Medicine.
The fundamental principles of Biology; the interrelationships of plants and animals; life processes; the cell and division
of labour; life-histories; relation to environment.
The course is prerequisite to all courses in Botany and
Zoology.
Text-book: — Smallwood, Text-book of Biology, Lea &
Febiger, 1920.
Two lectures and two hours laboratory per week.     3 units.
2. Principles of Genetics:—The fundamentals of Genetics
illustrated by the race histories of certain plants and animals;
the physical basis of heredity; variations; mutations; acquired
characters; Mendel's law with suggested applications.
Text-book:—Castle, Genetics and Eugenics, Harvard Press.
Prerequisite:—Biology 1.
Two lectures per week.   First Term. 1 unit.
3. General Physiology:—A study of animal and plant life
processes. Open to students of Third and Fourth Years having
prerequisite Biology, Chemistry and Physics; the Department
should be consulted.
Text-book:—Bayliss, Principles of General' Physiology,
Longmans, Green.
Two   lectures   and   three   hours   laboratory per   week.
Reference reading.   Second Term. 3 units. Botany 89
Botany
1. General Botany:—A course including a general survey of
the several fields of Botany and introductory to more specialized
courses in Botany.
This course is prerequisite to all other courses in Botany,
except the Evening Course. Partial credit for this course
(2 units) may be obtained through the Evening Course.
Text-book:—Coulter, Barnes & Cowles, Text-book of Botany,
Vol. I, University of Chicago Press.
Prerequisite:—Biology 1.
Two lectures and two hours laboratory per week.     3 units.
2. Morphology:—A comparative study of plant structures.
The relationship of plant groups. Comparative life-histories.
Emphasis is placed upon the increasing complexity of plant
structures, from the lower to the higher forms, involving a
progressive differentiation accompanied by an interdependence
of parts.
Text-book:—Coulter, Barnes & Cowles, Text-book of Botany,
Vol. I, University of Chicago Press.
Prerequisite:—Botany 1.
Two lectures and four hours laboratory per week. First
Term. 2 units.
3. Plant Physiology.
Text-book:—V. I. Palladin, Plant Physiology, English
Edition (Translation of 6th Russian Edition), 1918, Blakiston.
Prerequisite:—Botany 1.
Two lectures and four hours laboratory work per week.
First Term. 2 units.
4. Histology:—A study of the structure and development
of plants; methods of killing, fixing, embedding, sectioning,
staining, mounting, drawing, reconstructing. Use of microscope,
camera lueida; photo-micrographic apparatus.
Text-books:—Eames and McDaniels, Introduction to Plant
Anatomy, McGraw-Hill. Chamberlain, Methods in Plant Histology, University of Chicago Press. 90 Faculty of Arts and Science
Prerequisite:—Botany 1.
Seven hours per week.   Second Term. 2 units
5. Systematic Botany.
5 (a) Economic Flora:—An introduction to the classification of plants through a study of selected families of economic
plants of British Columbia; useful for food, fodder, medicine
and industrial arts; harmful to crops and stock. Weeds, and
poisonous plants.   Methods of control.
Prerequisite:—Botany 1.
Texts:—Jepson, Economic Plants of California, University
of California; Thomson and Sifton, Poisonous Plants and Weed
Seeds, University of Toronto Press.
Two lectures and two hours laboratory per week. First
Term. l1/^ units.
5 (b) Dendrology:—A study of the forest trees of Canada,
the common shrubs of British Columbia, the important trees of
the United States which are not native to Canada. Emphasis
on the species of economic importance. Identification, distribution, relative importance, construction of keys.
Prerequisite:—Botany 1.
Text-books:—Morton & Lewis, Native Trees of Canada,
Dominion Forestry Branch, Ottawa; Sudworth, Forest Trees of
the Pacific Slope, Superintendent of Documents, Washington,
D.C. Davidson and Abercrombie, Conifers, Junipers and Yew,
T. F. Unwin.
One lecture and one period of two or three hours' laboratory
or field work per week. 2 units.
5 (c) Descriptive Taxonomy:—An advanced course dealing
with the collection, preparation and classification of "flowering
plants." Methods of field, herbarium and laboratory work.
Plant description, the use of floras, preparation of keys, identification of species.    Systems of classification.    Nomenclature.
Prerequisites:—Botany 1 and 5 (a). Botany 91
Texts:—Hitchcock, Descriptive Systematic Botany, Wiley
& Sons, N. Y.; Henry, Flora of Southern British Columbia, Gage
& Co., Toronto.
One lecture and four hours laboratory per week. Second
Term. lx/2 units.
6 (a) General Plant Pathology:—Identification and life
histories of pathogens causing disease of some common economic
plants; means of combating them.
Text-book:—Heald, Manual of Plant Diseases, McGraw-
Hill.
Prerequisite:—Botany 1.
One lecture and two hours laboratory per week. Second
Term. 1 unit.
6 (b) Forest Pathology:—Nature, identification and control of the more important tree-destroying fungi and other plant
parasites of forests. I
Text-book:—Rankin, Manual of Tree Diseases, Macmillan.
One lecture and two hours laboratory per week during one-
half of the Second Term. y2 unit.
6 (c) Plant Pathology (Elementary):—A course similar to
6 (a), but including more details concerning the diseases studied.
Text-book:—Heald, Manual of Plant Diseases, McGraw-
Hill.
Prerequisite:—Botany 1.
Two lectures and four hours laboratory per week. Second
Term. 2 units.
6 (d) Plant Pathology (Advanced):—A course designed for
Honour or Graduate students. Technique; isolation and culture
work; inoculations; details concerning the various stages in the
progress of plant diseases; a detailed study of control measures.
Prerequisite:—Botany 6 (a) or 6 (c).
One lecture and four hours laboratory per week.      3 units.
6 (e) Mycology:—A course designed to give the student a
general knowledge of the fungi from a taxonomic point of view.
Text-books:—Stevens, Plant Disease Fungi, Macmillan.
Prerequisite:—Botany 1. 92 Faculty of Arts and Science
Two lectures and four hours laboratory per week. Credit
will be given for a collection of fungi made during the summer
preceding the course.   First Term. 2 units.
6 (/) History of Plant Pathology:—A lecture course dealing with the history of the science of Plant Pathology from
ancient times to the present.
Text-book:—Whetzel, An Outline of the History of Phytopathology, Saunders.
Prerequisite:—Botany 6 (a) or 6 (c).
One lecture per week.   Second Term. V2 UQit-
7. Plant Ecology.
7 (a) Forest Ecology and Geography:—The inter-relations
of forest trees and their environment; the biological characteristics of important forest trees; forest associations; types and
regions; physiography.
Text-book:—M. E. Hardy, The Geography of Plants, Oxford
University Press.
Prerequisite:—Botany 1.
One lecture and one period of field and practical work per
week.   First Term. 1 unit.
Evening and Short Courses in Botany
A Course in General Botany, comprising approximately
fifty lectures, is open to all interested in the study of plant life
of the Province. No entrance examination and no previous
knowledge of the subject is required.
The course is designed to assist teachers, gardeners, foresters,
and other lovers of outdoor life in the Province. As far as
possible, illustrative material will be selected from the flora of
British Columbia.
The classes meet every Tuesday evening during the University session (Sept.-May) from 7.30 to 9.30 p.m. Field or
laboratory work, under direction, is regarded as a regular part
of the course.
No examination is required except in the case of University
students desiring credit for this course.   This course may be Chemistry 93
substituted for the lecture part of Botany 1. Other students
desiring to ascertain their standing in the class may apply for a
written test.
A detailed statement of requirements, and work covered in
this course, is issued as a separate circular. Copies may be had
on request.
Department of Chemistry
Professor: R. H. Clark.
Professor of Analytical Chemistry: E. H. Archibald.
Associate Professor: W. F. Seyer.
Associate Professor: M. J. Marshall.
Assistant Professor: J. Allen Harris.
Instructor: John Allardyce.
Instructor: D. F. Stedman.
Assistant: A. F. Gallaugher.
Assistant: R. H. Ball.
Assistant: H. R. Lyle Streight.
Assistant: A. Ernest Morell.
Assistant: E. H. Nunn.
1. General Chemistry.—This course is arranged to give a
full exposition of the general principles involved in modern
Chemistry and comprises a systematic study of the properties of
the more important metallic and non-metallic elements and their
compounds, and the application of Chemistry in technology.
Text-book:—Byers, Inorganic Chemistry, Scribners.
Three lectures and three hours laboratory per week. 3 units.
2. Qualitative and Quantitative Analysis.
(a) Qualitative Analysis.—One lecture and six hours
laboratory per week throughout the First Term. (During the
first six weeks of the term an additional lecture may be substituted for a part of the laboratory work.)
(b) Quantitative Analysis.—This course embraces the more
important methods of gravimetric and volumetric analysis.
Text-book:—Cumming & Kay, Quantitative Analysis,
Gurney & Jackson.
Prerequisite:—Chemistry 1. 94 Faculty of Arts and Science
One lecture and six hours laboratory per week. Second
Term. 3 units.
Course (b) must be preceded by Course (a).
3. Organic Chemistry.—This introduction to the study of the
compounds of carbon will include the methods of preparation
and a description of the more important groups of compounds
in both the fatty and the aromatic series.
Chemistry 3 will only be given to those students taking
Chemistry 2, or those who have had the equivalent of Chemistry 2.
Books recommended:—Holleman-Walker, Text-book of
Organic Chemistry, Wiley; Gatterman, The Practical Methods
of Organic Chemistry, Macmillan..
Two lectures and three hours laboratory per week.    3 units.
4. Theoretical Chemistry.—An introductory course on the
development of modern Chemistry, including osmotic phenomena,
the ionization theory, the law of mass action, and the phase rule.
Text-book:—James Walker, Introduction to Physical Chemistry, Macmillan.
Prerequisite:—Chemistry 2.
Two lectures and three hours laboratory per week. Second
Term. V/2 units.
5. Advanced Qualitative and Quantitative Analysis.
(a) Qualitative Analysis.—The work of this course will
include the detection and separation of the less common metals,
particularly those that are important industrially, together with
the analysis of somewhat complex substances occurring in
nature.
One lecture and six hours laboratory per week.  First Term.
(b) Quantitative Analysis.—The determinations made will
include the more difficult estimations in the analysis of rocks,
as well as certain constituents of steel and alloys. The principles
on which analytical chemistry is based will receive a more minute
consideration than was possible in the elementary course.
Prerequisite:—Chemistry 2. Chemistry 95
One lecture and six hours laboratory per week. Second
Term. 3 units.
6. Industrial Chemistry.—Those industries, which are dependent on the facts and principles of Chemistry, will be considered in as much detail as time will permit. The lectures will
be supplemented by visits to manufacturing establishments in
the neighbourhood, and it is hoped that some lectures will be
given by specialists in their respective fields.
Prerequisites:—Chemistry 2 and 3.
Two lectures per week. 2 units.
7. Physical Chemistry.—The lectures, which are a continuation of those given in 4, include the kinetic theory of gases,
thermo-chemistry, the application of the principles of thermodynamics to chemistry, osmotic phenomena, applications of the
dissociation theory, colloidal solutions, and a study of the physical
properties of gases, liquids, and solids and of their chemical
constitutions.
Text-books: — Findlay, Physico-Chemical Measurements,
Longmans.
For reference:—Ramsay's Series of Books on Physical
Chemistry, Longmans.   Getman, Theoretical Chemistry, Wiley.
Prerequisites:—Chemistry 2, 3 and 4.
Two lectures and three hours laboratory per week.   3 units.
8. Electro-Chemistry. — Solutions are studied from the
standpoint of the osmotic and the dissociation theories. The
laws of electrolysis, electroplating, electromotive force, primary
and secondary cells are considered in some detail.
For reference:—Le Blanc, Elements of Electro-Chemistry,
Macmillan; Creighton-Fink, Theoretical Electro-Chemistry,
Vol. I, John Wiley & Sons; Allmand, Applied Electro-Chemistry,
Longmans, Green.
Prerequisite:—■Chemistry 4.
Three lectures and three hours laboratory per week. First
Term. 2 units. 96 Faculty of Arts and Science
9. Advanced Organic Chemistry.—Important organic reactions will be discussed. The Carbohydrates, Proteins, Enzyme
Action, Terpenes and Alkaloids will be studied in more or less
detail. In the laboratory some complex compounds will be prepared and quantitative determinations of carbon, hydrogen,
nitrogen, sulphur and the halogens made with the view of
identifying organic compounds.
For reference:—Cohen, Organic Chemistry, Arnold.
Prerequisites:—Chemistry 2 and 3.
Two lectures and three hours laboratory per week.   3 units.
10. History of Chemistry.—Particular attention will be paid
to the development of chemical theory.
For reference:—Von Meyer-McGowan, History of Chemistry, Macmillan.
Prerequisites:—Chemistry 2, 3, and 4.
Two hours a week.   Second Term. 1 unit.
11. Physical Organic Chemistry.—Stereochemical theories
will be discussed in greater detail than in Chemistry 9, and
chemical and physico-chemical methods employed in determining
the constitution of organic compounds will be studied. The
electronic conception of valency as applied to organic compounds
will be considered, and an outline of the work done in Electro-
Organic chemistry will be given.
The lectures may be taken without the laboratory work.
Prerequisites:—Chemistry 7 and 9.
Lectures:  2 units. Laboratory, three hours per week.
1 unit.
3 units.
12. Colloid Chemistry.—The Chemistry of colloids and the
application of colloidal chemistry to industry.
For reference:—Bogue, Colloidal Behaviour, Vol. I and II,
McGraw-Hill; Freundlich, Colloid Chemistry, Methuen; Reports
on Colloid Chemistry by British Association for Advancement
of Science.
Prerequisites:—Chemistry 3 and 4.
Two hours a week.   First Term. 1 unit. Chemistry 97
14. Organic Agricultural Chemistry.—An introduction to
the compounds of carbon, with special applications to problems
in agriculture. The laboratory work will be adapted to the needs
of the individual student.
Prerequisite:—Chemistry 2.
Two lectures and three hours laboratory per week.   3 units.
15. Dairy Chemistry.—The chemistry of the carbohydrates,
fats, and proteins will be discussed in outline, and the chemical
processes involved in enzyme action and fermentation will receive
consideration.
Text-book:—Chamberlain, Agricultural Chemistry, Macmillan.
Prerequisites:—Chemistry 2 and 3.
One lecture and three hours laboratory per week.     2 units.
17. Chemical Thermodynamics.—Derivation of fundamental
equations and application to the gas laws, theory of solutions,
chemical equilibrium, electrochemistry and capillarity. Study
of the quantum theory and the Nernst heat theorem.
Text-book:—Lewis & Randall, Principles of Thermodynamics, McGraw-Hill. Reference:—Sackur, Thermochemistry
and Thermodynamics, Macmillan.
Prerequisite:—Chemistry 7.
Two lectures per week.   Second Term. 1 unit.
18. Advanced Inorganic Chemistry.—A more detailed
treatment of the chemistry of the metals than is possible in
Chemistry 1, together with the chemistry of the Rare Elements.
Prerequisite—Chemistry 2 and 4.
One lecture per week. 3 units.
Text-book:—Lewis & Randall, Principles of Thermodynamics, McGraw-Hill. Reference:—Sackur, Thermochemistry and Thermodynamics, Macmillan.
19. Clinical Laboratory Chemistry.—This course is a general introduction to the chemical problems met with by the
technician in the modern clinical laboratory.   The underlying 98 Faculty of Arts and Science
chemical facts and principles of the various tests in common use
will be considered, with a general discussion of their physiological significances.
Prerequisites:—Chemistry 2 and 3.
Two lectures and one period of three hours laboratory work
per week. 3 units.
Department of Classics
Professor: Lemuel Robertson.
Professor of Greek: O. J. Todd.
Associate Professor: H. T. Logan.
Instructor: Geoffrey B. Riddehough.
Assistant: H. R. Trumpour.
Assistant:  Day Walker.
Assistant: Winifred E. Boyes.
Greek
Beginners' Greek.—White, First Greek Book, Chap. I-
XLVIII; Copp, Clark.
Four hours a Week. ■        ^^ 3 units.
1. Lectures.—White, First Greek Book, Chap. XLIX-
LXXX. Xenophon, Anabasis I and IV, Goodwin and White,
Ginn.
History.—Shuckburgh, History of Greece, Chap. I-V,
Unwin.
Four hours a week. Mr. Logan. 3 units.
2. Lectures.—Plato, Apology, Dyer-Seymour, Ginn; Aeschylus, Prometheus Bound, Wecklein-AUen, Ginn.
Composition—Arnold's Greek Prose Composition, Abbott,
Longmans. Selected passages will occasionally be set for Unseen
Translation.
History.—Shuckburgh, History of Greece, Chap. VI-X,
Unwin.
Four hours a week.   Mr. Todd, Mr. Logan. 3 units.
3. Lectures.—Thucydides, History, Book VII, Marchant,
Macmillan; Sophocles, Antigone, Jebb and Shuckburgh, Cambridge; Euripides, Heracles, Gray and Hutchinson, Cambridge. Classics 99
Literature.-—Wright, A Short History of Greek Literature,
American Book Company.
Three houra a week.   Mr. Logan, Mr. Todd. 3 units.
(Given in 1928-29 and alternate years.)
5. Lectures.—Homer, IUad (Selections), Monro, Iliad, 2
Vols., Oxford; Demosthenes, Third Olynthdac, First and Third
Philippics, Butcher, Oxford (Vol. I.).
Literature.—Wright, A Short History of Greek Literature,
American Book Company.
Three hours a week. 3 units.
(Given in 1929-30 and alternate years.)
6. Lectures.—Aristophanes, The Birds, Hall and Geldart,
Oxford; Herodotus, History, Hude, Oxford (the equivalent of
one book will be read; Lysias, Orations (Selections), Hude, Oxford. (Open only to those who have taken or are taking Greek
3 or 5.)
Three hours a week.  Mr. Todd, Mr. Robertson.       3 units.
(Given in 1928-29 and alternate years.)
7. Lectures.—Aristotle, Ars Poetica, Bywater, Oxford;
Plato, The Republic (Selections), Burnet, Oxford. (Open only
to those who have taken or are taking Greek 3 or 5.)
Three hours a week. 3 units.
(Given in 1929-30 and alternate years.)
8. Composition.—Obligatory for Honour students; to be
taken in both Third and Fourth Years.
One lecture a week (for Third Year students); individual
conferences.    Mr. Todd. 1 unit.
9. Greek History to 14 A.D.—The course will begin with a
brief survey of contributary civilizations of pre-Hellenic times
and will include a study of social and political life in the Greek
world during the period. Knowledge of Greek is not prerequisite.
Three hours a week. 3 units
(Given in 1929-30 and alternate years.) 100 Faculty of Arts and Science
10. Greek Literature in English Translation.—A survey of
Greek literary history from Homer to Lucian, with reading and
interpretation of selected works from the most important authors.
Knowledge of Greek is not prerequisite.
Members of the class will provide themselves with the
following books: Aeschylus, translated by Campbell (Oxford);
Sophocles, translated by Campbell (Oxford); Euripides, Medea
and Alcestis, translated by Murray (Allen and Unwin); Aristophanes, translated by Frere, Vol. I (Dutton).
Two hours a week. 2 units.
(Given in 1929-30 and alternate years.)
For those who wish to extend the work to 3 units additional
reading will be provided.
Latin
1. Lectures.—Cicero, De Senectute, Shuckburgh-Egbert,
Macmillan, N. Y.; Ovid, Elegiac Selections, Smith, Bell.
Composition.—Bradley, Arnold's Latin Prose Composition,
Longmans, to exercise 19.
History.—Robertson and Robertson, The Story of Greece
and Rome, Dent.
Three hours a week. 3 units.
Mr. Robertson, Mr. Todd.
A fourth hour a week will be devoted to lectures on the
Roman History prescribed. Attendance at these lectures is
voluntary and no formal credit is given.
2. Lectures.—Virgil, Aeneid, Bk. VI, Page, Macmillan;
Cicero, Pro Archia, Nail, Macmillan; Horace Odes II, Page,
Macmillan.
History.—Boak, A History of Rome to 565 A.D., Macmillan,
chapters 14 to 20.
Three hours a week. Mr. Robertson, Mr. Logan.       3 units.
A fourth hour a week will be devoted to lectures on the
Roman History prescribed. Attendance at these lectures is
voluntary and no formal credit is given. Classics 101
3. Lectures.—Terence, Phormio, Sloman,  Oxford;  VirgiL
Bucolics and Georgics, Page, Macmillan.
Literature:—Duff, Writers of Rome, Oxford.
Three hours a week.   Mr. Todd, Mr. Logan. 3 units.
(Given in 1928-29 and alternate years.)
4. Lectures.—Horace, Epistles, Wilkins, Macmillan; Cicero,
Selected Letters, Pritchard & Bernard, Oxford.
Literature:   Duff, Writers of Rome, Oxford.
Three hours a week. 3 units.
(Given in 1929-30 and alternate years.)
5. Lectures.—-Juvenal, Satires, Duff, Cambridge; Seneca,
Select Letters, Summers, Macmillan. (Open only to those who
have taken or are taking, Latin 3 or 4.)
Three hours a week.   Mr. Robertson. 3 units.
(Given in 1928-29 and alternate years.)
6. Lectures.—Tacitus, Histories I, II, Godley, Macmillan;
Garrod, Oxford Book of Latin Verse (Selections), Oxford.
(Open only to those who have taken or are taking Latin 3 or 4.)
Three hours a week.     ^ 3 units.
(Given in 1929-30 and alternate years.)
7. Lectures.—Roman History from 133 B.C. to 180 A.D.
Text-books:   A Short History of the Roman Republic, Heit-
land, Cambridge; A History of the Roman Empire, Bury,
Murray.
A knowledge of Latin is not a prerequisite for this course.
Three hours a week.   Mr. Logan, 3 units.
(Given in 1928-29 and alternate years.)
8. Composition.—Obligatory for Honour students; to b«
taken in both Third and Fourth Years.
One lecture a week (for Third Year students); individual
conferences.   Mr, Todd. 1 unit. 102 Faculty of Arts and Science
Department of Economics, Sociology and Political Science
Professor: Theodore H. Boggs.
Associate Professor: H. F. Angus.
Associate Professor: S. E. Beckett.
Assistant: Doris E. Lazenby.
Economics
1. Principles of Economics.—An introductory study of
general economic theory, including a survey of the principles of
value, prices, money and banking, international trade, tariffs,
monopoly, taxation, labour and wages, socialism, the control of
railways and trusts, etc.
Fairchild, Furniss, Buck, Elementary Economics, Macmillan; The Canada Year Book, 1927.
Economics 1 is the prerequisite for all other courses in the
department, but may be taken concurrently with Economics 2,
or Government 1. This rule may be waived in the case of
students of the Department of Nursing who may find it impossible to take both Economics 1 and Sociology 1.
Three hours a week. 3 units.
2. History of Economic Life and Economic Thought.—A
brief outline of Economic Thought, and of Economic and Social
conditions in England previous to 1776. A survey of the more
important phases of European Organization from the time of the
Middle Ages, with special reference to the Industrial Revolution,
the Progress of Agriculture, and resultant social conditions. The
development of modern Economic Thought, with a study of the
influence of Smith, Malthus, Ricardo, Mill and others, and
the place of the Deductive and Historical Methods.
Toynbee, The Industrial Revolution, Longmans. Marshall
and Lyon, Our Economic Organization, Macmillan; and assigned
readings.
Three hours a week.   Mr. Beckett. 3 unita
3. Labour Problems and Social Reform.—A study of the rise
of the factory system and capitalistic production, and of the
more important phases of trade unionism in England, Canada, Economics 103
and the United States. A critical analysis of various solutions
of the labour problem attempted and proposed; profit-sharing,
co-operation, arbitration and conciliation, scientific management,
labour legislation and socialism.
Furniss, Labor Problems, Houghton Mifflin. Carpenter,
Guild Socialism, Appleton. Simkhovitch, Marxism versus Socialism, Williams & Norgate; and assigned readings.
Three hours a week.   Mr. Boggs. 3 units.
(Given in 1929-30 and alternate years.)
4. Money and Banking.—The origin and development of
money. Banking principles and operations, laws of coinage,
credit, price movements, foreign exchange. Banking policy in
the leading countries, with particular reference to Canada.
Holdsworth, Money and Banking, Appleton. Foster and
Catchings, Money, Houghton Mifflin. Dunbar, Theory and History of Banking, Putnam, 1917. Phillips, Readings in Money
and Banking, Macmillan; and assigned readings.
Three hours a week.   Mr. Boggs. 3 units.
5. Government Finance.—An outline course dealing with
the principles and methods of taxation, and administration of
public funds. Topics examined include: growth of taxation
methods; theories of justice in taxation; classification, increase,
economic effects, and control of expenditures; property, business, personal, commodity, and inheritance taxes, with reference
to Canada, Britain and other countries; the single tax; double
taxation; shifting, incidence and economic effects of taxation;
flotation, administration, conversion and redemption of government loans.
Lutz, Public Finance, Appleton, 1924; and assigned
readings.
Three hours a week.   Mr. Beckett. 3 units.
(Given in 1928-29 and alternate years.) 104 Faculty of Arts and Science
6. International Trade and Tariff Policy.—A survey of the
theory of international trade and the foreign exchanges; the
balance of trade, foreign investments and other fundamental
factors; the problem of Reparations and of War Debts; the protective tariff and commercial imperialism; the commercial policy
of the leading countries, with considerable attention to Canada.
Griffin, Principles of Foreign Trade, Macmillan. Fraser,
Foreign Trade and World Politics, A. A. Knopf. Taussig,
Selected Readings in International Trade and Tariff Problems,
Ginn; and assigned readings.
Three hours a week.   Mr. Boggs. 3 units.
(Given in 1928-29 and alternate years.)
7. Corporation Economics.—Historical development of tht
different forms of industrial organization, including the partnership, joint-stock company, and the corporation, and the later
developments, such as the pool, trust, combination, and holding
company. Methods of promotion and financing, over-capitalization, stock market activities, the public policy toward corporations, etc.
Readings to be assigned.
Three hours a week.   Mr. Angus. 3 units.
(Given in 1929-30 and alternate years.)
8. Provincial and Local Finance. — A brief summary of
fundamental principles of taxation. Sources of revenue, and
tax systems of federal, and provincial and municipal governments, especially of British Columbia. War Finance and its
influences on local finance. Chief problems of provincial and
municipal finance and administration. Separation of sources of
provincial and municipal revenues. Methods of municipal supervision and control.  Government debts.
Assigned readings.
Three hours a week.   Mr. Beckett. 3 units.
(Given in 1929-30 and alternate years.) Economics 105
Agricultural Economics
1. Agricultural Economics.—The principles of Economics
as applied to Agriculture; historical background, the agricultural problem; and some special topics, such as the agricultural
Burplus, production in relation to population growth, the farm
income, and the share of Agriculture in the national income.
Taylor, Agricultural Economics, Macmillan.
References  and  assigned   readings   from   Gray,   Carver,
Nourse, and others.
Three lectures per week.   Mr. Clement. 3 units.
2. Marketing.—The principles of Marketing as applied to
the individual farjm and to Agriculture as a whole. The general
principles of Marketing, the marketing of agricultural products
as compared to wholesale and retail distribution of manufactured goods, the contributions of national Farmer Movements,
co-operative marketing as illustrated by the marketing of wheat,
fruit and milk in Canada.
Brown, Marketing, Harper and Brothers; Mackintosh,
Agricultural Co-operation in Western Canada, Ryerson Press,
Toronto; references and assigned readings from Macklin, Hib-
bard, Boyle, Benton, and others.
Three lectures per week.   Mr. Clement. 3 units.
Government
1. Constitutional Government.—This course deals with the
nature, origin, and aims of the State; and with the organization
of government in the British Empire, the United States of
America, France, and Germany.
Readings to be assigned.
Three hours a week.   Mr. Angus. 3 units.
2. Introduction to the Study of Law.—(a) A rapid survey
of Legal History,    (b) Outlines of Jurisprudence.
Readings to be assigned.
Three hours a week.   Mr. Angus. 3 units. 106 Faculty of Arts and Science
3. Imperial Problems.—A course on problems of government within the British Empire, to be given in alternate years
with Economics 7.
Readings to be assigned.
Government 1 is a prerequisite of this course, but may be
taken concurrently with it.
Three hours a week.   Mr. Angus. 3 units.
(Given in 1928-29 and alternate years.)
Sociology
1. Principles of Sociology.—An introductory study of early
man and his relation to his environment; of races of men and
their distribution; of the early forms and development of
industrial organization, marriage and the family, arts and
sciences, religious systems, government, classes, rights, etc. A
review also of certain of the social problems of modern society
growing out of destitution, crime, overcrowding, etc. A critical
survey of schemes for betterment.
Blackmar & Gillin, Outlines of Sociology, Macmillan. Beach,
An Introduction to Sociology and Social Problems, Houghton-
Mifflin Company.
Three hours a week.   Mr. Beckett. 3 units.
2. Social Origins and Development.—The different views
relating to the origin and evolution of human society; the
geographic factor and economic methods in their bearing upon
social life; primitive mental attitudes; the development of
ethical, etc., ideas among primitive peoples; primitive institu-
tons, tools, art, and their modern forms; the growth of cardinal
social ideas through the ancient and classical period to the
present time.
(Not given in 1928-29.) Education 107
Department of Education
Professor: G. M. Weir.
Associate Professor: Jennie Benson Wyman.
Special Lecturer: H. T. J. Coleman.
Lecturers in High School Methods: the following Heads of Departments: R. H. Clark, H. Ashton, D. Buchanan, T. C. Hebb, L.
Robertson, W. N. Sage (Acting Head), G. G. Sedgewick, also
W- K. Beech and C. H. Scott of the Vancouver School staff.
Lecturers in Elementary School Methods: A. Anstey, A. R. Lord,
F. W. Dyke, C. H. Scott, R. Straight, Miss E. J. Trembath.
Lecturer in Junior High School Organization and Administration:
H. B. King.
Courses in Education
Teacher Training Course
1. Registration
Documentary evidence of graduation in Arts or Science
from a recognized university must be submitted to the University
Registrar by all candidates other than graduates of The University of British Columbia.   All correspondence in connection
with the Teacher Training course should be addressed to the
University Registrar,  from whom registration cards may be
procured.
2. Certificates and Standing
At the close of the University session, successful candidates
in the Teacher Training Course will be recommended to the
Provincial Department of Education for the Academic Certificate, and to the Faculty of Arts and Science for the University
Diploma in Education. Successful candidates will be graded as
follows: First Class, an average of 80 per cent, or over; Second
Class, 65 to 80 per cent.; Passed, 50 to 65 per cent.
All students registered in the Teacher Training Course at the
University are entitled to the privileges accorded to students in
the various Faculties, and are also subject to the regulations of
the University regarding discipline and attendance at lectures.
First or Second Class standing in History and Principles
of Education and in Educational Psychology of the Teacher 108 Faculty of Arts and Science
Training Course is accepted as equivalent to a Minor for an M.A.
degree, subject in each case to the consent of the Head of the
Department in which the student wishes to take his Major.
3. Preparatory Courses in Arts and Science
After 1928 candidates will not be admitted to courses in
High School Methods unless they shall have obtained at least
six (6) units of credit in the corresponding courses normally
offered in the third and fourth years. After 1930 the above
prerequisite will be nine (9) units. Special cases will be considered on their merits by the Head of the Department concerned
and the Professor of Education.
4.   Courses Offered
A. Throughout the University Session.
(1) Educational Psychology:
Text: Gates, Psychology for Students of Education,
Macmillan.
References: Pillsbury, Education as a Psychologist Sees
It, Macmillan; Thomson, Instinct, Intelligence and Character, Longman; Burnham, The Normal Mind, Appleton.
Prerequisite: Philosophy 1, or its equivalent—obligatory from 1929.
(2) School Administration and Law:
Texts: Sears, Classroom Organization and Control
(Revised Edition), Houghton Mifflin. Manual of School
Law, British Columbia.
References: Cubberley, Public School Administration,
Houghton, Mifflin; Cubberley, The Principal and His
School, Houghton, Mifflin; Perry, The Management of a
City School, Macmillan (Revised Edition); Davis, Junior
High School Education, World Book Company; Johnson,
Administration and Supervision of the High School, Ginn &
Co.; Report of the School Survey Commission, British Columbia; Fifth Year book of the Department of Superintendence; Assigned readings. Education 109
(3) History and Principles of Education:
(a) Educational leaders and movements with special
reference to the period since 1800.
(b) Educational systems:—Canada with special reference to British Columbia; England; France; Germany; the United States.
Texts: Cubberley, A Brief History of Education,
Houghton Mifflin. Chapman and Counts, Principles of
Education, Houghton Mifflin.
References: Williams and Rice, Principles of Secondary Education, Ginn & Co.; Birchenough^ History of
Elementary Education in England and Wales, University
Tutorial Press; Sandiford, Comparative Education, J. M.
Dent; Balfour, Educational Systems of Great Britain and
Ireland, Oxford; Farrington, Public Primary School System
of France, Columbia University; Kandel, The Reform of
Secondary Education in France, Columbia University;
Alexander, The Prussian Elementary Schools, Macmillan;
Kandel, Twenty-five Years of American Education, Mae-
millan; Cubberley, Readings in the History of Education,
Houghton Mifflin.
(4) Interpretation and Construction of Educational
Tests and Measurements.
Text: Hines, A Guide to Educational Measurements,
Houghton Mifflin.
References: Pintner, Intelligence Testing, Holt; Monroe, DeVoss and Kelly, Educational Measurements, Houghton Mifflin; Williams, Graphic Methods in Education,
Houghton Mifflin; Otis, Statistical Measurement, World
Book Co.; Ruch, Improvement of the Written Examination,
Scott Foresman & Co.; Ruch and Stoddard, Tests and
Measurements in High School Instruction, World Book Co.
The above courses are obligatory for all students. 110 Faculty of Arts and Science
B. During the Fall Term.
From the three courses listed below candidates will
select at least six hours of work a week.
(1) Psychology of the Elementary School Subjects.
Texts: Reed, Psychology of Elementary School Subjects, Ginn & Co.; Stone, Silent and Oral Reading, Houghton
Mifflin.
References: Freeman, Psychology of the Common
Branches, Houghton Mifflin; Stormzand, Progressive
Methods of Teaching, Houghton Mifflin; Charters, Teaching
the Common Branches, Houghton Mifflin.
Assigned readings from the Year Books and Educational Journals. i
(2) Methods in Elementary School Subjects:
Assigned Readings.
(3) Junior High School Organization and Administration: Assigned Readings.
C. During the Spring Term.
(1) Methods in High School Subjects:
Text:     Judd,   Psychology   of   Secondary   Education,
Ginn & Co.
References: Douglass, Modern Methods in High School
Teaching, Houghton Mifflin Co.
Assigned Readings.
Methods Courses in the following high school subjects are
offered: English, History, Latin, French, Mathematics, Physics,
Chemistry. Two courses are obligatory (for teaching and examination purposes), while one course may be attended as an
auditor. Nine hours a week.
5. Courses in Education for Third and Fourth Year
Undergraduates in Arts
Undergraduates who intend to register in the Teacher Training Course are advised to take six units in Education for credit
towards the BA. degree. Education ill
1. Introduction to the Study of Education.—This course
is intended to serve as an introduction to the formal study of
education. The following topics, among others, will be discussed:
Significant phases of educational development in Eastern
Canada and British Columbia; Section 93, B. N. A. Act—legal
and social implications; present-day educational problems;
recent educational developments, such as scientific school supervision, use of tests and measurements, problems of curriculum
reconstruction, principles of educational finance; a general study
of the philosophy of the educational process—the knowledge-as-
power conception, the disciplinary conception, etc., the learning
process, the teaching process, etc.; problems in educational sociology—social relations of the school, problems of rural education, rural-school types and problems of reorganization, adult
vocational and extension education; educational and vocational
guidance; comparative survey of outstanding educational
developments in Europe and America in the last half century.
An attempt will be made to familiarize the student with current
tendencies in educational theory and practice and critically to
examine the sociological, economic, and philosophic background
of these tendencies.        ' ►     I
Text: Cubberley, Introduction to the Study of Education,
Houghton Mifflin. i
References: Judd, Introduction to the Scientific Study of
Education, Ginn & Co.; Smith, Principles of Educational Sociology, Houghton Mifflin. Readings from the Yearbooks, School
Surveys and Educational Journals. 3 units.
2. Elementary Educational Psychology.—An introductory
survey of the field of psychology as applied to education. A
study of the literature on the learning process, formal discipline,
transfer of training, work and fatigue and of individual differences in relation to heredity and environment.
Texts and references to be assigned. 3 units.
The following conditions apply to courses in Education:
(a) Not more than six units in Education may be taken
for credit towards the B.A. degree. 112 Faculty of Arts and Science
(b) An undergraduate with special qualifications may
(on the recommendation of the Faculty) be allowed
to substitute an advanced course in Education (of
similar content) for one Of the courses mentioned
above.
(c) Until the work of the first and second years has
been completed, courses in Education are not open
(for credit) to undergraduates.
6. Observation Assignments and Practice Teaching
1. Fall Term:   At least forty (40) hours in the elementary
schools of the Province.   Obligatory for all students.
2. Spring Term:    At least sixty  (60)  hours in the high
schools of the Province.   Obligatory for all students.
Department of English
Professor: G. G. Sedgewick.
