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Biblos 1969-07

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 UNIVERSITY OF BRITISH COLUMBIA
VOL. 5 No, 8 of the U.B.C. LIBRARY STAFF NEWSLETTER July/Aug. I969
So the fifth year of Biblos runs into its final issue.  It has
been a good year from your editor's point of view and I feel
that the policy for the year has been more than adequately
supported by the editorial staff.
As the Library staff expands and the lines of protocol are formed
communication between departments, groups, and classifications
seem to grow more remote and impersonal.  We have attempted
through the year to bridge these gaps, if only in a small way, by
varying means.  Possibly at times these means have seemed rather
mundane and suburban but never the less necessary to overcome
some of the pseudo-intelligentsia of the times.
The in-depth probes and sophisticated writings have been left to
others more able, ours has been the more personal approach and I
hope Biblos has succeeded, if only partially, in stemming the
encroachment of total impersonality.
So to Shannon, Georgie, Joan, Pam, Martina, Heather, Donna, Bruce,
and the two Dianas, also to the typists Lynne, Pat and Judy in
the Front Office who have managed to cope with numerous scraps
of paper, hurridly typed notes and undisciplined spelling, and
to the staff on the seventh floor who have succeeded in getting
the whole thing off to the printers and back in a reasonable
amount of time,  THANKS...I AM MOST GRATEFUL TO YOU ALL.
Pat LaVac -  2  -
STAFF       CHANGES
APPOINTMENTS:
Mary  Becket
L.A.   II
Serials
Edita Visnovsky
L.A.   1
Catalogue
Janet Ki rby
L.A.   II
Curr.   Lab.
Thomas  House
L.A.   II
Woodwa rd
Sidney Myers
L.A.   Ml
Catalogue
Arlene  Schmidt
L.A.   1
Catalogue
Elaine Sharpe
L.A.   1
Gov.   Pubs.
Pat  Blacklock
Sec.   111
Ci re.
Tim Porter
L.A.   1
Ci re.
Eve Porter
L.A.   II
Musi c
Martha Tully
L.A.   II
Catalogue
Carol   Challoner
L.A.   1
Curr.   Lab.
Deron Bacon
L.A.   II
Woodwa rd
Margaret McCann
L.A.   1
I.L.L.
Claire Gagne
L.A.   1
Reading  Rooms
Jeanette  Findlay
L.A.   II
Catalogue
Michael   Jessen
L.A.   1
Woodwa rd
Jeanne Elworthy
L.A.   1
Catalogue
Linda Dorricott
L.A.   1
Fi sheries
Geraldine Griffin
L.A.   Ill
Bi bliog raphy
Louise Hamilton
Clerk  II
Acqui sitions
M.   Baer
L.A.   1
Curric,   Lab.
Lynn Millar
L.A.   1
Catalogue
Joanne Bannerman
L.A.   Ill
I.L.L.
Janet Taggart
L.A.   1
Maps
Susan Chen
L.A.   II
Systems
Craig Jones
L.A.   1
Catalogue
Richard Martin
L.A. T
Catalogue
Barbara  Ross
Clerk  11
Ci rculation
Vera Sebb
L.A.   II
Serial s
Lynda Neal
L.A.   1
Ci rculation
Marie Fukuyama
L.A.   1
Catalogue
Maria Ramponi
L.A.   II
Catalogue
Ardele  Bruce
L.A.   II
Catalogue
Merike  Patrason
Jr.   Tehnician
1. & o.s.
Linda Cartlidge
L.A.   Ill
Serial s
Liane Langton
L.A.   1
Catalogue
Maureen Martin
L.A.   1
Catalogue
Jancis O'Mara
L.A.   1
Ci rculation APPOINTMENTS: (cont'd.)
Irene Strong
Susan Mathew
Grace Roberts
Meredith Liard
Jean Pounder
L.A.
L.A.
L.A.
L.A.
L.A.
II
Ci rculation
Catalogue
Ci rculation
Ci rculation
Catalogue
PROMOTIONS:
Gina Sen
L.A. 1
Catalogue
L.A. II
Catalogue
Janet Yuan
L.A. Ill
G. & E.
L.A. IV
Acqui si tions
Marion Krause
L.A. 1
Catalogue
L.A. II
Catalogue
Brian Varty
St. Att.
Woodwa rd
St. Super Woodward
Jane Shinn
L.A. II
Sedgewick
L.A. II
Fine Arts
Paul Rodgers
L.A. 1
Cat.
