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 VOL. 6 NO. 6 OF THE UBC LIBRARY STAFF NEWSLETTER MARCH/APRIL 1970
At the end of an almost perfect Winter it would seem as if we can
look forward to an almost perfect Summer, if the present weather
is any indication.
The sun is
weeks to go
New innovat
coffee room
premises wi
invited.
shining, exams are almost over and there are several
until Summer School starts.
ions are about to burst upon the Library scene, the
is automated and Woodward Library celebrates its new
th a pre-official opening function to which we are all
Sedgewick is off the drawing boards and the trees are already
being potted.
So happy vacation to all you travellers abroad, you holidayers at
home and you baskers in the sun - it promises to be an interesting
Summer.
PAL
UNIVERSITY OF BRITISH COLUMBIA A Hearty  Welcome  to:
STAFF CHANGES
Hetty Gomez
Marianne Krayenhoff
Rosemary Zwinge
Michael Gale
Kathy Brakwil1
Heather Brayshaw
Jane Ainsworth
Dei rdre Phil 1ips
Catharine Neil 1
Leslie Huddart
Laurie Dunbar
Maria Maros
Ann Krajeck
Sheila Scott
Shirley Flack
Pat Bearss
Chris Jones
Cinda Marie Hendrel
Judy CI ifton
Cherie Millard
Young-Ju Ahn
Woodwa rd
L.A. 1
BMB
L.A. 1
Sedgewick
L.A. 1
Catalogue
L.A. 1
Curric. Lab.
L.A. 1
Catalogue
L.A. 1
Sedgewick
L.A. 1
Catalogue
L.A. 1
MacMi1 Ian Library
L.A. 1
Systems
L.A. 1
Woodwa rd
L.A. 1
Catalogue
L.A. I
Gov. Pubs.
L.A. 1
Catalogue
L.A. 1
Woodwa rd
L.A. 1
Catalogue
L.A. 1
Ci rculation
L.A. 1
Catalogue
L.A. 1
Serials
L.A. 1
Ci rculation
L.A. 1
Catalogue
L.A. 1
11
11
11
Congratulations to you on your Promotions:
Gudrun Hiemstra
L.A.
II 1
Cat.
to
L.A.
IV
Cat.
Maureen Sutherland
L.A.
II
Cat.
to
L.A.
1 1 1
Cat.
Janice Roy
L.A.
1 1
Cat.
to
L.A.
1 II
Cat.
Rosemary Zwinge
L.A.
1 1 1
Sedge.
to
L.A.
IV
Sedge
We Regretfully wish Farewell to:
Trixie Korver
Rhiannon Wi11iams
Ingrid Sterner
Joan Baker
Erika Wlachow
Craig Jones
Susan Belman
SSD
Catalogue
Catalogue
Catalogue
Catalogue
Catalogue
Catalogue
L.A.
1
L.A.
1 1
L.A.
L.A.
V
L.A.
1 1
L.A.
L.A. Farewel1s cont'd.
Michael Howe
Errol Kalpatoo
Fred Wong
Sharon Brown
Lynne Malecot
Pat Heasl ip
Sally Krieger
Sandra Johnson
Magdolan Keto
Pauline Lambert
Jonathan Cohen
Alena Schultz
Gwen Tel ling
Jancis O'Mara
Penny Pi 1latt
Vera Nlessen
L. Van Den Wyngaart
Jeanette Wal1
Sally Blyth
Carol Kurylko
Susan Shi 11itto
Tom Howe
Duane Lunden
Elaine McIntyre
Cathy Carl in
Shui-H. Kwong
Sedgewick
Sedgewick
Sedgewick
Woodward
Mathematics
MacMi1 Ian Library
Fine Arts
Systems
Catalogue
Gov. Pubs.
Se r i a 1 s
Catalogue
Catalogue
Ci rculation
Acqui si tions
Reading Rooms
Woodwa rd
Woodwa rd
Sedgewick
Catalogue
Catalogue
Sedgewick
Acquisitions
Ci rculation
Catalogue
Asian Studies
Stack Attendant
L.A. I
Stack Supervisor
L.A.
L.A.
L.A.
L.A.
K.P.O
Flexo
L.A.
L.A.
L.A.
L.A.
L.A.
L.A.
L.A.
L.A.
L.A.