Associate Professor: W. L. MacDonald.
Associate Professor: F. G. C. Wood.
Associate Professor: Thorleif Larsen.
Associate Professor: F. C. Walker.
Assistant Professor: M. L. Bollert.
Assistant Professor: Frank H. Wilcox.
Assistant Professor: Philip A. Child.
Special Lecturer: Charles G. D. Roberts
Assistant: Dorothy Blakey.
Assistant: M. Dorothy Mawdsley.
Assistant: Edmund Morrison.
First Year
1. (a) Literature. — Elementary study of a number of
literary forms to be chosen from the short story, the play, the
novel, the essay, the simpler sorts of poetry.
Texts for 1928-29: Hastings, Clough and Mason, Short
Stories, Houghton Mifflin. Euripides, Bacchae, in Gilbert
Murray's paraphrase. Shakespeare, Julius Caesar. Sheridan,
The School for Scandal, Everyman. Ibsen, The Doll's House,
Everyman.   The Golden Book of Modem English Poetry, Dent.
Two hours a week. English 113
(b) Composition. — Elementary forms and principles of
composition.
Two hours a week. 3 units.
The work in composition consists of (i) themes and class
exercises, and (ii) of written examinations. Students will be
required to make a passing mark in each of these two parts of
the work.
Second Year
2. (a) Literature. — Studies in the history of English
Literature.
Lectures and texts illustrative of the chief authors and
movements from Tottel's Miscellany to Shelley. Neilson and
Thorndike, A History of English Literature, Macmillan.
Two hours a week.
(b) Composition.—Narrative and descriptive themes; the
writing of reports.
One hour a week. 3 units.
(c) Literature.—Readings from Nineteenth Century poetry
since 1830.
For this course, which is intended for prospective Honour
students in English and for others especially interested in the
study of Literature, no formal credit is given.
One hour a week.
Third and Fourth Years
The curriculum in English for students of the Third and
Fourth Years is arranged in three divisions. The first includes a
central body of general courses which will be offered, as far as
possible, every year, and to each of which are assigned 3 units
of credit. In the second division are listed courses carrying 2
units of credit and usually given in alternate years. And the
third consists of courses designed especially for Honour and
Graduate students, and open to others only by special permission. 114 • Faculty of Arts and Science
Division I
9. Shakespeare.—This course may be taken for credit in two
successive years. In 1928-29, 9 (b) will be given as follows:
i. A detailed study of the text of A Midsummer-
Night's Dream, Henry V, Othello, Antony and
Cleopatra.
ii. Lectures on Shakespeare's development, on his use
of sources, and on his relation to the stage and the
dramatic practice of his time.
Students will provide themselves with annotated editions of
the four plays named above, and with The Facts about Shakespeare, by Neilson and Thorndike, Macmillan. They are advised
to get the Cambridge Shakespeare, ed. Neilson, or the Oxford
Shakespeare, ed. Craig.
Three hours a week.   Mr. Sedgewick. 3 units.
9 (a). (Given in 1929-30 and alternate years.)
10. The Drama to 1642.—The course begins with a study of
the Theban plays of Sophocles and of Aristotle's Theory of
Tragedy. The main subject of the course, however, is Elizabethan Drama: (1) its beginnings in the Miracle and Morality
Plays and in the Interludes; (2) its development in Shakespeare's predecessors—Lyly, Peele, Greene, Kyd, and Marlowe;
(3) its culmination in Shakespeare; (4) and its decline in
Jonson, Beaumont and Fletcher, Middleton, Webster, Massinger,
Shirley, and Ford.
Texts:—Lewis Campbell, Sophocles in English Verse,
World's Classics, Oxford. Everyman and Other Interludes,
Dent. Chief Elizabetlian Dramatists, ed. Neilson. Shakespeare,
ed. Craig, Oxford, or the Cambridge Shakespeare, ed. Neilson.
Three hours a week.   Mr. Larsen. 3 units.
13. The English Novel from Richardson to the Present Time.
—The development of English fiction will be traced from Richardson, Fielding, Smollett, and Sterne through Goldsmith, Mrs.
Radcliffe, Jane Austen, Scott, C. Bronte, Dickens, Thackeray, English 115
and George Eliot to Trollope, Meredith, Stevenson, and a few
representative novelists now living.
A fair knowledge of the works of Jane Austen, Scott,
Dickens, Thackeray, and George Eliot is a prerequisite for those
taking this course.
Three hours a week.   Mr. Wood. 3 units.
14, Eighteenth Century Literature.—This course aims to
give a view, as comprehensive as possible, of the main currents
of English thought and literature during the period 1660-1800.
From year to year various periods will be stressed and the work
of various writers emphasized. Generally speaking, the course is
mainly concerned with the work of such men as Dryden, Pope,
Swift, Addison, Steele, Johnson, Goldsmith, Burke and BurnB.
Three hours a week.   Mr. MacDonald. 3 units.
16. Romantic Poetry, 1780 to 1830.—Studies in the beginnings and progress of Romanticism, based chiefly on the work of
Wordsworth, Coleridge, Byron, Keats, Shelley, Scott.
Texts:   The Oxford editions of the first five poets named.
For reference:    Elton, A Survey of English Literature,
1780-1830.
Three hours a week.   Mr. Walker. 3 units.
17. Victorian Poetry.—This course is concerned chiefly with
the work of Tennyson, Browning, and Arnold. A few weeks
at the close of the term will be devoted to a survey of the
development of later poetry down to the work of Hardy.
Texts: Browning, Complete Poetical Works, Cambridge
Edition. Arnold, Poems, Oxford Edition. Tennyson, Poems,
Globe Edition. Page, British Poets of the Nineteenth Century,
Sanborn.
For reference: Elton, A Survey of English Literature,
1830-1880.
Three hours a week.   Mr. Wilcox. 3 units.
19 (a). Private Reading.—Students who are candidates for
an Honours degree in English may elect a course of private
reading in their Junior Year. 3 units. 116 Faculty of Arts and Science
19 (b). Private Reading.—Students of the Senior Year
may pursue, with the consent and under the direction of the
Department, a course of private reading. In such courses examinations will be set, but no class instruction will be given.
3 units.
Division II
5. The Elements of Poetics.—Studies in the criticism and
appreciation of poetry; the poetic frame of mind; the emotional
element in poetry; poetic content and the nature of poetic truth;
poetic form and its varieties; metrics; contemporary developments in poetry; literary criticism, its nature and function; and
an outline of aesthetic theory from Aristotle to Croce. Exercises
in criticism and metrical composition.   |
Winchester, Principles of Literary Criticism.
Two hours a week.   Mr. Larsen. 2 units.
(Given in 1928-29 and alternate years.)
6. Narrative Writing.—A study of narrative composition:
(a) critical reading of a considerable number of modern short
stories and of two or three modern novels; (b) frequent critical
and narrative themes.
Only a limited number of students will be admitted to this
course.
Two hours a week. 2 units.
(Given in 1928-29.)
7. Technique of the Drama.—A practical study of dramatic
form and structure based on the analysis of modern plays, with
special reference to the one-act play as an art form. Playmaking,
by Wm. Archer, and Representative One-act Plays by British
and Irish Authors, Little, Brown, are the texts used in this
course.
Two hours a week.   Mr. Wood. 2 units.
(Given in 1929-30 and alternate years.)
8. English Poetry, exclusive of the Drama, from the death
of Chaucer to 1649—(1) The Renaissance; (2) the Fifteenth English 117
Century; (3) the Scottish Chaucerians; (4) John Skelton and
the poets of the Transition; (5) the Elizabethan Lyric; (6) the
Sonneteers; (7) Spenser and the Spenserians; (8) the Jacobean
Poets; (9) the Caroline Poets; (10) the Theory of Poetry
throughout the period.
Texts:—Ward, The English Poets, Vol. I. Spenser, ed
Smith and de Selincourt, Oxford.
Two hours a week.   Mr. Larsen. 2 units.
(Given in 1929-30 and alternate years.)
11. English Drama since 1600.—A survey of English drama
from the time of Ben Jonson to the present. Later Elizabethan
drama, representative plays of the Restoration, the works of
Goldsmith, Sheridan, and of early Nineteenth Century writers
will be considered. There will follow a study of some dramatists
of recent years, including Wilde, Shaw, Galsworthy, Pinero,
Jones, Stephen Phillips, Barrie, and the Irish School.
Two hours a week.   Mr. Wood. 2 units.
(Given in 1928-29 and alternate years.)
12. Narrative Poetry. — Discussion of the types,—epic,
ballad, and romance,—with readings, in suitable translations or
modern versions where desirable; modern ballads and metrical
romances represented by the work of Scott, Tennyson, Morris,
Masefield and others.
Two hours a week.   Mr. MacDonald. 2 units.
(Given in 1929-30 and alternate years.)
15. American Literature.—A survey of the principal writers
of this continent during the Nineteenth Century.
Texts: Broadus, A Book of Canadian Prose and Verse,
Oxford. Foerster, American Prose and Poetry, Houghton,
Mifflin.
Two hours a week.   Mr. Wilcox. 2 units.
(Given in 1928-29.) 118 Faculty of Arts and Science
18. Social, literary, religious and scientific movements of
the Victorian period: Carlyle, Ruskin, Macaulay, Newman, Darwin, Mill, Arnold, Butler, Stevenson.
Two hours a week.   Mr. MacDonald. 2 units.
(Given in 1928-29.)
Division III
20. Chaucer and Middle English. — (a) Middle English
grammar with the reading of representative texts, (b) The
Canterbury Tales.
Texts: A Middle English reader and the Oxford Chaucer,
ed. Skeat.
Three hours a week.   Mr. Sedgewick. 3 units.
(Given in 1928-29 and alternate years.)
21a. Anglo-Saxon—Moore & Knott, The Elements of Old
English, George Wahr. Bright, Anglo-Saxon Reader, Henry
Holt. )
Two hours a week.   Mr. Walker. 2 units.
21b. Anglo-Saxon.—Beowulf.
Two hours a week after Christmas.   Mr. Walker.      1 unit.
22. Studies in Linguistic History. — Origins, growth, and
development of the English language. A brief introduction to
Germanic philology; the Indo - European language group;
Grimm's Law; the Anglo-Saxon period; Norman, French, and
Latin influences; study of the gradual evolution of forms, sounds,
and meanings.
Two hours a week before Christmas.   Mr. Walker.    1 unit.
24. Seminar.—In this class advanced students will get practice in some of the simpler methods of criticism and investigation.
The subject for 1928-29 will probably be some problems in the
history of literary criticism.
Two hours a week.   Mr. Larsen. 2 units. Geology 119
Department of Geology and Geography
Professor: R. W. Brock.
Professor of Physical and Structural Geology: S. J. Schofield.
Professor of Palaeontology and Stratigraphy: M. Y. Williams.
Associate Professor of Mineralogy and Petrology:   T. C. Phemister.
Assistant: J. A. E. Kania.
1. General Geology.—This course serves as an introduction
to the science of Geology. The following subjects are treated in
the lectures and laboratory:
(o) Physical Geology, including weathering, the work of
the wind, ground water, streams, glaciers and the ocean, the
structure of the earth, earthquakes, volcanoes and igneous intrusions, metamorphism, mountains and plateaus, and ore-deposits.
Two lectures per week, First Term.   Mr. Schofield.
(b) Laboratory Exercises in Physical Geology, including
the study and identification of the most comlmon minerals and
rocks, the interpretation of topographical and geological maps,
and the study of structures by the use of models.
Two hours laboratory per week, First Term.  Mr. Schofield.
(c) Historical Geology, including the earth before the Cambrian, the Palaeozoic, the Mesozoic, the Cenozoic and Quarter-
nary eras.
Two lectures per week, Second Term.   Mr. Williams.
(d) Laboratory Exercises in Historical Geology, consisting
of the general study of fossils, their characteristics and associations, their evolution and migration as illustrated by their
occurrence in the strata. The principles of Palaeogeography will
be taken up and illustrated by the study of palaeogeography of
North America.
Two hours laboratory per week, Second Term. Mr. Williams.
Field Work will replace laboratory occasionally, and will
take the form of excursions to localities, in the immediate neighborhood of Vancouver, which illustrate the subject matter of the
lectures. 120 Faculty of Arts and Science
Prerequisite: Matriculation Chemistry or Physics, or Chemistry 1 or Physics 1, taken either before or concurrently.
Text-book: Pirsson and Schuchert, Introductory Geology,
Wiley.
Reference Books: Geikie, Text-book of Geology. Merrill,
Rocks, Rock-Weathering and Soils. Coleman and Parks, Elementary Geology. Shimer, Introduction to the Study of Fossils.
Davis, Geographical Essays.   Hugh Miller's works.
Students will be required to make a passing mark in each
of the above subdivisions. 3 units.
2. (a) General Mineralogy.—A brief survey of the field of
Mineralogy.
Lectures take the form of a concise treatment of (1) Crystallography, (2) Physical Mineralogy, and (3) Descriptive
Mineralogy of 40 of the most common mineral species, with
special reference to Canadian occurrences.
Laboratory Work consists of the study of the common
crystal forms and of 40 prescribed minerals, accompanied by a
brief outline of the principles and methods of Determinative
Mineralogy and Blowpipe Analysis.
Text-book: Dana, Text-book of Mineralogy, revised by Ford,
Wiley.
Prerequisite:   Chemistry 1.
Two lectures and two hours laboratory per week, First
Term.   Mr. Phemister. 1^2 units.
2. (b) Descriptive and Determinative Mineralogy. — This
course supplements 2(a) and consists of a more complete survey
of Crystallography, Physical and Chemical Mineralogy, with a
critical study of about 50 of the less common minerals, special
emphasis being laid on their crystallography, origin, association
and alteration.
Text-book: Dana, Text-book of Mineralogy, revised by Ford,
Wiley.
Prerequisite:   Geology 2(a).
Two lectures and two hours laboratory per week, Second
Term.   Mr. Phemister. IV2 units. Geology 121
3. Historical Geology.—Continental evolution and development of life with special reference to North America.
Text-book: Schuchert, Historical Geology, 2nd Ed., Wiley.
Prerequisite:   Geology 1.
Three hours per week, First Term.   Mr. Williams.
V/2 units.
4. Structural and Physiographical Geology.—The following
subjects are treated in the lectures: Fractures, faults, flowage,
structures common to both fracture and flow, mountains, major
units of structure, forces of deformation, the origin and development of land forms with special reference to the physiography
of British Columbia.
Text-book: Leith, Structural Geology, 2nd Ed., Holt.
Prerequisite:   Geology 1.
Three hours per week, Second Term.   Mr. Schofield.
IV2 units.
5. (a) History of Geology.—A brief history of the study
of the earth and the development of the geological sciences.
Mr. Brock.
(b) Geology of Canada.—The salient features of the geology
and economic minerals of Canada. Mr. Williams, Mr. Schofield,
Mr. Brock.
(c) Regional Geology.—The main geological features of the
continents and oceanic segments of the earth's crust, and their
influences upon life.   Mr. Brock.
Prerequisite:   Geology 1.
Three lectures and one hour laboratory per week.     3 units.
6. Palaeontology.—A study of invertebrate and vertebrate
fossils, their classification, identification and distribution both
geological and geographical.
Reference books:    Grabau and   Shimer,  North  American
Index Fossils.   Zittel-Eastman, Text-book of Palaeontology.
Prerequisite:   Geology 1.
Two lectures and two hours laboratory per week.
Mr. Williams. 3 units. 122 Faculty of Arts and Science
7. Petrology.—This course consists of systematic studies of
(i) optical mineralogy and (ii) petrography, with an introduction to petrogenesis.
The laboratory work deals with the determination of rocks,
first under the microscope, and then in hand specimen.
Text-books: Pirsson, Rocks and Rock Minerals, Wiley.
Johannsen, Essentials for the Microscopical Determination of
Rock-forming Minerals and Rocks, University of Chicago Press.
Dana, Text-book of Mineralogy, revised by Ford, Wiley.
Reference works: Johannsen, Manual of Petrographic
Methods. Rosenbusch, Microscopical Physiography of the Rock-
making Minerals, translated by Iddings. Rosenbusch, Elemente
der Gesteinslehre. Harker, Petrology for Students. Gruben-
mann, Die Kristallinen Schiefer.
Prerequisites:  Geology 1 and 2.
Two lectures and two laboratory periods of 2 hours per
week.   Mr. Phemister. 4 units.
8. Economic Geology.—A study of the occurrence, genesis,
and structure of the principal metallic and non-metallic mineral
deposits with type illustrations; and a description of the ore
deposits of the British Empire, special stress being placed on
those in Canada.
Text-book: Emmons, General Economic Geology, McGraw-
Hill.
Reference books: Lindgren, Mineral Deposits. Ries, Economic Geology.
Prerequisite: Geology 1. Geology 7 must precede or accompany this course.
Four hours per week. Mr. Brock, Mr. Williams, Mr. Schofield, Mr. Phemister. 4 units.
9. Mineralography.—Principally a laboratory course dealing
with the study and recognition of the opaque minerals by means
of the reflecting microscope. Geology 123
The work consists of practice in the cutting, grinding and
polishing of ore specimens, accompanied by training in micro-
chemical methods of mineral determination.
During the second term each student is assigned a suite
of ores from some mining district for a critical examination and
report.
Text-book: Davy and Farnham, Microscopic Examination of
the Ore Minerals, McGraw-Hill.
Prerequisite: Geology 7 and 8 must precede or accompany
this course.
Two hours laboratory per week.   Mr. Phemister.   1 unit.
10. Field Geology.—The methods taught are the fundamental ones used by professional geologists and by the officers
of the Geological Survey of Canada. The course is essentially
practical, and is designed to teach methods of observing, recording and correlating geological facts in the field. The students
construct geological maps of selected areas in the vicinity of
Vancouver which require the use of the various methods and
instruments employed in field geology.
Reference books: Lahee, Field Geology. Hayes, Handbook
for Field Geologists.   Spurr, Geology Applied to Mining.
Prerequisite: Geology 1. Geology 4, if not already taken,
must be taken concurrently.
Three hours per week.   Mr. Schofield. 1^ units.
12. Meteorology and Climatology.—A course covering in a
general way the whole field, with practice in using instruments,
constructing and using weather charts, and weather predicting.
Two lectures and one laboratory period of two hours per
week.   Second Term.   Mr. Schofield. IV2 units.
14. Crystallography.—This course consists of a systematic
study of the morphology of crystals, with an introduction to
mathematical crystallography.
The practical work deals with the measurement of crystals
and, in the case of students in chemistry, a certain number of
the crystals measured will be grown in the laboratory. 124 Faculty of Arts and Science
Students are advised to consult with the instructor before
registering for this course.
Text-book: Tutton, Crystallography and Practical Crystal
Measurement, Macmillan.
Two lectures and six hours laboratory work per week.
Mr. Phemister. 5 units.
Geography
1. Principles of Geography. — A general course dealing
especially with the effects of the physical features of the earth
upon life, and the ways in which various forms of life respond
to their physical environment. The following topics are studied:
earth relations; earth features; climate and climatic factors;
oceans; materials of the land and their uses; changes of the
earth's surface; coasts, plains, plateaus, mountains, inland
waters, and their relations to life; human geography.
Text-book: Salisbury, Barrows and Tower, Elements of
Geography, Holt.
Three lectures per week.   Mr. Brock and Mr. Schofield.
3 units.
10. Introduction to Geography.—A brief introduction to
the study of modern Geography, outlining the history and
content of the subject, physical geography and human geography.
One lecture a week. Mr. Brock and Mr. Schofield.    1 unit.
Department of History
Professor: 	
Associate Professor: W. N. Sage.
Assistant Professor: F. H. Soward.
Special Lecturer: Francis Painter.
Assistant: Kaye Lamb.
Assistant: Walter Lanning.
Students who intend to specialize in History are advised
to associate with it from the first some allied subject, such as
Economics. Economics 1, 2, 3, Government 1 and Sociology 1
will be found especially helpful. History 125
A reading knowledge of French and German will be found
extremely valuable in Third and Fourth Year courses, while in
certain classes of more advanced work Latin is indispensable.
Hereafter, French at least will be required for Honour work.
A list of books for reading and reference may be obtained
from the professor in charge of each course.
First and Second Years
1. Main Currents in Modern World History.—This course
is intended primarily for First Year students and covers the
period in World History between the French Revolution and
the present day. It will include a discussion of such topics as the
Balance of Power in the Eighteenth Century, the French Revolution, the Napoleonic Era, the Industrial Revolution, the
Growth of Democracy in the Nineteenth Century, the Eastern
Question, Nationality as a Factor in the Nineteenth Century, the
Expansion of Europe, the Armed Peace (1870-1914), the
Awakening of the Far East (1868-1914), the World War, the
Russian Revolution, the League of Nations, Problems of the
Pacific.
Text-book: Schapiro, Modern and Contemporary European
History, Houghton Mifflin Co. (revised edition), or Carleton
Hayes, Political and Social History of Modern Europe, Vol. II,
1815-1924.  Macmillan.
Three hours a week.   Mr. Soward. 3 units.
2. Canadian History. — This course opens with a brief
analysis of the reasons for European colonization of America
and a sketch of the colonial effort of Spain, France and Great
Britain. In the French regime, exploration, the development of
government, the conflict of church and state, and the struggle
with Great Britain for the West are studied. In the British
period, the relations of the French and English and the evolution
of Canadian self-government are given special attention.
On the colonization of America and the history of New
France, students are especially advised to consult: Ramsay
Muir, Expansion of Europe; Abbott, Expansion of Europe; the 126 Faculty of Arts and Science
works of Francis Parkman; Munro, Crusaders of New France;
Fiske, New France .and New England; Eastman, Church and
State in Early Canada; Lucas, History of Canada, Vol. I, New
France; Wrong, Conquest of New France and Rise and Fall of
New France.
On the British Period: Skelton, The Canadian Dominion,
Life and Letters of Sir Wilfrid Laurier; Trotter, Canadian History, a Syllabus; Egerton, History of Canada, Part II, 1763-
1921; Kennedy, The Constitution of Canada, Documents of the
Canadian Constitution, 1759-1915; Bracq, Evolution of French
Canada; Morison, British Supremacy and Canadian Self-government; Trotter, Federation of Canada; Wallace, Sir John Macdonald; Dafoe, Laurier.
An essay counting 10% of the year's work must be submitted early in the autumn term.
Subject, The Causes of European Expansion; Champlain
and Frontenac; a comparison and contrast.
Three hours a week. 3 units.
3. English History. — The history of England from the
Norman Conquest to the Revolution of 1688. This course is
intended primarily for Second Year students who mean to
specialize in history. It aims at interpreting the constitutional,
political, economic, and religious development of England and
Wales during the period prescribed. Attention will also be paid
to the history of Scotland and Ireland and the origin of Overseas
Britain.   The sequel to this course is History 8.
Text-book: Muir, A Short History of the British Commonwealth, Vol. I.
A preliminary essay counting 10 per cent, of the year's
work must be handed in as soon as possible after the opening of
the autumn term. Subject: The Geographic Background of
British History, or Feudalism in England, or The Rise of the
English Towns.
Three hours a week.   Mr. Sage. 3 units. History 127
Third and Fourth Years
History 4, 5 and 6 are intended especially for Third Year
students, History 7 and 8 for Fourth Year. History 4 (or 5)
must be taken by all candidates for Honours.
All Honour students (whether in History alone or in a
Combination Course) must take the History Seminar in their
Third and Fourth Years. The Seminar is intended as training in intensive work and carries no credits. If the Graduating
Essay be written in History, it will carry a value of 3 units.
4. Mediaeval History.—A sketch of Mediaeval History from
the Council of Nicaea to the Fall of Constantinople, 325-1453
A.D. The following subjects will be treated: the triumph of
Christianity; the breakdown of the Western Roman Empire;
the Barbarian Invasions; the earlier monastic movements;
Mohammed and Islam; the rise of the Papacy; the Franks and
Charlemagne; the struggle between Empire and Papacy; the
Normans in Europe; the Crusades; the Mediaeval Towns; the
later monastic movements; the rise of the universities;
Frederick II; the later Mediaeval Empire; the National Kingdoms in France, Spain, England and Scotland; the Turks and
the collapse of the Byzantine Empire.
Text-book: Thorndike, A History of Mediaeval Europe,
Houghton Mifflin.
Additional text-books for Honour students: Oman, The
Dark Ages. Tout, Empire and Papacy. Lodge, The Close of
the Middle Ages.   Bryce, The Holy Roman Empire.
A preliminary essay, counting 15 per cent, of the year's
work, must be handed in as soon as possible after the opening
of the autumn term. Subject: The Causes of the Downfall of
the Western Roman Empire, or Theodoric the Ostragath, or The
Rise of the Prankish Empire.
Three hours a week.   Mr. Sage. 3 units.
5. Renaissance and Reformation.—Mediaeval civilization in
the time of Dante; the forerunners of the Renaissance; the
Renaissance in Italy (illustrated with slides); the Protestant 128 Faculty of Arts and Science
Reformation and the Catholic Reaction; in conclusion, a short
account of the subsequent history of religious thought down to
our own times.
An introductory essay, counting 15 per cent, of the year's
work, must be handed in early in the autumn term. Subject:
Dante the Humanist, or The Rise of the Critical Spirit 1200-
1520, or The Beginning of National Literature.
Text-books: W. H. Hudson, The Story of the Renaissance.
Fisher, The Reformation.   McGiffert, Martin Luther.
Additional reading, especially for Honour students: Sichel,
The Renaissance. Taylor, Some Aspects of the Renaissance.
Symonds, A Short History of the Renaissance in Italy. Symonds,
The Renaissance in Italy. Burckhardt, The Renaissance
in Italy, Andre Michel, Histoire de I'Art (III, IV). Christopher
Hare, Life and Letters in the Italian Renaissance. Preserved
Smith, Erasmus. Emerton, Erasmus. Allen, The Age of
Erasmus.
Three hours a week. 3 units.
6. The Age of Louis XIV, the Pre-Revolution, the Revolution and Napoleon.
The break-up of the medieval system, the evolution of
modern intellectual and material conditions, and the effect of
the revolutionary spirit.
An introductory essay, counting 15 per cent, of the year's
work, must be handed in early in the autumn term. Subject:
The Foreign Policy of Louis XIV; Gallicanism in the Eighteenth
Century.
Text-books: Lowell, The Eve of the French Revolution.
Shailer Matthews, The French Revolution.   Johnston, Napoleon.
Additional reading required of Honour students: Taine,
L'ancien regime (abridged), Heath. Aulard, The French
Revolution. Lacour-Gayet, Napoleon, or Rose, Napoleon. Fisher,
Bonapartism. Tilley, Modern France. Abbott, Expansion of
Europe.
Three hours a week. 3 units. History 129
7. Europe, 1815-1919.—The political, social and economic
history of the chief countries of continental Europe, with
especial attention to international relations. Intended for Fourth
Year students.
An introductory essay, counting 15 per cent, of the year's
work, must be handed in early in the autumn term. Subject:
Geographic Factors in the European History of the 19th Century, or The Growth of Democracy, 1815-1914.
Text-book: Hazen, Europe Since 1815, Henry Holt.
Additional reading required of Honour students: Gooch,
History of Modern Europe, 1878-1919. Fueter, World History,
1815-1920. Moon, Imperialism and World Politics. Knight,
Barnes and Flugel, Economic History of Europe in Modern
Times. k^^
Reading and reference: Cambridge Modern History.
Lavisse et Rambaud, Histoire Generate. Moon, Syllabus of International Relations. Buell, International Relations. Tilley,
Modern France, Mowat, A History of European Diplomacy,
1815-1914. Rambaud, Histoire de la Civilization Francaise.
Grant Robertson, Bismarck. Thayer, Cavour. Fairgrieve,
Geography and World Power. Wright, Historical Geography of
Europe. Marvin, Century of Hope and The Unity Series. Gooch,
Germany. Makeef, Russia. Huddleston, France. Toynbee,
Turkey. Toynbee, The Balkans. Fay, The Origins of the World
War.
Three hours a week.   Mr. Soward. 3 units.
8. Great Britain Since 1688. The British Empire — This
course aims at an interpretation of the constitutional, political,
economic and religious development of the British Isles since
the Revolution of 1688. Attention will also be paid to the growth
of the British Empire during the eighteenth, nineteenth and
twentieth centuries. This course is the sequel to History 3.
Text-book: Muir, Short History of the British Commonwealth, Vol. II.
Additional reading required of Honour students: Grant
Robertson, England under the Hanoverians. Slater, The Making 130 Faculty of Arts and Science
of Modern England.   Trevelyan, British History in the Nineteenth Century.
For reading and reference: Cambridge History of British
Foreign Policy. Poole and Hunt, The Political History of
England (Vols. VIII-XII). Cambridge Modern History (Vols.
V-XII). Toynbee, The Industrial Revolution. Egerton, A Short
History of British Colonial Policy. Basil Williams, Life of
Chatham. Morley, Life of Gladstone. Moneypenny and Buckle,
Life of Disraeli. Howard Robinson, The Development of the
British Empire.  The History of Great Britain.
A preliminary essay, counting 15 per cent, of the year's
work, must be handed in early in the autumn. Subject:
William Pitt the Great Commoner, or The Irish Question in the
Eighteenth Century, or The Social Effects of the Industrial
Revolution.
Three hours a week.   Mr. Sage. 3 units.
9. History of the United States of America.—This course
begins with a sketch of the American colonies at the outbreak
of the Revolution and traces the history of the United States
from the commencement of the War of Independence to the
close of the World War.
Text-book: Pease, The United States, Harbourt Brace & Co.
Texts for additional reading required for Honour students:
Keenleyside, American-Canadian Relations. Malin, Interpretations of Recent American History, Century. Faulkner, American
Economic History, Hayers.
An essay, counting 15 per cent, of the year's work, must be
handed in early in the autumn. Subject: Hamilton and Jefferson, A Comparison and Contrast, or The Growth of Nationalism in the United States, 1776-1826.
Mr. Soward. 3 units.
Honour Seminar, 1928-29. (a) "Historical Method," Mr.
Soward.   (b) "The History of British Columbia," Mr. Sage. Mathematics 131
Department of Mathematics
Professor: Daniel Buchanan.
Professor: F. S. Nowlan.
Associate Professor: G. E. Robinson.
Associate Professor: E. E. Jordan.
Associate Professor: L. Richardson.
Assistant Professor: B. S. Hartley.
Assistant: May L. Barclay.
Assistant: C. Islay Johnston.
Assistant: A. P. Mellish.
Assistant: H. D. Smith.
Assistant: C. G. Patten.
Courses 2, 3, and 4 are open to students who have completed
Course 1.
Pass Courses
1. (a) Algebra. — An elementary course, including ratio,
proportion, variation, interest and annuities, theory of quadratic
equations, simple series, permutations, combinations, the binomial theorem, logarithms.     ^
Wilson and Warren, Intermediate Algebra, Chapters I to
XV, Oxford. I
Four hours a week.   First Term.
(b) Analytical Geometry.—Fundamental concepts, loci, the
straight line and circle. Buchanan and Nowlan, Analytical
Geometry.
Two hours a week.   Second Term.
(c) Trigonometry. — An elementary course involving the
use of logarithms.
Playne and Fawdry, Practical Trigonometry, Copp Clark.
Wentworth and Hill, Tables (Ginn).
Two hours a week.   Second Term. 3 units.
2. (a) Analytical Geometry.—A review of the straight line
and circle, and a study of the other conies.
Fawdry, Co-ordinate Geometry, Bell.
Two hours a week.   First Term.   Mr. Buchanan. 132 Faculty of Arts and Science
(b) Algebra.—The binomial theorem, induction, remainder
theorem, Horner's method of approximating roots, exponential
logarithmic and other series, undetermined coefficients, partial
fractions, convergence and divergence.
Wilson and Warren, Intermediate Algebra (Larger
Edition), Oxford.
Two hours a week.   Second Term.   Mr. Buchanan.
(c) Calculus.—An introductory course in differential and
integral calculus, with various applications.
Woods and Bailey, Elementary Calculus, Ginn.
One hour a week.   Mr. Buchanan. 3 units
3. The Mathematical Theory of Investments.—This course
deals with the theory of interest, annuities, debentures, valuation
of bonds, sinking funds, depreciation, probability and its application to life insurance.
Rietz, Crathorne and Rietz, Mathematics of Finance, Holt.
Three hours a week.   Mr. Robinson. 3 units.
(Given in 1929-30 and alternate years.)
4. Descriptive Astronomy.—The object of this course is to
acquaint the student with the various heavenly bodies and their
motions. It is intended primarily for Pass students, and only a
knowledge of elementary mathematics is essential. The subject-
matter treated includes: The shape and motions of the earth,
systems of coordinates, the constellations, planetary motion,
gravitation, tides, time, the stars and nebulae, theories of evolution of the solar system.
Moulton, Introduction to Astronomy, Macmillan.
Two hours a week.   Mr. Buchanan. 2 units.
Students desiring credit for an additional unit in connection
with this course may register for Mathematics 18.    They will
be required to write essays on prescribed subjects dealing with
various phases of Astronomy. 1 unit.
(Given in 1928-29 and alternate years.) Mathematics 133
Honour Courses
10. Calculus.—The elementary theory and applications of
the subject.
Granville, Differential and Integral Calculus, Ginn.
Three hours a week.   Mr. Nowlan. 3 units.
11. Plane and Spherical Trigonometry.—The work in plane
trigonometry will deal with the following: Identities and trigonometrical equations, the solution of triangles with various applications, circumscribed, inscribed and escribed circles, De Moivre's
theorem, expansions of sin ng, etc., hyperbolic and inverse functions. The work in spherical trigonometry will cover the solution
of triangles with various applications to astronomy and geodesy.
Loney, Plane Trigonometry, Parts I and II.
Dupuis and Matheson,  Spherical  Trigonometry and Astronomy, Uglow.
Two hours a week.   Mr. Hartley.
12. Synthetic Plane and Solid Geometry.—The course in
plane geometry is intended to cover such topics as the principle
of duality, cross ratio geometry, etc. In solid geometry the principal properties of solid figures are studied, as well as the theory
of projection in space, with various applications to the conic
sections.
Dupuis, Elementary Synthetic Geometry, Macmillan.
Wilson, Solid Geometry and Conic Sections, Macmillan.
Two hours a week.   Mr. Robinson. 2 units.
(Given in 1928-29 and alternate years.)
13. Plane and Solid Analytical Geometry.—A general study
of the conies and systems of conies, and elementary work in
three dimensions. 2 units.
(Given in 1929-30 and alternate years.)
14. Theory of Equations and Determinants. — A course
covering the main theory and use of these subjects. 134 Faculty of Arts and Science
Bumside and Panton, Theory of Equations, Vol. I, Dublin.
Weld, Theory of Determinants.
Two hours a week.   Mr. Jordan. 2 units.
(Given in 1928-29 and alternate years.)
15. Higher Algebra. — Selected topics in higher algebra,
including infinite series, continued fractions, the theory of numbers, probability.
Hall and Knight, Higher Algebra, Macmillan. Chrystal,
Text-book of Algebra, Part II.
Two hours a week.  ' 2 units.
(Given in 1929-30 and alternate years.)
16. Calculus and Differential Equations.—A continuation of
the previous course in calculus, treating partial differentiation,
expansions of functions of many variables, singular points,
reduction formulae, successive integration, elliptic integrals, and
Fourier series.
Ordinary and partial differential equations, with various
applications to geometry, mechanics, physics and chemistry.
Granville, Differential and Integral Calculus, Ginn.
Murray, Differential Equations, Longmans,
Three hours a week.   Mr. Buchanan. 3 units.
17. Applied Mathematics. — A course dealing with the
applications of mathematics to dynamics of a particle and of a
rigid body, and to the two body problem in celestial mechanics.
Loney, Theoretical Mechanics.
Three hours a week.   Mr. Richardson. 3 units.
18. History of Mathematics.—A reading course covering the
historical development of the elementary branches of mathematics from the earliest times to the present.
Ball, History of Mathematics. Cajori, History of Elementary Mathematics.   Mr. Buchanan. 1 unit.
Graduate Courses
20. Vector Analysis.—Weatherburn, Vector Analysis.
21. Theory of Functions of a Real Variable. — Goursat-
Hedrick, Mathematical Analysis, Vol. I. Modern Languages 135
22. Theory of Functions of a Complex Variable.—Townsend,
Functions of a Complex Variable.
23. Differential   Geometry.—Eisenhart,   Differential    Geometry.
24. Projective Geometry.—Veblen and Young, Projective
Geometry, Vol. I.
25. Celestial   Mechanics.—Moulton,   An   Introduction   to
Celestial Mechanics.
26. Advanced Differential Equations.—Moulton, Periodic
Orbits.
27. Theory of Numbers and Algebraic Numbers. — Reid,
Elements of the Theory of Algebraic Numbers.
28. Hyper-complex Numbers—Dickson, Algebras and Their
Arithmetics.
29. Modem Algebraic  Theories. — Dickson,  Modem Al
gebraic Theories.
Department of Modern Languages
Professor: H. Ashton.
Associate Professor: A. F. B. Clark.
Associate Professor: Isabel Maclnnes.
Associate Professor: Henri Chodat.
Assistant Professor: Janet T. Greig.
Assistant: E. E. Delavault.
Assistant: G. Barry.
Assistant: M. Portsmouth.
Assistant: W. Tipping.
Assistant: Y. Doriot.
Assistant in German: S. J. Battle.