L.A. II
Catalogue
Paddy Denroche
L.A. 1
Sedgewick
L.A. II
Sedgewick
Judy Lee
L.A. 1
Sedgewick
L.A. II
Sedgewick
Wendy McKim
L.A. 1
Ci rculation
Clerk 1
Ci rculation
Vera Niessen
L.A. II
Ci rculation
L.A. II
" Reading Rms.
WE SAY FAREWELL TO
•
Louise Exel
Clerk II
Ci rculation
Keiko Linde
L.A. 1
Ci rculation
Terre O'Brennan
Clerk 1
Ci rculation
Dorothy Frigon
.
L.A. II
Catalogue
Susan Slabotsky
Clerk 11
Acquisi tions
Evelyn Roth
L.A. IV
Fine Arts
Shirley Funk
L.A. II
Catalogue.
Maureen McFadden
L.A. 1
Catalogue
Bob Rippon
L.A. Ill
Catalogue
Judy Mitchell
L.A. Ill
Catalogue
Donna Richards
L.A. 1
Catalogue
Bessie Wong
L.A. II
Serials
Kathy Watt
L.A. 1
Ci rculation
Lynne Bexrud
K.P.O.
Systems
Luba Kalmakov
L.A. Ill
Serials
Nancie Pink
L.A. 1
Catalogue
Yen Yen Na
L.A. II
Catalogue
Shelley Cuddle
L.A. II
Sedgewick
Rhonda Hanson
Clerk 11
Ci rculation
Dale Mei r
L.A. 1
Ci rculation - 4
FAREWELLS   (cont'c
1.)
Sandra Sloan
Carol    Washburn
Sarah Gareel on
Maria Ussner
Brian  Ferris
Moraig  Fulton
Margaret Fukuyama
L.A.
L.A.
L.A.
L.A.
St.  A1
Clerk
L.A.
II
II
1
ttendant
1
V
1 1
Sandra Sawatzky
Bruce Stephenson
L.A.
Clerk
Ci rculation
Catalogue
Catalogue
Serials
Sedgewick
Acqu isit ions
Asian St.
Sedgewick
Acqu i s i t i on s
APPOIHTMENTS AND CHANGES OF THE PROFESSIONAL STAFF (ANNUAL LISTING)
Mrs. Judy Cardin, Circulation Division
Mrs. Wendy Chambers, Social Sciences Division
Mr. Erik de Bruijn, Catalogue Division
Mr. John Field, Social Sciences Division
Mr. Richard Hopkins, Sedgewick Library-
Mr. Leszek Karpinski, Catalogue Division
Mrs. Claudia Kaye, Catalogue Division
Mrs. Deanna Norris, Information & Orientation Division
Miss Joan Sandilands transferred to Humanities Division
Miss Linda Kwong transferred to Gifts & Exchange Division"
Mrs. Mary Magrega, Catalogue Division
Mrs. Margaret Price, Catalogue Librarian, to Catalogue Specialist
Mrs. Margaret Chambers, Sedgewick Library, resigned
Mrs. Susan Port, Humanities Division, resigned
COLLECTS
Osbert Sitwell (76)
N.Y.P.D. (Stricken)
D.D.T. (Banned)
Judy Garland (Last bow 45)
Frank King (Gasoline Alley-86)
Westbrook Pegler (74)
Benny (Astromonk)
Mary Jo Kopechne (28)
Gladys Swarthout (65)
Tom Mboya (38)
Walter Gropius (86)
Wilhelm Backhaus (85)
The Moon
Frank Loesser
Martians (Eliminated)
Victoria Pub. Library (book
budget
Declaration of Independence (copy sold for $404,000)
Richard Hoe Co. (Mfgrs of printing presses, failed)
John Howard Sissons (N.W. Terr. Judge, 77) - 5 -
A UB_C LIBRARIAN GOES TO THE_ INTERNATIONAL CONGRESS OF NURSES
As a librarian an ex-nurse now working with the nursing
side of the Woodward Library I was invited to assist at the
booth on "Library Tools for Nursing Libraries" at the
International Congress of Nurses in Montreal in June.  9,000
nurses came from all corners of the world and found that
Montreal was a'most hospitable city, and let me tell you that
the pinching of bottoms is not restricted to Italy and
Italians; yet, 9,000 nurses is too many nurses to put
together anywhere anytime.
We met in the Hall Concordia, the great showmart area which
stretches across the lower regions of the Place Bonaventure.
