UBC Publications

UBC Publications

UBC Publications

Biblos Jun 1, 1967

Item Metadata

Download

Media
biblos-1.0190846.pdf
Metadata
JSON: biblos-1.0190846.json
JSON-LD: biblos-1.0190846-ld.json
RDF/XML (Pretty): biblos-1.0190846-rdf.xml
RDF/JSON: biblos-1.0190846-rdf.json
Turtle: biblos-1.0190846-turtle.txt
N-Triples: biblos-1.0190846-rdf-ntriples.txt
Original Record: biblos-1.0190846-source.json
Full Text
biblos-1.0190846-fulltext.txt
Citation
biblos-1.0190846.ris

Full Text

Array V. 3.  No. 9 of the U.B.C. LIBRARY STAFF NEWSLETTER JUNE 1967,
Commencing with a word from our guest editor
left on a trip.
The Editor is on a trip,
But BIBLOS must go on,
So if this issue ain't real gone
Please don't nobody flip.
- who has also
We tried our best and all the rest,
And all we got was this.
Although it isn't lit'ry bliss
The damned thing's off our chest (s)
FEATURING THIS MONTH
News 'n Notes
First Annual Meeting LAA
Automation - Acquisitions Division
First Reports from Expo.
Judy and Maria
EXPOse
Notice to Employees
page 2
4
6
10
12
14
** P/L wishes to announce she can't take the  credit???!! NEWS 'N NOTES.
Sa1 a ries
Beginn i
will ta
follows
ng  July   1   a   general    increase   in   non-professional   salaries
ke  effect.     The  former  and   revised  beginning   rates  are  as
Clerk   I
LA j
Secretary I
LA I I
Clerk I I
Keypunch &
Flexo Op.
Secretary I I
Clerk 111
Secretary I I I
LA I I I
LA IV
was $218
230
245
263
263
290
295
300
313
320
378
now
$243
255
271
290
290
318
324
330
349
365
428
Some Library positions have been reclassified.  Front office
stalwart Mrs. Audre Dewar becomes Administrative Assistant, and
Mrs. Carol Wisdom of Math and Mrs. Nancy Morton of Maps become
LA Ms instead of LA I.  (congratulations)
Col beck
is responsible for the destruction to be found in the Social
Science Division.  The area is being remodelled to meet his requirements, including the installation of compact shelving,
Mr, Colbeck is expected on July 3.  Welcome aboard sir!
The Computer Has Done It Again!
This time it has thrown up ten thousand (10,000) pages of
print-out analyzing this year's circulation patterns - how often
by whom, how long, etc.
Vacanc ies
The pecking order is in disorder with openings in the top j:obs
in Woodward and Circulation.  Librarians, apply, apply!
Appointments will be made by the University Librarian on the -3-
recommendation of Committees appointed to scrutinize the
candidates. These committees will provide a consenses of relevant
campus opinion. The Woodward committee for example, will consist
of Mr. I.F, Bell, chairman, two members of the Woodward staff,
the Deans of Medecine, Dentistry, Pharmacy, Science, Applied
Science and Graduate Studies and Dr. W.C. Gibson.
STAFF CHANGES.
WELCOME TO:
Donna Richards
LA 1
Rosalie Acutt
LA 3
Maureen Gould
LA 1
Rosalind Sanderson
LA 3
Paul Gager
LA 2
1 Ize Gravi t i s
LA 3
E. King
LA 3
Jean Law
LA 3
Sally Dorward
LA 1
Shi rley Bouchard
LA 1
Janice Cundal
LA 1
Judy Sangha
LA 1
Rosemary Grigsby
LA 1
Vera Vanderhorst
LA 1
Edna Corbin
LA 1
Maureen Devine
Sec.
Barbara Bel ward
LA 3
Jane Price
LA 3
Kathleen Gower
LA 3
Linda Morrow
LA 1
Nancy Clarke
LA 1
J im Simon
Clerk
Micheal Newman
LA 2
Danae Chambers
LA 1
Teresa Clarke
LA 1
Thea Lantau
LA 1
David Clark
LA 1
Brigi tte Heller
Clerk
Cataloguing
Catalogu i ng
Woodwa rd
Catalogu ing
Record Library
Catalogu i ng
Catalogu ing
Cataloguing
Catalogu ing
Cataloguing
Catalogu ing
Agricultu re/Fores try
Acqu i si fions
Acqu i si tions
Mus ic
Admini strat ion
Ci rculat ion
Cataloguing
Special Collecti ons
Catalogu ing
Sedgewick
Acqu i si tions
Cataloguing
Cataloguing
Catalogu ing
Acqui si tions
Cataloguing
Acqu i si t ions PROMOTIONS
Magdolna Konya
Catalogu ing
LA
1
to LA 2
-Leah Gordon
Catalogu ing
LA
3
to LA 4
Claudia Kerr
Catalogu ing
LA
3
to LA 4
Ingeborg Schafer
Catalogu ing
LA
3
to LA 4
Valerie Carl isle
Acqu isi t ions
LA
1
to LA 2
Sylvia Fraser
Fine Arts
LA
2
to LA 3
Elvie Eigendorf
Catalogu i ng
LA
3
to;LA 4
Muneshwar Prasad
Serials
LA
1
to LA 2
Judy Cardin
C i rculat ion
LA
3
to LA 4
RESIGNATIONS
Joan Lundquist
Acqu i s i t ions
LA
1
Pat Gorgenyi
Catalogu i ng
LA
4
Jackie Urban
Catalogu i ng
Li brari an
Margaret Glaspie
Acqu i s i tions
LA
2
1rene Mi n ich
Serials
LA
3
Christiane Bartel
Catalogu ing
LA