With the consent of the Professor in charge of the course,
a student taking a Pass Degree may be admitted to any course
in the Third and Fourth Years in addition to, but not in lieu
of, 3(a) and 4(a). Students from other universities who have
already taken the work of 3(a) or 4(a), may be given special
permission by the Head of the Department to substitute other
courses. 136 Faculty of Arts and Science
French
1. (a) Moliere,  Les Precieuses Ridicules, Longmans,  Toronto.   Berthon, Grammaire Frangaise.   Clement and Macirone,
Void la France, Heath.  Kastner and Marks, French Composition, Pt. 1. 3 units.
1. (b) Prescribed texts as for 1(a).
Revision of the essentials of French grammar and syntax
applied to the correct writing of French. There will be an oral
examination based on the texts read. 3 units.
Note :—Students who choose French will be informed which
course 1(a) or 1(b) they must take. The decision will be made
after a consideration of the marks in French obtained at the
Matriculation examination. Students in 1(b) will normally take
not more than two years French, as they will not be sufficiently
prepared to profit by the Third and Fourth Year courses. If,
however, they make rapid progress in the First Year they may be
transferred to the higher course in the Second Year when they
have satisfied the examiners of their fitness for more advanced
work. Students who have not passed the Matriculation
examination in French (or its equivalent) are not allowed to
take either of the First Year courses in this subject.
1. (c) Lectures in French on Literature for students who
intend to take French throughout the four years. One hour a
week; no credit, no examination.
Summer Reading:—See the announcement after the Fourth
Year courses.
2. (a) La Fontaine, One Hundred Fables, Ginn. Moliere.
Les Femmes Savantes, Didier. France, Le Livre de Mon Ami,
Oxford.
Conversation in French on the above.    Written resumes.
Composition from Kastner and Marks, French Composition,
Pt. 1. 3 units.
There will be oral tests.
2.  (b) Texts as above. 3 units.
2. (c) Lectures in French on Literature for students who Modern Languages 137
intend to take French throughout the four years. One hour a
week; no credits, no examination.
Summer Reading: See the announcement after the Fourth
Year Courses.
3. (a) The Literature of the Age of Louis XIV.—Lectures
on the history and social conditions of the period, and on the
development of the literature. Careful reading and discussion
of the following texts: Racine, Andromaque, Didier. Moliere,
Le Misanthrope, Didier; Le Tartuffe, Heath. An Anthology of
Seventeenth  Century French Readings, Princeton University
Press.
Conversation and written resumes based on the above.
This course is obligatory for all students taking Third Year
French. 3 units.
3. (b) The Literature of the Eighteenth Century.—Lectures
on the history and social conditions of the period, with special
emphasis on the philosophe movement, and the beginnings of
romanticism. The inter-relations of French and English thought
and literature will be touched upon. Careful reading and
discussion of the following texts: Selections from Voltaire
(Havens), Century Co. Rousseau, Morceaux choisis (Mornet),
Didier. Diderot, Extraits (Fallex), Delagrave. Beaumarchais,
Le Barbier de Siville, Macmillan. 3 units.
3. (c) French Composition and translation from English
into French.   Kastner and Marks, French Composition, Pt. 2.
3 units.
Summer Reading:   See the announcement after the Fourth
YTear Courses.
4. (a) The Romantic Drama.—Musset, Quatre ComSdies,
Oxford. Hugo, Hernani, Oxford.   Rostand, Cyrano de Bergerac.
3 units.
4. (b) Literature and Society in the XVIIth Century.—
Mme de La Fayette, La Princesse de Cleves (Cambridge); La
Bruyere, Les Caracteres (Cambridge); Mme de Sevigne, Lettres
(Manchester) ; Moliere, Les Precieuses Ridicules (Longman),
Les Femmes Savantes (Hatier), L'Avare (Hatier), Le Bourgeois Gentilhomme (Hatier). 3 units. 138 Faculty of Arts and Science
4. (c) Bibliography, Composition and Oral French.—Book
required: Kastner and Marks, French Composition, Pt. 3.
3 units.
4. (d) Eighteenth   Century   Drama.—Lesage,    Turcaret,
Cambridge; Marivaux, Le jeu de I'amour et du hasard, Hatier,
Paris (Les classiques pour tous); Regnard, Le joueur, Hatier,
Paris; Sedaine, Le Philosophe sans le savoir, Hachette, London.
3 units.
Notes—Courses 3 (a) (b) (c) and 4 (a) (b) (c) (d) call for
much work out of class. They should be chosen only by students
able and willing to work alone. Students intending to take 4(a)
or 4(b) should apply to the Head of the Department before the
end of the present academic year for instructions for summer
reading. k^1
Summer Reading
Upon entering the courses for the years stated below the
student must satisfy the instructor that he has read the books
mentioned below.
Second Year:
1. Bernardin de St Pierre, Paul et Virginie.
2. Balzac, Eugenie Grandet.
3. Saintine, Picciola; or Vigny, Poesies Choisies.
Third Year:
1. Chateaubriand, Atala.
2. Le Sage, Gil Bias.
3. Vigny, Servitude et grandeur militaires.
4. Banville, Gringoire; or Musset,, Poesies Choisies.
Fourth Year:
1. Moliere, L'Avare.
2. Moliere, Le Bourgeois Gentilhomme.
3. Moliere, Les Femmes Savantes.
4. Racine, Andromaque.
5. Racine, Les Plaideurs.
6. Musset, Fantasio.
7. Musset, Un Caprice. Modern Languages 139
The above have all been chosen from the series Les Classiques
pour tous so as to lighten the cost of buying books for vacation
reading. At the present rate of exchange they can be bought at
the University Bookstore for ten or fifteen cents each. As these
books can be carried in the pocket and read at odd moments
no excuse will be accepted for failure to do summer reading.
German
A. Beginners' Course. Composition, Grammar, Conversation.—Texts: (a) Zinnecker, Deutsch fur Anf anger; Heath,
(b) Haertel, German Reader for Beginners. 3 units.
B. Beginners' Course (Scientific) Composition, Grammar,
Conversation.—Texts: (a) Zinnecker, Deutsch fur Anf anger,
Heath,    (b) Gore, German Science Reader, Heath. 3 units.
1. Completion and Revision of Zinnecker. Composition
and conversation based on texts read. Von Wildenbruch, Das
edle Blut, Scribner. Moser, Der Bibliothekar, Ginn. Bruns,
Book of German Lyrics, Heath.
Science Section with alternate reading. 3 units.
2. (a) Whitney and Stroebe, Easy German Composition,
Holt.  Composition and conversation based on texts read.
Heine, Die Harzreise, Allyn & Bacon. Lessing, Minna von
Barnhelm, Heath.   Bruns, Book of German Lyrics, Heath.
3 units.
2. (b) A general survey of German literature.
Prerequisite   for  German   3.    Lectures   in   English   and
open to students of other literatures.
3. ,The Classical Period.
Texts: Lessing, Emilia Galotti, Heath. Goethe, Faust I,
Heath.   Schiller, Die Jungfrau von Orleans, Holt.
Composition based on above texts and Whitney and Stroebe,
German Composition, Holt. 3 units.
4. (a) Nineteenth Century Drama. 3 units.
4. (b) Nineteenth Century Fiction. 3 units.
These courses, which include the reading of a number of
standard works, will be given alternately. '
5. A reading course in the short story. 3 units. 140 Faculty of Arts and Science
Department of Philosophy
Professor: H. T. J. Coleman.
Associate Professor: James Henderson.
Associate Professor of Psychology and Education:
Jennie Benson Wyman.
1. (a) Elementary Psychology.
Text-book: Warren, Elements of Human Psychology,
Houghton Mifflin Co.
References: Woodworth, Psychology, A Study of Mental
Life. Stout, A Manual of Psychology. Titchener, A Text-book
in Psychology; A Beginner's Psychology. James, Psychology
(Briefer Course).   Pillsbury, Essentials of Psychology.
Two hours a week. 2 units.
(b) Elementary Logic.
Text-book: Mellone, Introductory Text-book of Logic,
Blackwood (latest edition).
One hour a week. 1 unit.
(c) A fourth hour per week will be devoted to lectures
introductory to the main problems of Philosophy, and a special
study of Descartes' Discourse on Method and Berkeley's Treatise
Concerning the Principles of Human Knowledge. Attendance
at this hour is voluntary and no formal credit is given. Students
contemplating Honours are, however, advised to take this course.
2. Ethics.
Text-book:   Everett, Moral Values, Holt.
A special study will be made of selected portions of Aristotle's Ethics, Mill's Utilitarianism, and Kant's Metaphysic of
Morals.
Three hours a week. 3 units.
3. History of Greek Philosophy from Thales to Plato
(inclusive).
Text-books: Bakiewell, Source Book in Ancient Philosophy,
Charles Scribner's Sons, and Burnet, Greek Philosophy (Part 1), Philosophy 141
Macmillan.   In connection with this course a special study will
be made of Plato's Republic, Phaedo, and Philebus.
Three hours a week. 3 units.
(Given in 1928-29 and alternate years.)
4. The History of Philosophy from the Renaissance to the
Present time.
Text-book: Alexander, A Short History of Philosophy,
Macmillan.
Works of Reference: Rand, Modern Classical Philosophers,
and the various Histories of Philosophy.
Three hours a week. 3 units.
(Given in 1929-30 and alternate years.)
5. The Philosophy of Kant, with special study of the
Critique of Pure Reason.
Two hours a week. 2 units.
(Given in 1929-30 and alternate years.)
6. Philosophic Movements since the time of Kant. Post-
Kantian Idealism, Pragmatism, Modern Realism, Bergson and
others.
Two hours a week. 2 units.
(Given in 1928-29 and alternate years.)
7. Introduction to Education. A course of lectures and
discussions dealing with educational movements since the beginning of the 19th century, and with the theories of life and of
mind which are implicit in these movements.
Texts: Spencer, Education, Everyman Edition. Dewey,
Democracy and Education, Macmillan.
References: Butler, The Meaning of Education. Moore,
What is Educationt Adams (ed.), The New Teaching. Holmes.
What is and What might be. Articles in Cyclopedia of Education, Macmillan.
Philosophy 1 is recommended as preparatory to this course.
Three hours a week. 3 units. 142 Faculty of Arts and Science
8. Social Psychology. — A study of those particular phases
of mental life and development which are fundamental in social
organization and activity.
Texts: McDougall, Social Psychology, The Group Mind,
Methuen, London. Ginsberg, Psychology of Society, Methuen,
London. Collateral reading will be prescribed from the following : Hobhouse, Mind in Evolution, Morals in Evolution. Sutherland, Origin and Growth of the Moral Instinct. Cooley, Human
Nature and the Social Order. Wallas, Human Nature in Politics;
The Great Society. Ross, Social Psychology. Trotter, Instincts
of the Herd in Peace and War. Bernard, Introduction to Social
Psychology.
Philosophy 1 is recommended as preparatory to this course.
Three hours a week. 3 units.
9. (1) A study of the concept of intelligence. Current
theories of the nature and growth of intelligence. Its practical
bearing in modern life. Principles and applications of the
measurement of intelligence. History of the movement. The
nature and causes of mental defects and peculiarities.
References: Spearman, The Nature of Intelligence and the
Principles of Cognition, Macmillan; Woodrow, Brightness and
Dullness in Children, Lippincott; Peterson, Early Conceptions
and Tests of Intelligence, World Book Co.; Gesell, The Mental
Growth of the Pre-School Child, Macmillan; Freeman, Mental
Tests, Houghton Mifflin; Pintner, Intelligence Testing, Henry
Holt.
(2) Principles of Experimental Procedure. Method of
Measurement. Practical training in the methods of individual
and group examinations. Treatment of subnormal, normal and
gifted children.
Text: Terman, Measurement of Intelligence, Houghton
Mifflin Co.
References: Terman, Stanford Revision of Binet Simon
Scale, Warwick and York; Wells, Mental Tests in Clinical Practice, World Book Co.; Bisch, Clinical Practice, Williams and
Wilkins; Mateer, The Unstabe Child, Appleton; Hollingworth, Physics 143
Gifted Children, Macmillan; Wallin, Clinical and Abnormal
Psychology, Houghton Mifflin; Cyril Burt, The Young Delinquent, Appleton.
Students will note that Courses 3 and 4, and Courses 5 and
6 are given in alternate years. This arrangement is designed to
meet the needs of students who desire to pursue the study of
philosophy beyond the elementary stage.
Department of Physics
Professor: T. C. Hebb.
Associate Professor: A. E. Hennings.
Associate Professor: J. G. Davidson.
Assistant Professor: G. M. Shrum.
Assistant: H. W. Fowler.
1. Introduction to Physics.—A general study of the principles of mechanics, properties of matter, heat, light, sound, and
electricity, both in the lecture-room and in the laboratory. The
course has two objects: (1) To give the minimum acquaintance
with physical science requisite for a liberal education to those
whose studies will be mainly literary; (2) to be introductory to
the courses in Chemistry, Engineering, and Advanced Physics.
Students must reach the required standard in both theoretical
and practical work. Open only to students who have not matriculated in Physics.
Text-book:  Millikan, Gale and Pyle, Elements of Physics.
Three lectures and two hours laboratory per week.     3 units.
2. College Physics.—This course consists of a general course
in Physics suitable for those students who have obtained standing in Junior Matriculation Physics or its equivalent. It will
cover mechanics, properties of matter, heat, light, sound and
electricity in a fuller manner than would be possible in an introductory course.
Text-book:   Stewart, Physics, a Text-book for Colleges.
Prerequisite:   High School Physics.
Three lectures and two hours laboratory per week.    3 units. 144 Faculty of Arts and Science
3. Mechanics, Molecular Physics and Heat.—A study of the
statics and dynamics of both a particle and a rigid body, the laws
of gases and vapors, temperature, hygrometry, capillarity, expansion, and calorimetry.
Text-book: Millikan, Mechanics, Molecular Physics and
Heat.
Prerequisite:   Physics 1 or 2.
Two lectures and three hours laboratory per week.     3 units
4. Electricity, Sound, and Light. — A study of the fundamentals of magnetism, electricity, sound, and light.
Text-book: Millikan and Mills, Electricity, Sound and Light.
Prerequisite:   Physics 1 or 2.
Two lectures and three hours laboratory per week.     3 units.
5. Dynamics of a Particle and of a Rigid Body.—A rigorous
mathematical study of this subject.
Prerequisites:    Physics 3 and Mathematics 10.
Two lectures per week. 2 units.
6. Advanced Electricity and Magnetism. — In this course,
especial attention is given to the theoretical phases of Electricity
and Magnetism.
Text-book:   Starling, Electricity and Magnetism.
Prerequisites:   Physics 3 and 4 and Mathematics 10.
Two lectures per week. 2 units.
7. Kinetic Theory of Gases.—A course of lectures giving an
exposition of the classical deductions and an outline of recent
experimental advances of the subject.
Text-book: Loeb, Kinetic Theory of Gases.
Two lectures per week. 2 units.
8. Theoretical and Experimental Optics.—A course of lectures accompanied by laboratory work consisting of accurate
measurements in diffraction, dispersion, interference, and polarization. Zoology 145
Books for reference: Houstoun, Treatise on Light. Mann,
Advanced Optics. Wood, Physical Optics. Preston, Theory of
Light.   Drude, Theory of Optics, and Edser, Light for Students.
Prerequisites:   Physics 3 and 4, and Mathematics 10.
Two lectures and three hours laboratory per week.    3 units.
9. Recent Advances in Physics.—A course of lectures dealing with the electrical properties of gases, the electron theory,
and radioactivity.
Books for reference: Thomson, Conduction of Electricity
through Gases. Rutherford, Radio-active Substances and Their
Radiations. Millikan, Electron. Thomson, Positive Rays. Hughes,
Photo-electricity, and Kaye, X-Rays.
Prerequisites: Courses 3 and 4, and Differential and Integral
Calculus.
Two lectures per week. 2 units.
10. Advanced Experimental Physics. — In this course the
candidate for Honours is expected to perform one or more
classical experiments and to do some special work.
Carefully prepared reports, abstracts, and bibliographies
will constitute an essential part of the course.
Six hours laboratory per week. 3 to 6 units
11. Thermodynamics.—A course of lectures elucidating the
fundamental principles of the subject.
Text-book: Birtwhistle, The Principles of Thermodynamics.
One lecture per week. 1 unit.
Department of Zoology
Professor: C. McLean Fraser.
Assistant Professor: G. J. Spencer.
Instructor: Gertrude M. Smith.
Assistant: Mildred H. Campbell.
Note—Biology 1 is prerequisite to all courses in Zoology.
1. General Morphology.—General morphology of animals
Comparative anatomy. The relationships of animal groups.
Comparative life-histories. 146 Faculty of Arts and Science
Text-books': Parker and Haswell, Manual of Zoology, Macmillan.   (American Edition, 1916.)
This course is prerequisite to other courses in Zoology.
Two lectures and two hours laboratory per week.       3 units.
2. Comparative Anatomy of Vertebrates.—A detailed comparative study of a member of each of the classes of Vertebrates.
Two lectures and four hours laboratory per week. First
Term. 2 units.
3. Comparative Anatomy of Invertebrates. — A detailed
comparative study of a member of each of the main classes of
Invertebrates.
Two lectures and four hours laboratory per week. Second
Term. 2 units.
4. Morphology of Insects.—General Entomology.
Two lectures and four hours laboratory per week. First
Term. 2 units.
5. Histology.—Study of the structure and development of
animal tissues.   Methods in histology.
Ten hours per week.   Second Term. 3 units.
6. Embryology.—A general survey of the principles of
vertebrate embryology. Preparation and examination of em-
bryological sections.
Ten hours per week.   First Term. 3 units
7. Economic Entomology.—A study of the insect pests of
animals and plants; means of combating them.
Lecture and laboratory work, six hours per week. Second
Term. 2 units.
8. Private Reading. — A course of reading on Biological
theories. In this course examinations will be set, but no class
instruction will be given. 2 units. THE f^y
FACULTY
OF
APPLIED SCIENCE ^^   > V FACULTY OF APPLIED SCIENCE
FOREWORD
The object of the courses in Applied Science is to train
students in exact and fertile thinking, and to give them a sound
knowledge of natural laws and of the means of utilizing natural
forces and natural products for the benefit of man and the
advancement of civilization. Experience shows that such a
training is the best yet devised for a large and increasing proportion of the administrative, supervisory and technical
positions.
The object, then, is to turn out, not finished engineers or
industrial leaders—these are the product of years of development in the school of experience—, but young men with a special
capacity and training for attaining these goals, and thus for
helping to develop the industries of the province. Consequently
the undergraduate course is made broad and general rather than
narrow and highly specialized.
Furthermore, such a course is not only better suited to the
British Columbia conditions that the graduate will encounter in
his after life, but also better for later specialization, for it
furnishes a more solid foundation, a better background, a
broader outlook and a more stimulating atmosphere, all necessary
if the specialist is to achieve the maximum results of which
he is capable.
The student is offered a full undergraduate course and an
additional year of graduate study. The preliminary year
required in Arts is intended to increase the student's general
knowledge and to broaden his outlook. It is hoped that enough
interest will be aroused to encourage the student to continue
some study of the humanities as a hobby or recreation.
The first two years in Applied Science proper are spent in
a general course that includes Mathematics and all the basic
Bciences. This gives not only a broad training, but enables the
student to discover the work for which he has special liking or 150 Faculty of Applied Science
aptitude and to select more intelligently the subjects in which
to specialize during the two final years at college. During the
latter periods students acquire more detailed knowledge and get
practice in applying scientific knowledge, in solving problems,
in doing things; and there is also training in Economics, Law
and Industrial Management.
During the long period between sessions, the student is
required to engage in some industrial or professional work that
will afford practical experience not obtainable in the laboratory
or field classes, but that is a necessary supplement to academic
study.
An engineering degree in the Applied Science Course of
the University is accepted by the Association of Professional
Engineers of the Province of British Columbia in lieu of four
of the six years practical experience required by the Engineering Act of the Province for registration to practise engineering.
FACILITIES FOR WORK
For laboratory and other facilities see Pages 25-37.
ADMISSION
The general requirements for admission to the University are
given on pages 41, 42. The following are special conditions
affecting admission to Applied Science:
1. Nursing and Health courses require Junior Matriculation
or equivalent (as for Arts).
2. All other courses require:
(a) Junior Matriculation or equivalent.
(b) Also a First Year Arts course or equivalent,* which
shall include the following subjects: Chemistry 1;
Mathematics 1 (Algebra, Geometry and Trigonometry);
Physics 1, or 2; English 1; Latin 1, or French 1, or
German B.
•Students preparing for admission to Applied Science are recommended to take their First Year in Arts and Science rather than Senior
Matriculation, but if such students proceed by way of Senior Matriculation they must take Chemistry and Physics, and are required to make
50 per cent, in each of these two subjects and also in Algebra, Geometry
and Trigonometry. Courses in Applied Science 151
Th« passing grade is fifty per cent, for Chemistry, Physics
and each of the Mathematics subjects; but in the others a pass of
forty per cent, will be accepted, provided an average of fifty
per cent, has been obtained in the total.
Biology 1 may be taken as an optional extra subject, and,
if passed with a grade of at least fifty per cent., need not be
taken in Applied Science. Economics 1 taken in Arts is accepted
in lieu of Economies in Applied Science. A reading knowledge
of French and German is desirable for students in Engineering.
3. No student may enter with any outstanding supplemental
in Junior Matriculation or in any of the Chemistry, Mathematics
or Physics subjects listed above; or with supplemental in other
subjects to the extent of more than three units*.
Students who have failed to complete the above requirements
may apply for permission to take the September supplemental
examinations in Arts. p   I
DEGREES
The degrees offered students in this Faculty are:
Bachelor of Applied Science (B.A.Sc).    (See below.)
Master of Applied Science (M.A.Sc).    (See Page 178.)
COURSES LEADING TO THE DEGREE OF B.A.Sc.
The degree of Bachelor of Applied Science is granted on the
completion of the work in one of the coursest given below:
I. Chemical Engineering.
II. Chemistry.
III. Civil Engineering.
IV. Electrical Engineering.
V. Forest Engineering.
*A unit normally consists of one lecture hour, or one continuous
laboratory period of not less than two or more than three hours, per week
throughout the session; or two lecture hours or equivalent laboratory
periods throughout a single term.
tThe  curriculum  described  in  the  following  pages  may  be  changed
from time to time as deemed advisable by the Faculty. 152 Faculty of Applied Science
VI. Geological Engineering.
VII. Mechanical Engineering.
VIII. Metallurgical Engineering.
IX. Mining Engineering.
X. Nursing and Health.
A double course in Arts and Science and in Applied Science
is offered, leading to the degree of B.A., and B.A.Sc. (See
Page 178.)
Note:—A series of noon-hour talks is given during the
session by the Faculty and prominent outsiders on the subjects:
choice of a profession; occupations for which an Applied Science
course forms a suitable preparation; life and work in different
engineering professions and industries. The purpose of these
talks is to assist students to select the course best suited to their
tastes and aptitudes, and their probable life-work.
PRACTICAL WORK OUTSIDE THE UNIVERSITY
In order to master professional subjects it is very important
that the work done at the University should be supplemented
by practical experience in related work outside. Therefore
students are expected to spend their summers in employment
that will give such experience. But summer employment will
not be accepted as an excuse for failure to write off supplemental
examinations at the regular date specified in the Calendar or
for failure to enter University on the opening date, except when
the summer employment affords experience necessary for the
course the student in specializing in, as Geological Survey field
work for geological students, and the student furnishes a statement from his employer showing that circumstances made it
impossible for the student to get back to the University at the
proper time. Under these circumstances the student may, upon
the approval of the Dean, register without penalty after the
specified date of admission. Before a degree will be granted, a
candidate is required to satisfy the Department concerned that
he has done at least four months' practical work related to his Courses in Applied Science
153
chosen profession.   Third and Fourth Year Essays (see Page
154) should be based, as far as possible, upon the summer work.
Practical work such as Shop-work, Freehand Drawing,
Mechanical Drawing, Surveying, etc, done outside the University, may be accepted in lieu of laboratory or field work (but
not in lieu of lectures) in these subjects, on the recommendation of the Head of the Department and approval of the Dean.
Students seeking exemption as above must make written
application to the Dean accompanied by certificates indicating
the character of the work done and the time devoted to it.
GENERAL OUTLINE OF UNIVERSITY COURSES
The work of the First and Second Years is the same in all
courses, except those in Nursing and Health.
m First Year
Subject.
Math. 1 Trigonometry 	
Math. 2 Solid Geometry	
Math. 3 Algebra  	
Math. 4 Calculus   	
CE. 1 Descriptive Geom.  ..
M.E. 1 Drawing 1   	
Physics 1 Mechanics   	
Physics 2 Heat   	
Chem. 2a. Qual. Analysis ...
M.E. 2a Shop Practice 	
Biology  1*   Introductory....
C.E. 2 Surveying   	
C.E. 30 Engineering Prob. 1
C3    ttf
211
211
211
212
189
212
229
229
186
213
182
189
199
First Term.
Second Term.
J 0,
Field Work
I      4    I     ••
ggg
3
6
3
3
2
9
"Biology 1, Arts, passed with a grade of at least 60 per cent, will be
accepted in lieu of this course. 154
Faculty of Applied Science
Second Year
Subject.
Math. 6 Calculus  	
Math. 7 Anal. Geom	
Chem. 2b Quan. Analysis
C.E. 4 Graphics    	
M.E. 6a Elem. Theory	
Physics 3 Electricity 	
Physics 4 Mechanics   	
C.E. 5 Mapping   	
C.E. 6 Surveying   	
Geology 1 General	
tCE. 7 Surveying	
CE. 31 Engineering Prob. 2.,
8 «
U, so
212
212
186
190
214
229
229
190
190
206
191
200
First Term.
gee
Second Term.
Field Work
13   1..
3»
tStudents entering Civil, Forest, Geological, Metallurgical, and Mining
Engineering are required to take Civil Engineering 7 (see Page 191)
immediately after the spring examinations,    i
THIRD AND FOURTH YEARS
Essays
Essays are required of all students entering the Third and
Fourth Years, and must conform to the following:—
1. The essay shall consist of not less than 2,000 words.
2. It must be a technical description of the engineering aspects
of the work on which the student was engaged during the
summer, or of any Scientific or engineering work with which
he is familiar. In the preparation of the essay, advantage
may be taken of any source of information, but due
acknowledgment must be made of all authorities consulted.
It should be suitably illustrated by drawings, sketches,
photographs or specimens.
3. It must be typewritten, or clearly written on paper of substantial quality, standard letter size (8^x11 inches), on
one side of the paper only, leaving a clear margin on top
and left-hand side.   Students are recommended to examine Courses in Applied Science 155
sample reports to be found in the  library  or in  the  departments.
4.   All essays must be handed in to the Dean not later than
November 15th.
All essays, when handed in, become the property of the
Department concerned, and are filed for reference. Students
may submit duplicate copies of their essays in competition for
the students' prizes of the Engineering Institute of Canada, or
the Canadian Institute of Mining and Metallurgy.
Essays will be considered as final Christmas examinations.
A maximum of 100 marks is allowed, the value being based on
presentation, English and matter. In third year essays
presentation, that is, the manner in which the material is
arranged and presented to the reader, is given most weight,
with English second and matter third. In fourth year essays
most emphasis is placed on matter, but the other two are still
rated highly.
COURSES
I.    Chemical Engineering
The course in Chemical Engineering should prepare the
student for the duties of managing engineer in a chemical
manufactory. As such he must be conversant not only with
the chemical processes involved, but he must be prepared to
design and to oversee the construction of new buildings and
to direct the installation and use of machinery. In the industrial life of British Columbia the chemical engineer may be
more particularly concerned with the manufacture of acids and
alkalies, the preparation from natural sources of various organic
and inorganic compounds, the pulp and paper industry, and
the utilization of the waste from a number of industrial plants
indigenous to the Province. Accordingly, the course of study
includes a number of courses in the older branches of engineering
along with the maximum of chemical training allowed by the
time at the disposal of the student. 156
Faculty of Applied Science
Third Year
Subject.
aj   d
6 M
First Term.
3£
3»
Second Term.
2£
3«
Essay   	
Economics 1 Introductory
Met. 1 Introductory	
Geol. 2 (a) Mineralogy ..
Chem. 3 Organic 	
Chem. 4 Theoretical	
Chem. 5 Adv. Analysis   ..
E.E. 1 General	
Physics 5 Light	
CE. 12 Hydraulics 	
154
200
226
207
187
187
187
217
229
193
Subject.
Fourth Year
Essay   	
Chem. 6 Industrial  ...
Chem. 7 Physical   	
Chem. 8 Electro   	
Chem. 9 Adv.  Organic
Chem. 16 Engineering
Met. 2 General	
Thesis   	
a*
g m
154
188
188
188
188
188
226
First Term.
3«
Second Term.
&
12
3
*3
ii
II. Chemistry
The aim of this course is to train the students in the practice
of Chemistry, and to give a thorough, knowledge in the fundamental principles of this subject, that they may be prepared to
assist in the solution of problems of value to the industrial
and agricultural life of the Province. The course is arranged
to give in the first two years a knowledge of the fundamental Courses in Applied Science
157
principles of Chemistry and Physics, with sufficient mathematics
to enable the theoretical parts of the subject to be understood.
In the Third Year, Analytical, Organic, and Physical
Chemistry are studied from the scientific side and in relation to
technology; while in the Fourth Year a considerable amount of
time is devoted to a short piece of original work.
Third Year
Subject.
S  ■■
First Term.
00^1
V OJ
% fr-
2 &j
Second Term.
H
g s u
Essay   	
Econ. 1 Introductory .
Chem. 3 Organic  	
Chem. 4 Theoretical ..
Chem. 5 Adv. Analysis
Met. 1 Introductory ..
Geol. 2 (a) Mineralogy
Met. 5 Assaying	
German (Arts) B	
Physics 5 Light	
154
200
187
187
187
226
207
227
139
229
Fourth Year
3 it ■
Q  *
S «
First Term.
Second Term.
Subject.
lull*
DO Jd
ge$
|8>
154
86
230
188
188
188
188
226
2
2
2
3
2
2
7
3
3
3
9
"a
2
3
'h
2
••
Chem. 6 Industrial 	
3
3
Thesis   	
18 158 Faculty of Applied Science
III.   Civil Engineering
The broad field covered by Civil Engineering makes it an
adjunct of many other branches of engineering, yet the Civil
Engineer occupies a distinctive field and is intimately associated
with a wide group of undertakings vitally affecting the health,
comfort and prosperity of the commonwealth.
The various branches of Civil Engineering deal with problems in water supply and water purification; in sewerage systems, sewage disposal plants, and the handling of municipal and
industrial wastes; in hydraulic power development; in irrigation
and drainage for agricultural activities; in all types of structures, bridges and buildings, piers and docks, sea walls and
protective works; in transportation, canals, locks, highways,
electric and steam railways; and in the management and direction of public works, public utilities, industrial and commercial
enterprises.
The course in Civil Engineering is designed to provide,
in so far as time will permit, foundations for continued growth
along those lines which the student's interests and environment
determine, without compelling too early specialization. Training
in pure and applied science, in the humanities, in economics and
engineering law, and in the technical phases of professional
work establishes a broad basis for the stimulation of a sincere
spirit of public service and for the development of that capacity
for reliable work and judgment which makes safe the assumption
of responsibilities.
The methods of instruction are planned with the view of
bringing out the powers and initiative of the students while
training them in habits of accurate analysis and careful work.
Students are encouraged to secure summer work which will
give them an insight into the various phases of the career upon
which they are about to enter, and the summer essays lay the
foundation for the ability to set forth, in clear and precise
language, descriptions and analyses of projects and engineering
activities. In the Fourth Year thesis an opportunity is given
for special investigation and research under the supervision of
experienced engineers. Courses in Applied Science
159
Third Year
Subject.
J! ..
'3 9
a &
S «
g 09
First Term.
j 3
t1-
Is J
5«
Second Term.
S 01
5S
2e8
l§*
5a
Essay   	
C.E. 8 Foundations   	
CE. 9 Elementary Design
CE. 10 Strength of Mtls..
CE. 11 Railways   	
CE. 12 Hydraulics   	
CE. 13 Mapping   	
C.E. 14 Surveying   	
CE. 15 Drawing	
M.E. 6 (b) Laboratory ...
E.E. 1 General   	
Econ. 1* Introductory	
CE. 16 Surveying   	
CE. 21 Water Power  	
CE. 28 Seminar   	
154
191
2
192
192
2
193
2
193
1
193
, .
193
2
194
• •   1
215
. .
217
2
200
2
194
F
196
1
199
1
Field Work
•Economics 1 in Arts will be accepted in lieu of the Science Course.
Fourth Year
Subject.
S ■■
■2 »
First Term.
?.*
5a
Second Term.
u
Is*
5«
Essay .
CE. 17
CE. 18
CE. 19
CE. 20
CE. 22
C.E. 23
CE. 24
CE. 25
CE. 26
CE. 27
CE. 28
CE. 29
Structural Design   .
Engineering Economics
Law—Contracts  	
Geodesy   	
Municipal   	
Transportation	
Mechanics of Mtls. .
Theory of Structures
Trips 	
Thesis  	
Seminar   	
Hydraulic Machines
154
194
194
195
195
196
197
197
198
198
198
199
199
3
6
Required
1
1
2
2
2
1
Sat. A
i
l
M.
3
6
3
1 160
Faculty of Applied Science
IV.    Electrical Engineering
This course is designed for those students who desire a
general training in the theory and practice of Electrical Engineering in addition to the basic principles of Mechanical
Engineering. The Third Year of tb*e course is devoted mainly
to Mechanical Engineering, together with work which involves
the broad principles which underlie all engineering work. The
Fourth Year is devoted to Electrical Engineering, the fundamental principles of industrial economics, works organization,
management, and financing.
Vancouver and the surrounding country afford excellent
facilities for the study of engineering works under commercial
conditions. The managing officials of these works are pleased to
permit students, in charge of a member of the Faculty, to inspect
and conduct tests at pre-arranged times. Organized visits to
industrial plants constitute a regular part of the advanced work.
Third Year
Subject.
£ i;
Q *
«- «
o *
First Term.
2£
Second Term.
gas
!§*
5»
Essay   	
M.E. 3 Kinematics   	
M.E. 4 Dynamics   	
M.E. 5 Design   	
M.E. 7 Thermo-dynamics 	
CE. 10 Str. of Materials 	
E.E. 2 General    	
C.E. 12 Hydraulics    	
M.E. 2b Shop Practice 	
Math.   8   (Adv.   Calculus)   or
Math. 9 (Differential Equa.)
154
214
214
214
215
192
218
193
213
212
2
3
2
3
1
3
3
3
4
3
8 Courses in Applied Science
161
Fourth Year
Subject.
O 6<
g 50
First Term.
111
Second Term.
?.*
gs s
■§s*
5«
Essay	
E.E. 4 Machines   	
E.E. 5 Traction	
E.E. 6 Transmission	
E.E. 7 Design   	
E.E. 8 Radio   	
M.E. 8 Thermo-dynamics	
M.E. 10 Design   	
M.E. 14 Mechanical Design ...
Math.  8   (Adv.  Calculus)   or
Math. 9 (Differential Equa.)
C.E. 18 Engr. Economics 	
CE. 19 Engr. Law 	
CE. 29 Hydr. Machines	
154
221
222
223
223
223
215
216
217
212
212
194
195
199
2
6
2
1
1
2
..
2
1
3
1
1
, ,
1
2
3
3
3
3
2
1
L   • J^
1
2
'   2
2
2
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I
1
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1
V.    Forest Engineering
In British Columbia the forest industries, including logging
and the manufacture of lumber, pulp and paper, now lead all
others, and are rapidly expanding. They must always play a
very important part in the economy of the Province, because
seven-eighths of the productive land is absolute forest soil, that
will grow good timber but no other crop of value; and because
over half the remaining stand of saw-timber — the last big
reserve — of Canada is here. The development of these industries is requiring more and more the services of engineers, and
especially is this true in logging. Furthermore, most of the
forest land is owned by the public, and the management of these
vast estates is a task that will require constant growth on the
part of the government forest services.
This indicates very briefly the various fields of service open
to Forest Engineers, and for which the course of studies is
designed. Primarily the course is planned for the lumber
industry, and a major part of the time — apart from the preliminary  foundation work — is  devoted  to  the  branches  of 162
Faculty of Applied Science
engineering most used in it. In addition, the fundamental
subjects of forestry are covered. As in other engineering courses
the students are expected to obtain practical experience during
the summer vacations, this being an essential supplement to the
studies at the University.
Vancouver contains large sawmills, wood-working plants,
and plants for seasoning and preserving wood — more, in fact,
than any other place in the Province. Pulp mills, logging
operations and extensive forests are within easy reach. The
advantages of location are therefore exceptional. A special
feature is the affiliation of the Forest Products Laboratory of
Canada, maintained at the University by a co-operative arrangement with the Dominion Forestry Branch. A description of
this Laboratory and its activities is given in another part of this
calendar. It affords opportunities for instruction in testing the
mechanical properties of timber and other structural materials,
and facilities are now provided for experimental and demonstration work in wood seasoning.
Third Year
Subject.
3   M
First Term.
3-s
bS3
§°*
gE S
.5 o-^
Second Term.
rt oi QJ
5*
Essay   	
F.E.'l General  Forestry   .