L.A.
L.A.
L.A.
Stack
.A.
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Op-
I I
II
I I
I I
V
Attendant
CI.
Assist. Mail
L.A.
I I
Thought for the month - the editor - PAL.
from the Administrators Vocabulary;-
RELIABLE SOURCE -   The guy you just met.
UNIMPEACHABLE SOURCE - The guy who started the rumor originally. Page 4U
THOUGH I Ail SPIRIT
My mind is a woman, aloof and dreaming;
A royal cat, inpervious to counsel.
Willowy, cool, transparent, unquenchable,
She gazes far.
From every side I tilt at her
To prove her my chattel;
She fades like mist.
As a dagger I thrust,
as lake-blue water
She spills and mends
Beyond me, liquid.
I concede; I leave her
Untroubled, unaltered,
a sphinx of foam. 5
COLLECTION OF THE MONTH  -  COINS
There are a number of Canadian and foreign coins and tokens in
Special Collections which have reached us in the form of donations
or bequests to the University. The bulk of these pieces were the
residue of Dr. Robie Reid's collection, the main elements of which
had been disposed of privately. Among them was a fair strength in
Canadian tokens (of very variable condition), though the decimal
coinage was largely represented only by the large cents. These
latter are mostly uncirculated, but had been taped to cardboard
with resultant disfigurement. The foreign coins were a hodgepodge rather than a collection.
The material has now been classified and graded and housed in 2" x
2" vinyl-windowed holders - with a few exceptions (Indian dubs,
Chinese cash, religious tokens).
The Canadian material together with the few Greek and Roman coins
is being retained. But the rest of the coins, being an agglomeration rather than a collection, are being disposed of as and when
favorable opportunities occur. The only really good coin was an
English 1869 penny in VF condition (the rarest date of the series)
which fetched #75 at auction in London.  Groups of coins have also
been sold in Washington, Montreal and Sweden.
Last December we took possession of a bequest from Mr. E.N. Peterson, of Vancouver, of Canadian coins, which included a nice set of
silver dollars, some mint sets and a few nice minors, as well as a
lot of modern bulk speculative material, most of which latter went
for face value.
Out of the coins mentioned above and the proceeds of those sold
elsewhere we are building a complete Canadian decimal type set
(i.e. emphasis on designs rather than on dates) in Extra Fine or
better condition.  EF is a beautiful grade showing extremely little
wear. The one exception is the 1911 ("godless") half dollar of
which we are contenting ourselves with a V[ery] F[ine] specimen on
account of the high cost involved. This and a number of other
'key' coins were recently acquired at auction in Toronto.
The type set of about 100 specimens should be completed in the
next few months, whereupon it will be put on display. Special Collections crave your indulgence until such time, unless anyone
would care to see things as they now are any lunch time by
arrangement with the under-signed.
John Gray
The Library Assistants Association held their Annual General
Meeting February 19, Room 85^a in the School of Librarianship.
Financial Report was given by Tannis Mulcahy.  Yearly Report on
the Affairs of the Association was given by Pat LaVac.  Membership Report was given by Janet Lenko.
Elections were held and the 1970/71 slate of officers were elected
as follows:
Chai rman
Vice Chai rman
Sec/Treasurer
1st member at
2nd member at
large
large
Pat LaVac
Gwen Gregor
Tannis Mulcahy
Janet Lenko
Bernie Olson
Law
Map Division
Ci rculation
Sedgewick
Woodwa rd
Is "HAL" taking over? .
Social Science Research Council
Data Bank, no 2. Nov/67
"Several readers have noted the
misprint of "magnetic rape" for
"magnetic tape". This was a
typing error not a Freudian slip;
the staff of the Data Bank are
not of the opinion that computers
can displace all human activities.-
not yet]
It's just put itself at the
top of the holiday roster!' ST WIBBY REPORTS...
SOMETHING new in Cataloguing
a print-out by title as well as
by author-title entry.
HAPPY TOURING to Joan Cosar of
Serials who is once again off
to Duncan, Prince George and
points north with the B.C. Tel.
choir. Joan is appearing as
soloist on this occasion.
FRONT OFFICE. Enviable sight -
Lynne Maclver sorting over passport, immunization cards, tickets
etc. prior to a May visit to Expo
Japan, Hawaii and other points
East.