1
Rhonda Jennens
Catalogu ing
LA
1
Bob Wallace
Catalogu ing
LA
3
Nancy Moss
Woodwa rd
LA
1
Mary Adolph
Social Sciences
LA
3
Lorraine Tomlinson
Catalogu ing
LA
1
Carol Trueman
Clerk 1
Acqu is i t ions
Nancy Konkin
Cataloguing
LA
1
Penny Jandali
C i rculat ion
LA
4
(Music)
REPORT
The first Annual Meeting of the LIBRARY ASSISTANTS ASSOCIATION
was held May 11th 1967 Room 865 of the School of Librarianship.
The main items on the agenda were to elect a new Executive for
year 1967/68, to present a financial report and to review the
activities of the Association during the past year.
Those elected officers are -
Mrs. Pat LaVac 'Chairman
Mrs. Helen Derewenko      Vice Chairman
Mrs. Ann Gil landers       Sec./Treasurer
Mrs. Janet Lenko 1st.
Mr. Rod Cardin
Member at
Large
2nd. Member at
Large
Acqu i s i t ions
Science
Catalogu ing
Sedgewick
Woodwa rd -5-
The Financial Report audited by Mr. John Lomax A.I.A.T. (Head
Accountant ofthe Universityof B. C.) and presented by Mrs.
Helen Derewenko showed a balance of $235.17 as of March 31st
1967.
Membership report presented by Mrs. Janet Lenko disclosed that
there were 86 paid up members.  It was also noted that with the
reclassification of the non-professional staff it had been impossible
for one person to cover for membership all those now eligible.
(A Membership committee has since been formed and at the moment
there is a 70% membership of those eligible.  This is going up as
new personnel arrive.)
The report on the activities of the Association during the year, as
presented by Mr. Rod Cardin followed closely the report in the March
issue of Biblos.  These activities of course included support of the
bid for reclassification (successful). Active co-operation with both
the Librarians office and personnel, in the matter of pay increases
(also succesful we believe if you refer to page 2 News 'n Notes) and
the possibility of developing a LA technical group within the CLA....
still to be followed up.
The meeting concluded with an assurance that the Library Assistants
Association will continue to be active to help improve any condition,
where it is needed, for the betterment of all Library Personnel.
Filler uppers.
We often wonder how to handle some of the irate communications
readers send in.  We rather like the German composer Max Reger's
response to a review appearing in the New York Sun.  He sent the
following letter to the critic.
"Ich sitze in dem kleinsten Zimmer in meinem hause.
Ich habe ihre Kritik vor mir, Im nachsten Augenblick
wird sie hinter mir sein,
which means
I am sitting in the smallest room in my house
I have your review before me.  In a moment it will
be behind me.
A recent addition to the library's holdings;
KITLEY, Alan T.  The big problem of small organs.
Colchester 1966. AUTOMATION - ACQUISITIONS DIVISION
Plans are presently under way to automate procedures in the
Acquisitions Division.  While the specific details of the system
are not defined, the approach has been decided to the extent
that equipment has been ordered (Friden Flexowriters), and the
Honeywell computer in the Data Processing Centre has been equipped
to handle paper tape.  The Flexowriters will be used to prepare
orders, and the by-product paper tape used to establish and maintain
the machine records.  Keypunches will also be used for entering
and changing records.
The 'thorny' part of implementing most library systems is the
task of record conversion - of taking an existing system of records
that is very large and dynamic, and systemat i cal.ly establishing
machine records for every entry, maintaining the file for changes and
deletions as the conversion progresses.  In preparing for the automation of the Acquisitions Division, conversion of the order file has
loomed as one of the most critical problems to be overcome.  The
file is massive.  It contains both outstanding orders and records
of most materials received by the library over the last two years.
It runs to. some 150,000 entries.  The alternatives in dealing with
the order file were two:
1. to clear it of all entries except those representing
outstanding orders and materials being processed, and
then to convert it to machine-readable form and print it
2. to leave it as it is for a period of about a year and then
to discard it,