F.E. 2 Mensuration   	
F.E. 3 Protection   	
F.E. 4 Finance	
Bot. 1 General Botany ...
Bot. 5 (b) Dendrology ....
E.E. 1 Fundamentals   ....
CE. 8 (a)  Foundations 	
C.E. 9 Structural Design .
C.E. 10 Strength Materials
C.E. 11 Railways   	
CE. 13 Mapping    	
C.E. 14 Surveying   	
CE. 12 Hydraulics   	
154
201
201
201
202
183
184
217
191
192
192
193
193
193
193
1
4 1
1
2
2 2
2 1
2 2
3
1
3 2
2
3 "\ Courses in Applied Science
163
Fourth Year
Subject.
F.E. 5 Technology .
F.E. 6 Organization
F.E. 7 History ....
F.E. 8 Silviculture .
F.E. 9 Lumbering .
F.E. 10 Logging ...
F.E. 11 Milling ....
F.E. 12 Products   ..
Bot. 6 (b) Pathology )
Zool. 7 Entomology     \'
Bot. 7 (a) Ecology	
C.E. 17 Structural Design
C.E. 18 Economics   	
C.E. 19 Law  	
M.E. 6 (b) Steam Lab. ...
154
202
202
203
203
203
204
204
204
185
235
185
194
194
195
215
First Term.
SB
►3^
O  Q.    .
S * £
5n
Second Term.
S a#
3
2
1
..
1
2
..
1
4
n
"»l
"A
i
2
3
i
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2
1
3
VI.    Geological Engineering
This course is designed to meet the requirements of students
who intend to enter Geology as a profession.
It gives a broad training not only in Geology, but also in
the sciences of Biology, Chemistry, Physics, and Mathematics,
which are extensively applied in the solution of geological
problems. The engineering subjects are useful not only to the
Mining and Consulting Geologist and the Geological Surveyor,
but to the Geologist engaged in original research in any branch
of the science.
The course therefore furnishes a foundation for the professions of Mineralogist, Geological Surveyor, Mining Geologist,
Consulting Geologist, Palaeontologist, Geographer, etc., and is
useful for those who will be in any way connected with the
discovery or development of the natural resources of the country.
As a supplement to the work in the classroom, laboratory
and field during the session, the student is expected to obtain
practical experience during the summer vacations. 164
Faculty of Applied Science
Third Year
Subject.
First Term.
1*
111
5a
Second Term.
fa   U
■3 is
sh
5a
Essay   	
Geol. 2 Mineralogy    ...
Geol. 3 Historical  	
Geol. 4 Structural   	
Geol. 5 Regional  	
Chem. 4 Theoretical    ..
Econ. 1  (Arts)   	
Min. 1 Metal Mining ..
Met. 5 Fire Assaying  .
Met. 1 General    	
Ore Dressing 1 General
Zool. 1	
C.E. 13 Mapping	
Chem. 5* Adv. Analysis
Met. 6* Wet Assaying .
154
207
208
208
208
187
200
224
227
226
227
235
193
187
227
'Either Chem. 5 or Met. 6 must be taken.
Fourth Year
Subject.
3 ■■
3 8>
R *
First Term.
Second Term.
Essay    	
Geol. 6 Palaeontology  ....
Geol. 7 Petrology   	
Geol. 8 Economic   	
C.E. 18 Engr. Economics .
Geol. 9 Mineralography   ..
Geol. 10 Field   	
Min. 2 Coal and Placer ...
Min. 3 Metal Mining	
Min. 5 Surveying    	
Met. 2 Smelting   	
Ore Dressing 2 Laboratory
Thesis  	
154
209
209
209
194
210
210
224
225
225
223
228
2
4
I
*3
3 Courses in Applied Science
165
VII.   Mechanical Engineering
As this branch of Engineering forms an outstanding feature
in all industrial development, the course of training is general
and basic in its character. Because of its general character it is
not possible in the time available to give the student an intimate
knowledge of the details of practice in any special line of work.
The course is designed more particularly for those who are likely
to take up the manufacture of machinery, power plant work (including design and construction of steam, gas, oil, or hydraulic
plants), heating and ventilation of buildings, refrigeration, or
industrial management.
Students in this course are given a systematic course in the
fundamentals of Electrical Engineering.
Governed by the fact that values and costs are controlling
factors in the practice of Engineering, the subjects of the final
years are treated with a view of developing a business sense,
an understanding of men, and the ability to report clearly on
industrial problems. This demands the study of Economics, the
use of good English, and the participation in outside industrial
work during the vacation.
Third Year
As in Electrical Engineering.    (See Page 160.)
Fourth Year
Subject.
Essay   	
M.E. 9 Thermodynamics    	
M.E. 10 Design  	
M.E. 11 Heating	
M.E. 12 Plant Design 	
M.E. 13 Metals   	
E.E. 3 Standard Practice   	
C.E. 18 Engr. Economics    	
CE. 19 Engr. Law	
CE. 29 Hydraulic Mach	
Math.  8   (Adv.  Calculus)   or
Math. 9 (Differential Equa.)
*§   SB
a,   «
R b
154
216
216
216
216
217
220
194
195
199
212
First Term.
H
3a
Second Term.
Hi*
■81 166 Faculty of Applied Science
VIII.-IX.   Metallurgical and Mining Engineering
Modern Metallurgical practice covers a wide and expanding
field. The Metallurgical Engineer has to design and operate a
great variety of plants and processes. He must be able to deal
with furnace and solution processes, based on chemical principles,
and mechanical crushing and separating processes, based on
physical principles, together with an immense variety of principal and auxiliary machinery, from small to immense, used in
the separation and refining of ores, artificial mineral products
and metals. The whole forms a keenly competitive and strictly
commercial industry, based on, and closely limited by, the
practical economic considerations of costs and profits. Rapid
and continuous change and improvement is the rule. Methods
and machines quickly become obsolete. The field for research
and improvement in methods and machinery is ever widening,
though the economic margin is ever narrowing.
The Metallurgical course, in the Third and Fourth Years,
based on the fundamental earlier years, is designed to give the
student a broad general knowledge of standard metallurgical
methods and machinery, with a fundamental grasp of the actual
applications of the basic sciences in practical metallurgical
operations, also sufficient laboratory practice to illustrate and
fix these in his mind and train him for an actual junior position
after graduation.
Modern mining operations cover a field notable for its
breadth and variety. The discovery, steadily becoming more
difficult, and the development, steadily becoming more scientific,
of new mineral deposits are based largely on a knowledge of
the laws and processes of Nature, ultimately physical and
chemical, but, immediately, chiefly geological in kind. On
the other hand, the operations of actual mining are largely
mechanical in kind, and call for use and knowledge of mechanical
and electrical equipment, adapted to underground methods and
conditions.
The conditions under which mining operations are carried
on are often of great natural difficulty, and many of the factors
to be dealt with are, to a large extent,  obscure or indefinite Courses in Applied Science 167
oftener than measureable. The qualities of good judgment and
decision are therefore of great importance in the application
of technical knowledge to mining. As in metallurgy, economic
considerations are paramount.
The Mining course is correspondingly broad in scope. In
addition to the fundamental sciences, it includes fundamental
subjects in Civil, Electrical and Mechanical Engineering,
Economics and Economic Geology.
The special mining subjects cover the underlying principles
and practice on which the discovery, development and economic
operation of mines are based, the practical application of
technical knowledge to actual operations, and the use of judgment and decision, by precept, example and illustration. Sufficient practical training and laboratory work are included to fit
the student for an actual junior position after graduation.
While not given as separate subjects, the social, administrative
and ethical sides of the professions of Mining and Metallurgy
are included in the general treatment of appropriate subjects.
In this University, emphasis is naturally placed on British
Columbia conditions and its chief mineral products, namely:
Gold, Silver, Lead, Zinc, Copper, Coal and Coke.
The University is conveniently located in proximity to coal
and metal mining districts, large coal and metal mining operations being carried on within a few hours' journey, in connection
with which there are large washing and ore concentration plants.
There is a large metallurgical plant at Tacoma, within an easy
day's journey. Students have little difficulty in obtaining
positions in mines or smelters during their vacation, as several
of the larger companies have established the practice of accepting
student employees in reasonable numbers during the vacation
months.
Students are recommended to spend their vacations at
practical works, in connection with Metallurgy or Mining, and
are required to do so between the Third and Fourth Years as
an essential part of their course, without which a degree will
not be granted. An essay covering this work is also required,
as specified in the Fourth Year curriculum. 168
Faculty of Applied Science
Students are advised to become student members of
Canadian Institute of Mining and Metallurgy.
the
VIII.   Metallurgical Engineering
Third Year
« ,,
£   bo
s «
First Term.
Second Term.
Subject.
IBM
j a
a.
Ml
5a
n
^8.
5a
150
200
192
192
193
193
215
207
217
224
227
226
227
227
2
3
3
3
2
2
5
3
•2
1
2
1
2
2
2
2
2
C.E. 9 Elem. Design  	
3
CE. 10 Str. of Materials
C.E. 12 Hydraulics   	
2
1
2
3
3
C.E. 13 Mapping   	
3
3
2
E.E. 1 General  	
2
2
2
2
1
2
Met. 5 Fire Assay  	
3
Fourth Year
Subject.
s ■■
R<2
>- s
First Term.
Second Term.
mM
H
^8,
2 » £
Is*
5a
.J <u
" a
is'1-
if
Geol. 9 Mineralography     .
154
210
209
194
188
228
225
226
226
227
*3
2
3
2
3
2
1
3
9
6
*3
2
*2
2
2
2
1
C.E. 18 Engr. Economics ...
Chem. 8 Electro-    	
Ore Dressing 2 Laboratory .
Min. 3 Metal Mining 	
9
12 Courses in Applied Science
169
IX.   Mining Engineering
Third Year
As in Metallurgical Engineering.    (See Page 168.)
Fourth Year
Subject.
4)
P.
&
KJ1
First Term.
00 .M
2i*
Essay   	
Geol. 7 Petrology   	
Geol. 8 Economic   	
C.E. 18 Engr. Economics ..
CE. 19 Engr. Law	
Met. 2 Smelting   	
Ore Dressing 2 Laboratory
Min. 2 Coal and Placer  ...
Min. 3 Metal Mining 	
Min. 4 Machinery  	
Min. 5 Surveying	
Min. 7 Methods  	
Min. 6 Design	
SgJ
5a
Second Term.
fa *
n.
e* iB OJ
Ss2
■2 5
5a
154
209
2
4
2
4
209
3
1
3
1
194
2
. .
2
..
195
1
. ,
1
, ,
226
2
. .
2
• ■
228
..
9
. .
9
224
2
2
• •
225
2
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2
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225
2
, .
2
, ,
225
1 1
, .
. .
226
, ,
, ,
1
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225
3
••
3
Short Courses in Mining
The regular Short Courses in Mining for the Session commence on the second Monday in January, and continue for eight
weeks. These courses include Mining, Smelting, Ore Concentration, Geology and Ore-deposits, Mineralogy and Bock Study,
Fire Assaying, Chemistry, and Surveying.
The courses are thoroughly practical in nature. They are
not primarily intended for those who have had a technical
training, but rather for those who have had practical experience
in mining and prospecting, or are connected with the business of
mining in any way. The courses are designed to give practical
and technical knowledge, helpful in practical mining work and
mining business. While they are short they are complete in themselves, and require no other preparation than a common-school
education or ability to read and write. 170 Faculty of Applied Science
Experience has shown that they fill a real need, and they
have proved very successful in the past.
As they do not form part of the regular University course,
a special bulletin is issued, in which details of the courses and
requirements for admission are given. Copies of this may be
obtained on application to the Registrar of the University.
These courses will not be given unless at least ten students
register for them.
X Nursing and Health
1. Nursing A.—A five-year undergraduate course. (See
below.)
2. Nursing B.—A graduate course of one academic year
in Public Health Nursing.    (See Page 174.)
3. Nursing C.—A graduate course of one academic year in
Teaching and Supervision in Schools of Nursing. (See Page
175.)
Registration for these courses will be subject to the general
University Regulations. (See Pages 43-45) and to the
special requirements of the Department.
All regulations are subject to change from year to year, and
subjects or courses may be modified during the year as the
Faculty may deem advisable.
Nursing A (Five-year Undergraduate Course)
This is a five-year combined course leading to the Degree of
B.A.Sc. (Nursing) and to the diploma in nursing. It is given
by the University in co-operation with the Associated Hospital
Schools of Nursing, which means those that have signified their
willingness to supply the professional part of the course, and
have received the approval of the University Senate for that
purpose. Up to the present time the Vancouver General is the
only Hospital which has entered into association with the University to this end.
The course is open to applicants who meet the general requirements mentioned above, and who, in the opinion of the Courses in Applied Science
171
Department, are personally fitted for the profession of nursing. In addition they must be able to satisfy the entrance requirements of the associated Hospital Schools of Nursing.
The aim of the five-year combined course is to afford a
broader education than can be given by the Hospital Schools of
Nursing alone, and thus to build a sound foundation for those
who desire to fit themselves for Teaching and Supervision in
Schools of Nursing or for Public Health Nursing service.
The First and Second Years, which are academic, give the
students an introduction to general cultural subjects and a
foundation in the sciences underlying the practice of nursing.
Between the First and Second years a probationary period of
four months will be spent in an associated Hospital School of
Nursing. The Third and Fourth Years are devoted to professional training in an Associated Hospital, and are planned to
afford experience and training in the care of the sick, and to
develop the skill, observation and judgment necessary to the
efficient practice of nursing. The Fifth Year affords two alternative courses, one in Public Health Nursing (Nursing B) and the
second in Teaching and Supervision in Schools of Nursing
(Nursing C).
I        First Year (Academic)
Subject.
is
First Term.
I,*
fe i- <°
5«
Second Term.
£gis
3a
English 1 (a)   	
English 1 (b)	
Choice of Mathematics 1
or Latin 1 	
or French  1   	
or History 1, 2, or 3
Physics 1  	
Chemistry 1 	
Biology 1 	
Nursing 1   	
112
113
131
100
136
125
229
186
182
231 172
Faculty of Applied Science
Probationary Period (Hospital)
The probationary period of four months, to be taken between
the first and second academic years, will be spent in an Associated
Hospital. In order to meet the admission requirements of the
Associated Hospital School of Nursing, the student must have
attained such age as may be fixed by the Associated Hospital
School of Nursing before entering upon this probationary
period; in the Vancouver General Hospital School of Nursing
the eighteenth birthday must be passed.
During this period the student will undergo rigid examination as to fitness in physique, temperament and character for
the practice of nursing. This will afford the Hospital School of
Nursing information upon which to judge the students' qualifications for the profession of nursing. It also enables the student
to determine whether she feels herself personally fitted or inclined to proceed in the course. The Hospital Schools of Nursing
reserve the right to reject candidates who do not reach the
required standards.
Second Year (Academic)
Subject.
S ;:
First Term.
a a, «
fe h v
5a
Second Term.
u
►3 s
5a
English 2 (a)  	
English 2 (b)   	
Zoology 1 	
Philosophy 1 	
Economics 1  	
Bacteriology 1  	
Bacteriology 2 	
Nursing 2  	
Anatomy and  Physiology
113
113
235
140
102
86
87
231
231
Third and Fourth Years (Professional)
The Third and Fourth Years will be  spent in  practical
training in an associated Hospital School of Nursing.   Students Courses in Applied Science 173
in these years are required to register with the University even
though during this portion of the course they are in residence
at the Hospital. During these professional years students are
subject to the authority and are under the direction of the
officers of the associated Hospital Schools of Nursing. The
required professional period is twenty-eight months, in which
is included the probationary period of four months. Full maintenance and such allowance as the associated Hospital authorities
may designate are accorded, and a yearly vacation of three
weeks is granted at the convenience of the Superintendent of the
School of Nursing.
Instruction in the following Nursing subjects is given by
members of the medical staff of the associated Hospital and by
qualified nurse, instructors: Introductory Ethics of Nursing;
Practical Nursing Procedure; Elementary Nutrition and
Cookery; Drugs and Solutions; Materia Medica; Surgical
Nursing; Medical Nursing (including charting); Gynecological
Nursing; Nursing of Communicable Diseases; Obstetrical Nursing; Diet in Disease; Pediatric Nursing and Infant Feeding;
Nursing in Diseases of the Eye, Ear, Nose and Throat; Nursing in
Tuberculosis; Urinalysis; Introduction to Anaesthesia; Introduction to Physiotherapy and X-Ray.
This schedule is open to change at any time, at the discretion of the associated Hospital School of Nursing.
The period of Hospital service includes actual nursing
experience in the following departments:
Medical. Operating Room.
Surgical. Eye, Ear, Nose and Throat.
Gynecological. Obstetrical.
Pediatric and Orthopaedic. Infectious.
Observation and Neurological. Tuberculosis.
Infants. Diet Kitchen.
The Social Service Department of the Hospital offers opportunity for a four weeks' service to a limited number of students.
Selection will be made by the Superintendent of Nurses from
the students desirous of receiving this course. 174
Faculty of Applied Science
Fifth Year (Academic and Professional)
The Fifth Year will be spent in either Nursing B or Nursing
C, at the option of the student.    The selection between these
courses need not be made until registering with the University for
the Fifth Year.
Nursing B (Public Health Nursing)
A graduate course of one academic year, including work in
the University, and appropriate field work under the supervision
of the various associated Public Health organizations.
Nursing B (Public Health Nursing)
Subject
Preventable  Diseases   	
Epidemiology   	
Tuberculosis    	
Venereal Diseases  	
Mental Hygiene	
Bacteriology   	
Infant  Welfare   	
Orthopedics   	
Public Health 	
Public Health Administration 	
Public Health Organiations  	
Vital Statistics  	
Principles and Practice of Public
Health  Nursing  	
Rural Public Health Nursing 	
Urban Visiting Nursing Programme ..
Health Education 	
History of Nursing and Contemporary
Nursing Problems  	
School  Hygiene   	
Hospital Social Service  	
Metabolism and  Nutrition  	
Psychology for Nurses 	
Principles of Education Applied to
Teaching  	
Public Speaking and Parliamentary
Procedure  	
Sociology	
Geography 10  	
Motor Mechanics  	
For Details
See Page:
Field Work
231
231
231
231
231
232
232
232
232
232
232
233
233
233
233
233
233
234
234
234
234
234
234
234
234
234
175
Total Hours
k Lectures
21
21
11
3
11
11
5
15
4
4
18
34
6
2
16
11
12
3
11
16
34
18
21
16
Total Hours
Laboratory
10
To run concurrently
with the academic
work.
* Hours to be arranged. Courses in Applied Science
175
Nursing C (Teaching and Supervision)
A graduate course of one academic year, including work in
the University, and opportunity for practice teaching and for
the observation of Training School administration and ward
supervision in associated Hospitals.
Nursing C
Subject
See Page:
For Details
Preventable Diseases   	
Mental Hygiene  	
Bacteriology    	
Infant Welfare 	
Orthopedics   	
History of Nursing and Contemporary
Nursing Problems  	
Teaching in Schools of Nursing	
Principles of Supervision in Schools
of Nursing 	
Metabolism and Nutrition  	
Psychology for Nurses 	
Principles of Education Applied to
Teaching   	
Public Speaking and Parliamentary
Procedure  	
Sociology    	
Electives from Nursing B or from
related Science Courses 	
Field Work  	
231
231
232
232
232
233
233
233
234
234
234
234
234
176
Total Hours
Lectures
Total Houra
Laboratory
21
11
11
5
11
34
16
11
16
34
18
21
* Hours to be arranged.
Field Work in Nursing B and C
Through the courtesy and co-operation of the following
agencies arrangements have been made for supervised field work,
or observation:
FOR NURSING B
Vancouver General Hospital.—The Social Service Department, Miss Laura B. Timmins, Director. 176 Faculty of Applied Science
The Provincial Department of Health.—Dr. H. E. Young,
Provincial Health Officer.
The Victorian Order of Nurses.—Miss M. Duffield, District
Superintendent.
The Medical Department of the Vancouver Public Schools.—
Dr. H. White, Medical Director; Miss E. Breeze, Director, School
Hygiene.
The Vancouver Rotary Clinic for Diseases of the Chest.—
Dr. H. A. Rawlings, Director.
The Department of Child Hygiene, City of Vancouver.—
Dr. F. T. Underhill, City Health Officer; Miss L. Sanders,
Supervisor, Department of Child Hygiene.
The Government Venereal Disease Clinic.—Dr. J. Ewart
Campbell, Director; Miss E. V. Cameron, Nurse in charge.
The Provincial Mental Hospital, Essondale.—Dr. A. L.
Crease, Medical Superintendent.
FOR NURSING C
The Vancouver General Hospital.—Dr. F. C. Bell, Superintendent ; Miss K. "W. Ellis, Superintendent of Nurses.
The academic work and field work will run concurrently
throughout the two University terms, with the exception of the
last four weeks of the Second Term which, in Nursing B, will be
devoted entirely to field work under the supervision of the
Provincial Rural Public Health Nursing organizations and, in
Nursing C, to such Hospital Service as may be arranged by the
Associated Hospitals. Field work for some students may have
to be delayed until after the close of the University year.
During the period spent in the Hospital, all students will
be subject to the authority, and under the direction, of the officers
of the Associated Hospital School of Nursing.
Adequate opportunity for observation, as well as for
practice, is thus afforded in all of the more important fields
of Public Health Nursing and in the field of Teaching and Supervision in Schools of Nursing. Courses in Applied Science 177
Admission to Nursing B and C
The courses are open to students of the five-year course,
and also to nurses who have graduated from recognized Schools
of Nursing, who are eligible for registration in British Columbia
and who are personally fitted for their proposed work. For
Nursing C it is also required that applicants shall fulfil the
University Educational requirement of Junior Matriculation.
Applications for admission to the courses of Nursing B or C
Bhould be sent to the Department of Nursing and Health not
later than July 15th of the current year. A certificate of good
health and physical condition, signed by a regular practising
physician, must be presented with the applications.
As a preparation for Nursing B, nurses without previous
Public Health Nursing service are advised to obtain at least one
month's experience in a visiting nursing agency, or other public
health or social agency approved by the Department. While not
obligatory, this month is most important, and various Field
Agencies—the Provincial Board of Health, the Vancouver
General Hospital Social Service Department and the Victorian
Order of Nurses, have each agreed to receive nurses for this
month in so far as it can be arranged. Inquiry should be made
at as early a date as possible to the Department of Nursing and
Health that arrangements may be made with the Field Agencies.
Nurses will be responsible for their own maintenance, and will
receive no remuneration during this period.
Nurses registering for Nursing C who have had no experience in family case-work, social service or visiting nursing, are
also advised to secure this month's experience with one of the
Public Health organizations if possible.
For the convenience of graduate nurses already engaged in
nursing, who wish to take Nursing B or C, but are unable to take
a year off, provision is made that either one may be taken as a
part-time course over a period of two or more years. Nurses
registering in this way must fulfil the same requirements as the
regular-course students. 178 Faculty of Applied Science
DOUBLE COURSE FOR THE DEGREES OF B.A.
AND B.A.Sc.
The requirements for the first and second years are as set
forth in the Calendar for the first and second years of Arts
(Pages 68-71) except as follows:
1. Physics 1 or 2, Mathematics 2 (c) (Calculus) and
Chemistry 1 must be taken. The passing grade for each
of these subjects is fifty per cent. (See also, admission
to Applied Science, Page 150.)
2. Biology 1, Chemistry 2, Mathematics 2 (a) and 2 (b),
and Physics 3 or 4 may not be taken. These subjects
are covered later in Applied Science.
3. A course in German is recommended (and, for those
intending to enter Geological or Civil Engineering,
French also).
The third, four, fifth and sixth years of the double course
correspond to the first, second, third and fourth years of Applied
Science. The degree of B.A. is conferred on completing the
fifth year of this course.
COURSES LEADING TO THE DEGREE OF M.A.Sc.
1. Candidates for the degree of Master of Applied Science
must hold a B.A.Sc. degree from this University, or its
equivalent.
2. A graduate of another university applying for permission
to enter as a graduate student is required to submit with his
application an official statement of his graduation together with
a certificate of the standing gained in the several subjects of
his course. The Faculty will determine the standing of such a
student in this University. The fee for examination of certifi
eates is $2.00 Courses in Applied Science 179
3. Candidates with approved degrees and academic records
who proceed to the Master's degree shall be required:
(a.) To spend one year in resident graduate study; or
(6.)  (At the discretion of the Faculty concerned):
(i.) To do two or more years of private work
under the supervision of the University,
such work to be equivalent to one year of
graduate study; or
(ii.) To do one year of private work under
University supervision and one term of
resident graduate study, the total of such
work to be equivalent to one year of
resident graduate study.
4. One major and one minor shall be required and a thesis
must be prepared on some approved topic in the major subject.
(Two typewritten copies of each thesis shall be submitted.   Set
special circular of "Instructions for the Preparation of Masters
Theses").
The choice of and relationship between major and minor
subjects, and the amount of work in each, or of tutorial work,
must be approved by each of the departments concerned, by tin
Committee on graduate studies, and by the Dean.
5. First or Second Class standing in History and Principles
of Education and Educational Psychology of the Teacher Training Course will be accepted as equivalent to a Minor for the
M.A.Sc. degree, subject in each case to the consent of the Head
of the Department in which the student wishes to Major.
6. Examinations, written or oral, or both, shall be required,
and a standing equivalent to at least 75 per cent, in the major
subjects and 65 per cent, in the minor.
7. Application for admission as a graduate student shall
be made to the Registrar by October 15th.   For fees see Page 47. 180 Faculty of Applied Science
EXAMINATIONS AND ADVANCEMENT
1. Examinations are held in December and in April.
December examinations will be held in all subjects of the First
and Second Years, and are obligatory for all students of these
years. December examinations in subjects of the Third and
Fourth Years, excepting those subjects that are completed before
Christmas, shall be optional with the Departments concerned.
Applications for special consideration on account of illness or
domestic affliction must be submitted to the Dean not later than
two days after the close of the examination period. In cases
where illness is the plea for absence from examinations, a medical certificate must be presented on the appropriate form which
may be obtained from the Dean's office.
2. Candidates in order to pass must obtain at least 50 per
cent, in each subject. The grades are as follgws: First Class,
an average of 80 per cent, or over; Second Class, 65 to 80 per
cent.; Passed, 50 to 65 per cent. But in the First and Second
Years of the course in Nursing and Health the requirements for
passing are the same as those for the First and Second Years
in Arts and Science.   (See Page 84.)
3. If a student's general standing in the final examinations
of any year is sufficiently high, the Faculty may grant him
supplemental examinations in the subject or subjects in which
he has failed. Notice will be sent to all students to whom such
examinations have been granted.
4. Supplemental examinations will be held on September
18th, 19th, 20th and 21st, and will not be granted at any other
time, except by special permission of the Faculty, and on payment of a fee of $7.50 per paper.
5. Applications for supplemental examinations, accompanied
by the necessary fees (see Schedule of Fees Page 47), must be
in the hands of the Registrar at last two weeks before the date set
for the examinations.
6. No student may enter a higher year with supplemental
examinations still outstanding in respect of more than 4 units Examinations and Advancement 181
of the preceding year, or with any supplemental examination
outstanding in respect of the work of an earlier year unless
special permission to do so is granted by Faculty. Such permission will be granted only when Faculty is satisfied that the
failure to remove the outstanding supplemental examinations
had an adequate cause. Students in Nursing A must remove
all outstanding supplemental examinations before entering
their third year.
7. No student will be allowed to take any subject unless he
has previously passed, or secured exemption, in all pre-requisite
Bubjects. If any subject has another which is concurrent with it,
both must be taken in the same session.
8. A student who is not allowed to proceed to a higher year
may not register as a partial student in respect of the subjects
of that higher year. But a student who is required to repeat
his year may, on application in writing, be exempted by the
Faculty from attending lectures and passing examinations in
subjects in which he has already made at least Second Class
standing. In this case he may take, in addition to the subjects
of the year which he is repeating, certain subjects of the following year.
9. A student who fails twice in the work of the same year
may, upon the recommendation of the Faculty, be required by
the Senate to withdraw from the University.
10. Any student whose academic record, as determined by
the tests and examinations of the first term of the First or
Second Year, is found to be unsatisfactory, may, upon the
recommendation of the Faculty, be required by the Senate to
discontinue attendance at the University for the remainder of
the session. Such a student will not be readmitted to the
University as long as any supplemental examinations are
outstanding.
11. Term essays and examination papers will be refused a
passing mark if they are noticeably deficient in English. 182 Faculty of Applied Science
DEPARTMENTS IN APPLIED SCIENCE
N.B.—The following subjects may be modified during the
year as the Faculty may deem advisable.
Department of Botany
Professor: A. H. Hutchinson.
Associate Professor: Frank Dickson.
Assistant Professor: John Davidson.
Assistant: Jean Davidson.
Assistant: R. W. Pillsbury.
Assistant: Dorothy Newton.
Biology
1. Introductory Biology.—The course is introductory to
more advanced work in Botany or Zoology; also to courses closely
related to Biological Science, such an Agriculture, Forestry,
Medicine.
The fundamental principles of Biology; the interrelationships of plants and animals; life processes; the cell and division
of labour; life-histories; relation to environment.
Text-book: Smallwood, Text-book of Biology, Lea & Febiger,
1924.
The course is prerequisite to all other courses in Biology.
One lecture and one period of two hours laboratory per
week.
2. Principles of Genetics.—The fundamentals of Genetics
illustrated by the race-histories of certain plants and animals;
the physical basis of heredity; variations; mutations; acquired
characters; Mendel's law with suggested applications.
Prerequisite:   Biology 1.
Text-book:   Castle, Genetics and Eugenics, Harvard Press
Two lectures per week.   First Term.
3. General Physiology of animal and plant life processes.
Open to students of Third and Fourth Years having prerequisite
Biology, Chemistry and Physics; the Department should be
consulted. Botany 183
Text-book: Bayliss, Principles of General Physiology,
Longmans-Green.
Two lectures and one period of three hours laboratory per
week.   Second Term.
Botany
1. General Botany.—A course including a general survey of
the several fields of Botany and introductory to more specialized
courses in Botany.
Prerequisite:   Biology 1.
Text-book: Coulter, Barnes & Cowles, Text-book of Botany,
Vol. I, University of Chicago Press.
This course is prerequisite to all other courses in Botany,
except the Evening Course. Partial credit for this course
(2 units) may be obtained through the Evening Course.
Two lectures and one period of two hours laboratory per
week. a        f  \
2. Morphology.
General Morphology of plants. A comparative study of
plant structures. The relationships of plant groups. Comparative
life histories. Emphasis is placed upon the increasing com
plexity of plant structures, from the lower to the higher forms,
involving a progressive differentiation accompanied by an inter
dependence of parts.
Prerequisite:   Botany 1.
Text-book: Coulter, Barnes & Cowles, Text-book of Botany,
Vol. I, University of Chicago Press.
Two lectures and two periods of two hours laboratory per
week.   First Term.
3. Plant Physiology.
Prerequisite:   Botany 1.
Text-book: Palladin, Plant Physiology, English EditioD
(Translation of 6th Russian Edition), 1918, P. Blakiston.
Two lectures and two periods of two hours laboratory per
week.   First Term. 184 Faculty of Applied Science
4. Histology.—A study of the structure and development
of plants; methods of killing, fixing, embedding, sectioning,
staining, mounting, drawing, reconstructing. Use of microscope,
camera lucida; photo-micrographic apparatus.
Text-book:   W. C. Stevens, Plant Anatomy, P. Blakiston.
Prerequisite: Botany 1.
One lecture and two periods of three hours laboratory per
week.   Second Term.
5. Systematic Botany.
5. (a) Economic Flora.—An introduction to the classification of plants through a study of selected families of economic
plants of British Columbia; useful for food, fodder, medicine
and industrial arts; harmful to crops and stock. Weeds, and
poisonous plants.   Methods of control.
Prerequisite: Botany 1.
Text-books: Jepson, Economic Plants of California, Jepson,
University of California. Thomas and Sifton, Poisonous Plants
and Weed Seeds, University of Toronto Press.
Two lectures and two hours laboratory per week. First
term.
5. (6) Dendrology.—A study of the forest trees of Canada,
the common shrubs of British Columbia, the important trees of
the United States which are not native to Canada. Emphasis
on the species of economic importance. Identification, distribution, relative importance, construction of keys.
Prerequisite:   Botany 1.
Text-books: Morton & Lewis, Native Trees of Canada,
Dominion Forestry Branch Ottawa. Sudworth, Forest Trees of
the Pacific Slope, Superintendent of Documents, Washington,
D. C.; Davidson and Abercrombie, Conifers, Junipers and Yew,
T. F. Unwin.
One lecture and one period of two or three hours laboratory
or field work per week. Botany 185
5. (c) Descriptive Taxonomy.—An advanced course dealing with the collection, preparation and classification of "flowering plants." Methods of field herbarium and laboratory work
Plant description, the use of floras, preparation of keys, identification of species.   Systems of classification.   Nomenclature.
Prerequisites: Botany 1 and 5(a).
Text-books: Hitchcock, Descriptive Systematic Botany,
Wiley & Sons, N.Y.; Henry, Flora of Southern British Columbia, Gage & Co., Toronto.
One lecture and four hours laboratory per week. Second
Term.
6. (a) General Plant Pathology. — Identification and life-
histories of parasites causing plant-diseases; means of combating
them. * ■
Prerequisite:   Botany 1.
Text-book: Heald, Manual of Plant Diseases.
One lecture and one period of two hours laboratory per
week.   Second Term.
6. (b) Forest Pathology.—Nature, identification and control of the more important tree-destroying fungi and other plant
parasites of forests.
Text-book:    Rankin, Manual of Tree Diseases, Macmillan.
One lecture and one period of two hours laboratory per
week during one-half of one term.
7. (a) Forest Ecology and Geography.—The inter-relationB
of forests and their environment; the biological characteristics of
important forest trees; forest associations; types and regions;
physiography.
Text-book: Hardy, The Geography of Plants, Oxford
University Press.
One lecture per week during one term. Field trips and
laboratory work during the session amounting to thirty hours,
one period per week. 186 Faculty of Applied Science
Department of Chemistry
Professor: R. H. Clark.
Professor of Analytical Chemistry: E. H. Archibald.
Associate Professor: W. F. Seyer.
Associate Professor: M. J. Marshall.
Assistant Professor: J. Allen Harris.
Instructor: John Allardyce.
Instructor: D. F. Stedman.
Assistant: A. F. Gallaugher.
Assistant: R. H. Ball.
Assistant: H. R. Lyle Streight.
Assistant: A. Ernest Morell.
Assistant: E. H. Nunn.
1. General Chemistry.—This course is arranged to give a
full exposition of the general principles involved in modern
Chemistry and comprises a systematic study of the properties of
the more important metallic and non-metallic elements and their
compounds, and the application of Chemistry in technology.
Text-book: Horace Byers, Inorganic Chemistry, Scribner's.
Three lectures and one period of three hours laboratory per
week.
2. Qualitative and Quantitative Analysis.
(a) Qualitative Analysis.—During the first six weeks of
the term an additional lecture may be substituted for a part
of the laboratory work.
Text-book:  A. A. Noyes, Qualitative Analysis, Macmillan.
Prerequisite:  Chemistry 1.
One lecture and one period of three hours laboratory per
week.
(6) Quantitative Analysis.—This course embraces the more
important methods of gravimetric and volumetric analysis.
Text-book: Cumming & Kay, Quantitative Analysis,
Gurney & Jackson.
Prerequisite:   Chemistry 1.
One lecture and one period of three hours laboratory per
week.
Course (b) must be preceded by Course (a). Chemistry 187
3. Organic Chemistry.—This introduction to the study of
the compounds of carbon will include the method of preparation
and a description of the more important groups of compounds
in both the fatty and the aromatic series.
Chemistry 3 will also be given to those students taking
Chemistry 2, or those who have had the equivalent of Chemistry 2.
Text-books: Holleman-Walker, Text-book of Organic Chemistry, Wiley; Gatterman, The Practical Methods of Organic
Chemistry, Macmillan.
Two lectures and one period of three hours laboratory per
week.
4. Theoretical Chemistry.—An introductory course on the
development of modern Chemistry, including osmotic phenomena,
the ionization theory, the law of mass action, and the phase rule.
Text-book: James Walker, Introduction to Physical Chemistry, Macmillan.
Prerequisite:   Chemistry 2.
Two lectures and one period of three hours laboratory per
week.    Second Term.      \
5. Advanced Qualitative and Quantitative Analysis.
(a) Qualitative Analysis. — The work of this course will
include the detection and separation of the less common metals,
particularly those that are important industrially, together with
the analysis of somewhat complex substances occurring in
nature.
One lecture and two periods of three hours laboratory per
week.   First Term.
(6) Quantitative Analysis.—The determinations made will
include the more difficult estimations in the analysis of rocks,
as well as certain constituents of steel and alloys. The principles
on which analytical chemistry is based will receive a more minute
consideration than was possible in the elementary course.
Prerequisite:  Chemistry 2.
One lecture and two periods of three hours laboratory per
week.    Second Term. 188 Faculty of Applied Science
6. Industrial Chemistry. — Those industries which are
dependent on the facts and principles of Chemistry will be
considered in as much detail as time will permit. The lectures
will be supplemented by visits to manufacturing establishments
in the neighbourhood, and it is hoped that some lectures will be
given by specialists in their respective fields.