The "Place" is one of the group of Places including, the Canada,
the Champlain, the Ville Marie, all linked together by underground corridors and all designed in 'modern brutal" i.e. unfinished cement, plush carpets and dim lighting.  We could eat
elegantly in many different cafes in this complex of buildings,
shop for groceries or shoes for our swollen feet or retire to
bed without ever drawing a breath of fresh air or leaving the
raw cement environment. Ugh.  Though I should say that one
friend had an elegant room in the "Bonaventure" on the 13th
floor, which looked out onto a steep hill of green grass topped
by small trees which edged a stream with rapids, a waterfall
and several small pools hidden among the plants!
Canadian nurses were proud of the speech
given by the Federal Minister of Health,
the Hon. John Munro.  Of all the speeches
his hit the hardest at the problems
arising for nurses in the supplying
of health care to all people.  He
said we "had escaped the bedpan only
to graduate into a mindless round
of ... administrative detail" while
in Canada's northland he had "see
young girls carry a health load
that would stagger many doctors .
I think that a nurse in the south
of our country can be fully
trusted,;with proper training,
to handle at least half of the tasks
her northern sister does routinely.
In this process, I think she can
take a good deal cf the volume
load off our doctors..."
op
m:0
i-<
~J
j\
■jl - 6
I took a day away from the congress and visited the McGill
Medical Faculty building to look at the collection in the Osier
Library on the history of medicine.  My hostess gave me a most
complete tour and I saw many of their
treasures.  From there I went for a
brief visit to the McLennan Library,
McGill University's very new 'main
library.  The vibrant colors used
in both these new buildings were a
joy to me.
/ ^—-**
An unsuccessful phase of my trip
was my attempt to see a piece of
furniture given by Florence Nightingale
to the daughter of one of her personal
physicians.  The daughter, who is now a
very elderly woman, was charming, but
the present owner of the furniture was not so cordial.
This disappointment was alleviated by an unexpectedly good
visit to the Academy of Medicine in Toronto.  I wanted to see
the Academy's collection of antique infant feeding devices and
in particular the nineteenth century patterned china feeding
bottles.  We have no samples of this type of bottle in the
Woodward Library collection and we hoped that somehow, sometime, we might acquire some.  I was thrilled with the Academy's
collection.  It fills one whole room of some 8 large cabinets
and it covers all the small things that a child might need.
There were ornate gold and silver rattles with teething sticks
of ivory attached, exquisite tiny 17th century drinking cups,
oriental jade and ivory pieces and 168 nineteenth century
patterned china feeding bottles.'  And nothing was for sale or
trade.
So I felt very fortunate to have seen a feeder just like
those in the Toronto collection while in an antique shop in
Kingston during the vacation part of my eastern trip.  So I
bought it.  An now the UBC collection has one nineteenth
century printed china feeding bottle.'
Peg Leighton - 7 -
News Flashes From Amidst The Division of Construction.
The Woodward Biomedical Library is rejoicing in its
latest acquisition!  In this case it is not a new book but
a p
erson.  Dr. Frances Valadez, a very attractive young
woman, has a brand new Ph.D. degree in the History of Medicine
received under the aegis of the famous medical historian
Dr.
Charles Donald O'Malley of the University of California
at
Los Angeles.  Even more "mirabile dictu" is the fact
that she received a master's degree in Library Science at
U.C
.L.A. following her bachelor's degree in Zoology, before
her
Ph.D.  We feel very fortunate indeed to have managed
to
lure such a wel1-trained, knowledgeable and delightful
person to our Memorial Room staff.
Since she is a stranger not only to our campus but to our
country as well, we feel certain that everyone will be most
anxious to be of assistance in making her feel welcome in
Vancouver.
Oh yes!  She likes to be called Frances.
;
Here is Peg Leighton
V
of Woodward, her former
*'
muse Flo Nightingale
-'. '   '                                 and a gift of flowers
h
:■■        ■                              from Stuart Keate in
appreciation of Peg's
K&--
.- ■:                              present career as a
E *'
'■w£-                              reference librarian.
■
^            s/f.'S                              ■   "Best damn thing on
!
*            / ";^            2 legs outside of
-*.    t                . myself" he is supposed
I                              *s. %%•                           \   to have said.
i              v?            *' -
i
WLa- .^
.- - *      ■■■■■■   -'it.---- ;
: , * V.   . ...,_„ „.-,'-»^      i 8 -
THE   THOUGHTS   BEYOND.
'It's her last wish upon retiring after twenty-five years!"