A survey was done which indicates that to clear the file of the
45,000 entries representing materials which have been received,
catalogued and processed would call for over 1,000 hours of
student assitant time at a cost of almost $1,500.  Keeping the
clearing current would cost $100 per month.  Assuming that removing
backlog entries from the file would involve no sorting but would
probably result in more matching problems, another 40,000 items
could be cleared at a cost of about $1,000.
The numerically-organized file of 30,000 items would have to be '
converted to machine-readable form regardless.  An alphabetic printout of this file would allow the 30,000 entries to be cleared
for another $750. Altogether, the order file could be reduced to some 35,000
entries, representing materials being processed, for a total
cost of between $3,000 and $3,500.
It did not seem likely that $3,000 worth of searching time could
be saved by reducing the 150,000 entry file of slips to a printed
list of one-quarfer the,size.  Therefore, on grounds of economy
it was decided to retain the order file for a period of a year,
make certain that all material in the Cataloguing Division when
the automated system begins is processed or consigned to backlog withing the year, and then discard the order file.
At present, the order process appears as follows:
For a specific item to be acquired, an order is prepared and sent
to a supplier, followed with a number of 'housekeeping' steps to
record the order and its effect on funds.  When the material is
received, the records are changed to reflect the current status,
invoices are passed for payment, fund records are altered, and
the material passed along for further processing.  When fully
processed (catalogued and classified), the records are cleared
for each respective item in the Acquisitions records, and the item
then represented in the cataloguing records.
This is oversimplified, and does not reflect the complexities
involved, however, the point that is important is that this process
involves considerable clerical effort, is repetitive in nature,
and voluminous files are difficult to use and to maintain. Also,
errors tend to creep into the system because of the routine operations, and repeated manual operation.
The reasons for using computers for some of these operations can
be grouped into two general paragraphs:
- to reduce the clerical effort involved by transferring
routine operations to the computer, and
- to obtain a more efficient system of records; increasing
utility, providing better information, reducing errors,
and extending the system to consider other related functions.
The first reason involves such tasks as filing new entries,
clearing or changing existing entries, adding and subtracting in
fund records. Most of these can be done faster and more accurately by the computer, and the maintenance procedures can be sim-
plified because all of the information can be kept in one file and
not require several, as most manual systems do. -8-
The second reason is significant because of the size of the files,
and the computers ability to present the information to users in
a more useable format;  a listing of books on-order and in-*process,
in multiple copies, located in more than one place where constant
users can have easy access.
Information entered as part of the Acquisitions process will also
be used for other systems - when items are catalogued, the call number
is added to the record and the descriptive information changed as
required, the corrected record can then be used to produce circulation book cards, print monthly accession listings, and also to
maintain a proposed machine 'shelf-list' file. This shelf-list
wi11 be established under the terms of the Donner grant.
The importance of the Acquisitions system as an integral part of an
overall management system is a major consideration on its design,
and it is essential to   relate purposed of acquisitions, serials,
searching, cataloguing, with other systems such as;  circulation,
location files, course files, and even to use studies that will be
conducted using- information gathered from the circulation control
system.
The new system is expected to work something like this.  Each day,
the paper tapes and punched cards will be submitted for overnight