LAW'S Allan Soroka seems to be
finding Ottawa an Interesting
place to commute to and Melva
Dwyer of Fine Arts just returned
from attending the Conference
of the Council of Planning
Librarians in New York.
CONGRATULATIONS to Janet Yuan
of Acquisitions and Sui Cheong
Siu of the Math Library who became Canadian Citizens at the
Citizen's Court in the new MacMillan Bloedel building Georgia
Street on Friday March 20, 1970.
HAPPY HUNTING to Penny Pi 11att
of Acquisitions who tells us she
is off to Mexico to set up residence for awhile in that sunny
clime.
TALKING about Mexico reminds us
that Graham Elliston of Bibliography should be back any day
from his travels to that country.
CONGRATULATIONS to
Claudia
Kaye of Cat.
who placed
second in
those New
York Metro,
auditions in
Seattle.  We
were happy
to hear that
Claudia has
received a
Canada
Council Bursary to further
studies.
musical
CONGRATS also to Duane Lunden
of Acquisitions, another
recipient of a Canada Council
Arts Bursary.  This will enable
Duane to continue his studies.
Duane will be travelling for a
while in England and then back
to Halifax for further studies
in his chosen field.
POPULATION INCREASES.
Baby Brongers, Carina, weighed
in at 3560 grams, on Feb. 2k.
Happy parents Rein Brongers of
Science, and Laurie, ex For/Ag.
Irene Everest also ex of For/
Ag., welcomed a daughter,
Terri-Jo on the 13th Feb.
Incidentally we understand that
the brother of Rosina Koo
Spec. Coll., found himself unexpectedly physician in charge
at this happy event. Small world. 8
From Science Div. an "old girl1
Karin Casasempere produced the
reason for her departure Alfonso
Casasempere III.
Diana and Robin Colquhoun tells us
that their first child was born
Feb. 28 5 p.m. weighing 7 lbs.
9 ounces and named Tobin Kent.
Diana was in Circ. but many will
remember her
better for
those delight-     .^^
ful \'lttle   A&frLQ-'~
people who used   lrX!j2f  cP
to appear in Biblos
Cartoons.
Doug. Mclnnes of the 'Front
Office' is also wearing that
special 'look' this month.  Wife
Emily presented Doug with Scott
Gordon Douglas on the 4th April.
CONGRATULATIONS TO ONE AND ALL.1.'
SERIALS reports that the first
working session of the task force
assigned to the completion of the
transfer of titles from Acquisitions
Kardex to Serials has been held.  The
Task Force composed of Cataloguing,
Systems and hourly temp., staff will
try to complete the project by the
end of 1970.
HOPE you all got a glimpse of those
rare and fascinating items in maps,
books and atlases that were in the
main entrance hall and outside Social
Science.  These included some items
from the George H. Bean collection of
Japanese maps of the Tokugawa era
and other interesting items from the
On which happy note I leave you all
for this month: 'Go fly a kite -
it's Summer".
Rogers-Tucker Map Collection.  If you missed the
display go up to Spec.
Coll. where the collection
is housed.
SOCIAL SCIENCES reports
John Field and Iza Fiszhaut
are sporting California
tans and Liz Fussell is
the envy of everyone having
recently bought a sail
boat.  Happy sailing Liz!
BIG WELCOME to the City
College students who are
in the process of taking
the Library Assistants
Course at C.C. and are
doing their Field Work at
the Library.  Hope to see
some of you soon as permanent staffers.
FROM Sedgewick Janet Lenko
and Rosemary McAndless,
who recently returned from
Los Angeles called to say
Disneyland is still the
place to go and the new
Haunted House is real scary.
OTHER TRAVELLERS ABROAD
include Pat Heaslip of
For/Ag. off to Europe and
a cruise on the Mediterranean.  Mollie Buckingham
of Law to England and a
trip up the Rhine & Italy.
AND talking about Law reminds
us that one of the interesting items on Reserve over
there is a KITE "Go fly your
kite' at Law means just that
and the students sign out
the 'flying bat' at the Circ.
desk. wAiUMUHUM
OPEN HOUSE   MARCH 1970
^JSi
ttij^i
ra- • ji
2.   ■■■     .a!
&£•*
""<■?!% f j$
Do you  Remember?