Biblos thought it would be fun to find out what would
be in store for our library if the librarians were to carry
cut thei r  last wishes.  Lois Carrier would return on "the
day after" her retirement, approach the Information Desk
and ask to borrow the card catalogue overnight!  According
to Lois "it really has happened".  We asked Mc Elrod what
his last wishes would be, but he kept us guessing by
replying:  "Mine are all illegal, sinfull, or fattening".
In Circulation, Judy Cardin would defy the command not to
staple, fold or mutilate by dancing on a pile of IBM cards
wearing golf shoes.
Other staff were approached for their last wishes
but they were either reluctant to divulge or said they
needed time to choose just one!  Biblos would like to
hear your last wishes, whether or not you want them
published.  Send to ed. - 9 -
C.L.A. Report - from 3 of the many that were there.
The Canadian Library Association, this year and last, held
its conference in a striking area geographically.  The Atlantic
replaced mountains, and St. John's old buildings replaced
Jasper's glaciers as the foci of interest.  Newfoundland's
people are even more distinctive than their locale - being
friendly, helpful, and witty.  How long their delightful
personality can survive the onslaught of carping convention
attenders is another problem.
Comparison with other institutions was for me the most
rewarding aspect of the trip.  (Toronto using fifty (50)
searchers to cope with just twice the volume our ten (10)
searchers handle; McGill adding a third of our volume in spacious;
high ceilinged, carpeted quarters).
The CACUL workshops varied from superb to abysmal depending
upon the quality of the individual leader, judging from coffee
break corridor comment.
General meetings meekly rubber stamped that which had been
prepared for them, with the exception of a CACUL meeting
which by running late into the night hammered out a statement on academic status for Librarians (we should have it).
Each night saw publishers' motel and hotel rooms filled
with boozing Librarians and generally deserted displays.  Publishers would create more good will in my heart by spending
the booze money on letting me select a book or two from the
display - and I would spend more time looking at books if
there were a joint, subject arranged, display of books rather,
than individual publishers' exhibits.
UBC Library has one of Canada's most liberal convention
policies.  Perhaps this explains in part why its staff is the
least provincially minded of Canada's major libraries.  The
major reaction i bring back to UBC is increased appreciation
for the quality of our staff, services, and administration.
J. McRee Elrod - 10 -
C.L.A. Report  cont'd ....
CLA meetings and functions were, as usual, a mixed bag.
Among the better ones, though not necessarily attended by us
were:  Research and Special Libraries Section (chaired by
Anne Brearley), which concentrated on SDI (Selective Dissemination of Information), and ran a training session on editing
SDI profiles; the Province of Newfoundland banquet, at which
Joey's spellbinding oratory worked for the first 30 of his
65 minutes; the marathon CACUL meeting, which after many
years of struggle finally adopted detailed reports on position
classifications and on academic status for librarians; Technical Services (chaired by Rita Butterfield), where we heard
from the fountain head at LC about shared cataloguing; Bibliographical Society (chaired by Bill Bell), at which
Dr. Herbert Halpert was the hit of the conference - a thoughtfu
yet amusing account of the importance of Newfoundland folklore,
complete with demonstration by masked mummers; the Council
Advisory Group's presentation of plans for the reorganization
of CLA.
Side benefits:  Signal Hill, with its exquisite little
historical museum (federal government); Nonia shop, which did
a land-office business in handknit sweaters and other local
crafts; sumptuous off-campus meals of cod tongues, flipper
pie, lobster, Newfie Bullets (a concoction of ice cream and
lashings of screech r,a raw local rum).  We do not include
the lobster boil at Quid! Vidi Lake; it was memorable
in the wrong sense.  And finally, touring by car across the
province, through the Maritimes to the Gaspe and Quebec
City.
Dorothy Shields
Eleanor Mercer 11
PICTURE OF THE MONTH
A new Biblos Cultural
Program may commence
any day now - herewith two possible
nominees for the
Modern Dance section
present ing thei r
classic rendition,
The Centennial Minuet.
Biblos extends many
thanks to the nony-
mous donor who submitted these historical
shots. 12
APROPOS OF THOSE PERFORMANCE
GUIDE TO PER-
FAR EXCEEDS JOB
REQUIREMENTS
PERFORMANCE FACTORS
EXCEEDS JOB
REQUIREMENTS
QUALITY
Leaps tal1
bu i1 dings wi th
a single bound
Must take running start to
1eap over tal1
bu iIdings
TIMELINESS
1s faster than
a speeding
bul let
1s as fast as
a speeding
bullet
INITIATIVE
Is stronger
than a loco-
mot i ve
1s st ronger
than a bull
elephant
ADAPTAB1L1TY
Walks on water
consi stently
Walks on water
in emergencies
COMMUNICATION
Talks with God
Talks with the
Angels -  13 -
RATING  SHEETS   HEREWITH  AN   ILLUMINATING
FORMANCE  APPRAISAL
PERFORMANCE  DEGREES
MEETS   JOB
REQUIREMENTS
NEEDS   SOME
IMPROVEMENT
DOES NOT MEET
MINIMUM
REQUIREMENTS
Can only leap over
a short building
or med ium wi th no
spi res
Crashes into
bu ildi ngs when
attempti ng to jump
over them
Cannot recognize
buiIdings at al1,
much less jump
over them
Not quite as
fast as a
speeding bul1et
Would you believe
a slow bu1 let?