Prerequisite:  Chemistry 2 and 3.
Two lectures per week.
7. Physical Chemistry.—The lectures, which are a continuation of those given in 4, include the kinetic theory of gases,
thermo-chemistry, the application of the principles of thermodynamics to chemistry, osmotic phenomena, applications of the
dissociation theory, colloidal solutions, and a study of the
physical properties of gases, liquids, and solids and of their
chemical constitutions.
Text-book: Findlay, Physico-Chemical Measurements,
Longmans-Green.
Reference books: Ramsay's Series of Books on Physical
Chemistry, Longmans.    Getman, Theoretical Chemistry, Wiley.
Prerequisite:  Chemistry 2, 3 and 4.
Two lectures and one period of three hours laboratory per
week.
8. Electro-Chemistry.—As in Arts.   (See Page 95.)
9. Advanced Organic Chemistry. — As in Arts. (See
Page 96.)
11. Physical Organic Chemistry.—As in Arts. (See Page
96.)
12. Colloid Chemistry—As in Arts.    (See Page 96.)
16. Chemical Engineering. — Theory and design of fractionating columns, condensers, multiple effect evaporators;
chamber, tunnel, drum, rotary and spray driers. Theory and
practice of technical filtration; calculation of capacity of box Civil Engineering 189
filters, filter presses, centrifugals, etc. Principles of counter
current extraction.
Prerequisites:   Chemistry 3 and 4.
Text-book: Walker, Lewis & McAdams, Principles of
Chemical Engineering, McGraw-Hill.
Reference books: Liddell, Handbook of Chemical Engineering, McGraw-Hill. Robinson, Elements of Practical Distillation.
McGraw-Hill.
Two lectures per week during second term of Fourth Year.
17. Chemical Thermodynamics.—As in Arts. (See Page
97.)
18. Advanced Inorganic Chemistry.—As in Arts. (See Page
97.)
Department of Civil Engineering
Professor: Wm. E. Duckering.
Associate Professor: E. G. Matheson.
Assistant Professor: F. A. Wilkin.
Assistant Professor: A. H. Finlay.
Instructor: A. Lighthall.
Instructor: A. G. Stuart.
Assistant: Arthur H. Lang.
1. Descriptive Geometry.—:Geometrical drawing; orthographic, isometric and axometric projections.
Text-book: Armstrong, Descriptive Geometry, second edition,
Wiley.
One three-hour period per week.
Mr. Matheson, Mr. Wilkin, Mr. Finlay, Mr. Stuart, Mr.
Lang.
2. Field Work 1.—Elementary surveying. Practical problems involving the use of the chain, telemeter, compass, transit
and level. Traverses, closed circuits, contour and detail surveys.
Levels for profiles, benches and contours.
Work commences immediately upon the close of spring
examinations, and consists of field work, eight hours per day for
twenty days, or equivalent.
Mr. Stuart, Mr. Wilkin. 190 Faculty of Applied Science
3. Materials of Engineering*—Manufacture and properties
of iron and steel; principal alloys; considerations governing
selection of materials; manufacture and properties of cements;
concrete; stone and brick masonry; principal kinds of commercial timber; treating and preservation of timber; discussion
of standard specifications for engineering work.
Text-book:  Moore, Materials of Engineering, McGraw-Hill.
References: Mills, Materials of Engineering; Johnson,
Materials of Construction, Wiley; Upton, Materials of Engineering, Wiley.
One lecture per week.   Mr. Matheson.
4. Graphical Statics. — Elementary theory of structures;
composition of forces; general methods involving the force and
equilibrium polygons; determination of resultants, reactions,
centres of gravity, bending moments; stress in framed
structures, cranes, towers, roof-trusses and bridge-trusses.
Algebraic check methods will be used throughout.
Text-book: Hudson and Squire, Elements of Graphic
Statics, McGraw-Hill.
Prerequisites: Physics 4 must either precede or accompany
Civil 4.
One two-hour period per week.   Mr. Lighthall.
5. Mapping 1.—Draughting from notes obtained in Civil 2.
Maps of telemeter, compass and transit surveys. Contour and
topographical maps in convention or color.
Prerequisite:   Civil 2.
One three-hour period per week.  Mr. Stuart.
6. Surveying 1. — Chain and angular surveying; the construction, adjustment and use of the transit, level, compass,
stadia, minor field instruments, planimeter, and pantograph;
leveling; topography; contour surveying; stadia; railway curves;
vertical curves; transition curves.
Prerequisite:   Civil 2.
•Elective Civil Engineering 191
■Text-book: Breed and Hosmer, Elementary Surveying,
Vol. I, Wiley.
References: Allen, Curves and Earthwork, McGraw-Hill;
Sullivan, Spiral Tables, McGraw-Hill.
Two lectures per week.   Mr. Stuart.
7. Field Work 2.— (a) Railway surveys, reconnaissance,
preliminary and location surveys, methods of taking topography,
cross-sectioning; estimating quantities; running in easement and
vertical curves, etc. The notes secured will be used in class work
for mapping and for estimating quantities and costs.
(6) Hydrographie surveys, topography of a section of
river-bed by sounding and fixing position by transits and
sextants; the three-point problem; stream-gauging by surface
and deep floats and by the current meter.
(c) Solar and stellar observations for latitude and azimuth;
adjustments of instruments; the use of plane table, sextant and
minor instruments.
Prerequisite: Civil 2.
Time, same as for Civil 2.
Mr. Matheson, Mr. Wilkin, Mr. Lighthall.
8. Foundations and Masonry.—(a) Borings; bearing power
of soils; pile and other foundations; cofferdams; caissons; open
dredging; pneumatic and freezing processes; retaining walls;
estimates of quantities and costs.
Prerequisite:  Civil 4.
Text-book: Jacoby and Davis, Foundations of Bridges and
Buildings, McGraw-Hill.
One lecture and one three-hour period per week. First Term.
Mr. Matheson.
(b) Theory of Earth Pressure; combined stresses, ellipse
of stress, principal and conjugate axes, as applied to the determination of earth pressures; Rankine's Coulomb's, Wey-
raueh's, Cain's and Rebhann's theories and solutions for earth
pressure; retaining walls; dams. 192 Faculty of Applied Science
Prerequisite: Civil 4; Civil 8a must accompany 8b during
the First Term.
References: Ketchum, Walls, Bins and Grain Elevators;
Howe, Retaining Walls for Earth; Cain, Earth Pressure, Walls
and Bins; Morley, Theory of Structures.
One lecture per week each term. Mr. Matheson.
9. Structural Design 1.—Problems in draughting, illustrating designs in structural engineering; estimates of quantities
and costs; preparation of plans.
Text-book: Conklin, Structural Draughting and Elementary
Design, Wiley; Carnegie, Pocket Companion, Carnegie Steel Co.
Prerequisite:  First Term of Civil 10.
One lecture and one three-hour period.   Second Term,
Mr. Matheson.
10. Strength of Materials.—A thorough introduction to the
fundamental principles dealing with the strength of materials;
stress, deformation, elasticity and resilience; the application of
the laws of derived curves to the construction of load, shear,
moment, inclination and deflection diagrams, fibre stress, deflection of simple, cantilever, and continuous beams under any
loading; riveted joints; torsion; columns; combined stresses;
longitudinal shear; reinforced concrete; special beams.
The laboratory period includes the testing of cement, concrete, timber and steel specimens to determine the strength and
elasticity of these materials.
About one-half of the laboratory time will be set aside for
the solution of problems in investigation and design
Text-book: Maurer and Withey, Strength of Materials,
Wiley.
Reference:  Swain, Strength of Materials, McGraw-Hill.
Prerequisites: Physics 4, Civil 4 and 31.
Two lectures and one three-hour period per week.
Mr. Duckering, Mr. Lighthall.
Note:—The laboratory testing is performed in the Forest
Products Laboratories, under the supervision of Superintendent
McElhanney and Mr. Lighthall. Civil Engineering 193
11. Transportation 1. Railways.—The inception of railway
projects; reconnaissance, preliminary and location; grade problems; grades, curvature and distance and their effects upon
operating costs and revenue; velocity and pusher1 grades;
adjustment of grades for unbalanced traffic; construction; railway economics, traffic, revenue, branch lines.
Prequisite:   Civil 6 and 7.
Text-book:  Williams, Design of Railivay Location, Wiley.
Reference: Allen, Railroads, Curves and Earthwork,
McGraw-Hill; Wellington, Economic Theory of the Location of
Railways, Wiley.
Two lectures per week.   Mr. Wilkin.
12. Hydraulic Engineering 1.—(a) Hydrostatics; design of
standpipes, reservoirs and dams. I     +Jr-
(b) Hydrodynamics; fundamental principles and their
application to problems on the discharge of orifices, notches and
weirs; flow in pipes and open channels; practical field and
laboratory measurements; examination of hydraulic developments.
Prerequisite:   Physics 4. f .
Text-book:     Russell, Hydraulics, Third Edition, Holt.
One lecture and one three-hour period per week.
Mr. Wilkin, Mr. Lighthall.
13. Mapping 2. — Draughting from notes obtained in
Civil 7; railway location and hydrographie surveys; topographic
maps from photographic plates.
One three-hour period per week.   Mr. Lighthall.
14. Surveying 2.—A continuation of Civil 6. (a) Theory
and use of aneroid, sextant, plane-table and precise instruments; plane-table surveying; mine, hydrographie and photo-
topographic surveying; Dominion and Provincial surveys. First
Term.
(6) Field astronomy.  Second Term.
Text-book:  Breed and Hosmer, Surveying, Vol. II, Wiley. 194 Faculty of Applied Science
References: Johnson and Smith, Theory and Practice of
Surveying, Wiley; Wilson, Topographic, Trigonometric and
Geodetic Surveying, Wiley; Green's Practical and Spherical
Astronomy, Ginn and Co; Manual of Surveys of Dominion
Lands; Instructions for B. C. Land Surveyors.
Prerequisite: Civil 6.
Two lectures per week. Mr. Lighthall.
15. Perspective Drawing and Map Projections.—(a) Mathematical perspective; perspective drawings of buildings and
structures. First Term.
(b) Map projections.   Second Term.
Prerequisite:   Civil 1.
Text-book: Crosskey, Elementary Perspective, Blackie &
Son; Armstrong, Descriptive Geometry, Second Edition, Wiley.
Son.
16. Field Work 3.—Problems in geodetic and precise surveying ; determination of latitude, azimuth and time by solar and
stellar observations; baseline measurements; precise levelling.
Prerequisite:  Civil 7.
Time, same as for Civil 2.   Mr. Lighthall.
17. Structural Design 2. — Selection of types of bridges;
determination of loadings; stresses; choice of cross-sectional
forms and areas; design of combination wood and steel trusses,
steel trusses; design of connections; masonry structures, dams
and retaining walls; complete drawings.
Text-book:   Kuntz, Design of Steel Bridges, McGraw-Hill.
Reference: Johnson, Bryan and Turneaure, Modem Framed
Structures, Vol. Ill, Wiley; Kirkham, Structural Engineering,
McGraw-Hill; Carnegie, Pocket Companion.
Prerequisites: Civil 8, 9 and 10.
One lecture and two three-hour periods per week.
Mr. Matheson.
18. Engineering Economics.—(a) A general treatment of:
sinking funds; first cost; cost analysis; salvage and scrap values; Civil Engineering 195
yearly cost of service; collecting data; estimating; economic
selection, reports.
Text-book: Fish, Engineering Economics, 2nd Ed., McGraw-Hill.
Prerequisite: Economics 1.
Two lectures per week. First Term. Mr. Wilkin.
(6) Principles of financing; forms of business enterprises;
stocks; bonds; operating and fixed charges; business finance;
capital and interpretation of financial statements.
References: Fish, Engineering Economics, Second Edition.
Anger, Digest of Canadian Mercantile Law. Lough, Business
Finance.
Two lectures per week.   Second Term.   Mr. Wilkin.
19. Engineering Law.—The engineer's status; fees; salary;
as a witness; responsibility; engineering contracts; tenders;
specifications; plans; extras and alterations; time; payments and
certificates; penalty, bonus or liquidated damages; maintenance
and defects; subcontractors; agents; arbitration and awards;
specification and contract writing.
Text-book.- Waddell and Wait, Specifications and Contracts,
McGraw-Hill.
References: Anger, Digest of Canadian Mercantile Law of
Canada, W. H. Anger; Ball, Law Affecting Engineers, Constable
and Co.
One lecture per week.   Mr. Matheson.
20. Surveying 3.—Geodesy; the determination of azimuth,
longitude, latitude, time, the figure of the earth; measurement of
baselines; triangulation systems; adjustments and reductions
of observations; precise levelling.
References:   Hosmer,Geodesy, Wiley; Cary, Geodetic Surveying, Wiley; Gillespie, Higher Surveying, D. Appleton and Co.
Prerequisite:  Civil 14.
One lecture per week.   Mr. Lighthall. 196 Faculty of Applied Science
•21. Hydraulic Engineering 2. — Waterpower engineering;
rainfall, runoff, stream flow; investigation of power problems;
selection of hydraulic machines; hydrographs; auxiliary power;
mass curves, load factors and characteristics; impulse and
reaction wheels; methods of control and operation of various
forms of machines; transmission of hydraulic power.
Text-books: Gibson, Hydroelectric Engineering, Volume I,
Blackie.
References: Mead, Water Power Engineering, McGraw-Hill.
Mead, Hydrology, McGraw-Hill.
Prerequisites: Civil 12 must either precede or accompany
Civil 21.
One lecture per week and fifteen hours in laboratory.
Second Term.   Mr. Wilkin.
22. Municipal Engineering.—(a) Sewerage and Sewage
Disposal. General methods and economic consideration; quantity
and run-off; design of sewers, manholes, flushtanks, etc.; construction methods, materials and costs; estimate, design, maintenance and managemment.
Sewage Disposal: physical, chemical, biological and economical aspects of sewage treatment; dilution; screening, sedimentation, filtration; disinfection; maintenance and management costs.
First Term.
References: Metealf and Eddy, Sewerage and Sewage Disposal, McGraw-Hill; Fuller and McClintock, Sewage Problems,
McGraw-Hill.
(b) Water Supply, Rainfall; evaporation; run-off; quantity, quality and pressure required; pumping machinery;
storage; aqueducts, pipe lines and distribution systems; purification systems; valves, hydrants and fire service; materials,
estimates and designs; construction methods and costs. Second
Term.
References: Turneaure, Public Water Supply, 3rd Edition,
Wiley; Flinn, Westbrook, Bogart, Waterworks Handbook,
McGraw-Hill. Civil Engineering 197
(c) Town Planning; covering the economical and artistic
development of a city, city management Street cleaning and
disposal of waste; composition and quantity of city wastes;
collection, dumping and disposal; land treatment; incineration
and reduction; costs and returns.  Second Term.
Reference: Lewis, City Planning, Wiley.
Prerequisite:  Civil 12.
Two lectures and one two-hour period per week. Mr. Stuart.
23. Transportation 2. (a) Railways.—Organization and
rules of maintenance-of-way; roadway; ballast; ties; lumber
preservation; rails and appurtenances; turnouts, tracks, accessories ; structures and their design; stresses in track; track tools;
track work; work-train service; maintenance-of-way records and
accounts; expenditures; betterments; improvements of old fines,
yards and terminals; maximum capacity of single track.
Prerequisite:  Civil 11.       *
Two lectures per week, First Term.   Mr. Wilkin.
(b) Highways.—Highway economics, surveys and locations;
grades; cross-sections; paving materials; construction methods;
designs and estimates.
Streets and pavements; materials, design, construction,
maintenance and repairs.
Text-book: Agg, Construction of Roads and Pavements,
McGraw-Hill.
Reference: Harger and Bonney, Highway Engineer's Handbook.
Prerequisite:  Civil 11.
Two lectures per week, Second Term.   Mr. Matheson.
24. Mechanics of Materials. — A continuation of Civil 10,
Strength of Materials; the application of the Principle of Least
Work to the determination of statically indeterminate forces in
beams and rigid frames; stress and deflection of unsymmetrical
sections and beams with variable moment of inertia; analysis
and design of reinforced concrete beams, slabs, columns, and
reinforced concrete arches. 198 Faculty of Applied Science
Text-book: Hool and Einne, Concrete Engineer's Handbook, McGraw-Hill.
References: Ketchum, Steel Mill Buildings; Hool, Reinforced Concrete, Vol. Ill; Urquhart and O'Rourke, Design
of Concrete Structures, McGraw-Hill
Prerequisite:  Civil 10.
Two lectures and one three-hour period per week.
Mr. Duckering.
25. Theory of Structures.—The analysis of statically determinate framed structures under dead and live loads; distortion
of framed structures; the use of influence lines for analysis of
stresses and deflections; hinged and hingeless arches; secondary
stresses and redundant members.
Text-book:  Kuntz, Design of Steel Bridges, McGraw-Hill.
References: Johnson, Bryan and Turneaure, Modern
Framed Structures, Vols. I and II, Wiley; Hool and Kinne,
Framed Structures, McGraw-Hill; Morley, Theory of Structures,
Longmans Green and Co.
Prerequisite:  Civil 10.
One lecture and two three-hour periods per week.
Mr. Finlay.
26. Class Excursions. — Members of the Fourth Year class
in Civil Engineering, under the supervision of an instructor,
will visit such factories, industrial developments, public works,
docks, shipyards, and important examples of engineering construction as are calculated to assist the student best to grasp the
application and scope of the studies pursued and to broaden
his vision of the engineering field. Written reports of trips are
required.
Note:—In periods where no trips are taken, tests of
hydraulic machines will be made in Hydraulic Laboratory. (See
Civil 29.)
27. Civil Engineering Thesis.—Original research on selected
topics; analyses of engineering projects; experimental or the- Civil Engineering 199
oretical investigations. Topics may be selected from divisions or
the Civil Engineering Course: Goedetics, Railways, Hydraulics,
Municipal, Highways, Economic and Business Engineering,
Structures.   Copy of thesis must be filed with the department.
28. Seminar. — Written and oral discussion of articles
appearing in the current Transactions and Proceedings of the
various engineering societies, also reviews of important papers
in engineering periodicals; reports on local engineering projects
visited in Civil 26; written outlines must be prepared for all
oral reports; training in technical writing and public speaking.
Required of all Third and Fourth Year students in Civil
Engineering.
Reference: Rickard, Technical Writing, McGraw-Hill.
One hour per week.
29. Hydraulic Engineering 3. — Theory, investigation and
design of hydraulic motors and machinery. Turbines, Pelton
and impulse wheels, centrifugal pumps, hydro-electric installations, plant design and operation.
Laboratory work, testing hydraulic machines, arranged for
periods when no trips are taken.  (See Civil 26.)
Prerequisite: Civil 12.
Text-book: Dougherty, Hydraulic Turbines, Third Edition.
McGraw-Hill.
Reference: Gibson, Hydro-electric Engineering; Volume I,
Gibson, Hydraulics and Its Application, Van Nostrand; Mead,
Water Power Engineering, Second Edition, McGraw-Hill.
One lecture per week.   Mr. Wilkin.
30. Engineering Problems 1. — Training in methods of
attacking, analyzing and solving engineering problems. Coaching in proper methods of work and study, including drill in
systematic arrangement and workmanship in calculations. The
content is based upon the application of mathematics to problems in physics and engineering.
Prerequisite:  First Year Arts. 200 Faculty of Applied Science
Text-books:    Duckering,   Notes   and   Problems,   Second
Edition, McGraw-Hill; Swain, How to Study, McGraw-Hill.
Two two-hour periods per week.
Mr. Wilkin, Mr. Finlay, Mr. Lighthall, Mr. Stuart, Mr.
Lang.
31. Engineering Problems 2.—A continuation of Engineering Problems 1, involving a thorough drill in problems in the
principal divisions of mathematics given in the First and Second
Years of Applied Science, drawn from the field of mechanics,
surveying, draughting, and engineering.
Prerequisite:   Civil 30.
Text-book: Duckering, Notes and Problems, Second Edition
McGraw-Hill.
One three-hour period per week.
Mr. Lighthall, Mr. Wilkin.
50. Elementary problems in rural engineering, dealing with
drainage, water supply, sewerage and sewage disposal, ventilation, simple structures and surveying. Adapted to the needs of
students in Dairying.   \^
One lecture per week.   Mr. Stuart.
Department of Economics
Professor:  Theodore H. Boggs.
Associate Professor: H. F. Angus.
Associate Professor: S. E. Beckett.
Assistant: Doris E. Lazenby.
1. Principles of Economics. — An introductory study of
general economic theory, including a survey of the principles
of value, prices, money and banking, international trade, tariffs,
monopoly, taxation, labour and wages, socialism, the control of
railways and trusts, etc.
Text-books: Fairchild, Furniss, Buck, Elementary Economics, Macmillan.   The Canada Year Book, 1927.
Two lectures per week. Forestry 201
Department of Forestry
Professor:   H. R. Christie.
Assistant Professor:   F. Malcolm Knapp.
1. General Forestry.—A general survey of the subject.
Text-book:  Fernow, Economics of Forestry, Toronto University Press.
References: Whitford and Craig, Forests of British
Columbia, Commission of Conservation, Ottawa. Pinchot, Primer
of Forestry, Superintendent of Documents, Washington, D.C.
Moon and Brown, Elements of Forestry, Wiley, second edition.
Allen, Practical Forestry in the Pacific Northwest, Western
Forestry and Conservation Association, Portland. Schlich, Forest
Policy in the British Empire, fourth edition, Bradbury Agnew.
Zon and Sparhawk, Forest Resources of the World, McGraw-
Hill.   Various government publications.
One lecture per week. f
2. Forest Mensuration.—Measurement of felled timber, of
standing timber, and of growth of trees and forests. Includes
scaling, timber estimating, and preparation of tables of volume,
growth and yield.
Text-book: Chapman, Forest Mensuration, Wiley, second
edition. Winkenwerder and Clark, Problems in Forest Mensuration, second edition, Wiley.
Reference books: Graves, Woodsman's Handbook, Superintendent of Documents, Washington, D.C. Graves, Forest Mensuration, Wiley. Carey, Manual for Northern Woodsmen, third
edition, Harvard Press.
One lecture and one period of four hours' field or laboratory
work per week.
3. Forest Protection.—The fire problem, legislation, organ
izations, prevention and control.'
Text-book: Western Fire Fighters' Manual, Western For
estry and Conservation Association, Portland. 202 Faculty of Applied Science
Reference books: Millar, Methods of Communication
Adapted to Forest Protection, Dominion Forestry Branch,
Ottawa. U. S. Forest Service, Trail Building in the National
Forests, Superintendent of Documents, Washington, D.C.
One lecture per week.   Second Term.
4. Forest Finance.—Forestry from the financial standpoint,
including studies of compound interest, valuation, rotation,
insurance and taxation.
Text-book: Roth, Forest Valuation, University of Michigan,
Second Edition.
Reference books: Chapman, Forest Finance, Wiley. Woodward, Valuation of American Timber Lands, Wiley.
Two periods of one hour each, lectures and problems, per
week.    Second Term.
5. Timber Physics and Wood Technology.—The structure of
wood; the identification of different woods and their qualities
and uses; wood seasoning; wood preservation; emphasis on the
Canadian woods of commercial importance.
Text-books: Record, Economic Woods of the United States,
Wiley, second edition. Record, Mechanical Properties of Wood,
Wiley.
Reference books: Koehler, The Properties and Uses of
Wood, McGraw-Hill. Koehler and Thelen, Kiln Drying of Lumber, McGraw-Hill. Snow, Wood and Other Organic Structural
Materials, McGraw-Hill. Roth, Timber, U. S. Forest Service,
Bui. 10, Superintendent of Documents, Washington, D. C.
Two lectures and one period of three hours laboratory per
week.
6. Forest Organization. — The principles and methods of
organizing forest areas for business management. Normal forest,
increment, rotation, felling budget, working plans.
Text-book: Roth, Forest Regulation, Roth, University of
Michigan.
Reference books: Recknagel and Bentley, Forest Management, Wiley.  Recknagel, Forest Working Plans, Wiley, second Forestry 203
edition. Schlich, Forest Management, Bradbury Agnew. Woolsey, American Forest Regulation, Woolsey, New Haven.
One lecture per week.
7. History of Forestry and Forest Administration. — The
development of forestry in different parts of the world; forest
resources and industries, policy, legislation and education.
Reference books: Fernow, History of Forestry, University
of Toronto Press, second edition. Schlich, Forest Policy in
the British Empire, Bradbury Agnew. Boerker, Our National
Forests, MacMillan. Ise, The United States Forest Policy, Yale
University Press. Zon and Sparhawk, Forest Resources of the
World, McGraw-Hill.   Various government publications.
One lecture per week.
8. Silviculture. — Principles and methods of caring for
forests and growing timber crops.
Text-books: Hawley, Practice of Silviculture, Wiley.
Tourney, Planting and Seeding in the Practice of Forestry,
Wiley.
Reference books: Graves, Principles of Handling Woodlands, Wiley. Woolsey, Studies in French Forestry, Wiley.
Schlich, Silviculture, Bradbury Agnew. Various government
publications,     k
Two lectures per week during the year, and one period of
three hours field or laboratory work during the second term.
9. General Lumbering.—A general study of the principles
and practice of logging and milling in the chief timber regions
of North America.
Text-book: Bryant, Logging, Wiley, second edition.
Reference books: Gibbons, Logging in the Douglas Fir
Region, U. S. D. A. Bui. 711, Superintendent of Documents,
Washington, D. C. Berry, Lumbering in the Sugar and Yellow
Pine Region of California, U. S. D. A. Bui. 440, Superintendent
of Documents, Washington, D. C.
Two lectures per week, First Term.
One lecture per week, Second Term. 204 Faculty of Applied Science
10. Logging.—An intensive study of logging systems and
operations in the forests of western North America.
Text-book: Gibbons, Logging in the Douglas Fir Region,
U. S. D. A. Bui. 711, Superintendent of Documents, Washington, D. C.
Reference books: Various articles in the Timberman,
B. C. Lumberman and other trade journals.
One lecture per week throughout the year; one period of
four hours laboratory or field work per week, alternating with
Forestry 11 and 12.
11. Milling.—A study of the sawmilling and allied woodworking industries of western North America.
Text-book: Bryant, Lumber, Wiley.
Reference books: Oakleaf, Lumber Manufacture in the
Douglas Fir Region, Commercial Journal Co. Brown, American
Lumber Industry, Wiley. Berry, Lumbering in the Sugar and
Yellow Pine Region of California, U. S. D. A. Bui. 440, Superintendent of Documents, Washington, D, C Seeley, Small Sawmills, U. S. D. A. Bui. 718, Superintendent of Documents,
Washington, D. C.
Two lectures per week; one period of four hours laboratory
or field work per week, alternating with Forestry 10. First
Term.
12. Forest Products.—A study of other forest industries,
including paper and pulp, naval stores, and wood distillation.
Text-book: Brown, Forest Products, Their Manufacture and
Use, Wiley.
Reference books: Joint Authorship, The Manufacture of
Pulp and Paper, Vol. 3 to 5, McGraw-Hill. Hawley, Wood
Distillation, Chemical Catalogue Co.
Two lectures per week; one period of four hours laboratory
or field work per week, alternating with Forestry 10. Second
Term. Forest Products Laboratories of Canada 205
Vancouver Laboratory
Forest Products Laboratories of Canada
R. M. Brown, B.Sc.F. (Toronto), Superintendent
R. S. Perry, B.Sc. (McGill), Assistant Engineer.
J: H. Jenkins, B.A.Sc. (Brit. Col.), Timber Products Supervisor.
J. B. Alexander, B.Cc. (New Brunswick), D.L.S., A.L.S., Timber Tests
Supervisor.
H. W. Eades, B.Sc.F. (Washington), Assistant Timber Pathologist.
F. W. Guernsey, B.A.Sc. (Brit. Col.), Assistant in Timber Products.
J. T. Lee, Timber Tester.
D. S. Wright, Timber Tester.
The Forest Service of the. Federal Department of the
Interior maintains two Forest Products Laboratories, one at
Ottawa, and the other at Vancouver, in association with. the
University of British Columbia. The latter was established in
1918 in order to more adequately deal with forest products
research problems of the western portion of Canada. It was
equipped at first only for timber testing, as British Columbia
timbers are of outstanding importance for structural purposes.
The scope of the work of the laboratory has gradually extended
in accordance with the requirements of the timber industry and
now includes lumber seasoning ingestigations, timber decay
research, etc. A most important phase of the work of the
laboratory is its technical service to the timber industries in
the dissemination of information on a variety of subjects, such
as wood preservation, utilization of wood waste, pulp and paper,
wood distillation, etc. Research in wood preservation is, at
present, confined to the Ottawa Laboratory. A new co-operative
laboratory has been established at McGill University through an
arrangement with the Canadian Pulp & Paper Association, McGill University and the Forest Products Laboratories of Canada,
which will deal with all questions relating to pulp and paper
research.
An increasingly valuable amount of material has been
collected from the research Work of other laboratories and
catalogued for reference.
A mutually beneficial scheme of co-operation exists between
the Laboratory and the University, whereby students of the 206 Faculty of Applied Science
University in Engineering and Forestry have access to the
laboratory to watch the work being carried on and to use the
apparatus at times in testing strength of materials. The staff
of the Laboratory also has the benefit of the University library
and the advice and assistance of University specialists in related
work.
Department of Geology and Geography
Professor: R. W. Brock.
Professor of Physical and Structural Geology: S. J. Schofield.
Professor of Palaeontology and Stratigraphy: M. Y. Williams.
Associate Professor of Mineralogy and Petrology:   T. C. Phemister.
Assistant: J. A. E. Kania.
Geology
1. General Geology.—This course serves as an introduction
to the science of Geology. The following subjects are treated in
the lectures and laboratory:
(a) Physical Geology, including: weathering, work of the
wind, ground water, streams, glaciers, the ocean and its work,
the structures of the earth, earthquakes, volcanoes and igneous
intrusions, metamorphism, mountains and plateaus, and ore-
deposits, w f
Two lectures per week.  First Term.  Mr. Schofield.
(6) Laboratory Exercises in Physical Geology, including
the study and identification of the most common minerals and
rocks, the interpretation of topographical and geological maps,
and the study of structures by the use of models.
Two hours laboratory per week. First Term. Mr. Schofield.
(c) Historical Geology, including the earth before the Cambrian, the Palaeozoic, the Mesozoic, the Cenozoic and Quarter-
nary eras.
Two lectures per week.  Second Term.  Mr. Williams.
(d) Laboratory Exercises in Historical Geology, consisting
of the general study of fossils, their characteristics and associa-
ions, their evolution and migration s illustrated by their occurrence in the strata.   The principles of Palaeogeography will bo Geology and Geography 207
taken up and illustrated by the study of the palaeogeography
of North America.
Two hours laboratory per week. Second Term. Mr.
Williams.
Field Work will replace laboratory occasionally, and will
take the form of excursions to localities, in the immediate neighborhood of Vancouver, which illustrate the subject matter of the
lectures.
Prerequisite: Matriculation Chemistry or Physics, or Chemistry 1 or Physics 1, taken either before or concurrently.
Text-book: Pirsson and Schuchert, Introductory Geology,
Wiley.
Reference books: Geikie, Text-book of Geology. Merrill,
Rocks, Rock-Weathering and Soils. Coleman and Parks, Elementary Geology. Shimer, Introduction to the Study of Fossils.
Davis, Geographical Essays.   Hugh Miller's works.
Students will be required to make a passing mark in each
of the above subdivisions. 1 3 units.
2. (a) General Mineralogy.—A brief survey of the field of
mineralogy.
Lectures take the form of a concise treatment of (1) Crystallography, (2) Physical Mineralogy, and (3) Descriptive
Mineralogy of 40 of the more common mineral species, with
special reference to Canadian occurrences.
Laboratory Work consists of the study of the common
crystal forms and of 40 prescribed minerals, accompanied by a
brief outline of the principles and methods of Determinative
Mineralogy and Blowpipe Analysis.
Text-books: Dana, Text-book of Mineralogy, revised by
Ford, Wiley.
Prerequisite:  Chemistry 1.
Two lectures and one laboratory period of two hours per
week.   First Term.   Mr. Phemister.
2. (b) Descriptive and Determinative Mineralogy. — This
course supplements 2 (a) and consists of a more complete survey 208 Faculty of Applied Science
of Crystallography, Physical and Chemical Mineralogy, with a
critical study of about 50 of the less common minerals, special
emphasis being laid on their crystallography, origin, association
and alteration.
Text-book: Dana, Text-book of Mineralogy, revised by Ford,
Wiley.
Prerequisite:  Geology 2 (a).
Two lectures and one laboratory period of two hours per
week.   Second Term.   Mr. Phemister.
3. Historical Geology .—Continental evolution and development of life, with special reference to North America.
Text-book:  Schuchert, Historical Geology, 2nd Ed., Wiley.
Prerequisite:  Geology 1. %
Three lectures per week.   First Term.   Mr. Williams.
4. Structural and Physiographical Geology.—The following
subjects are treated in the lectures: Fractures, faults, flowage,
structures common to both fracture and flow, mountains, major
units of structures, forces of deformation, the origin and development of land forms with special reference to the physiography
of British Columbia.
Text-book: Leith, Structural Geology, Holt.
Prerequisite:  Geology 1.
Three lectures per week.   Second Term.   Mr. Schofield.
5. (a) History of Geology.—A brief history of the study
jf the earth and the development of the geological sciences.
Mr. Brock.
(b) Geology of Canada.—The salient features of the geology
and economic minerals of Canada. Mr. Williams, Mr. Schofield,
Mr. Brock.
(c) Regional Geology.—The main geological features of the
3ontinents and oceanic segments of the earth's crust, and their
influences upon life.   Mr. Brock.
Prerequisite:  Geology 1.
Three lectures and one laboratory period of one hour per
week. Geology and Geography -  209
6. Palaeontology.—A study of invertebrate and vertebrate
fossils, their classification, identification and distribution both
geological and geographical.
Reference books: Grabau and Shimer, North American
Index Fossils.   Zittel-Eastman, Text-book of Paleontology.
Prerequisite:  Geology 1.
Two lectures and one laboratory period of two hours per
week.   Mr. Williams.
7. Petrology.—This course consists of systematic studies of
(i) optical mineralogy, and (ii) petrography, with an introduction to petrogenesis.
The laboratory work deals with the determination of rocks,
first under the microscope, and then in hand specimens.
Text-books: Pirsson, Rocks and Rock Minerals, Wiley.
Johannsen, Essentials for the Microscopical Determination of
Rock-forming Minerals and Rocks, University of Chicago Press.
Dana, Text-book of Mineralogy, revised by Ford, Wiley.
Reference works: Johannsen, Manual of Petrographic
Methods. Rosenbusch, Microscopical Physiography of the Rock-
making Minerals, translated by Iddings. Rosenbusch, Elemente
der Gesteinslehre. Harker, Petrology for Students. Gruben-
mann, Die Kristallinen Schiefer.
Prerequisites:   Geology 1 and 2.
Two lectures and two laboratory periods of two hours per
week.   Mr. Phemister. 4 units.
8. Economic Geology.—A study of the occurrence, genesis,
and structure of the principal metallic and non-metallic mineral
deposits with type illustrations; and a description of the ore-
deposits of the British Empire, special stress being placed on
those in Canada.
Text-book: Emmons, General Economic Geology, McGraw-
Hill.
Reference book:  Lindgren, Mineral Deposits, 2nd ed. 210 Faculty of Applied Science
Prerequisite: Geology 1. Geology 7 must precede or accompany this course.
Four lectures per week.
Mr. Brock, Mr. Williams, Mr. Schofield, Mr. Phemister.
9. Mineralography.—Principally a laboratory course dealing
with the study and recognition of the opaque minerals by means
of the reflecting microscope.
The work consists of practice in the cutting, grinding and
polishing of ore specimens, accompanied by training in micro-
chemical methods of mineral determination.
During the second term each student is assigned a suite of
ores from some mining district for a critical examination and
report.
Text-book: Davy and Farnham, Microscopic Examination
of the Ore Minerals, McGraw-Hill.
Prerequisite: Geology 7 and 8 must precede or accompany
this course.
One laboratory period of two hours per week. Mr.Phemister.
10. Field Geology. — The methods taught are the fundamental ones used by professional geologists and by the officers
of the Geological Survey of Canada. The course is essentially
practical, and is designed to teach methods of observing, recording and correlating geological facts in the field. The students
construct geological maps of selected areas in the vicinity of
Vancouver which require the use of the various methods and
instruments employed in field geology.
Reference books: Lahee, Field Geology. Hayes, Handbook
for Field Geologists.   Spurr, Geology Applied to Mining.
Prerequisite: Geology 1. Geology 4, if not already taken,
must be taken concurrently.
One period of three hours per week.   Mr. Schofield.
14. Crystallography.—This course consists of a systematic
study of the morphology of crystals, with an introduction to
mathematical crystallography. Mathematics 211
The practical work deals with the measurement of crystals,
and, in the case of students in chemistry, a certain number of
the crystals measured will be grown in the laboratory.
Students are advised to consult with the instructor before
registering for this course.
Text-book: Tutton, Crystallography and Practical Crystal
Measurement, Macmillan.
Two lectures and six hours laboratory per week.
Mr. Phemister. 5 units.
Department of Mathematics
Professor: Daniel Buchanan.
Professor: F. S. Nowlan.
Associate Professor: G. E. Robinson.
Associate Professor: E. E. Jordan.