The "NEW"   Sedge
on a  tabletop 10
Guarding the Display
The Shakespeare
fi rst folio 11
"Dal T" Ing
with
Alice
How i t a 11
began
(Asian Studies) 12
Gov.   Pubs.
Tempting  the  Censor
No strings attached -
just   ribbons - for a
guided  tour of Cataloguing
ADDf'D -;■.
COPIES
-ii.ii1>      vt Mrifs Iwn
■ ■ C-idA*. TO ?,..  I7u0.il!.
'j ' -■ Ji* fi'*r capv mj j,
■»■ j i wi- m { Mcjve i*ai 15
 ■ I c* tr.';il   si.-i
■..!  ..-.   |   *■ I •CAllOll i
■ i.'   .'i i i.   ■...!■  ,\ori.OM«-,i.
PHOTOS BY TIM PORTER, CIRCULATION.  CAPTIONS BY JUDY & DEE 13
R.I.P. OR CIRCULATION REVISITED
For a period of several weeks, the circulation overdues department
was almost convinced that it had a ghost on its hands.  (The Ghost
of Circulation Present?)  Shortly after Christmas, all notices
sent to C.J. van Twest were returned to circ. with "Deceased"
scrawled on the envelopes.  No sooner had we cleared our loan
records of his name, than his borrower's number reappeared on the
daily printout.  Curious, our overdues staffer phoned the Registrar
of Births, Deaths and Marriages in Vancouver but there was no record
of his demise.  At about the same time, one of the traces staff
noticed that C.J. had asked to have a book traced after he had
supposedly died.  Since all mail from the Library was being returned
unopened, she sent a note to C.J. in a plain envelope with her own
return address telling him that his book had been found.  At the
same time she instructed staff members to check his identification
carefully when he appeared to claim his book.  Imagine his surprise
when he arrived at the loan desk and was informed of his recent
death.  Needless to say, C.J. was indeed alive and well, and although
not in Argentina, he had moved to a new address. Mail sent to his
previous address was being handled in a rather unorthodox manner by
the new tenant.  With a sigh of relief we keypunched a change of
address only to receive yet another notice from the old address -
the last we hope.  Top line reads: The good that men do is often
interred with them.
THE UNIVERSITY OF BRITISH COLUMBIA
THE LIBRARY
VANCOUVER  8, CANADA
\00U,
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27 D '70
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AjlS-
s+* 14
A PROGRESS REPORT FROM THE WOODWARD LIBRARY
At last the end of the first, and major, phase of doubling the size
of the Woodward Library is in sight.
The new top floor is shining and empty except for the Dean of
Medicine and his staff. They are occupying, temporarily for three
years, the seminar rooms on the south side of the building. The
basement is crowded with some 26 tons of steel which will become
new regular stacking and the much talked about "compact stacking".
The tracks for the "compacts" have been laid and it is quite evident
that all the small boys on the staff are going to enjoy pushing the
buttons and making the trains of books move.
The second floor is presently housing all the bound journals AND the
BOOKS.  Fortunately our students seem able to accept this with
equinamity.
The main floor is a mixture of
sameness, for the circulation
division, and new beauty or
mess for everybody else.  The
new Technical Services Room
is 70 by 30 feet of beautiful
color, sunshine, and SPACE.
Over the rest let us draw a
veil; there are many large
sheets of plastic handy, lying
here and hanging there. They
wi11 do nicely.
VIEW FROM
WITHIN
NO 4
Moments at Woodward Lib.
during construction...
"Would yon take over for a minute? Td like to go
outside and let out a healthy scream.r 15
ALONG UGANDA COUNTRY ROADS
May I take you along a country
road in Uganda? So much has
been told and written about
the wonderful National Parks
and Game Reserves of Africa
perhaps a less storied part
would be of more interest to
you. My three week holiday
was far too short for the vast
area covered and this is but a
snap shot view of a small part
where the scene is changing
fast.
The main roads are mostly
unpaved and of a hard red clay
and though I love walking, I
was glad for once I was not.
The dust from the cars of the
imperious Ugandan drivers, who
at present, are the "big boys",
is horrifying and what the
roads would be like in the wet
season one does not like to
imagine.  There, I have given
you the worst.  From the inside
of a car or more commonly a
mini bus, I think you would be
struck as I was, with the lush
greens and gay colours of the
countryside; fascinated by the
picturesque travellers along
the way; and above all, delighted with the grace and
beauty of the women.