processing to provide the necessary output for use the following day.
This will be done in the Data Processing Centre, probably during
the graveyard shift. After the data has been transcribed to magnetic
tape, an editing operation will take place to examine for the
fairly obvious errors and ommissions that can be detected through
p-ogrammed checking.  Any errors found will be listed separately
as exceptions for checking and correction by the library.
Qnce past the edit stage, the data will be arranged by order number
And  processed against the outstanding file;  inserting new items,
extering changes and additions to existing items, and producing a
list of revisions to the file.
For new orders, a processing form will be produced to be used when
the item is received;  as a worksheet for cataloguing, updating
the in-progress file, etc.  Split shipments will require a replacement
process form to cover subsequent shipments, and in this case will
reflect the outstanding items as well as those already received.
After the main file has been brought up-to-date, the additions and
cnanges that have occurred since the last complete listing will be -9-
organized by main entry and a cummulative supplementary in-
process list prepared.
Periodically a complete list will be prepared, depending on the
requirements. A weekly cycle has been anticipated, and can be
accommodated, but may not be necessary - experience with the
system may indicate a different reporting cycle.  Fund accounts
will be maintained each day, and periodic reports produced to
provide balances by fund of expended, unexpended, committed monies.
Daily, there can be exception reports to indicate any accounts
overexpended, or nearly fully expended.
General statistics are a natural by-product of the system, and
are limited only by the imagination and the information kept in
the file.  Basic statistics would Include; orders outstanding,
items received and in-progress, items catalogued, items backlogged,
wew titles, added copies, new periodicals, and so on. As books
are catalogued, there will be produced:
Lists of newly catalogued material (excluding added copies)
Circulation bookicards
Backlog lists, and temporary cards for the public catalogue
Backlog book cards
It may also be possible to produce labels for marking the spine
of the book.
The periodic and cummulative in-progress listings will reflect
the information needed to identify an item, and provide some
detail on the status of the order or of items, in-process.  It
is possible to indicate the exact location of a book, or more
correctly, the stage of processing. As an item is received, the
records will reflect the date received and the specific item
description, and when an item is catalogued the call number will De
given as well as the date.  For the intervening processes, an entry
could also be made when an item is moved from one operation to another
This involves changing the record by submitting information,
transcribing the information to punched cards and then updating
the computer file. This obviously involves some effort, and the
fact that it would be easier to locate and expedite an item through
the system, would probably tend to increase the number of rush
books. The effort invested will have to be weighed against the
advantages of saving professional staff time looking for items
that are in-process and have been requested by a division or
faculty member. -10-
EXPO TRIP.
Everyone has heard and read about Expo. Some of you will have
already been there, so, we will try to give a brief summary of
the things we have seen and you can compare it to your reports.
As you all know, the Exhibitions grounds are on 3 masses of land -
Cite du Havre which has the cultural pavilions such as Habitat 67,
the Art Gallery, Theatre Plaza and various Expo services; Me
St. Helene which has a quarter of the country pavilions, a large
park (nice for picnicking in) and the amusement area named La Ronde;
last but not least, is the man made island lie Notre Dame.  It
houses the remainder of the country pavilions and we found that
It took most of our time.
They are joined by a mini rail which runs on the ground, above
the St. Lawrence, through the U.S. pavilion and all in all, is a