Associate Professor: L. Richardson.
Assistant: Harold D. Smith.
1. Plane Trigonometry.—An elementary course, including
the solution of triangles and the use of logarithms, inverse and
hyperbolic functions.
Text-books:   Playne and Fawdry, Practical Trigonometry,
Copp, Clark.   Six-Place Tables, McGraw-Hill.
Two lectures per week.   Second Term.
2. Solid Geometry.—A study of the three-faced corner, the
various polyhedra and solid figures, and the theorems of Pappus.
Text-book: Foster, Geometry, Practical and Theoretical,
(Vol. Ill Solid), Bell.
Two lectures per week.   First Term.
3. Algebra.—A review of simple series, permutations, combinations and the binomial theorem, and a study of exponential
and other series, undetermined coefficients, partial and continued
fractions, graphical algebra.
Two lectures per week
Text-book: Rietz and Crathorne, College Algebra, Holt. 212 Faculty of Applied Science
4. Calculus.—An introductory study of the differential
and integral calculus will be made, and some of the simpler
applications considered.
Text-book: Woods and Bailey, Elementary Calculus, Ginn.
Two lectures per week.
6. Calculus.—Differential and integral calculus with various
applications.
Text-book: Woods and Bailey, Elementary Calculus, Ginn.
Three lectures per week.
7. Analytical Geometry.—A study of the conies and other
curves occurring in engineering practice, and elementary work
in three dimensions.
Text-book: Fawdry, Co-ordinate Geometry, Bell.
Two lectures per week.
8. Applied Calculus. — The applications of calculus to
various problems in engineering.
Two lectures per week.
(Given in 1928-29 and alternate years.)
9. Differential Equations.—A study of ordinary and partial
differential equations and their applications.
Two lectures per week.
(Given in 1929-30 and alternate years.)
Department of Mechanical and Electrical Engineering
Professor: Herbert Vickers.
Associate Professor of Mechanical Engineering: F. W. Vernon.
Assistant Professor of Mechanical Engineering: H. F. G. Letson.
Assistant Professor of Electrical Engineering:  Leonard B. Stacey.
Lecturer in Mechanical Engineering: G. Sinclair Smith.
Instructor in Mechanical Engineering: John F. Bell.
Assistant in Drawing: H. P. Archibald.
Mechanical Engineering
1. Mechanical Drawing.—Practice in freehand lettering in
accordance with common practice. Geometrical Drawing, to give
facility in the use of drawing instruments.  Freehand sketching Mechanical and Electrical Engineering 213
of machine parts and structures from which drawings are made
to scale. Drawing to scale of simple machine parts. Making of
assembly drawings from detail drawings, and detail drawings
from assembly drawings.    Tracing and blueprinting.
Two three-hour periods per week.
2. (a) SJwp Work.—This work is intended to supplement
the manual training given in the high schools, and also to give
the student some knowledge of the more common machine shop
methods and processes as employed commercially. The object is
to provide some basis for the intelligent design of machines and
structural parts.
Lectures.—Physical properties of the materials used in
machine construction. Modern methods of handling and finishing wood. Forging and hammering of metals. Annealing and
tempering. Making of patterns and cores. Cupola practice.
Soldering and brazing, tinning, electroplating. Drilling
and tapping, turning and boring, calipering and fitting, milling
and milling cutters, reaming and reamers, screw cutting. Grinding and abrasive wheels. Lapping. Punching and shearing.
Drop forging and die-casting. Metal spinning. Torch and
electric welding. Cold sawing and torch cutting. Tool-making
and dressing. Use of jigs. Machine shop standards, including
wire and sheet metal gauges, threads, etc.
Text-book: Colvin & Stanley, American Machinists' Handbook, McGraw-Hill.
One lecture per week.
Practice in Metal-working.—Bench work, including marking
off, chipping, filing, scraping, tapping, and fitting; lathe work,
including turning and boring, screw-cutting and finishing; lathe
adjustments; shaping; milling; gear-cutting; tool-dressing.
One two-hour period per week.
2. (b) Machine Shop Practice.—A continuation of Mechanical Engineering 2.
Five hours laboratory per week First Term, and three hours
Second Term. 214 Faculty of Applied Science
3. Kinematics of Machines. — Displacement, velocity and
acceleration. Relative motions. Harmonic motions. Gear trains.
Cams, ratchets, and escapements. Classification of mechanisms.
Study of mechanisms in common use. Transmission of motion
by belting.   Design of outlines of gear teeth.
Text-book: Durley, Kinematics of Machines, Wiley.
Reference book: McKay, Kinematics of Machines, Longman
Green.
One two-hour period per week.
4. Dynamics of Machines.—Friction and lubrication. Transmission of power by belts, ropes, gears and friction clutches.
Function and dynamics of speed governors. Dynamics of the
screw. Forces involved in linear and angular acceleration of
moving parts, with special reference to engines, turbines, and
pumps. Stresses due to centrifugal force. Balancing of moving
parts.   Dynamics of the gyroscope.
Reference books: Low, Applied Mechanics. Dent & Harper,
Kinematics and Kinetics of Machinery, Wiley.
Two lectures per week.
5. Machine Design.—Strength of materials used in machine
construction. Factors of safety and allowable stresses under
various conditions of load. Design of: Valve mechanisms for
steam engines; governors; thin cylinders and tanks; rivetted
joints; fastenings, such as bolts, screws and cotters; levers and
winch handles.
Reference books: Spooner, Machine Design, Construction
and Drawing, Longmans Green. Dalby, Valves and Valve
Gears, Arnold.
Two lectures and one three-hour period per week.
6. Elementary Thermodynamics.—(a) Fuels and combustion. General principles underlying the construction and operation of steam boilers. Elementary theory of the steam engine.
Measurement of power. Performance of various types of steam
engines.   Elementary theory of internal combustion  engines. Mechanical and Electrical Engineering 215
Design and operation of isolated power plants to give the best
economic results. Theory of air compressors, transmission and
use of compressed air. Elementary theory and practical operation of producer gas plants.
Text-books: Inchley's Heat Engines, Longmans Green; or
Allen & Bursley, Heat Engines, McGraw-Hill.
Reference books: Ewing, Thermodynamics, Cambridge
Press. Callendar, Steam Power, Longman's Green. Simmons,
Compressed Air, McGraw-Hill. Marks and Davis, Steam Tables
and Diagrams, Longman's Green. Gebhardt, Steam Power
Plant Engineering, Wiley. Kent, Mechanical Engineer's Pocket
Book, Wiley. Fernald & Orrok, Engineering of Power Plants,
McGraw-Hill.
Two lectures per week.
(6) Laboratory.—Testing  of  boilers,  steam  engines  and
internal combustion engines.   Analysis and calorimetry of fuels.
One three-hour laboratory period per week.
7. Thermodynamics. — A more precise study of the performances and construction of various types of boilers, including
furnaces and superheaters. Theoretical efficiency of different
types of reciprocating engines working under various conditions.
Influence on efficiency of size, speed and ratio of expansion
with variations of load. Compound and triple expansion engines.
Use of steam tables in reference to calculations on saturated and
superheated steam. Flow of gases and vapours through orifices
and nozzles.
Text-book: Low, Heat Engines, Longman's Green.
Reference books: Ewing, Thermodynamics, Cambridge
Press. Callendar, Steam Power, Longman's Green. Lucke,
Thermodynamics, McGraw-Hill, and as under Mechanical 6.
Three lectures and one three-hour laboratory period
per week.
8. Thermodynamics. — Advanced theory relative to the
transformation of heat into mechanical energy.  Laws governing 216 Faculty of Applied Science
the flow of heat through various substances. More precise study
of the theory and performance of all types of prime movers,
including all types of reciprocating and rotary steam engines,
steam turbines, and internal combustion engines.
Text-book: Low, Heat Engines, Longman's Green.
Reference book: Ewing, Thermodynamics, Cambridge Press.
Two lectures and one three-hour period per week.
9. Thermodynamics.—For Mechanical Engineering students
only.
Text-book: Low, Heat Engines, Longman's Green.
Laboratory   text-book:    Moyer,    Power   Plant    Testing,
McGraw-Hill.
Reference book: Ewing, Thermodynamics, Cambridge Press.
Two lectures and one six-hour laboratory per week.
10. Machine Design.—The design of machine and structural
parts, including parts of engines of all types; design of appliances for the transmission of power, including belts, rope, cable,
friction and toothed gearing. The student is required to work
out the complete design of some machine or appliance, and make
the drawings and tracings requisite for its construction.
Text-book: Spooner, Machine Design, Longmans Green.
Two lectures and one five-hour laboratory per week for
Mechanical Engineering, and two lectures and one three-hour
laboratory for Electrical Engineering.
11. Heating, Ventilation, and Refrigeration.—Design of
steam, hot water, and hot air systems of heating. Heaters for
steam and water systems. Use of exhaust steam for heating.
Central heating plants. Loss of heat from buildings. Refrigerating systems.
Reference book: Harding & Willard, Mechanical Equipment
of Buildings (Vols. I and II), Wiley.
One lecture per week.
12. Design of Power Plants.—A study of the function, construction, and performance of the various machines and appli- Mechanical and Electrical Engineering 217
ances which enter into the design of industrial plants. Special
attention is given to the economic results to be expected from
various combinations.
Reference books: Harding & Willard, Mechanical Equipment of Buildings (Vols. I and II), Wiley. Fernald & Orrok,
Engineering of Power Plants, McGraw-Hill.
One lecture per week.
13. Physical Treatment of Metals.—A study of the various
metals used in commercial work, with special reference to the
treatment applied to get the physical properties and qualities
required for specific purposes.
Text-book: Colvin & Juthe, The Working of Steel, McGraw-
Hill.
One lecture and one three-hour laboratory per week.
14. Mechanical Design of Electrical Machines.
Electrical Engineering
1. Theory and Operation of Electrical Machines.—A practical course for students not specializing in Electrical or
Mechanical Engineering. Units: Absolute electrostatic and
electromagnetic, practical units, conversion factors.
Magnetic Circuit: Unit magnetic pole, field, intensity,
induction; flux, magnetomotive force, reluctance, permeability,
potential, B-H curves, hysteresis. Electric Circuit: Unit quantity,
current and current density, electromotive force, Ohms Law,
Joules Law, Kirchhoff's Laws, resistivity and specific resistance,
conductivity and conductance; induction, self and mutual.
Direct Current Machines: The dynamo, motor and generator; Emf. equation; armature, simple lap and wave; excitation; characteristic curves of series, shunt, separately and compound excited generators and motors; armature reaction;
commutation; efficiency, rating and heating; types of motors
suited to various classes of service; boosters; balancers for three
wire systems; parallel operation of generators. 218 Faculty of Applied Science
Alternating Current: The production of simple alternating
electromotive forces and currents; wave form; form factor;
frequency; maximum, average, and root-mean-square values;
effect of induction and capacity on the properties of alternating
current circuits; vector diagrams; measurement of power; power
factor; polyphase circuits; Y and Delta connections.
Alternating Current Machines—Alternator: Emf. equation;
armature winding: magneto-motive forces and fluxes; armature
reaction; leakage reactance; regulation; efficiency. Synchronous
Motor: Principle; vector diagram; output; power factor; synchronizing; hunting; parallel operation of alternators. Transformer: Constant potential1 vector diagrams; leakage reactance;
constant current; losses; efficiency; connections; phase transformation; auto and booster transformers. Induction Motor:
Revolving field; slip; characteristics; circle diagram; variable
speed; wound rotor induction motor; choice of type; starting.
Rotary Converters: Description of operation.
Transmission of Electrical Energy: Comparison of cost of
transmission with different number of phases; instrument transformers. \
The above course is designed to introduce to the students
the principal factors in electrical machinery; only enough theory
being given to explain intelligently the operating characteristics
of the apparatus studied.
Text-books: Gray, Principles and Practice of Electrical
Engineering, McGraw-Hill. Maclean, Electrical Laboratory
Course for Junior Students, Blackie & Sons.
Prerequisite:  Physics 3.
Two lectures and one laboratory period of two hours per
week.
2. Elementary Electrical Engineering.—Units-' Absolute,
electrostatic, electromagnetic and practical units.
Electromagnetism'- Permeability; flux-density; magnetomotive force; magnetic reluctance; calculation of pull of electromagnets ; inductance, self and mutual. Mechanical and Electrical Engineering 219
Commercial Current and Voltage Measuring Instruments'
Requirements of good measuring instruments, amperemeters and
voltmeters; construction and moving-coil; hot-wire; electrostatic
and induction-type measuring instruments.
Secondary Batteries-' Theory; use and application.
Armature Winding-' Theory of lap and wave windings; use
of equalizing connections; characteristics of series, shunt and
compound wound motors; characteristics of shunt and compound
wound generators; commutation, and armature reaction in direct
current machines.
Elementary Theory of Alternating Currents: The production of simple alternating electromotive forces and currents;
wave form, frequency, crest and RMS valves; Cartesian and
Polar diagrams; effect of self induction and capacity on the
properties of alternating current circuits; measurement of power
in A.C. circuits; polyphase circuits, balanced and unbalanced
systems; star and mesh connections; vector treatment.
Elementary Theory of the Transformer. Automatic Reversible Battery Boosters.  Testing of apparatus studied.
Wave Form Indicators: The Oscillograph, Joubert's contact, the Ondograph.
Insulation: Characteristics of various types, switches and
fuses.
Illumination and Photometry: Arc Lamps, Incandescent
Lamps, Street Illumination, etc.
Text-books: MacCall, Electrical Engineering Continuous
Currents, University Tutorial Press Ltd. Lawrence, Alternating
Currents, McGraw-Hill. MacCall, Electrical Engineering Alternating Currents, University Tutorial Press Ltd. Smith, Testing
Dynamos and Motors, Scientific Publishing Co. Smith, Practical
Alternating Currents, Scientific Publishing Co. Maclean, Electrical Laboratory Course for Junior Students, Blackie & Sons.
Bennett & Crothers, Electro-Dynamics, McGraw-Hill. 220 Faculty of Applied Science
For Third Year Electrical and Mechanical students only.
Prerequisite: Physics 3.
Three lectures and one laboratory period of four hours per
week.
3. Electrical Engineering. — Direct Current Machines:
Separation of losses by various methods; back to back methods
of testing efficiency; parallel operation; review of armature
reaction and the compensating thereof; further study of commutation.
Alternating Current Machines: The Alternator; Induced
Electromotive force, Armature winding, Magnetomotive forces
and fluxes concerned in the Alternator, Armature Raection,
Armature leakage reactance, Armature effective Resistance,
Regulation, Methods of predeterminating Regulation and the
vector diagrams thereof, Losses, Efficiency.
Static Transformers: Types of Transformers, The Ideal
Transformer, True equivalent circuit of a Transformer, Approximate equivalent circuit of a transformer, Calculation of
Magnetizing current and inphase current supplying Core losses,
Calculation of leakage reactance, Solution of the vector diagram
and Calculation of Regulation, Losses in a Transformer—Eddy
Current Loss—Hysteresis Loss—Copper Loss, Calculation of
Efficiency, Ratio Test, Polarity Test, Short Circuit Test. Calculation of Regulation from the short circuit Test, Regulation by
loading, Sumpner efficiency Test, Separation of Hysteresis and
Eddy Current loss Test, Current Transformer, Potential Transformer, Constant Current Transformer, Auto-Transformer
Induction Regulator, Parallel operation of Transformers, Transformer Connections, Phase Transformation.
Synchronous Motors: General characteristics, Power factor,
V Curves, Methods of starting, Explanation of the operation of
a Synchronous Motor, Hunting, Damping, Stability, Circle diagram of the Synchronous Motor, Losses and Efficiency, Parallel
operation of Alternators. Mechanical and Electrical Engineering 221
Synchronous Converters: Voltage Ratio and current relations, Armature heating and resistance and the effect thereof
of change in power factor.
Polyphase Induction Motors: Revolving field, slip, Transformer properties of an Induction Motor, True and approximate
equivalent circuit of an induction motor, Load equivalent to a
non inductive resistance, Circle diagram, Characteristic Curves,
Methods of starting Induction Motors, Speed Control.
Transmission of Electrical Energy: A brief treatment dealing with the economy of conducting material for different num
ber of phases.
Text-books: Smith, Practical Alternating Currents, Scientific
Publishing Co. Lawrence, Principles of Alternating Current
Machinery, McGraw-Hill.
For Fourth Year Mechanical students only.
Prerequisite:  Electrical 2.
Two lectures and one laboratory period of three hours per
week.
4. Electrical Machinery. Theory of the Transformer. Core
and Shell types. Vector diagrams. Magnetizing current, Regulation, Current Rush on suddenly switching on. Systems of
Connection.   Methods of Cooling.   Testing.
The Alternator. Salient and non-salient pole types. Alternator windings. EMF equation. Breadth factor, Form Factor,
Coil-span Factor. Method of obtaining pure sine wave form.
Regulation. Calculation of Regulation. Synchronous Impedance.
Short Circuit Currents. Method of Calculating excitation on
loads of various power factors. Synchronizing of alternators.
Synchroscopes.   Parallel Operation of Alternators.
The Synchronous Motor. Single and Polyphase Types
Vector diagram. Variation of power factor with excitation.
Calculation of excitation necessary for power factor improvement. Damping windings. Hunting and its cure. Methods of
Starting. 222 Faculty of Applied Science
The Induction Motor. Windings. Production of Rotating
field, Circle diagram. Slip, torque and other characteristics.
Squirrel Cage and Slip Ring Types. Effect of rotor resistance.
Torque slip curves. Starting methods of Squirrel cage machines. Calculation of steps of starting resistances for wound
rotor machines. Crawling of Induction motors. Leakage fluxes
in Induction motors. Pole changing. Cascade Connection and
its characteristics. Speed Control by rotor resistance, by change
of frequency, by use of AC commutating motors. Hunt Cascade
motor.
Efficiency Tests. Stroboscopic method of slip measurement.
Single Phase Induction Motor Theory.
The Rotary Converter. EMF and current relations. Heating of Rotaries. Methods of Changing voltage ratios. Starting
and Synchronizing.
The Three Phase Commutator Motor. Shunt and Series
Types. Vector diagrams and characteristics.
Text-books: McCall, Alternating Currents, University
Tutorial Press. Lawrence, Alternating Currents, McGraw-Hill.
Steinmetz, Theory and Calculation of Electric Apparatus,
McGraw-Hill. H. Vickers, The Induction Motor, Sir Isaac
Pitman & Sons.
Two lectures and one laboratory period of six hours per
week.
5. Electric Traction.—Electric Railways: advantages and
disadvantages of various systems. Low tension DC and high
tension DC. High tension systems. Speed-time curves and their
estimation. Estimation of power required for electric trains.
Train Resistance. Series Traction Motors DC and AC and their
complete theory and characteristics. Control and Control Systems. Equipment and Rolling Stock. Regenerative Braking.
Overhead construction and rail construction. Feeder systems
and their design.   Sub-station Equipment.
Text-books:  A. T. Dover, Electric Traction, Sir Isaac Pit- Mechanical and Electrical Engineering 223
man & Sons.   F. W. Carter, Electric Traction, Chapman & Hall.
Harding, Electric Traction, McGraw-Hill.
One lecture per week.
6. Electric Power Plants and Transmission Lines. — Comparison of amounts of Copper for Various Systems. Choice of
Site and type of machinery. Load Factor and diversity factor.
Inductance and Capacity Calculations. Voltage drops on Single
Phase and Three phase lines. Charging currents. Voltage rises
on AC systems. Automatic Protective Switch-gear. Lightning
Arresters. Kelvin's Law. Design of Feeders. Voltage drops in
feeders and cables. Conductors and disributing networks; loss
of potential in networks. Voltage control. Tirrill Regulator.
Economics of hydro-electric development. Design of E.H.T.
feeders. Suspension Type Insulators and other types. Mechanical design of line and towers.
Corona. Losses due to Corona. Laws of Corona. Voltage
and Power Factor Control of Transmission lines.
Lowe, Electric Power Transmission, McGraw-Hill.
Text-book: Still, Overhead Power Transmission, McGraw-
Hill.
Two lectures per week.
One lecture per week.
7. Electrical Design.—Design of DC generators and motors.
Induction motors. Salient and non-salient Pole Alternators.
Rotary Converters.    Transformers.
Text-books: Slichter, Design of Electrical Machinery,
Wiley & Sons. Miles Walker, Specification and Design of Electrical Machinery, Longmanns, Green & Co. Gray, Design of
Electrical Machinery, McGraw-Hill. H. Vickers, The Induction
Motor, Sir Isaac Pitman & Sons. Whittaker, The Rotary Converter, Benn Bros.
One lecture per week.
8. Radio, Telegraphy and Telephony. — Open and closed
oscillators. Resonance. Coupled Circuits. Forced and free vibrations. Waves on coils and wires. 224 Faculty of Applied Science
Antennae and Earth Connections. Propagation of waves
over the earth's surface.
Generation of Oscillations. Spark. Arc. High-frequency
Alternator.  Frequency Changers and Ionic Valves.
Methods of Detection. Valve Circuits, beat reception, relaying, amplifying, with special attention to work on Ionic Valves.
Wireless Telephony. Microphones: Various Types. Transmitting Circuits.  Receiving Circuits.   Tuning.
Direction Finding. Latest work on above. Interference and
its prevention. Short Wave Work with Beam Systems.
Text-book: Eceles, Continuous Wave Telegraphy and Telephony, Van Nostrand. Lauer & Brown, Radiotelegraphy and
Telephony, McGraw-Hill. Morecroft, Principles of Radio Communication, Wiley & Sons.
One lecture per week.
Department of Mining and Metallurgy
Professor of Mining:   J. M. Turnbull.
Professor of Metallurgy:   H. N. Thomson.
Associate Professor of Mining:   Geo. A. Gillies.
Assistant in Metallurgy:   W. B. Bishop.
Mining
1. Metal Mining.—An introductory course in metal mining,
covering the following subjects:
Ores and economic minerals; economic basis of mining;
ordinary prospecting; mineral belts; conditions in British
Columbia; preliminary development of mines; timbering and
framing; tunnelling; shaft sinking; transportation and haulage;
drainage; ventilation.
Two lectures per week.   Mr. Turnbull.
2. Coal and Placer Mining.—A general course in coal and
placer mining, covering the following subjects:
(a) Classification of coals; prospecting; mine development;
mining methods; ventilation; transportation and haulage; drainage ; tipples; coal mines acts and laws. Mining and Metallurgy 225
(6) Gravel deposits; nature and origin of paystreaks; prospecting; examination and testing of deposits; ordinary mining
methods; hydraulic and dredging methods; plant and equipment; placer mines acts and laws.
Two lectures per week.   Mr. Turnbull.
3. Metal Mining. — An advanced course in metal mining,
covering the following subjects:
Scientific prospecting; development work in mines; mining
methods; blasting and explosives; examination of mines and
prospects; methods of ore sampling; mine valuation; accounting
and costs, administration; welfare and safety work; mining laws
and contracts; economics; ethics. ^^
Prerequisite:  Mining 1.
Two lectures per week.   Mr. Turnbull.
4. Mining Machinery.—A special course covering the structural and mechanical features of Mining Engineering, as follows:
Mine structures; mining plant and machinery; core and
churn drills; tramways, etc.
Prerequisites: Mining 1; Mechanical Engineering 3, 6;
Civil Engineering 3 and 10.
Two lectures per week.   Mr. Gillies.
5. Mine Surveying.—A practical course covering the work
of the surveyor and staff in metal mines:
Methods and practice in mine surveying; geological work
underground; maps, plans and models; notes and records.
Prerequisites:  Civil Engineering 2 and 6.
One lecture per week.   First Term.   Mr. Turnbull.
6. Mining Design.—A laboratory draughting course covering the special requirements of Mining students in regard to
design of the layout and details of mining plant, structures, and
mine survey plans.
One three-hour period per week.   Mr. Gillies. 226 Faculty of Applied Science
7. Mining Methods.—A special course covering the mining
of large ore bodies by special mining methods.
Prerequisite: Mining 1.
Concurrent Courses: Mining 2, 3 and 4.
One lecture per week.   Second Term.   Mr. Turnbull.
Metallurgy
1. General Metallurgy.—This course covers the fundamental
principles underlying metallurgical operations in general, and
is introductory to subsequent more specialized study.
The lectures follow in general the subject as taken up in
Principles of Metallurgy, by Chas. H. Fulton, including the
following main subjects:
Physical mixtures and thermal analysis. Physical properties
of metals. Alloys. Measurement of high temperatures. Typical
metallurgical operations. Roasting and fusing. Electrometallurgy. Slags. Matte. Bullion. Refractory materials. Fuels.
Combustion.  Furnaces.
Text-book: Fulton, Principles of Metallurgy, McGraw-Hill.
Reference books: Hofman, General Metallurgy, McGraw-
Hill. Current Mining and Metallurgical Journals. Trade
Catalogues.
Prerequisites:   Chemistry 1 and Physics 1 and 2.
Two lectures per week.    Mr. Thomson.
2. Smelting and Leaching.—A general course covering principles and practice of Pyrometallurgy and Hydrometallurgy as
applied to gold, silver, copper, iron, lead and zinc.
Prerequisite: Metallurgy 1.
Two lectures per week.    Mr. Thomson.
3. Metallurgical Calculations.—A special course covering
Thermochemistry; Metallurgical Calculations; Furnace Design
and Efficiency; Special Processes.
A large portion of the time will be given to the study of
heat balances of typical smelting operations. Mining and Metallurgy 227
Reference book: Richards, Metallurgical Calculations.
Prerequisites:  Metallurgy 1, Chemistry 1.
Two hours per week.   Mr. Thomson.
4. Metallurgical Analysis.—Advanced course in Metallurgical Analysis of Ores and Furnace Products, Pyrometry and
Refractories.
Special attention will be given to analytical methods used
by smelting plants in purchase of ores and control of furnace
operations.
Prerequisites:   Metallurgy 1, Metallurgy 6.
Six hours laboratory per week, First Term. Twelve hours
laboratory per week, Second Term.   Mr. Thomson.
5. Fire Assaying.—Quantitative determination of gold,
silver, and other metals by fire-assay methods, with underlying
principles.
Text-book:  Bugbee, Fire Assaying, Wiley.
One lecture and one five-hour laboratory period per week.
First Term.   Mr. Thomson.
6. Wet Assaying.—An introductory course in metallurgical
analysis of ores and concentrates.
Most of the time will be given to the technical determination
of zinc, copper and lead.
One three-hour laboratory period per week.   Mr. Thomson.
Ore Dressing
1. Ore Dressing.—A general course covering the concentration of ores by mechanical means.
Most of the time is spent in considering fundamental
principles, typical machines, and their general operations and
relations in modern milling practice, emphasizing the economic
and practical aspects.
Students are taught the commercial and technical characteristics of true concentrating ores, the general principles on which
the size, character, site, and other features of a mill are designed. 228 Faculty of Applied Science
The general lay-out of crushing, handling, and separating machinery. The laws of crushing and of various classifying and
separating actions, and the design, operation, and comparative
efficiency of typical machines, such as crushers, rolls, stamps,
ball and tube mills, jigs, tables, screens, classifiers, and slime-
handling devices.
Attention is paid to pneumatic, magnetic, electrostatic, flotation, and other special processes, including coal-washing.
Text-books: F. Taggart, A Manual of Flotation Processes,
Wiley.
Reference Books: S. J. Truscott, Text-book of Ore Dressing.
Richards and Locke, Text-book of Ore Dressing.
Two lectures per week.   Mr. Gillies.
2. Ore Dressing Laboratory.—A variety of crushing, sizing,
classifying and separating operations are carried out by the
students and studied quantitatively on appropriate machines,
singly and in combination. Special attention is paid to flotation
processes, several types of machines being used.
Ores from British Columbia mines are usually chosen, so
that the work of the students is along practical lines in comparison with actual work in operating plants.
Prerequisite:  Ore Dressing 1.
Nine hours laboratory per week.   Mr. Gillies.
Note:—All students in Mining and Metallurgy are advised to provide
themselves with a copy of Peele's Mining Engineer's Handbook (Wiley),
which is used for reference in many of the courses in which no special textbook is required.
Department of Physics
Professor: T. C. Hebb.
Associate Professor: A. E. Hennings.
Associate Professor: J. G. Davidson.
Assistant Professor:  G. M. Shrum.
Assistant: H. W. Fowler.
The instruction includes lectures on the general principles
of Physics, accompanied by courses of practical work in the
laboratory. Physics 229
1. Mechanics 1.—An elementary treatment of the subject of
statics, dynamics, and hydrostatics, with particular emphasis on
the working of problems. The course is given in the first half
of the First Year of Applied Science.
Text-books: Loney, Mechanics and Hydrostatics, Cambridge
University Press. Millikan, Mechanics, Molecular Physics and
Heat, Ginn.
Three lectures and one three-hour laboratory period per
week.
2. Advanced Heat.—This course is begun when Mechanics 1
is finished, and the six hours devoted to it are divided in the
same manner. The course is based on the supposition that the
student is already familiar with the elementary principles of
heat.
Text-books: Edser, Heat for Advanced Students, Macmillan. Millikan, Mechanics, Molecular Physics and Heat, Ginn.
3. Electricity and Magnetism.—A quantitative study of the
fundamental principles of electricity and magnetism, with a
special reference to the fact that the student is to be an engineer.
The course includes a short treatment of the elements of
alternating currents.
Text-books: Millikan and Mills, Electricity, Sound and
Light (first part), Ginn. Smith, Electrical Measurements,
McGraw-Hill.
Two lectures and one three-hour laboratory period per week.
4. Mechanics 2.—The subject-matter consists of an extension
of the statics and dynamics of Mechanics 1, but with the use of
the differential and integral calculus.
Prerequisite: Mechanics 1.
Text-book: Poorman, Applied Mechanics, McGraw-Hill.
Two lectures per week.
5. Light. — A short lecture course on light for students
taking Chemical Engineering.    The time will be devoted to a 230 Faculty of Applied Science
study of refraction, dispersion, interference, diffraction, double-
refraction, polarization and spectroscopy.
One hour per week.
9. Recent Advances in Physics.—A course of lectures dealing with the electrical properties of gases, the electron theory,
and radioactivity.
Prerequisites: Physics 3 and 4, and Mathematics 10.
Reference books: Thomson, Conductivity of Electricity
Through Gases, Cambridge University Press, Second Edition.
Rutherford, Radio-active Substances and Their Radiations,
Cambridge University Press. Millikan. Electron, University of
Chicago Press, Second Edition. Thomson, Positive Rays, Longman's. Hughes, Photo-electricity, Cambridge University Press,
X-Rays, Longman's.
Department of Nursing and Health
Professor:   Hibbert Winslow Hill.
Assistant Professor:   Mabel F. Gray.
Part-time Lecturers: A
Miss Elizabeth Gertrude Breeze, R. N.
Miss Margaret Duffleld, Cert.P.H.N.  (University of Toronto).
Miss Laura Halland, P.H.N.
John Ewart Campbell, B.A., M.D., C.M.   (McGill).
Ralph Elswood Coleman, M.B. (Toronto).
William A. Dobson, M.D. (Jefferson Medical College).
Mrs. Isabelle M. Gibb, R.N.
Miss Laura B. Timmins, R.N., Cert.P.H.N. (British Columbia).
Miss Ruby Adeline Kerr.
Frank Cornwall McTavish, M.B. (Toronto), L.S.A. (London),
M.R.C.S. (England), L.R.C.P. (London).
Robert Lester Pallen, D.M.D. (North Pacific College of
Dentistry).
Alfred Howard Spohn, M.B. (Toronto).
Frederic Theodore Underhill, L.R.C.P. & S., L.M., and F.R.C.S.
(Edinburgh), D.P.H. (Edinburgh and Glasgow), F.R.S.I.
London), F.R.I.P.H.
Charles Harvey Vrooman, M.D., C.M. (Manitoba).
Harold White, M.D. (McGill), L.M.C.C.
Henry Esson Young, B.A. (Queen's), M.D., CM., (McGill),
LL.D. (Toronto), LL.D. (McGill), LL.D. (British Columbia), L.M.C.C. Nursing and Health 231
Subjects of Nursing A
(Five-year Undergraduate Course)
1. Introduction to Nursing.—A series of lectures dealing
with the nature of hospital service and discipline, designed to
prepare stuflents for entrance to Schools of Nursing. No formal
credit is given for this course, but attendance is compulsory.
One hour per week, First Year.   Miss Gray.
2. History of Nursing.—A series of lectures dealing with
the origin and history of nursing.
One hour a week, Second Year.   Miss Gray.
3. Anatomy and Physiology.—A study of the structure and
function of the normal human body as the basis for the study of
all pathological conditions, as well as for the study of hygiene.
Two hours a week, Second Year.   Miss Gray.
Nursing B (Public Health Nursing)
Preventive Medicine in the Public Health Nursing Programme
1. Preventable Diseases. — Brief sketches of the more
important of the preventable diseases; immunology; vaccine
therapy.
One hour a week.   Both Terms.   Dr. Hill.
2. Epidemiology.—Principles and practice in the control of
disease.
One hour a week.   Both Terms.   Dr. Hill.
3. Tuberculosis.—A study of tuberculosis, its prevention
and cure.
Eleven lectures.   Dr. Vrooman.
4. Venereal Diseases.—The care and control of venereal
diseases.
Three lectures.   Dr .Campbell.
5. Mental Hygiene.—An introduction, with clinical demonstrations, to the study of mental illness, its cure and prevention.
Eleven lectures.   Dr. Dobson. 232 Faculty of Applied Science
6. Bacteriology.—A short laboratory course to familiarize
students with the practical application of laboratory technique
in Public Health measures.
Hours to be arranged.   Miss Wilson.
Child Welfare
7. Infant Welfare.—A series of lectures and clinics dealing
with pre-natal care, and the normal development of the infant;
also dealing with the disorders of infancy, their prevention and
cure.
Eleven hours.   Dr. Spohn.
8. Orthopedics.—A series of lectures dealing with the problem of children handicapped by deformities, with emphasis
upon the importance of early recognition of deformities and
their prevention and cure.
Five hours.   Dr. McTavish.
Public Health, Hygiene and Sanitation
Public Health, Hygiene and Sanitation.
9. Public Health.—A series of lectures covering the fields
of general hygiene and sanitation.
One hour a week.   Fifteen lectures.   Dr. Hill.
10. Public Health Administration.—A study of the official
relation of the Public Health Nurse to the Departments of
Health.
Four lectures.   Dr. Underhill, Dr. Young.
11. Public Health Organizations.—A series of single lectures dealing with special aspects of their work.
(a) Diagnostic Clinics for Tuberculosis.   Dr. Lamb.
(b) The Hospital's Relation to the Community Health Programme.   Dr. Bell.
(c) The Rotary Clinic.   Dr. Rawlings.
(d) The Workmen's Compensation Act.   Dr. Bastin. Nursing and Health 233
12. Vital Statistics.—The general principles governing the
collection and arrangement of statistical facts, and their application in Public Health Nursing.
One hour a week.   Eighteen lectures.   Dr. Hill.
Nursing
13. Principles and Practice of Public Health Nursing.—
A study of the principles and practice of public health nursing.
One hour a week.   Both Terms.   Miss Gray.
Text-book: Gardner, Public Health Nursing, Macmillan.
14. Rural Public Health Nursing.—A study of the principles and practice of public health nursing in rural communities.
Six hours.   Mrs Gibb.
15. Urban Visiting Nursing Programme.
Two lectures.   Miss Duffield.
16. Health Education.—A consideration of the material to
be presented in the teaching of personal hygiene and home nursing, and the method of presentation.
Two hours a week.   Second Term.   Miss Gray.
17. History of Nursing and Contemporary Nursing Problems.—A study of the origin and history of nursing, followed
by the consideration of recent developments in the nursing field.
Eleven lectures.   Miss Gray.
18. Teaching in Schools of Nursing.—A study of the Curriculum; the selection of subjects, and content of each, and
methods of presentation.
One lecture a week.   Both Terms.   Miss Gray.
19. Principles of Supervision in Schools of Nursing.—A
study of the organization of the School of Nursing, its relation
to the various departments of the Hospital; and the problems
of training and record keeping.
One lecture a week.   Both Terms.   Miss Gray. 234 Faculty of Applied Science
20. School Hygiene.—A series of twelve lectures given by
members of the staff of the Medical Departmnt of the Vancouver
School Board, dealing with the specific problems of this division
of Public Health.
One hour a week. First Term. Miss Breeze, Miss Kerr,
Dr. Pallen, Dr. White.
21. Hospital Social Service.—A presentation of the principles underlying Medical Social Service.
Three lectures.   Miss Johnston.
22. Metabolism and Nutrition.
Eleven lectures.   Dr. Coleman.
23. Psychology for Nurses.
Two hours a week.   Second Term.   Dr. Wyman.
24. Principles of Education Applied to Teaching.
Two hours a week.   Both Terms.   Dr. Weir.
25. Public Speaking and Parliamentary Procedure.—Principles and practice, fitting students for giving addresses and
conducting meetings.
One hour a week.   Eighteen hours.   Dr. Hill.
26. Sociology.—The nature of Sociology as a study; environment; influence of technology and other conditions on social
development, etc.; social pathology.
One hour a week.   Both Terms.   Mr. Beckett.
Text-book: Beach, Introduction to Sociology, Houghton-
Mifflin.
27. Geography 10.
One hour a week.   Both Terms.   Mr. Brock, Mr. Schofield.