Though Kampala is built on
many hills, the road to 16
Masindi is fairly flat and one does not have the views beyond as
one does between Masindi and Fort Portal where the road approaches
close to the Ruenzori Range (Mountains of the Moon) and the nearby
Congo border.  Shortly after leaving Kampala there is a swampy area
thick with the graceful papyrus and where cut back, pale pink water
lilies raise their heads high above their pads.  How I would have
loved to bring back a few of the regal triangular stemmed wands of
papyrus standing twelve feet or more in places.  It is much used for
thatching roofs.  Everyone has a banana palm growing close to his
rondavel and you will see acres of banana plantations, cotton, millet,
sugar cane, pineapple.  Near Fort Portal, the rolling hills are
covered with tea plantations.  Coffee is grown extensively but we did
not pass any large areas of it.
Although midsummer
and close to the
equator, because
of the high altitude the ai r was
warm but pleasant
and it always
cooled off at
night.  In the
higher areas amongst
the lush greens, the
bri11iant orange
red flowers of the
huge Kaffi r Boom
trees is startling.
In fu11 b1oom in
summer, it grows
its leaves as the
flowers fade, only
to drop them before
flowering time
again.  Many introduced shrubs and
trees enliven the
route, perhaps the
tree that is most
noticeable of these
in summer is the
fiuge.Hison Fau.3 liftr. H;.
Wasindi
UGANDA
MtCTQRlQ 17
Cassia, its plumes of
bright yellow flowers are
seen in all the villages,
a quick growing tree it has
seeded itself along the way.
Bougainvi11ia, frangipani,
jacaranda and flamboyant are
foreigners who love Uganda
too, and we were lucky to
see the two latter spring
flowering trees in second
bloom.
Back to the road and the
travellers who thread their
way along the edge as the
elephant grass grows tall
and thick beside it, and
here and there weird shaped
termite hills, red because
of the soil, make obstructions.  Where the road
climbs a hill and drops
sharply away the roadmakers
have wisely left a dividing
mound of soil and vegetation, which keeps traffic
to its own lane (to the left).
One wishes they had followed
the same thought on dangerous
curves. Among the four legged
travellers, in the southern
area, particularly around
Mbarabara, there are often
Ankole cattle with enormous
horns, being herded by thei r
owners at a slow pace, often 18
accompanied by goats.  Indeed goats were very
common and wee kids take their life in their
"hoofs" bounding across the road quite unused
to cars which are still infrequent.  Rarely
does one see a dog.  We stopped to watch a
troup of colobus monkeys cavorting high in the
trees and occasionally saw baboons and vervet
monkeys.  In the early morning or evening hours
nearer the parks where the area is more open,
one will see from the road,impala and other
types of antelope, elephant and giraffe. 19
Now to the more important travellers, the men for the most part
have adopted western dress and, of course, the ubiquitous T-shirt
is in evidence.  Except when walking to market the men are empty
handed, the few more opulent on bicycles. Passing a village
school at break time is a lovely sight, the children come out like
petals or leaves in a breeze, the boys and girls all dressed in
the same colour. The school's chosen colour is usually a shade of
bright blue or green. The little girls have their hair as short
as the boys.  But, it is the Ugandan
women who catch the eye.  They have a
style of their own and wear a long
loose fitting, much draped garment.
They quite obviously are artistic,
showing a love of colour but favouring
greens and shades from warm yellows to
lively browns, though brilliant blue is
often chosen, much more rarely, red.
Near Kampala, almost all the women wear
shoulder peaks to their sleeves. The
women's heads are always covered and
the women of the Masindi area, wear a
distinctive and most attractive turban.
They are siim and stately, always
carrying something on their heads,
gourds for water,
bunches of green bananas,
faggots, washing, anything
and everything. Most are
carrying a baby on their backs
as wel1.
Single file they travel along the
road and one longs to take a picture,
but they are proud, reserved and feel
that something is being taken from
them if photographed. How quickly this
scene will change, but in the inevitable
passing, may the Ugandan women keep
their superb carriage and dignity and
may their innate artistic ability bring
them greater reward.
Helen Allan ano iMtrvr  is sou*, ^esncw.sift ?

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