Wounds self with
bullets when
attempting to
shoot gun
Is stronger than
a bull
Shoots the
bull
SmelIs 1i ke a
bull
Washes with
water
Drinks water
Passes water   in
erne rgencies
Talks   to
h imself
Argues with
himself
Loses  those
Arguments 14
TO BRITAIN VIA HANG-OVER.
When you travel the City Hail's chartered Air Canada's
D.C. 8, expect the bar to be open at 10 o'clock in the
morning!  That's what I found flying back from London
recently.  With chartered flights, of course, practically
every seat has to be filled in the plan to make it pay - so
you can't put your feet up over three seats which is generally
possible on regular flights.  When you are flying for 9-10
hoLrs, comfort is a great consideration.  Service by four
attractive hostesses and one steward keeps everyone happy and
the bar practically dry by the end of the flight!  (all liquor
is free and you can have as much as you want and there is a
reasonable selection to cater to most people's tastes).  Food
was fine going but coming back hardly edible (due, no doubt,
to English catering services).  I was told by a veteran air
traveller that this is generally the case all the time on all
airlines.  If you like a nice party atmosphere (sleep is a
little difficult) and the price is right, try one of City
Hail's several flights this and next year.
Robin Willi ams
N.3.  These charter flights are open to members of staff via
the Library Assistant Association.
Fort Lauderdale. Fla.  Oct. 31 (AP)
The city commissioner's new ordinance to ban obscenity in
books, magazines and records, for those under 17, is so specific
in describing anatomical features and acts, which may not be
portrayed, that the Miami Herald reported the definition
unpr i ntable.
AB Bookman's Weekly Nov. 18 1968	 - 15 -
BOHEMIAN HOLIDAY
Czechoslovakia the second time around was even more exciting
than during my first brief glimpse in 1967.  In some ways nothing
has changed yet everything seems different,  Prague is still its
charming golden self, the countryside is still rich and blooming,
the beer is still the best in the world.  But the people are a
little less gay, a little more watchful. Politics is the only topic
of conversation.  The jokes are cynical, satirical, and, of course,
poli t ical.
There are no Russian soldiers in Prague, fortunately.  But they
can't be avoided in the provincial towns, on the highways, and most
of all buying up everything in sight in the department stores.
However, I didn't go all that way to see Russian soldiers. A
number of Czech friends here at the library and in town had asked
me to visit their friends and relations, give them news, gifts,
etc. All these people fell over themselves to offer a most elaborate
hospitality including impromptu guided tours of their district.
Consequently, I was shown around Prague several times (but you can
never see enough of that city), saw lots of castles and chateaux,
went to fabulous concerts, mime shows, etc., inspected innumerable
cathedrals, cloisters, frescoes, gardens, galleries, and finally
went camping in Hansel-and-Gretel type woods complete with cuckoos,
hedgehogs, and green-caped, mustachioed, beer-bellied forest wardens.
Many local pubs were visited and many endless conversations
launched.  Politics, hockey, Indians, gipsies, French-English
Canadian relations
vs. Czech-Slova<
relations, more
poli tics, etc.,
What did I
bring back? A
few colou r sii des,
a book, a bottle
of wine.  But the
dozen new friends
I found had to
stay behind.
Pam Piddington - 16 -
It could happen here ??? M!...
Peter Meinke
THE PROFESSOR
AND THE LIBRARIAN
Here in the college, collecting dust,
books and professors huddle together;
Professor Crookshank, studying lust,
talks with Miss Bailey about the weather.
Is that a cirrus cloud, you think?
— Clouds is clouds, Miss Bailey said.
Look at that one, tinged with pink!
— Balls on pink, she gaily said.
Your eyes, quoth he, are nothing like
the sun. — Some think they're bright enough,
the nymph replied.   He said, Your thighs
are marbled pillars.   She said, Can that stuff.