28. Motor Mechanics.
Practical instruction in the structure and operation of automobiles, including practice driving.
One hour a week.   One Term.   Mr. Bell. Zoology 235
Department of Zoology
Professor:   C. McLean Fraser.
Assistant Professor:   G. J. Spencer.
Instructor:   Gertrude M. Smith.
Assistant: Mildred H. Campbell.
Note:—Biology 1 is prerequisite to all courses in Zoology.
1. General Morphology.—General morphology of animals.
Comparative  anatomy.   The  relationships  of  animal  groups.
Comparative life-histories.
Text-books:    T. J. Parker and W. A. Haswell, Manual of
This course is prerequisite to other courses in Zoology.
Zoology, Macmillan (American Edition, 1916).
Two lectures and two hours laboratory per week.
7. Economic Entomology (in part).—The portion of the
course in Economic Entomology that deals with forest insects.
One lecture and two hours' laboratory work per week for
half of Second Term. ^^     At   V THE
FACULTY
OF
AGRICULTURE 238
Faculty of Agriculture
TIME TABLE
FACULTY OF AGRICULTURE-
FIRST
Monday
Room
Tuesday
Room
Wednesday
Room
9-10
Agronomy 1
AglOO
English 1 b 	
Poultry 1	
A 100
AglOO
Agronomy 1 ....
AglOO
10-11
Animal
Husbandry 1
AglOO
Biology 1 	
AplOO
AplOl
French 1      	
A 104
A 204
Biology  1
Zoology  1	
AplOO
11-12
Zoology 1 	
Botany 1 	
AplOl
12-1
1-2
Chemistry  1 a ....
English 2 b 	
S300
A 100
Agronomy 1	
Bacteriology 1 	
Agl03
S
Chemistry  1 a
English 2 a 	
S100
A 100
2-3
Agronomy 1 	
Bacteriology 1 	
Agl03
S
Botany 1 Lab...
Ap
3-4
Chemistry 1
Lab.  1  	
S
S
Agronomy 1 	
Chemistry 2 Lab b
Agl03
S
Botany 1 Lab...
Ap
Bacteriology 1 ....
4-5
Chemistry 1
Lab.  1
Bacteriology 1 ....
S
S
Chemistry 2 Lab b
S
5-6
Chemistry 1
Lab. 1 	
S
S
Chemistry 2 Lab b
S
Bacteriology 1 ....
SECOND
Monday
Room
Tuesday
Room
Wednesday
Room
Agronomy 2 	
AglOO
English 1 b 	
A 100
AglOO
Agronomy 2
AglOO
9-10
10-11
Horticulture 1 ....
AglOO
Animal
Husbandry 4
AglOO
Animal
Husbandry 4
AglOO
Biology  1  	
Ap 100
AplOl
French 1 	
A 104
A 204
Biology 1  	
Zoology 1 	
AplOO
AplOI
11-12
Botany I  _	
12-1
1-2
Chemistry  1 a ....
English   2 b   	
S300
A 100
Agronomy 2 	
Agl03
Chemistry 1 a ...
English 2 a 	
S300
A 100
2-3
Dairying 1 Lab..
Agl08
Agl03
Botany 1 Lab...
Ap
3-4
Chemistry 1 Lab. 1
Dairying 1 Lab.
S
Agl08
Agronomy 2 	
Chemistry 2 Lab.b
Agl03
S
Botany 1 Lab...
Ap
4-5
Chemistry 1 Lab. 1
Dairying 1 Lab..
S
Agl08
Chemistry 2 Lab.b
S
5-6
Chemistry 1 Lab. 1
S
Chemistry 2 Lab.b
S
KEY TO BUILDINGS:  A, Arts; Ag, Agriculture; Time Tables
239
-1928-29
FIRST AND SECOND YEARS.
TERM
Thursday
Room
Friday
Room
Saturday
Room
English lb    	
A 100
Poultry 1  	
AglOO
English 1 a
Poultry  1	
A 100
Agl02
9-10
Animal
Husbandry 1
Chemistry 2 	
Agll4
S300
Poultry 1
Agl02
10-11
French 1  -
A 104
A 204
Animal
Agll4
French 1	
Poultry 1	
A 104
Agl02
Botany 1	
11-12
12-1
Zoology 1 Lab	
Ap
Chemistry 1 a 	
English 2 a 	
S300
A 100
1-2
Zoology 1 Lab	
A 100
Ap
Bacteriology   1
S
2-3
Animal
Husbandry 1 .
Chemistry 2 Lab. t
AgH4
S
Bacteriology  1
S
3-4
Animal
Husbandry 1 .
Chemistry 2 Lab. Ii
Agll4
S
Biology 1 Lab. 6.
Ap
4-5
Chemistry 2 Lab. b
S
Biology 1 Lab. 6...
Ap
5-6
TERM
Thursday
Room
Friday
Room
Saturday
Room
English 1 b 	
A 100
Dairying. 1  	
AglOO
English 1 a 	
A 100
9-10
Animal
Husbandry 4 .
Chemistry 2 	
AglOO
S300
AglOO"
10-11
French 1 	
A 104
A 204
Horticulture  1   .
French 1 	
A 104
11-12
12-1
Zoology 1 Lab.  .
Ap
English 2 a 	
S300
A 100
Agl04
1-2
English 1 a  .....
A 100
Ap
Horticulture 1 ....
Zoology 1 Lab	
2-3
Chemistry 2 Lab.b
S
Horticulture 1 ....
Agl04
3-4
Chemistry 2 Lab.b
s
Biology 1  Lab	
Horticulture 1 ....
Ap
Agl04
4-5
Chemistry 2 Lab.b
s
Biology I Lab...
Ap
5-6
Ap, Applied Science; S, Science. ^^     At   V FACULTY OF AGRICULTURE
INFORMATION FOR STUDENTS IN
AGRICULTURE
The degrees offered in this faculty are:
Bachelor of Science in Agriculture (B.S.A.) and Master of
Science in Agriculture (M.S.A.).
Courses of Study
Five distinct lines of study are offered, as follows:
(1.) A Four-year Course leading to the Degree of Bachelor
of Science in Agriculture (B.S.A.).
(2.) A One-year Occupational Course in which the basic
work is in Agronomy, Animal Husbandry, Dairying,
Horticulture, and Poultry Husbandry, leading to a
Diploma in Agriculture.
(3.) A series of Short Courses at the University, in Agronomy, Animal Husbandry, Dairying, Horticulture and
Poultry Husbandry.
(4.) Extension Courses at different points in the Province.
(5.) Graduate work in Agriculture, leading to the degree,
M.S.A.
Course Leading to the Degree of B.S.A,
Students in Agriculture are required to have Junior
Matriculation or its equivalent before entering upon this course
(see "Matriculation Requirements"). The degree of B.S.A. is
granted only after the successful completion of four years of
lecture and laboratory work. The course is planned for students
who wish to obtain a practical and scientific knowledge of
Agriculture, either as a basis for demonstration and teaching,
or as an aid to success in farm management.
The Occupational Course
The Occupational Course is planned  for those students
whose academic qualifications are not high, but whose practical 242 Faculty of Agriculture
qualifications are satisfactory. The course permits of work in
Agronomy, Animal Husbandry, Poultry Husbandry, Dairying,
Horticulture, Farm Management and Marketing on the part of
those who wish to extend their practical knowledge. A successful completion of the course leads to a Diploma in Agriculture.
Matriculation standing for entrance is not required.
A printed descriptive folder giving further details of this
course may be secured on application to the Registrar, University of British Columbia.
Short Courses
The Short Courses are planned for those men and women
who are unable to take advantage of the longer courses, but who
desire to extend their knowledge of agriculture in one or more
of those branches in which they are particularly interested. The
work throughout is intensely practical. Illustrative material and
periods devoted to demonstration and judging work are strong
features of the course. No entrance examination is required, nor
are students asked to write an examination at the conclusion
of the course.
Special announcements giving details of the various divisions of the course are issued in December of each year, and
may be obtained from the Registrar on application.
Extension Courses
In order to reach those engaged in Agriculture who are
not able to avail themselves of the Winter Courses given at the
University, the Faculty of Agriculture offers extension short
courses in various centres throughout the Province. These
courses are of at least four days' duration, are proceeded with
according to a definite time-table, and include lectures and
demonstrations in connection with the work of each department
of the Faculty. Detailed programmes are prepared to suit the
specific centres, and requests for such courses may be addressed
to the Registrar.
(Not offered in 1928-29.) Courses in Agriculture 243
Graduate Work
For regulations, see page 248.
CURRICULUM
Courses are described in terms of units. A unit normally
consists of one lecture hour (or one continuous laboratory period
of not less than two or more than three hours) per week
throughout the session, or two lecture hours (or equivalent
laboratory periods) throughout a single term.
The first two years of work leading to the degree in
Agriculture are devoted to acquiring a knowledge of the basic
sciences upon which Agriculture rests, in adding to the student's
knowledge of language, and in laying a foundation for more
advanced studies in practical and scientific Agriculture. The
Third Year is devoted largely, and the Fourth Year almost
wholly, to courses in Applied Agriculture.
Except under special circumstances, students under the age
of seventeen will not be eligible for registration. Specialization
will begin at the commencement of the Third Year. Students
who have not had at least one full season's practical farm
experience will be required to obtain this preliminary training
before registering for the Third Year.
First Year
Units
Agronomy (1 and 2)  3
Animal Husbandry (1 and 4)  3
Biology 1   3
Chemistry 1  3
English 1  3
The first course in a language offered for
Matriculation    3
Total required    18 244 Faculty of Agriculture
Second Year
Units
Poultry Husbandry 1  l1/^
Horticulture 1    V/2
Dairying 1  l1/^
Botany 1   3
Zoology 1  3
English 2  3
Bacteriology 1    2
Chemistry 2  3
Total required   I8V2
Third and Fourth Years
On account of the specialized types of farming which must
necessarily be followed in many parts of British Columbia, the
work in the Third and Fourth Years leading to the degree of
B.S.A. has been arranged in major courses so as to admit of a
measure of specialization in one of the several recognized
branches of Agriculture. At the same time all courses have
been so arranged that every student will get the basic work in
all lines no matter what option is chosen.
Prior to the beginning of the Third Year every student must
indicate in which one of the major options he wishes to continue
his study, and shall arrange his elective courses with the approval
of the Head of the Department in which he is majoring, and
in consultation with the Heads of other Departments directly
concerned.
A thesis shall be prepared by each student on some topic,
the subject of which shall be selected, with the approval of the
Head of the Department in which the student is majoring, before
the end of the Third Year's work.
Two typewritten copies of each thesis on standard-sized
paper (8y2 in. by 11 in.) shall be submitted on or before the
1st of April in the graduating year.
Agricultural students are required to take a total of 35
units, thesis included, in their Third and Fourth Years. Courses in Agriculture 245
Third Year
(Required subjects)
Units
Economics 1     3
Chemistry 3 or 14     3
(To be taken on the advice of the Head
of the Department in which the student is
majoring.)
Principles of Heredity—Biology 2    1
Total required    7
Fourth Year
(Required subjects)
* Units
Agricultural  Economics       1^
Thesis     3
Total required      4*4
Agronomy Major
Third Year
Units
Required subjects, as above    7
Plant Physiology—Botany 3    2
Systematic Entomology—Zoology 4    2
Economic Entomology—Zoology 7    2
•Total  13
Fourth Year
Units
Required subjects, as above    4*4
Animal Husbandry 9      iy2
•Total     ~6~
* Students are required, with the advice and consent of the
Head of the Department, to elect up to a total of from 15 to 18
units. 246 Faculty of Agriculture
Animal Husbandry Major
Third Year
Units
Required subjects, as above    7
•Total       7
Fourth Year
Units
Required subjects, as above     4%
Agronomy 7     1^2
•Total       6
Dairying Major
Third Year
Units
Required subjects, as above    7
•Total       7
Fourth Year
Units
Required subjects, as above    4y2
Civil Engineering (Special)..     1
Plant Physiology—Botany 3      2
Dairy Chemistry     2
•Total     9V2
* Students are required, with the advice and consent of the
Head of the Department, to elect up to a total of from 15 to 18
units. Courses in Agriculture 247
Horticulture Major
Third Year
Units
Required subjects, as above    7
Plant Physiology—Botany 3     2
Systematic Entomology—Zoology 4    2
Economic Entomology—Zoology 7    2
•Total   13
Fourth Year
Units
Required subjects, as above    4V£
Plant Pathology—Botany  6   (c)     2
•Total    6V2
Poultry Husbandry Major
Third Year
Units
Required subjects, as above...    7
•Total      7
Fourth Year
Units
Required subjects, as above    4%
•Total      4%
Botany (Plant Pathology) Major
Third Year
Units
Required subjects, as above    7
•Total ~T~
* Students are required, with the advice and consent of the
Head of the Department, to elect up to a total of from 15 to 18
units. 248 Faculty of Agriculture
Fourth Year
Units
Required subjects, as above    4y£
•Total       4V2
Zoology (Entomology) Major
Third Year
Units
Required subjects, as above    7
•Total      7
Fourth Year
Units
Required subjects, as above    4%
#
Total      4V2
COURSES LEADING TO THE DEGREE OF M.S.A.
1. Candidates for the degree of Master of Science in Agriculture (M.S.A.) must hold a bachelor's degree from this
University, or its equivalent.
2. A graduate of another university applying for permission
to enter as a graduate student is required to submit with his
application an official statement of his graduation together with
a certificate of the standing gained in the several subjects of
his course. The Faculty will determine the standing of such a
student in this University. The fee for examination of certificates is $2.00.
3. Candidates with approved degrees and academic records
who proceed to the master's degree shall be required:
(a.) To spend at least one year in resident graduate
study; or
• Students are required, with the advice and consent of the
Head of the Department, to elect up to a total of from 15 to 18
units. Examinations and Advancement 249
(b.)   (At the discretion of the Faculty concerned):
(i.) To do two or more years of private work
under the supervision of the University,
such work to be equivalent to one year of
graduate study; or
(ii.) To do one year of private work under
University supervision and one term of
resident graduate study, the total of such
work to be equivalent to one year of
resident graduate study.
4. Students doing tutorial work shall not be allowed to come
up for final examination in less than two academic years after
registration as M.S.A. students.
5. One major and one minor shall be required. Candidates
may select their minor in another Faculty.
6. (a.) A thesis must be prepared on some approved topic
in the major subject.
(b.) Examinations, written or oral, or both, shall be
required.
7. Two typewritten copies of each thesis, on standard-sized
thesis paper, shall be submitted. (See special circular of
"Instructions for the Preparation of Masters' Theses.")
8. Application for admission as a graduate student shall be
made to the Registrar by October 15th.   (See schedule of fees.)
Examinations and Advancement
1. Examinations in all subjects, obligatory for all students,
are held in December and in April. Applications for special
consideration on account of illness or domestic affliction must be
submitted to the Dean not later than two days after the close
of the examination period. In cases where illness is the plea
for absence from examinations, a medical certificate must be 250 Faculty of Agriculture
presented on the appropriate form which may be obtained from
the Dean's office.
2. In the First and Second years candidates taking a full
course will not be considered as having passed unless they obtain
at least 40 per cent, on each subject and 50 per cent, on the
aggregate. In the Third and Fourth years candidates will not
be considered as having passed unless they obtain at least 50
per cent, on each subject and at least 60 per cent, on all subjects
of the Department in which the student is majoring. Candidates taking less than a full course (15 units) must obtain at
least 50 per cent, on each subject of the First and Second years,
and at least 60 per cent, on each subject of the Third and Fourth
years. Students taking work in the Summer Session will not be
considered as having passed unless they obtain 50 per cent, or
more in each subject.
3. Successful candidates will be graded as follows: First
Class, an average of 80 per cent, or over; Second Class, 65 to
80 per cent.; Passed, 50 to 65 per cent.
4. If a student's general standing in the final examinations
of any year is sufficiently high, the Faculty may grant him
supplemental examinations in the subject or subjects in which
he has failed. Notice will be sent to all students to whom such
examinations have been granted.
5. Supplemental examinations will be held in September
and will not be granted at any other time, except by special
permission of the Faculty, and on payment of a fee of $7.50
per paper.
6. Applications for supplemental examinations, accompanied by the necessary fees (see Schedule of Fees) must be in
the hands of the Registrar at least two weeks before the date
set for the examinations.
7. No student may enter a higher year with supplemental
examinations still outstanding in respect of more than 3 units
of the preceding year, nor with any supplemental examination Examinations and Advancement 251
outstanding in respect of the work of an earlier year or of
Matriculation unless special permission to do so is granted by
Faculty. Such permission will be granted only when Faculty
is satisfied that the failure to remove the outstanding supplemental examinations had an adequate cause.
8. A student may not continue in a later year any subject
in which he has a supplemental examination outstanding from
an earlier year, except in the case of compulsory subjects in the
Second Year.
9. A student who is not allowed to proceed to a higher
year may not register as a partial student in respect of the
subjects of that higher year. But a student who is required to
repeat his year may, on application in writing, be exempted by
the Faculty from attending lectures and passing examinations
in subjects in which he has already made at least Second Class
standing. In this case he may take, in addition to the subjects of
the year which he is repeating, certain subjects of the following
year.
10. A student who fails twice in the work of the same year
may, upon the recommendation of the Faculty, be required by
the Senate to withdraw from the University.
11. Any student whose academic record, as determined by
the tests and examinations of the first term of the First or
Second Year, is found to be unsatisfactory, may, upon the
recommendation of the Faculty, be required by the Senate to
discontinue attendance at the University for the remainder of
the session. Such a student will not be readmitted to the
University as long as any supplemental examinations are
outstanding.
12. Term essays and examination papers will be refused a
passing mark if they are noticeably deficient in English, and,
in this event, students will be required to pass a special
examination in English to be set by the Department of English. 252 Faculty Of Agriculture
COURSES IN AGRICULTURE
Department of Agronomy
Professor: P. A. Boving.
Associate Professor: G. G. Moe.
Assistant Professor: D. G. Laird.
Assistant: G. B. Boving.
Assistant: C. A. Lamb.
1. Soil and Soil Fertility.—An examination will be made of
the more important soil types; cultivation, manuring, and rotation of crops will be studied in their relation to soil productivity;
methods of treatment will be observed, and the principles underlying soil management and improvement will constitute the basis
for subsequent courses in Agronomy.
Two lectures and one laboratory per week. First Term,
First Year.   Mr. P. A. Boving, Mr. Laird. 1^2 units.
References: Miller, The Soil and Its Management, Ginn &
Co.; Hopkins, Soil Fertility and Permanent Agriculture, Ginn
& Co.
2. Field Crops.—This course embraces a study of the most
important grain, corn, forage, and root crops. A detailed study
of the crops, in the field and in the laboratory, will supplement
the lecture work in order to give the student a comprehensive
idea, not only of the different phases of crop production, but also
of the relative value of separate specimens and samples.
Two lectures and one laboratory per week. Second Term,
First Year.   Mr. Moe, Mr. G. B. Boving. 1% units.
References: Montgomery, Productive Field Crops, Lippin-
cott; Hutcheson and "Wolfe, Production of Field Crops, McGraw-
Hill ; Butter, Wheat Growing, A. and C. Black.
3. Seed Growing.—This course deals with the production
and marketing of vegetable, root, clover, and grass seeds.
Two lectures and one laboratory per week. First Term,
Third Year.   Mr. P. A. Boving, Mr. G. B. Boving.      1^2 units.
Reference: Cox and Starr, Seed Production and Marketing,
John "Wiley and Sons. Agronomy 253
4. Field Crops (Advanced).—Course 4 constitutes a more
detailed study of field crops than was possible in Course 2.
It also embraces special lecture and laboratory work on the
harvesting, threshing, cleaning, storing, and marketing of our
ordinary field crops. The two courses combined will give the
student a more complete understanding of the various factors
bearing upon the production of a first-class article, whether
intended for sale or for feeding.
One lecture and one laboratory per week. First and Second
Terms, Third Year.  Mr. Moe. 2 units.
References: Piper, Forage Plants and Their Culture, Macmillan; Bracken, Crop Production in Western Canada, Grain
Growers' Guide; Piper, Principals of the Grain Trade of Western Canada, Macmillan.
5. Economics of Crop Production.—This course embraces
a study of the selecting, planning, and operating of a farm.
Various conditions, systems and practices prevailing on the
American Continent and in Europe will be discussed and
compared.
Two lectures and one laboratory per week. Second Term,
Third Year.   Mr. P. A. Boving, Mr. Laird. V/2 units.
Reference: Adams, Farm Management, McGraw-Hill.
6. Field-crop Judging. — The judging and handling of
grains, grasses, forage and root crops will be taken up in the
field as well as in the laboratory.
One lecture and two laboratories per week. First Term,
Fourth Year.   Mr. Moe. iy2 units.
7. Soil Management. — Different systems of cultivation,
rotation, manuring and irrigation, as practised in Canada and
elsewhere, will be discussed, and the influence of these factors on
the maintenance or exhaustion of soil fertility will be studied.
Two lectures and one laboratory per week. Second Term,
Third Year.   Mr. Laird. iy2 units.
References: Russell, Soil Conditions and Plant Growth,
Longmans Green; Murray, Soils and Manures, Constable & Co.; 254 Faculty of Agriculture
Emerson, Agricultural Geology, John "Wiley and Sons; Rotham-
stead Exp. Station Reports.
8. Plant-breeding. — This course is planned to follow
Biology 2. With this as a basis, the course is designed to illustrate and explain the breeding of field crops.
One lecture and two laboratories per week. Second Term,
Fourth Year.   Mr. Moe. iy2 units.
Hayes and Garber, Breeding Crop Plants, McGraw-Hill;
Babcock and Clausen, Genetics in Relation to Agriculture, McGraw-Hill; Sinnott and Dunn, Principles of Genetics a. McGraw-
Hill.
9. Field Experiments. — The scope, the methods and the
interpretation of field experiments will be discussed, and a study
will be made of the more important results obtained in different
parts of the world-
Two lectures per week.   Second Term, Fourth Year.
Mr. Laird. 1 unit.
10. Thesis. 3 units.
11. Crop Adaptation and Distribution (Crop Ecology).—
The relation of field crops to elevation, climate and soils will be
studied in order to give the student a comprehensive idea of the
distribution of crops and the adaptation of various types to
different parts of the world.
One lecture per week.   First Term, Fourth Year.
Mr. Moe. V* unit.
Reference: Finch and Baker, Geography of the World's
Agriculture, U. S. A. Department of Agriculture.
12. Research (Directed). 3 units.
(Not required of Undergraduates.)
13. Soil Bacteriology.—Laboratory and lecture course, in
which the bacteria of soils are studied qualitatively and quantitatively, with special reference to soil fertility.
Prerequisites: Bact. 1, Agronomy 1.
Five hours per week.   First Term.
Mr. Laird. 2 units. Animal Husbandry 255
References: Lohnis and Fred, Text-book of Agricultural
Bacteriology, McGraw-Hill; Waksman, Principles of Soil Microbiology, "Williams and "Wilkins.
50. Research (Directed). 3 to 5 units.
(Open to Graduates only.)
Students majoring in Agronomy are required to work one
summer under the direction of the Department.
Department of Animal Husbandry
Professor:  H. M. King.
Assistant Professor:  R. L. Davis.
Assistant Professor:  H. R. Hare.
Lecturer in Veterinary Science: J. G. Jervis.
1. Market Classes and Grades of Livestock.—A study of
the characteristics and requirements of the various market classes
and grades of beef cattle, dairy cattle, horses, sheep, swine and
goats. ^l
Texts: Vaughan, Types and Market Classes of Livestock.
Plumb, Judging Farm Animals.
Three laboratories per week.   First Term, First Year.
Mr. King, Mr. Davis, Mr. Hare. iy2 units.
2. Breeds of Cattle. — A study of the origin, history of
development, characteristics, and adaptations of the breeds of
cattle. Students are required to make several trips to leading
herds in the Province.
Text:   Plumb, Types and Breeds of Farm Animals.
Prerequisites: Animal Husbandry 1.
Three laboratories per week.   First Term, Third Year.
Mr. King, Mr. Davis. iy2 units.
3. Breeds of Horses, Sheep, Swine and Goats.—A study of
the origin, history of development, characteristics, and adaptations of the breeds of horses, sheep, swine and goats.
Text:   Plumb, Types and Breeds of Farm Animals.
Prerequisites: Animal Husbandry 1.
Two laboratories per week.   Second Term, Third Year.
Mr. Davis, Mr. King. 1 unit. 256 Faculty of Agriculture
4. Livestock Feeding and Management.—The feeding, care.
and management from birth to maturity of the various types of
livestock.
Text: Henry and Morrison, Feeds and Feeding, abridged
edition.
Prerequisite:   Animal Husbandry 1.
Three lectures per week.   Second Term, First Year.
Mr. Davis, Mr. King, Mr. Hare. IV2 units.
5. Advanced Judging.—A continuation of the type of work
represented in the laboratory of Animal Husbandry 2 and 3.
Designed to strengthen Animal Husbandry students in the
selection of herd sires, foundation breeding herds, and in the
building up of superior flocks and herds. Special work in the
fitting and handling of live stock is presented. Students are
required to make several trips to leading herds in the Province.
Prerequisites:   Animal Husbandry 2 and 3.
Three laboratories per week.   First Term, Fourth Year.
Mr. Davis, Mr. King. 1% units.
6. Livestock Breeding. — A study of the principles of
breeding in their application to livestock development and improvement.
Text: Rice, Breeding and Improvement of Farm Animals.
Prerequisites:   Animal Husbandry 2 and 3 and Biology 2.
Two lectures per week.   Second Term, Third Year.
Mr. Davis. 1 unit.
(Not offered in 1928-29.)
7. Herd, Flock and Stud-book Study.—An advanced course
in the study of the principal breeds of livestock, familiarizing
the student with the leading sires, dams, families, and herds
of the various breeds, and the blood lines entering into their
formation.    Emphasis is placed upon a study of pedigrees.
Prerequisites:   Animal Husbandry 2 and 3.
Two lectures and one laboratory per week.   Second Term,
Third Year.   Mr. King, Mr. Davis. iy2 units.
(Not offered in 1928-29.) Animal Husbandry 257
8. Nutrition. — A study of the elements and compounds
important to animal nutrition and their relation to the animal
organism; the digestive system; the digestion, absorption,
assimilation, and disposition of food materials. A study of the
various feedstuffs.
Texts: Henry and Morrison, Feeds and Feeding. Armsby,
Animal Nutrition.
Two lectures per week. First Term, Fourth Year.
Mr. Davis. 1 unit.
(Not offered in 1928-29.)
9. Animal Feeding.—The feeding of all classes of livestock,
having distinct regard to the economic problems confronting the
breeder and the producer. Af^^^s^ ]
Text:   Henry and Morrison, Feeds and Feeding.
Three lectures per week.   Second Term, Fourth Year.
Mr. Davis, Mr. King, Mr. Hare. iy2 units.
(Open to Third Year Students in 1928-29.)
10. Markets and Marketing.—A careful study of the markets with their requirements for livestock and livestock pro-
duets, and the relation which these bear to production. Marketing
of breeding stock.
Two lectures per week.   First Term, Fourth Year.
Mr. King. 1 unit.
(Not offered in 1928-29.)
11. Thesis. 3 units.
12. Livestock Practice and Seminar.—Every Animal Husbandry student is required to spend the summer months between
the Third and Fourth Years on an approved livestock farm and
to present a written report upon his summer's work before
entering upon the Second Term of the Fourth Year.
Open only to students majoring in Animal Husbandry.
A seminar of one hour per week for the special study of
current problems and literature is held. Mr. King.      iy2 units. 258 Faculty of Agriculture
13. Livestock Farm and Ranch Management.—The management of the range, ranch, and farm for the production of live
stock.
Texts: Potter, Western Livestock Management. Sampson,
Farm and Range Management.
Prerequisite:   Animal Husbandry 12.
Two lectures and one laboratory per week. Second Term,
Fourth Year.   Mr; King, Mr. Hare. iy2 units.
(Open to Third Year Students in 1928-29.)
14. Veterinary Science.—A study of the common diseases
of horses, cattle, sheep, swine and goats; their causes, prevention,
and treatment.
Prerequisites: Animal Husbandry 1 and 4.
Three lectures per week.   First Term, Third Year.
Mr. Jervis. IV2 units.
15. Research  (Directed). 3 units.
(Not required of Undergraduates.)
50. Research (Directed). 3 to 5 units.
(Open to Graduates only.)
Department of Dairying
Professor: Wilfrid Sadler.
Associate Professor: N. S. Golding.
Assistant: H. L A. Tarr.
1. Elementary Dairying.—An elementary course of lectures
on the principles underlying the successful practice of dairying.
Laboratory work on the control of milk, the preparation of
dairy products, the judging of the same, and the methods of
testing adopted.
Two lectures and one laboratory per week. Second Term,
Second Year.   Mr. Golding, Mr. Sadler. iy2 units.
2. Farm Cheese-making. — Principles and practices of
cheese-making, hard-pressed, blue-veined, and soft; the making Dairying 259
of cheese on the farm; a general knowledge required of the principal varieties of each class of cheese, and laboratory practice
in the making of standard varieties.
This course is offered in the Third Year or Fourth Year to
students other than those who propose to major in Dairying.
One lecture and two laboratories per week for one term.
IV2 units.
3. Dairy Bacteriology.—The bacteriology of milk; sources
of bacteria in milk, and quantitative and qualitative determinations of the bacterial content; normal and abnormal fermentations of milk, and a somewhat detailed study of certain organisms responsible therefor.
One lecture and two laboratories per week. First Term.
Third Year.   Mr. Sadler. I iy2 units.
4. Creamery Butter-making. — Creamery butter-making-
grading of cream; treatment and preparation of cream for
butter-making; pasteurization; manufacture of creamery butter;
judging, grading, and marketing of butter.
Prerequisite:   Dairying 3.      ^^f
One lecture and two laboratories per week. First Term,
Third Year.   Mr. Golding, V/2 units.
5. Market Milk—The hygienic aspect of milk production;
handling and management of milk designed for city consumption; grading of milk on bacterial standards; pasteurization,
control and distribution of milk.
One lecture and two laboratories per week. Second Term.
Third Year.   Mr. Sadler, Mr. Golding. iy2 units.
6. Cheese and Cheese-making.—This course deals with the
principles and practices of cheese-making — hard-pressed, blue-
veined, and soft.
Offered to those majoring in Dairying.
Two lectures and two laboratories per week.   Fourth Year.
Mr. Golding. 4 units.
7. Dairy Bacteriology. — The ripening of hard-pressed
cheeses; the bacteria employed in the practice of cheese-making; 260 Faculty of Agriculture
the organisms concerned in the ripening processes of cheese; and
of necessity, in a measure, a systematic study of the Lactic Acid
Bacteria.
One lecture and two laboratories per week.   Mr. Sadler.
3 units.
8. Testing of Milk and Dairy Products. — The testing of
milk, cream, butter, and cheese; the selling of milk and cream
on the butter-fat basis; causes of variation in butter-fat content.
One lecture-laboratory per week. First Term,
Mr. Golding. y2 unit.
9. Dairy Buildings and Equipment.—Buildings suitable for
handling of milk and manufacturing of dairy products; their
situation, construction, arrangement; equipment of farm dairies,
creameries, and cheese-factories. This course includes detailed
studies of selected buildings.
One lecture and one laboratory per week. Second Term,
Fourth Year. 1 unit.
(Not offered in 1928-29.)
10. The Judging and Grading of Milk and Milk Products.—
Offered to students of the Senior Year.
Mr. Golding, Mr. Sadler. iy2 units
(Open to Third Year Students in 1928-29.)
11. Thesis. 3 units.
12. Research (Directed). 3 units,
(Not required of Undergraduates.)
50. Research (Directed). 3 to 5 units.
(Open to Graduates only.) Horticulture 261
Department of Horticulture
Professor: F. M. Clement.
Professor: A. F. Barss.
Associate Professor: F. E. Buck.
1. Principles of Horticulture. — A study of the principles
involved in the selection, propagation, planting, and general care
of the more important fruits, vegetables, flowers and ornamental
trees and shrubs, with sufficient practice to enable a student to
care for the home plantings.
This course is designed to meet the needs of all students in
Agriculture, giving them a general knowledge of Horticultural
Crops. At the same time the work is fundamental for students
who are planning to take further courses in Horticulture.
.  Two lectures and one laboratory per week.   Second Term,
Second Year.   Mr. Barss, Mr. Buck. iy2 units.
Text: Hood, Farm Horticulture, Lea & Febiger.
3. Practical Pomology. — A detailed study of the best
methods in Orchard Management with field practice in various
orchard operations, such as planting, pruning, and spraying.
The course also deals with the culture of small fruits.
Two lectures and two laboratories per week. Second Term,
Third Year.   Mr. Barss. 2 units.
Text: Gardner, Bradford and Hooker, Orcharding, McGraw-Hill.
Reference: Chandler, Fruit Growing, Houghton Mifflin Co.
4. Plant Propagation and Nursery Practice.—This course
deals with the methods used in propagating plants, including
budding and grafting; and with Commercial Nursery practices.
One lecture and one laboratory per week.    Second Term,
Third Year.   Mr. Buck. 1 unit.
Text: Hottes, Practical Plant Propagation, De la Mare Co.
5. Commercial Pomology.—A study of the problems connected with the handling of fruits and vegetables—harvesting,
grading, packing, shipping, storing, marketing; packing and 262 Faculty of Agriculture
storage houses; marketing associations; costs of production and
marketing.
Two lectures and one laboratory per week. First Term,
Fourth Year.   Mr. Barss. IV2 units.
(Open to Third Year Students in 1928-29.)
Reference: Folger and Thomson, The Commercial Apple
Industry of North America, Macmillan.
6. Systematic Pomology.—A course in description, identification, classification, displaying, and judging of fruits. The
course also includes a certain amount of work in Systematic
Olericulture.
One lecture and two laboratories per week. First Term,
Fourth Year.   Mr. Buck, Mr. Barss. iy2 units.
(Not offered in 1928-29.)
Reference: Drain, Essentials of Systematic Pomology, John
Wiley & Sons.
7. Practical Vegetable Gardening.—A study of the problems
connected with the commercial growing of vegetables, including
the selection of a location, soil requirements, fertilizing, irrigating, and special cultural methods for the more important vegetables. This course also deals with the construction of hot-beds,
cold-frames, greenhouses, and their management in the forcing
of vegetable crops.
Two lectures and one laboratory per week. Second Term,
Fourth Year.   Mr. Buck. 1% units.
(Open to Third Year Students in 1928-29.)
Text:  Thompson, Vegetable Crops, McGraw-Hill.
8. Special Horticulture.—A course for the study of special
branches of Commercial Horticulture, including the manufacture
of horticultural products, such as canned fruits, dried products,
jams, jellies, and fruit juices.
Two lectures per week.   Second Term, Fourth Year.
Mr. Barss. 1 unit.
(Not offered in 1928-29.)
Reference:   Cruess, Commercial Fruit and Vegetable Products, McGraw-Hill. Horticulture 263
9. Horticultural Problems.—An introduction to the study
of problems in Horticulture, including the breeding of Horticultural crops, variety adaptations, and methods of research,
together with a review of Horticultural investigational work
in other institutions. There will also be practice in outlining
investigations, and in preparing reports.
Two lectures and one laboratory per week. First Term,
Fourth Year.   Mr. Barss. iy2 units.
References: Hayes and Garber, Breeding of Crop Plants,
McGraw-Hill; Gardner, Bradford and Hooker, Fundamentals of
Fruit Production, McGraw-Hill.
10. Landscape Gardening and Floriculture. — The course
aims to give the student a working knowledge of the selection,
planting and care of ornamental plants—trees, shrubs, and
flowers; with the principles for the improvement of home
grounds, school grounds, city streets, and parks. The course
includes practice in identification of plant materials; also practice in making of planting plans.
Two lectures and one laboratory per week. First Term,
Fourth Year.   Mr. Buck. V/2 units.
Text: Cridland, Practical Landscape Gardening, De la
Mare Co.
Reference: Van Rensselaer, Art Out of Doors, Charles
Scribner & Sons.
11. Thesis. 3 units.
12. Research (Directed). 3 units.
(Not required of Undergraduates.)
50. Research (Directed). 3 to 5 units
(Open to Graduates only.) 264 Faculty of Agriculture
Department of Poultry Husbandry
Professor:  E. A. Lloyd.
Associate Professor: V. S. Asmundson.
Assistant:   W. J. Riley.
1. General.—Fundamentals of poultry husbandry, including
breeds, breeding, judging, selection, culling, feeds, feeding,
incubation, brooding, poultry-house construction, killing, egg-
grading, marketing, sanitation and hygiene, diseases, general
management.
The regular laboratory exercises are supplemented by practice work in the feeding and care of poultry flocks.
Two lectures and one laboratory per week. First Term,
Second Year.   Mr. Lloyd. IV2 units.
2. Markets and Marketing.—Marketing conditions for poultry products in British Columbia. The relation of the home
market to outside markets. Canadian Egg Marketing Regulations. Provincial Egg Acts and Regulations. Egg-grading, care,
packing, storing, selling. Fattening poultry for market; killing,
packing, storing, selling. Production and sale of high-class
breeding stock for local demand and export trade. Advertising.
Principles and practice of marketing, private and co-operative.
Study of prices.
One lecture and two laboratories per week. First Term,
Third Year.   Mr. Lloyd. IV2 units.