cheap way of seeing the Expo grounds without walking for hours.
There are many parking lots, and buses run frequently but we always
took the underground metro.  All we can say in its favor, is that
it's fast.  If you think our buses are hot and crowded, try the
metro.
Our best advice to you is to get a map and study it well.  We
ran across a very handy little one in the Bank of Commerce.  There
are thick books ($1.00) which describe everything in detail and if
time is limited, it's good to know what you want to see.  But for
general locations, the B. of C, one is good enough, (also free)
As for the pavilions themselves, it's hard to find new adjectives
to describe them.  We could start by saying, the USA, USSR, and
Great Britain pavilions always had long lineups.  Others did
periodically - always on the weekends.  Many of the small countries
have small pavilions and they mostly display their rulers costumes,
handicrafts and other typical items.
We were most impressed by the Czechoslovakian and Russian pavilions.
Whereas many seem to be so purely scientific (the French is entirely)
in their exhibits, the Czech has a great variety that will be of
interest to all age groups;  beautiful glassware, old works of art,
(mostly religious, as many of the European paintings were) a fantastic woodcut replica of an old Czech town, modern day fashions,
heirloom jewelry, pop art.  Take your pick. -11-
The USSR Pavilion is huge (3 or 4 stories) but it is well
arranged. We had to wait in a long queue to get in but it was
worth it. As expected we were shown a lot about the space race
and its implements.  All facets of life in the Soviet Union are
on display, industrial and economic growth, cultural activities -
all most impressive.  We were also surprised to note that they
have male hosts instead of hostesses.
We are sure everyone would like to hear about the US pavilion.
Well, we don't know what to say except that we were disappointed.
After standing in line in the blowing cold, we were confronted with
pictures of movie stars, cowboy guitars and charred spaceships.
To us it was truly a waste of time.
Both the West German and the Australian pavilions are big and
spacious and consequently air conditioned which provided pleasant
oases in the hot bustle of Expo.
Great Britain's pavilion is large and takes one from the middle
ages (dark and spooky) up to the jet age (Beatles and all).
At the Japanese display it was interesting to note the advanced
electronic equipment and the elegant simplicity of their furnishings.
One could go on for hours summarizing and remembering but space is
limited (probably a lucky thing), however it might be helpful to
know that all explanations in the pavilions are in English and
French and sometimes the host language.  It takes some time to sort
out the English but it is there.
There seems to be diverse opinions about the price of food but
we did find the restaurants expensive and of course there were
line ups there too.  However it must be remembered that we were
very early visitors, and Expo has promised to work out the problems.
If we sound as though we're complaining, we aren't really because
we had a wonderful time.  We thoroughly enjoyed it and all the
walking we did made us sleep soundly and well, (which is an asset
because walking around Expo can be most tiring - there is so much
to see.)  Happy travels, and don't forget to pack your low heeled
shoes.
Maria Haas and Judy MacDermot. EXPOse.
WORLD'S FAIRS.
see EXHIBITIONS.
EXHIBITONS.
see also particular exhibitions, e.g., EXPO 67 and
subdivision EXHIBITIONS under names of cities, e.g.
MONTREAL - EXHIBITIONS.
SEE! SEE! SEE!
VOYAGES AND TRAVELS.
see also AERONAUTICS
AERONAUTICS.
see also AEROPLANES.
AEROPLANES
FLIGHTS.
AIRWORTHINESS?
- COLLISIONS WITH BIRDS?
- DITCHING?
- ESCAPE DEVICES?
- JET PROPULSION!
- LANDING?
-- OXYGEN EQUIPMENT (see also AIR LINES
- REFUELLING (see also TORONTO)
HOTELS, TAVERNS, ETC.
see also HOUSE DETECTIVES.
RESTAURANTS, LUNCHROOMS, etc. and
HOTELS, TAVERNS, etc. under names of cities,
MONTREAL - HOTELS, TAVERNS, ETC.
see also TEMPERANCE?
TRANSPORTATION.
see also LOCAL TRANSIT.
SUBWAYS (Direct)
RAILROADS, SINGLE-RAIL.
JUNKS.
VIKING SHIPS.
GONDOLAS.
HOVERCRAFT.
FEET.
see FOOT.
FOOT - ABNORMITIES AND DEFORMITIES,
see also ORTHOPEDIC SHOES.