Professor Crookshank courted her
through several centuries of lyric verse;
he was the stricken cavalier
besprent by Aphrodite's curse.
He wrote a sonnet to her breasts,
an ode upon her tiny shoe;
she wrote a memo to attest
that Herrick's poems were overdue.
His mind was blind and could not see
the way to leave her or detest her;
he wrote a bibliography
of love throughout the fall semester.
And when Miss Bailey turned him down
he wept real tears upon real rocks
and sang a melancholy song
to bored imaginary flocks.
Florida Quarterly. Vol. 1. No. 1. Summer /6l 17
St. WIBBY REPORTS
OUR talented cartoonist DIANA
CALQUHOUN of "Library Capers"
fame has turned up in the Can-
dian Library Journal this month
with a two page spread - subject-
The Librarian.
WOODWARD SHOW CASES.
Displays on the U.B.C. Research
Station at Port Renfrew and an
interesting look at the
Curtis Botanical Journal
1787 - 1969.
VACATIONERS ABROAD at the
moment or very recently returned.
MARIA HAAS, searching - Germany -
where she found time to have a
short visit with GILLIAN STONEMAN
also of searching who is currently
on an extended tour of many points.
PAT O'ROURKE, Circulation - sporting a beautiful tan from Hawaii.
REIN BRONGERS, Science - off to
conference at Del ft Hoi land.
Also bound for a home visit to the
Netherland TRIXIE KORVER of Social
Science.
NANCY CLARKE, Sedge. - Mexico.
LINDA PUTNAM, Cataloguing - off to
Tahitti for three weeks after a
busy summer with her girl guide
troupe.
ROSINA K00 & FRANCIS WOODWARD both
of Special Collection, GLENIS BROWN
Systems, &BEV. RICHARDS, Social
Science - all destined for England.
And a special Bon Voyage to EVELYN
ROTH, Fine Arts who has delighted and
at times astounded many through the
past several years with her original ensembles and designs.
Evelyn is
leaving for a
6 months stint
i n Ven i ce wi th
the School of
Archi tectures
tour.  Evelyn
is presently
pre-showi ng
her Venitian
wardrobe to
an appreciative staff.
Hope to see
you back Evelyn.
WHO can deny what an improvement
has been wrought in front of the
Library.  Wonder how long those
lovely flower beds wi i1 survive
the engineers - Here's hoping
anyway and I believe the thanks
for the improvement should again
go to MR. LADNER,  Who knows in
ten years the tower might even be
a revered monument - stranger thing
things have happened.
■.
MARRIAGES.
Best wishes to GEORGIE DETWILLER
of Sedge, who takes the step
Saturday to become Mrs. WIN
HENDERSON.
Congrats to CHANG CHOE of Asian
Studies who has already pledged his
troth.  His delightful wife arrived
from Korea a few days prior to tne
wedding .  We understand Chang was
a might worried whilst the Airways
strike was in progress, but all
turned out wel1. 18
Every happiness to
Mrs. KEITH TURNER of Cataloguing
"ormerly known as Ann Craig
and ;o Mrs. DENNIS MAGREGA,also
of Cataloguing the former Mary
White.
Many friends wi i1 also want to
congratulate BILL JOHNSON who
used to work with JULIUS in the
Mail Room for many moons and who
"s now with the Post Office on
Campus (he still pops in with
the nail delivery).  Bill was
narried August 1st to BARBARA
KELLY also well known to many
as a student assistant in Circ.
""or the past two years.
ONWARD AND UPWARD, (to the 8th fl.)
Several members of staff will be
attencing Library School in the
new session.
SHELLEY CRIDDLE - Sedgewick
MARGARET FUKUYAMA - Asian Studies
BOB RIPPON - Cataloguing
MARGARET STEVENS - Serials
SANDRA TAN I GAM I - Cataloguing.
ASIAN STUDES. Miss ING has lately
returned from presenting a series
of lectures in Wisconsin at the
institutes to Train Far Eastern
Librarians.  These institutes were
in Wisconsin and Chicago and
were the first- of such institutes
ever to be held.  Many distinguished
educators attended from all over the
world including the head Librarian
from the National Diet Library
Japan.  Mr. N. Yoshida.
SUZANNE DODSON of Gov. Pubs in again
being recognized for her delicate,
and perfectly detailed Botanical
studies.  Suzanne was invited to
show her paintings at the Henry
Gallery.  The Univ. of Washington
for the occassion of the 11th
International Botanical Congress
held Aug. 25 - Sept. 3rd.