3. Incubation and Brooding.—Selection and care of hatching
eggs. Shipping hatching eggs. Natural incubation. Artificial
incubation. Types of incubators. Natural brooding. Artificial
brooding. Rearing, including systems of management, housing,
feeding and training chicks. Brooding equipment. Practice in
operating incubators and brooders.
Prerequisite:   Poultry Husbandry 1.
One lecture and two laboratories and practice per week.
Second Term, Third Year.  Mr. Asmundson. IV2 units. Poultry Husbandry 265
4. (a) Breeds and Breeding.—The breeds of poultry; their
history, origin and economic qualities. The principles of
breeding as applied to Poultry Husbandry.   Breeding records.
Prerequisite:   Poultry Husbandry 1 and Biology 2.
Two lectures and one laboratory per week. Second Term,
Third Year.   Mr. Asmundson. IV2 units.
4. (6) Advanced Breeding.—Breeding for egg and meat
production.   Statistical study of production records.
Prerequisite:  Poultry Husbandry 4 (a).
One lecture and one laboratory per week.    Second Term,
Fourth Year.   Mr. Asmundson. 1 unit.
5. (a) Poultry Management.—Types of poultry farms and
their respective problems. Farm layouts. Economy of investment of capital in land, buildings, stock and equipment.
Efficiency in breeds, maintenance, labor, housing, feeding, production and personnel. Marketing. Farm income, labor income
and profit as based on University survey. Studies of individual
farms for criticism.
One lecture and two laboratories per week. First Term,
Fourth Year.   Mr. Lloyd, Mr. Riley. iy2 units.
5. (6) Advanced Farm Management.—Continuation of
Poultry 5, with more detailed study of surveys and cost account
records to determine labor income and profits. Inventory valuations. Special study of disease problems. Estimates on cost
of developing poultry farms. Efficiency, factors. Costs of
production.
One lecture and one laboratory per week. Second Term,
Fourth Year.   Mr. Lloyd, Mr. Riley. 1 unit.
6. Diseases, Housing and Hygiene.—Common ailments of
poultry and their treatment. Parasites. Infectious and contagious diseases of poultry and chicks, turkeys, geese and ducks
Autopsies. Dissection. Poultry-house construction, building
sites, types, costs and uses.   Yarding.   Sanitation and hygiene.
Two lectures and one laboratory per week. Second Term,
Fourth Year.   Mr. Lloyd, Mr. Asmundson. IV2 units. 266 Faculty of Agriculture
7. (a) Feeding Management.—Feeding growing stock,
laying hens, breeding males and females, turkeys, ducks and
geese. Use of lights. Study of standard methods of routine
management.
Two lectures per week.   First Term, Fourth Year.
Mr. Asmundson. 1 unit.
7. (b) Poultry Rations.—Application of the facts revealed
by studies in nutrition to the compounding of rations for
poultry. Study of feed mixtures. Problems and assigned
reading.
Prerequisite: Animal Husbandry 8.
One lecture and one laboratory per week.
Second Term, Fourth Year.   Mr. Asmundson. 1 unit.
8. Seminar.—Poultry literature. Reports on current events.
Research and experimental problems. Preparation of reports
and bulletins. Export trade. Advertising and other economic
propaganda.
One lecture per week. Three hours practice per week
Second Term, Fourth Year.   Mr. Lloyd. 1 unit.
9. Judging and Selection.—Judging according to standard.
Changes induced by egg production. Characteristics of layers.
Selection for egg production.    Selection for meat production.
Two laboratories per week.    First Term, Fourth Year.
Mr. Asmundson. 1 unit.
10. Thesis. 3 units.
11. Research (Directed). 3 units.
(Not required of Undergraduates.)
50. Research (Directed). 3 to 5 units.
(Open to Graduates only.) Agricultural Economics 267
Agricultural Economics
Dean Clement.
A. Farm Organization and Management.—This is a lecture
and laboratory course, based on a detailed study of five hundred
farms in British Columbia, as recorded on the Farm Survey
Sheets.
References and assigned readings.
Two lectures and one laboratory per week.   Fall Term.
Mr. Hare. IV2 units
B. Agricultural Economics and Marketing.—Some applications of the principles of Economies and Marketing to Agriculture. Required of all students in the Occupational Course, but
not open for credit to degree students.
Text: Carver, Elements of Rural Economics, Ginn.
Three lectures per week.   Second Term.
Mr. Hare. IV2 units.
1. Agricultural Economics.—The principles of Economics
as applied to Agriculture; historical background, the agricultural problem, and some special topics, such as the agricultural
surplus, production in relation to population growth, the farm
income and the share of agriculture in the national income.
Text: Taylor, Agricultural Economics, Macmillan.
References   and   assigned   readings   from   Grey,   Carver,
Nourse, and others.
Three lectures per week.
Mr. Clement. 3 units.
2. Marketing.—The principles of Marketing as applied to
the individual farm and to Agriculture as a whole. The general
principles of Marketing, the marketing of agricultural products
as compared to wholesale and retail distribution of manufactured goods, the contributions of national Farmer Movements,
co-operative marketing as illustrated by the marketing of wheat,
fruit, and milk in Canada. 268 The University of British Columbia
Texts: Brown, Marketing, Harper and Brothers. Mackintosh, Agricultural Co-operation in Western Canada. Ryerson
Press, Toronto.
References and assigned readings from Macklin, Hibbard,
Boyle, Benton, and others.
Three lectures per week.
Mr. Clement. 3 units.
50. Agricultural Economics.—The principles of Economics
as applied to the individual farm and to agriculture as an industry. Lectures, discussions and assigned readings. (Open to
graduates only.)
Mr. Clement. 3 to 5 units.
(Not offered in 1928-29.)
51. Agricultural Economics.—The general principles of
marketing, price fixing, marketing by commission, the influence
of the market on production, co-operation; and on special topics
and assigned readings from general reference and the reports
of the American Institute of Co-operation. (Open to graduates
only.)
Mr. Clement. 3 to 5 units.
(3 and 4 are offered in alternate years.)
Note :—Where courses other than those listed under Agronomy, Animal Husbandry, Dairying, Horticulture, Poultry
Husbandry and Agricultural Economics are mentioned, the
student will please refer to outlines of courses in Arts and Science
or Applied Science. List of Students
LIST OF STUDENTS IN ATTENDANCE, SESSION 1928-29
FACULTY OF ARTS AND  SCIENCE
Name
First Yeah
Full  Undergraduates
Abramson, Alice S	
Acheson, Helen K	
Adams, Marjorie W	
Agar, Martha J	
Aitken, Stirling C	
Akenhead, A. Edwin	
Akerly, Ernest N	
Alexander, Hugh J	
Alexander, Margaret R	
Allan, Margaret M	
Archibald, Marjorie D	
Armstrong, A. Helen 	
Armstrong, Berniece M	
Armstrong, Howard S	
Armstrong, L. Gwendolyn R.
Astell, Clara A	
Attenborough, Esm6 N	
Bachmann, Hazel T	
Bailey, Alice T	
Baillie, G. By 	
Bain, Violet B	
Baird, Thomas C	
Ball, Mary O. B	
Ball, M. Elizabeth 	
Banno, Edward C	
Barber, Phyllis M	
Bardsley, John H	
Barnett, Thomas S	
Barr, Helen I	
Barran, Arthur	
Bartlett, Eugene 	
Barton, Helen C	
Bate, Shirley C	
Beall, Desmond 	
Beavan, A. Paul 	
Beech, Raymond J	
Bell, Alberta 	
Bell, Florence A	
Benedict, Howard 	
Bennett, Gordon H. 	
Bickford, Edith P	
Bischoff, Harold D	
Black, Bertie A. F	
Black, Peter 	
Blackledge, Vera M	
Bolam, M. Gwendolyn	
Bolton, Reginald S	
Home Address
. Anyox
...Vancouver
...New Westminster
...New Westminster
...Vancouver
. Ladysmith
...Vancouver
Vancouver
..Mission City
Vancouver
..Vancouver
Vancouver
.. Vancouver
...Vancouver
..New Westminster
...Vancouver
...Aldergrove
...Vancouver
..Vancouver
.Vancouver
Murrayville
...Vancouver
Vancouver
..Sandwick
Vancouver
..Vancouver
Vancouver
...Brea, Calif.
Vancouver
.. New Westminster
.Port Coquitlam
Vancouver
Vancouver
New Westminster
Courtenay
Waldo
Vancouver
Coronado, Calif.
Abbotsford
Vancouver
Vancouver
Hilversum, Holland
Vancouver
Prince Rupert
New Westminster
North Vancouver
...Vancouver 270
The University of British Columbia
Name. Home Address.
Bolton, Verna M Vancouver
Boutilier, Helen R Vancouver
Bowell, Lyla A .: Vancouver
Bradbury, John F Vancouver
Brent, Norma M Vancouver
Briggs, S. Isabelle  Vancouver
Bright, Richard A Vancouver
Brissenden, Pearley R Vancouver
Brock, A. Ellis  Haney
Brooke, Gordon L Steveston
Brookes, Mary  Vancouver
Brown, Brenton S Vancouver
Brown, C. E. Gordon Liverpool, Eng.
Brown, Edgar N Vancouver
Brown, Evelyn M Vancouver
Brown, Ralph M Vancouver
Bruce, Dorothy M Agassiz
Bryant, Beverly  Vancouver
Buchanan, Richard D Vancouver
Buckland, Elizabeth C Vancouver
Burchell, William U Vancouver
Burnham, Frank L Vancouver
Burns, Ronald M Vancouver
Burritt, Oscar C Vancouver
Burton, Geoffrey S Enderby
Butler, Ruth  Vancouver
Butorac, Jeanne B Trail
Cade, Arthur F Prince Rupert
Cairns, Edmund A. M Trail
Caldicott, Arthur H Trail
Callan, Pat J Vancouver
Cameron, Duncan  Agassiz
Cameron, Jean G Vancouver
Campbell, Alan T New Denver
Campbell, Colin B New Denver
Campbell, Kenneth F Vancouver
Campbell,  Nora  Vancouver
Campbell, Phyllis M New Denver
Carnwath, Velma S Vancouver
Carpenter, Margaret E Vancouver
Carstairs, G. Dennis  Vancouver
Carter, A. Elizabeth  Burnaby
Cartlidge, Annie  , North Vancouver
Chodat, Henry H Vancouver
Christie, Jean S New   Westminster
Clark, Edward A Vancouver
Clark, Harland W Cranbrook
Clarke, Allan F Vancouver
Clarke, Maurice C Trail
Clarke, Norma R Vancouver
Clement, Maurice G Vancouver
Cleveland, Courtney E Vancouver
Clydesdale, Marion  Vancouver
Cole, Cedric A Christchurch,   N.   Z.
Collinson, Carl A Lloydminster,  Sask. List of Students
271
Name. Home Address.
Coltart,  Robert Vancouver
Cooke, Carlton C Vancouver
Corp, Grenville A New Westminster
Costerton, Leonard F Vernon
Cowan, Ian M North Vancouver
Crawford, Thomas E Vancouver
Creelman, Margaret W Vancouver
Crisp, Allan G.  Vancouver
Culley, Erma L Vancouver
Cummings, John M Vancouver
Currie, Jack B North Vancouver
Custance, Lillian E New Westminster
Cuthbert, Enda M New Westminster
Dairon, David A Vancouver
Dalton, Christopher J. A North Vancouver
Davidson, Edna M Vancouver
Davidson, Jack  Vancouver
Davidson, Margaret H Vancouver
Dawe, Harold J. F New Westminster
Dawson, Barbara L Vancouver
Deacon, George B Vancouver
Dick, Hazel M Britannia Beach
Dickie, Mildred O.  Vancouver
Dillabough, Alice E Vancouver
Dingle, Edith A New  Westminster
Dixon, Harold S Vancouver
1 Dodd, Dorothy A. E Vancouver
Doherty, Thomas H North Vancouver
Dunbar, Ross P Vancouver
Duncan, Kathleen  I ^ Vancouver
Dunfee, Harry C Vancouver
Dunlap, Francis A ^. mf New Westminster
Dunn, Janet B Vancouver
Dunning, Edgar C Ladner
Dutcher, Howard N Vancouver
Edwards, H. Gwendoline S North Vancouver
Edwards, Joan E Steveston
Efford, Ruby E Vancouver
Eldridge, Beverley A Vancouver
Ellett, Alec S Vancouver
Ellison, Florence R Vancouver
Ellison,  Robert Trail
Fanning, George  Vancouver
Farris, John L Vancouver
Ferguson, Ann B. S Vancouver
Fernie, W. Vacy Kamloops
Fernlund, Holger B Vancouver
Finlay, Margaret G Vancouver
Fisher, Kathleen P Ladner
Fishman, Solomon   Vancouver
Fletcher, Margaret G.  Victoria
Follick, C. Ralph  _Vancouver
Forsyth, Agnes J Vancouver
Foss, I. Harriet  Vancouver
Fowler, Jean R Vancouver 272
The University of British Columbia
Name.
Fox, Clara G. B. .:	
Fox, John W	
Fraser, Frances L	
Fraser, Kenneth F	
Fraser, Louise G	
Fraser, T. Clyde	
Frattinger, Peter A. ...
Fridleifson, Leif F	
Frost, John W	
Fukumoto, Aichi 	
Gallagher, J. Wilfred ...
Galloway, Verna E	
Garden, Murray E	
Garratt, Morley W	
Garrison, Florence T. .
Gaul, Katharine L. C. .
Gaul, Robert W	
Gavin, Harold D	
Gibson, Eileen 	
Gilbert, Frank M	
Giles, Harold F	
Gillespie, Charles R	
Gillies, Eleanor M. D	
Gillies, Isobel L	
Girardi, Elda 	
Givins, Henry C	
Glover, Herbert G	
Godfrey, Langford M. .
Goranson, Ewald 	
Gordon, Boyd J	
Gordon, Francis -^0smm
Gotoh, John	
Graham, Dorothy M	
Graham, Mary H. S	
Grant, Donald B	
Grant, Donald E	
Grant,  George  .....^^.	
Gray, Alice G.	
Gray, David	
Green, Bertha M	
Green, James J	
Greenwood, Dorrie 	
Greenwood, Frances M.
Griffin, Eileen B	
Griffin, Herbert H	
Griffith, Dorothy M	
Groves, Philip S	
Haase, Rudolph E	
Hager, A. Robert 	
Haley, Francis E	
Hallett, Joan E	
Hamilton, M. Ruth 	
Hansen, Joyce E	
Harford, Barrie H	
Harrell, Bert F	
Home Address.
...Thurlow
...Vancouver
...Vancouver
...Vancouver
...Vancouver
...Vancouver
...Vancouver
...Vancouver
...Vancouver
...Vancouver
...Vancouver
...Nanaimo
...Chapman Camp
...Vancouver
...Vancouver
...Vancouver
...Vancouver
...New Westminster
...Smithers
...Ladner
..North Vancouver
...Vancouver
...Vancouver
...Vancouver
...Vancouver
...Vancouver
...Vancouver
...Vancouver
...Vancouver
...Vancouver
..Anyox
...Vancouver
...Vancouver
...Vancouver
...Vancouver
...Vancouver
...Burnaby
...Vancouver
...Vancouver
...Pemberton Meadows
..Vancouver
...Vancouver
..Vancouver
...Vancouver
...Vancouver
...Vancouver
...Vancouver
...Vancouver
...Vancouver
...Santa Monica, Calif.
...Nelson
...Vancouver
..New Westminster
Burnaby
..Vancouver List of Students
273
Name.
Harrison, Margaret W.
Harvey, H. Stuart	
Harvey, John
Harvey, William H	
Hawes, Isabel G	
Healey, Agnes M	
Heap,  Maxwell   	
Hebb, Malcolm H	
Hedreen, Guy N	
Helmer, Cecil D	
Henderson, Gibb G	
Henderson, Margaret H. T.
Hendry,  Alexander  	
Henniger, William F	
Herbert, Ruth E	
Herbison, Mary 	
Hewer, Jack M	
Hill, Evelyn S	
Hillier, William V	
Hockin, Katharine B	
Holloway, Mavis M. E	
Hood, Jean A	
Hopkinson, Dorothy M	
Horton, R. Donald	
Howe, Eileen D	
Humble, Ralph S	
Hume, Philip G	
Hunt, Cicely R	
Hunter, Virginia 	
Hurford, James R	
Hutchinson, Grace M	
Hutchinson, Myrl  .^..	
Hutchison, Donald F	
Hutson, A. Maud 	
Huycke, Barbara S	
Hyndman, John 	
Inglis, Effle F	
Inglis, James W	
Jack, Lawrence B	
Jakeway, Thomas G	
James, Bessie M	
James, Doris E	
Jestley, H. Lyle 	
Johnson, Edwin B	
Johnson, H. Elizabeth 	
Johnston, John 	
Johnston, Viola M	
Jordan, John S	
Kelly, Dorothy B	
Kennedy, Bessie 	
Kidd, Allan J	
Kilpatrick, T. Donald	
King, Elva M	
King, Margaret A	
Knappett, Louisa M	
Horn* Address.
...Vancouver
...Vancouver
...Vancouver
...Vancouver
...Vancouver
...Vancouver
...Vancouver
...Vancouver
... Vancouver
... Vancouver
...Vancouver
...Vancouver
...Vancouver
Grand Forks
...Vancouver
...Vancouver
...Vancouver
...Vancouver
...Vancouver
...Vancouver
...Vancouver
...Dundarave
..Aberdeen, Wash.
...Vancouver
...Vancouver
...Vancouver
...Vancouver
North Vancouver
...Vancouver
...Courtenay
..Vancouver
...Vancouver
.. Vancouver
...Vancouver
...Vancouver
...Vancouver
...Vancouver
...Courtenay
...Hatzic
...Vancouver
...Vancouver
...Vancouver
... Nakusp
..Vancouver
...Vancouver
...New Westminster
•Vancouver
...Vancouver
...Vancouver
...Vancouver
...Burnaby
...Vancouver
...Vancouver
...Vancouver
...Victoria 274
The University of British Columbia
Name. Horns Address.
Knight, Hilda  Vancouver
Knowles, C. Lockhart  Vancouver
Knowlton, Edna M Vancouver
Koshevoy, Himie  Vancouver
Kyle, Lome S Vancouver
Ladner, Frank E New Westminster
Laing, Jean L. C Vancouver
Lammers, Walter A Vancouver
Lane, Melvin W New Westminster
Large, F. Margaret Vancouver
Larson, Bertil F New Westminster
Larson, May E.  Vancouver
Lawley, J. E. Ryan Vancouver
Lawrance, John C North Vancouver
Lawson, Martha E Vancouver
Lea, Margaret  Vancouver
Leard, Ralph M. P.  New Westminster
Leatherdale, Donald A Vancouver
Lind, Carl A. A Golden
Lind, J. Walter S idney
Lind, Lily A Vancouver
Little, Archie F Vancouver
Lloyd, Douglas  Vancouver
Lockhart, Myra R Vancouver
Lowe, Ronald  Sidney
Lugsdin, Claribel  New Westminster
Lundell, Torsten E Revelstoke
Madeley, F. St. John H Vancouver
Maguire, Helen K Vancouver
Makepeace, Ronald A Vancouver
Mallory, William R Montreal,  P. Q.
Malm, Carl A mdK. Britannia Beach
Manley, J. Reginald  Vancouver
Marr, I. Isabelle  Vancouver
Marshall-Wright, Winnifred A. E Brighouse
Martin, Berna A Enderby
Martin, D. Gordon  New Westminster
Martin, Edward E Vancouver
Martin, Vera  Vancouver
Mathers, William W Burnaby
Matheson, Malcolm A Mayo,  Yukon  Territorj
Mathews, James D Vancouver
Matsuzaki, Susumu  Steveston
Matthews, Helen M Vancouver
Mawby, Vera B Vancouver
Mayers, E. Wallace  New Westminster
Mayse, Shirley I Vancouver
Mearns, William D.  Vancouver
Meilicke, Marian E Vancouver
Mellish, Humphrey W Vancouver
Meredith, George M Vancouver
Millar, Robert D Vancouver
Mitchell, M. Ellen  Vancouver
Moilliet, Theodore K Vavenby
Mole, Dorothy S Ladner List of Students
275
Name.
Montserrat, Dorothy L	
Moodie, Elizabeth M	
Moore, Elizabeth E	
Moore, Emma W	
Morley, Frank S	
Morrison, C. Florence 	
Morrison, George 	
Morrow, James W	
Moscrop, Margaret A	
Mossey, Margaret N	
Mouat, William J	
Moxham, Kathleen A	
Muir, Mildred E	
Muirhead, Margaret O	
Munday, Otis J	
Mundie, John A	
Munn, Emily G	
Murdoch, Margaret J. M	
Murdoch, M. Jean	
Murray, Elmore 	
Murray, Grace W	
Murray, Mae 	
Murray, Mary K	
Myers, Dorothy I	
McAlister, Louise M	
McBay, John 	
McBride, Clarke F	
McCague, Mary L	
McCall, R. Joseph 	
McCallum, Albert D	
MacCallum, Mary 	
McCharles, Donalda M	
McColl, Marjorie 	
McConnachie, Mae T. W. ..
McCormick, C. Marjorie K.
McDonald, A. Ruth 	
MacDonald, Catherine 	
Macdonald, John L	
McDonald, Mabel L	
Macdonald, Marian E	
McDonald, M. Frances 	
MacDonald, Wilfred J	
MacDonald, William R	
McEwen, Enid C	
McEwen, Norman R. 	
McEwen, Theodore S	
McGinness, John H. 	
MacGregor, Harold T	
Mcintosh, Edith J	
Maclver, Dorothy 	
MacKay, Clifford H	
McKay, Dorothy E	
MacKay, J. Fraser 	
McKee, G. Eleanor 	
MacKenzie, Donald A	
Home Address.
...Vancouver
...New Westminster
...Vancouver
..Nanaimo
... Vancouver
...Vancouver
...Vancouver
...New Westminster
...Vancouver
...Vancouver
...Ganges
...New Westminster
...Vancouver
...Vancouver
...New Westminster
...Vancouver
...Vancouver
...Vancouver
...Vancouver
...Vancouver
•Burnaby
...Vancouver
• Vancouver
• Vancouver
...Vancouver
...Vancouver
...Vancouver
...Vancouver
...Vancouver
...Keremeos
..Agassiz
...Vancouver
...North Vancouver
... Vancouver
...New  Westminster
... Vancouver
...Vancouver
...Vancouver
... Vancouver
... Vancouver
...Vancouver
...Vancouver
...Ruskin
...New Westminster
...Hatzic
...New Westminster
...Eburne
..Vancouver
... Vancouver
...Vancouver
...Vancouver
Vancouver
...Kamloops
...Vancouver
...Vancouver 276 The University of British Columbia
Name. Home Address.
McKenzie, Francis J .Vancouver
McKie, Marion C Vancouver
MacKinnon, Peter E Revelstoke
MacKnight, Wilfred T Vancouver
McLarty, Robert L Vancouver
McLean, John F Vancouver
MacLean, Lachlan M Vancouver
McLean, Mary E Vancouver
McLellan, Marion C Vancouver
MacLeod, Audrey L North Vancouver
McLeod, Beulah H Vancouver
McLeod, Jessie M Vancouver
McLeod, J. Lome  Van Anda
McLeod, Katherine  Vancouver
McLeod, Kenneth A Vancouver
MacLeod, Margaret P.  Dundarave
McNab, Zora  Waldo
MacPherson, Donald W Vancouver
McQuillan, Henry C Courtenay
McRae, D. Fraser  Vancouver
MacRae, Duncan G Vancouver
McRae, Roderick B Vancouver
MacSween, Allan J North Vancouver
McVicar, John S Vancouver
McWhinnie,  Sarah K Vancouver
McWilliams, Harold C Vancouver
McWilliams, Kenneth R Vancouver
Nakano, Isao A Cumberland
Naylor, Harold S Vancouver
Nelson, Lewis H Vancouver
Newlands, Patricia  Oswego, Oregon
Nicholson, Laurence J Vancouver
Nomoto, Kyuichi  Vancouver
North, Walter E Armstrong
Oates, Creswell J Vancouver
O'Connor, Aileen J Britannia Beach
Osborne, Rhuna  Vancouver
Owens, Frances M. M Vancouver
Palmer, Arthur B Vancouver
Palmer, Donald D Vancouver
Palmer, E. Irene  Vancouver
Papin, Patricia L. F New Westminster
Parker, Clifford F.  Vancouver
Parker, Eric G Vancouver
Parker, Hugh  Vancouver
Parker, Jack R Vancouver
Parker, Jerrold  Vancouver
Parkin, Gertrude E North Vancouver
Parnham, Helen R Cumberland
Parr, John W New Westminster
Parsons, George R Vancouver
Parsons, Phyllis B. M New Westminster
Partridge, Margaret E Vancouver
Paterson, Marjorie F Vanderhoof
Paulson, P. Edwin New Westminster List of Students
277
Name.
Pearson, Jack M.	
Peel, Marjorie F	
Pennykid, Archibald W. .
Petrie, Isabel 	
Philpott, Margaret S	
Pigott, Arnold D	
Pigou, Elfrida M	
Pike, Albert E	
Piatt, Dorothy 	
Poole, Louise E	
Preston, Madeleine E. M.
Pritchard, Hubert D	
Pronick, Natalia A. 	
Purdy, Frances I	
Read, John R	
Reid, Katherine B	
Retallack, Henry R	
Ricardo, W. Crawley 	
Richardson, Jack	
Richardson, Laurence R,
Rigney, Irene B. 	
Rindal, Kaare 	
Ritchie, Agnes C	
Roberts, Hesketh  	
Robertson, Bessie T	
Robinson, E. Lapage 	
Robinson, Frances E	
Rosenbaum, Dorothy A. ...
Ross, John F	
Ross, Kathleen M	
Rossiter, Philip D	
Royce, Gladys 	
Rutherford, Donald H	
Rutherford, J. Murdoch ...
Rutledge, Howard A. 	
Samis, Bruce C	
Sanders, Gislie E	
Sangster, Marion C	
Sangster, Robert C	
Savage, John P	
Savage, William F	
Selby, Cyril C	
Selfe, Olive F	
Shilvock, Winston A	
Sievers, Harland L	
Simmonite, Stella A	
Sinclair, Hilda M	
Skinner, Doris 	
Smeltzer, Gladys 	
Smith, Alice M	
Smith, Cyril H	
Smith, Frank A	
Smith, Marion W	
Smith, Maxine E	
Smith, Norma F	
Home Address.
.Vancouver
...Vancouver
..Burnaby
...Vancouver
New Westminster
...Vancouver
..North Vancouver
Vancouver
..Vancouver
Port Hammond
. Vancouver
..Grindrod
Vancouver
...Vancouver
Vancouver
Vancouver
...Vancouver
Vernon
..Vancouver
..Vancouver
.Vancouver
Vancouver
Vancouver
..Vancouver
Vancouver
. Vancouver
New Westminster
Vancouver
. Vancouver
Vancouver
...Oliver
..Vancouver
Vancouver
..Revelstoke
..Vancouver
Vancouver
Vancouver.
... Vancouver
Vancouver
..Vancouver
..Vancouver
. Kimberley
Vancouver
Vancouver
.... Victoria
..North Vancouver
...Vancouver
...Vancouver
...Vancouver
...Vancouver
..Matsqui
...Vancouver
...Vancouver
...Vancouver
...Vancouver 278
The University of British Columbia
Name. Home Address.
Smith, Phyllis G. B Vancouver
Smith, Ronald N Vancouver
Smith, W. Cameron „ Vancouver
Smith, Wilbert B Vancouver
Smyth, Roberta L Vancouver
Snedden, Kathleen M Vancouver
Stanley, Beatrice M Vancouver
Staples, Edwin P Creston
Stearman, Renita M Vancouver
Stelmaschuk, Michael  Vancouver
Stevens, Sylvia M Vancouver
Stewart, Beatrice J Vancouver
Stewart, Doris W Vancouver
St. John, David M Vancouver
Strachan, Adeline J Vancouver
Straight, Harold L Vancouver
Streight, Jack M New Westminster
Sugamori, Patricia H Aldergrove
Summers, Muriel L Vancouver
Sutherland, Donald F Vancouver
Sutherland, Dorothy E Vancouver
Sutherland, Lillian M Victoria
Swain, Lyle A Vancouver
Sweeting, Alma T Vancouver
Tamura, Kathuno  Port Haney
Taylor, John R. Vancouver
Teeple, Charles C.  Vancouver
Telford, Jean R Vancouver
Terry, Norman K Vancouver
Thompson, E. Roland  New Westminster
Thompson, G. Morrin  Vancouver
Thompson, Phyllis P Cranbrook
Timmins, Talosa V Vancouver
Tingley, Rettie  Vancouver
Tipping, Vera L Vancouver
Toll, Harold J New Westminster
Tough, William J Vancouver
Tourtellotte, Lois M Vancouver
Trites, Helen L Vancouver
Turin, Alexandra  Vancouver
Turner, George H. R Vancouver
Utsumi,  Kiku   Mission City
Van Allen, Harry M Vancouver
Vance, Earl J Vancouver
Vandervoort, Walter D Vancouver
Vollum,   Clarence    Vancouver
Wakely, C. Verna L Vancouver
Wallace, William D Fernie
Ward, Gordon O.  Vancouver
Webb, Kathleen S Heffley Creek
Wentworth, Charles F Brookline, Mass.
Westmacott, Tom R Vancouver
Whalen, John J ...Vancouver
Wheeler, Marjorie A .Vancouver
Whyte, Jean  _ Vancouver List of Students 279
Name. Home Address.
Wilders, Donald C. L Vancouver
Wilders, Isobel  Vancouver
Wiles, Gordon A Burnaby
Wilson, F. Lloyd  Vancouver
Wilson, James R Vancouver
Wilson, John A Vancouver
Wilson, W. George  Vancouver
Wolfe, Paul B Vancouver
Wong, W. Yin  Vancouver
Woodbury, Charles P Vancouver
Wright, Vernon S Vancouver
Wylie, Dorothy E Vancouver
Wyness, Enid S Vancouver
Yasuda, Toyoyoshl  Vancouver
Yip, K. Dock  Vancouver
Young, Alfred B Burnaby
Young, John T Vancouver
Young, William D Vancouver
Zarrelli, Elvira E Vancouver
Conditioned
Bachman, Florence H Vancouver
Baird, Electa L Vancouver
Berry, Jean B .•. Vancouver
Burns, T. Michael  Calgary, Alta.
Cameron, William F Vancouver
Cooke, Jean E. M Vancouver
Cowlard, Reginald L Vancouver
Coyle, Craig M Vancouver
Cutler, Genevieve K Vancouver
Dorchester, Frank D. M Altamont
Durkin, Peter J Nakusp
Evans, Alfred A Vancouver
Fleming, Elva Z Vancouver
Ford, Graydon  Vancouver
Freedman, Harry C Vancouver
Gill, Arthur T Cranbrook
Grant,   Hugh    New Westminster
Harris, Thomas O. D New Denver
Hulbert, Ethel M Sardis
Hussey, Violet M Vancouver
Jamieson, Grace A.  Vancouver
Lee, Evelyn G Vancouver
Mason, John A Vancouver
Morrow, Alice I.  Vancouver
McCallum, William M Vancouver
McDonald, James T Vancouver
Mclntyre, Theodore J Vancouver
McLaughlin, Nancy A. R Vancouver
MacLean, Angus H Vancouver
McLean, Edwin G.  Edmonton, Alta.
McLellan, Alice E Vancouver
MacNaughton, Ewart R Oliver
Oliver, Jean R Vancouver
Robertson, Douglas K Vancouver 280 The University of British Columbia
Name, Home Address.
Ross, Walter   Dewdney
Selder, William J Vancouver
Shelly, Margaret  Vancouver
Shortreed, Elva E. M ;.._New Westminster
Topper, E. Mabel  Mission City
Ullock, John  Vancouver
Wilson, C. Margaret A Vancouver
Second Year
Full  Undergraduates
Acorn, Jessie I Vancouver
Alexander, Kenneth F Fernie
Archibald, Reginald M Vancouver
Ashby, Barbara M Vancouver
Baker, Maurice G Vancouver
Baker, Russell K Vancouver
Ballentine, George  Vancouver
Ballentine, Helen M Vancouver
Barr, Alice J Vancouver
Beall, Geoffrey  New Westminster
Bedford, Margaret M Salmon Arm
Bell, Helen V Hollyburn
Bennett, Ruth M Vancouver
Birch, Robert H New Westminster
Black, Mildred M. C Vancouver
Bolton, Lorraine D Vancouver
Boothroyd, Gordon G Surrey
Bowen, Marjorie M Vancouver
Bowman, E. Annie  Vernon
Brazier, Charles W.  Vernon
Brennan, W. Earle Vancouver
Bridgman, Erica M North Vancouver
Broatch, Andrew L.  Calgary, Alta.
Bruce, Winnie M Vancouver
Burch, Arthur F Vancouver
Bush, Dora M Chilliwack
Campbell, Marion I Abbotsford
Campbell, Mary E Vancouver
Chalmers, Thomas M Burnaby
Chapman, Maxine F Trail
Chappell, John G Vancouver
Clayton, John N. C Vancouver
Coates, A. Carol  Vancouver
Colledge, M. Elaine  Vancouver
Collier, Sally I Chilliwack
Conlan, John R Vancouver
Connor, Earle C Vancouver
Coope, Margaret  Berkeley, Calif.
Cornish, Naomi H :. Hollyburn
Cornwall, George L Vancouver
Crawford, Muriel M Stewart
Creighton, George L. D Vancouver
Crosby, Helen  J Vancouver
Crowe, M. Loraine Vancouver List of Students
281
Name Home Address
Cupit, Ernest H  Vancouver
Curtis, James D North Vancouver
Daniels, Dorothy L Sardis
Davis, Beatrice E Vancouver
Dawley, George E Victoria
Dee, Isabel M Victoria
Dewar, Dorothy G Revelstoke
Dickinson, Farley B Chilliwack
. Dow, Marion E Vancouver
Dowler, David R Vancouver
Downing, Dorothy M Vancouver
Duckering, Margaret G Vancouver
Duncan, Campbell  Vancouver
Dunn, James  New Westminster
Edwards; Howard I Vancouver
Elliott, E. N. Rhodes  West Summerland
Fawcett, Fairvan C Vancouver
Fenner, J. May Vancouver
Fish, C. Morrison  Langley Prairie
Fisher, John F Eburne
Freeman, Harry  Vancouver
GareschS, Cecilia M Victoria
Garratt, H. Jean  Vancouver
Gaudin, Melvin L New Westminster
Gilbert, Ernest W Ladner
Gilley, H. Frances New Westminster
Goard, Dean H Vancouver
Grant, Jessie M. C Vancouver
Grant, Marion R Vancouver
Gray, Kenneth R ^^ Vancouver
Gray, Roland C. V New Westminster
Grossman, Peter F Chilliwack
Hale, John S North Vancouver
Hall, Gordon W Kelowna
Hallonquist, Frank W New Westminster
Hanes, F. E. Evelyn North Vancouver
Hardy, Ella  New Westminster
Hardy, Walter T Vancouver
Harris, Irene M West Summerland
Hart, Harold W Vancouver
Hartley, Basil S. S , Vancouver
Harvey G. Lloyd  Vancouver
Harvie, M. Muriel  Vancouver
Hay, Letitia A Vancouver
Helliwell, Hilary R. B Vancouver
Henderson, E. Ruth Vancouver
Henderson, Jean A. B .Vancouver
Hickman, W. Henry  Lavington
Hill, Dorothy R Vancouver
Holland, Virginia Vancouver
Holliday, Elizabeth M Armstrong
Holloway, M. Emily  Vancouver
Holmes, A. Constance  Vancouver
Horn, Howard J Vancouver
Horton, Ruby J Vancouver 282 The University of British Columbia
Name. Home Address.
How, Lilian K Vancouver
Hughes, Norah L Abbotsford
Inglis, Hugh F Gibson's Landing
Ingram, Dorothy H North Vancouver
Ireland, Elizabeth B. W Vancouver
Irvine, Margaret C New Westminster
Irvine, Margaret S Fernie
Itter, Stuart Vancouver
Jenkins, Ernest A Vancouver
Johnsen, Clara E Vancouver
Johnson, Daniel E Ocean Falls
Johnson, Thelma H. C Vancouver
Johnston, A. Elizabeth Vancouver
Keeling, F. Temple  New Westminster
Keillor, Dorothy E Vancouver
Kelly, Eric  Vancouver
Kennett, William T. E Vancouver
Kidd, Kathleen M Burnaby
King, Everett H Shaw P. O.
Kinninmont, Russell J North Vancouver
Kirk, Ada W Vancouver
Kirk, Marjorie S Vancouver
Kolle, William J Vancouver
Langridge, Marion H Vancouver
Lauriente,  Miranda  Trail
Leach, Jean F. M Vancouver
Leslie, Jean O Los Angeles, Calif.
Linfleld, Arthur G Vancouver
Little, Thomas  Victoria
Loch, Margaret S Vancouver
Logan, Margaret C Vancouver
Madigan, Stephen E Vancouver
Mahon, Thelma H Vancouver
Malcolm, Olive M. C Vancouver
Marchbank, Wellwood A Errington
Mathers, Alice S Vancouver
Maxwell, Angus A Port Hammond
Menten, R. Claire  New West