FOOT - CARE AND HYGIENE.
see also CHIROPODY.
FOOT, WASHING OF.
see FOOT WASHING (RIGHT!)
HOSTESSES)
also subdivision ■13
EXPOse (2)
FOOD.
see also BEVERAGES.
GASTRONOMY
SEA FOOD.
      DINNERS AND DINING.
COST AND STANDARD OF LIVING,
see also FOOD PRICES.. '
LUXURY.
SAVINGS AND THRIFT?
POOR.
ART - EXHIBITIONS.
ART - MONTREAL - GALLERIES AND MUSEUMS.
ARCHITECTURE, DOMESTIC.
see also APARTMENT HOUSES.
APARTMENT HOUSES (Direct)
see also HABITAT.
COMMERCIAL PRODUCTS (indirect)
see also DISPLAY OF MERCHANDISE.
STORES, RETAIL.
AMUSEMENT PARKS.
see also LA RONDE.
MUSIC - PERFORMANCES,
see also PLACE DES ARTS.
MONEY.
see also CIRCULAR VELOCITY OF MONEY.
DEFLATION (FINANCE)
HOARDING OF MONEY?
REPRODUCTION OF MONEY, DOCUMENTS, ETC.
PRISONS.
POVERTY.
see also CHARITIES, POOR, PUBLIC WELFARE.
FATIGUE.
FATIGUE, MENTAL.
see: also WORK.
WAITING-LINE THEORY.
see QUEUING THEORY.
But, by all means, see EXPO if you can.
Larbara Gibson NOT ICE TO EMPLOYEES.
1) Godliness, Cleanliness and
punctuality are the necessities of good business
2) This Library has reduced the
hours of work, and the clerical
staff will now only have to be
present between the hours of
7 a.m. and 6 p.m. on weekdays(
Daily prayers will be held each —
morning in the main office.
The clerical staff will be
present.
Clothing must be of a sober
nature.  The clerical staff
will not disport themselves in
raiment of bright colours, nor
will they wear hose, unless in
good repa i r.
5) Overshoes and top coats
may not be worn in the
office, but neck-scarves
and headwear may be worn
in inclement weather.
6) A stove is provided for
the benefit of the staff
Coal and wood must be kept
i n the locker.  It is
recommended that each member
of the staff brings 4 pounds
of coal each day during the
cold weather.
J -cti'K*-- -15-
7) No members of the staff may
leave the room without permission from Mr. Bell,  The
calls of nature are permitted
and staff may use the garden
below the second gate.  This
area must be kept in good
order,
8) No talking is al lowed during"
business hours
We
2.
The craving of tobacco, wines
or spirits is a human weakness
and, as such, is forbidden to all
members of the staff.
Now that the hours of business have
been drastically reduced the partaking of food is allowed between
the 11.30 a.m. and noon but work
will not, on any account cease
Members of the staff will provide
their own pens, a new sharpener
is available on application to
Mrs. Dewar.
Department Heads will nominate a
Senior clerk to be responsible for
the cleanliness of the main office
and all clerks will report to him
40 minutes before prayers and will
remain after closing hours for
similar work.  Brushes brooms scrubbers
_and soap are provided by the Front Office,
* rOiVclT
13)  The new increased weekly wages are Junior boys (up to II years)
Is 4d, Boys (to 14 years) 2s Id, Juniors 4s 8d, Junior
clerks 8s 7d, Clerks 10s 9d, Senior clerks (after 15 years
wi th owners) 21s. ^
&M
The Administration recognizes the generosity of the new Labour Laws
but will expect a great rise in output of work to compensate for these
near Utopian conditions. -    Prayers any one!!!!!
And a happy 1967 to all you lucky 20th Century clerical staff.

Cite

Citation Scheme:

        

Citations by CSL (citeproc-js)

Usage Statistics

Share

Embed

Customize your widget with the following options, then copy and paste the code below into the HTML of your page to embed this item in your website.
                        
                            <div id="ubcOpenCollectionsWidgetDisplay">
                            <script id="ubcOpenCollectionsWidget"
                            src="{[{embed.src}]}"
                            data-item="{[{embed.item}]}"
                            data-collection="{[{embed.collection}]}"
                            data-metadata="{[{embed.showMetadata}]}"
                            data-width="{[{embed.width}]}"
                            async >
                            </script>
                            </div>
                        
                    
IIIF logo Our image viewer uses the IIIF 2.0 standard. To load this item in other compatible viewers, use this url:
http://iiif.library.ubc.ca/presentation/cdm.biblos.1-0190846/manifest

Comment

Related Items