Also 14 other of her studies are
currently on show at the
Science Centre in Seattle under
the division of Botanical Technical illustrat i ons.
Susanne's artistry will also be
featured at the Hunt Botanical
Library in Pittsburg.
JOHN FIELD.  Social Science who
is currently organizing the
Commerce section has returned
from a week of research at Stanford
all ready to go go go!.
OUR LAWN BOWLING whizz ANN
GARDNER of serials has just
become a rosebowl winner (1st
place)  in the club's Triples
division at the Dunbar Lawn
Bowling Championship Competition.
GOOD SHOW Ann.
CONGRATULATIONS to our newest
"swinging" grandmother, JOAN
SELBY of Humanities who is
proudly boasting these days of
a grandson named Stephan.
Many staff members wi11 remember
Joan's daughter Lynn, who was a
secretary in the School of
Librarianship.
We also hear ROBEY NIELSON late
of Periodicals has welcomed a son.
and MARGARET CHAMBERS friends
will be happy to know that she is - 19
also enjoying the birth of a son
John Eric.
DAVID MILLER of Acquisitions reports that he is busy restoring
the Old Marr House atFoirt Langley
of which he recently became the
proud owner.  The house is said
to be 70 years old and features
the gingerbread architecture
and post and beam construction
of that era.
DAVID extends a welcome to any
staff member who might be in the
vicinity of 9090 Glover Road.
Langley.
BERN IE 0L.S0N of Woodward starting
rehearsals for the next North
Vancouver Operatic Companies
production of Brigandoon.
SPECIAL RECOGNITION to
MARTINA CIPPOLI of Systems
who has been busy producing
many numbers for the
Woodward Department Store's
Touring fashion show
(Simplicity fashions)
This show will be touring
across Canada and we
understand that whilst the
show is in Vancouver MARTINA
and MARIA HAAS of searching
may be doing some of the
modelling.  Let us know
the date Marti nal.
THAT'S al1  for this month
can't think of a suitable
fade out except - be prepared and what DID happen
at the Lobster 5oTl,?.
^^frccta^^
"Good morning. This is account number 624-598-32465.
Could you please connect me with a human beingF' - 20 -
INCOMING MAIL...
The Hazards of the computer age.
A note to subscribers to ....
Last December, in an effort to improve service to our
subscribers, we installed a computer.  Unfortunately (but,
we are told, not unprecendentedly), this technological wonder
has since repeatedly broken down or malfunctioned.  As a
result, issues have been mailed late, payments have not been
processed promptly, and complaints have not always been
acknowledge.
The benighted instrument is now showing signs of life,
and we devoutly hope that by the end of June we will have
caught up on the work that has been accumulating.
Meanwhile, we can only beg your continued indulgence and
apologize for the inconvenience you have been caused.
Fai thfully yours,
The Publisher
University of California Press
Plaintiff copy of letter received by the Acquisitions Division.
Kings College School,
Wimbledon, London.
Art Society Press. 11th May, 1969
Thank you for your order 5/69/18143 etc, etc, etc.
But your order is too complex for us to follow!  This is a
press in a school with a reputation but no business sense.  If
you wish the book please order privately and send dollars...
to defray package and postage and time and trouble.
Yours etc. Robert Hoilonday. - 21 -
Up to the minute with Helen in Moscow...
Dear Science,
I guess by this time
you've given me up
i
for lost
\
No,
I'm still alive!  First of all, I'd like to thank you for
sending me the two issues of Biblos.  I really enjoyed reading
them.  Secondly, thank you for the letters and I must apologize
for not writing sooner!
Well, I did manage to survive the winter, and what a
winter!  There were days when I couldn't stay outside for     j
more than 5 minutes because I literally froze so I would pop
into a store, warm up, then out
again and so on until I reached
my distination.  Anyway, at long
last Spring is here.  Never in my
life have I appreciated greenery
as I do now. What a pleasant
sight, green trees and flowers,
green grass!  But Spring forgot
to bring warm weather! All of
May was cold, at nites it hit
0°C, during the day it averaged
between 7° to 15°C.  About two
days it hit 25° to 27°C.  So, as
a result, I'm still wearing my winter
clothes!  All the Moscovites say
if a cool Spring - that means a
hot, hot summer.
What have I been doing?       h   .,
Nothing all that much exci ti ng. ^^M'ly^'
I've seen "Swan Lake" at the        ^
Palace of Congresses.  The
performance was very good.  The Palace is really something to
see.  I must say it is extremely big and also beautiful.  It
holds 6,000.  The 'buffet' alone can hold up to 2,000 sitting
at tables.  The inside is mostly done in different types of
wood, red plush carpets, escalators.  It really is impossible
to describe it, one has to see it!
I have also seen the Sov. production of Brothers Karamazov,
a 4 and half hour film.  It is very good,  have also seen
several other films.  Have also seen several plays, Gogol's
and
but
goes, but it sure flies by!  And of course it's not always that
Chekhov's.  I really would have liked to have seen more,
it's always the lack of time.  I don't know where the day
easy to get tickets, usually all the
so budget wise I have to watch it.
expensive one are left. 22
In April there was an inter-faculty concert competition.
Our prep. fac. gave an evening  performance.  It was judged
by a panel of specialists.  From each faculty, several
members were chosen for the grande finale.  Three were chosen
from ours (l was one of the 3).  What a performance the finale
was!  When they do things here, they really go all out.  A
majority of the numbers were of pro. calibre.  (How I got in
there I'll never know!)  Let me tell you, it was a frightening
experience walking out on the hugestage, facing a completely
strange audience!  Talk about feeling alone — Whew!  Before
every number you could have heard a pin drop, as a result I
heard my own footsteps walking behind me.  This rather
unnerved me as well.  Oh well, I did manage to pull  thru.
Found out later, the whole thing had been televised as well.
Well, I guess I've made my formal debut in Moscow! (ho! ho!)
Walking down Gorki the other day, I ran into a very
pleasant sight - fresh strawberries.~ What a welcome sight!
Didn't get any because the line-up was almost a mile long.
As much as I like strawberries.  I really wasn't prepared to
stand that long1.  Had my first taste of cukes and tomatoes
in a restaurant couple of weeks ago, once or twice I've
seen them being sold but the line-up is just too much. Anyway
thus  far I've been eating canned fruit.  How about tossed
salad this way, huh!
So far on my tight budget I've managed to acquire some
books and records (my downfall).  Oh, how I'd love to have
jubilee edition of Tolstoy (100 vols*')'All the books I've
got so far, I've picked up very
cheaply in 2nd. hand books stores
Let's see what other excitin
news can I tell you all.  Oh yes
Went on an excursion to Yasnaya
Polyana - Tolstoy's residence.
It was a 5 hr. bus ride.  The
estate  is really beautiful.  The
house itself is quite a museum
now.  Everything is as the night
Tolstoy left it. After seeing the
house and surroundings, one gets
a better understanding of some
of his scenery descriptions in
War and Peace for example.  We
also saw his grave (on his estate,
j,it.i very, very simple). I must - 23 -
say he had a fabulous library of his own.  Oh, how I'd like
to own some of, 'those 1 st. editions!
Our second excursion was to Leninskye Gorki, (i.e. where
Lenin rested from time to time and where he died.)  What a
beautiful, beautiful estate — sheer heaven.  Of course now
it is a museum. The paths where he strolled, the benches he
used to sit on are all cordoned off.  The mansion inside is
lovely (belonged to a former police inspector of Moscow.)
Everything remains as it was.  Well, one of these days I shall
have to make it to the Lenin Mausoleum on Red Square.
That's about all the exciting things I"ve done up to now,
Now we're coming into the final stretch.  Exams start on the
16th., end about 26th.  So its to the books for me. After
that I guess I sail be in Moscow till the 1st.  approx, then
if I get my visa.  I shall go visit my relatives for a month,
then onto the Black Sea for some sun and rest!  After that
it's a great big question mark.
So with this cheery little note I shall end for now.  I
would also like to thank Anne Brearley for her letter.  Am
sending a great big HELLO to all staff that I knew, to the
Front Office, and to the Library School Staff.  Also thanks
to Bertha for the letter and picture.  Gosh.  I'd better
stop or I'll write another letter just saying hello to
everyone:'
Cheers to all!
Helen. 24
BIBLOS NEEDS YOU:
Herewith our annual call to all ye with journalistic
talents or interests.
If you would like to join the Biblos editorial staff
during the year 1969/70 please do not hesitate to call
or wri te to ei ther
Pat LaVac
Law Library
Campus Mai 1
Phone      2275
or
Phone
Georgi a McCrae
Catalogui ng
Main Library
3426
We need both professional and non-professional staff
members to apply so that we can be sure that the Biblos has
as wide a view as possible of the activities and interests
of the whole Library.
Don't procrastinate - call today - not too much of your
time will be required and the company is amiable.
SORRY...NO ROOM FOR AN INDEX THIS MONTH,..YOU'LL JUST HAVE
TO READ IT ALL!!

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