UBC Publications

UBC Publications

UBC Publications

Biblos 1970-10

Item Metadata

Download

Media
biblos-1.0190839.pdf
Metadata
JSON: biblos-1.0190839.json
JSON-LD: biblos-1.0190839-ld.json
RDF/XML (Pretty): biblos-1.0190839-rdf.xml
RDF/JSON: biblos-1.0190839-rdf.json
Turtle: biblos-1.0190839-turtle.txt
N-Triples: biblos-1.0190839-rdf-ntriples.txt
Original Record: biblos-1.0190839-source.json
Full Text
biblos-1.0190839-fulltext.txt
Citation
biblos-1.0190839.ris

Full Text

 " — —
VOL 7 NO. 1
U.B.C. LIBRARY STAFF NEWSLETTE1
OCTOBER 1970
Introducing your Editorial Staff for Volume 7 1970/71
Pat Bolton
Judy Cardin
Adrienne Clark
Shelley Cri ddle
Georgie Macrae
David Miller
Deanna Norris
Mary Paterson
Pat LaVac Ed.
Systems
Ci rculation
Woodward Library
Sedgewick Library
Law Library
Acquis it ions
Information & Orientation
Seri al s
Law Library
Cartoons and Illustrations
Dianna Kraetschmer
Merike Patrason
Suzanne Dodson
Nancy Clarke
Fine Arts
Information & Orientation
Government Publications
Catalogu ing
UNIVERSITY OF BRITISH COLUMBIA STAFF CHANGES
A Hearty Welcome To:
Phyl1 is Miles
L.A.
Catalogue
Qui Yong Poh
L.A.
Catalogue
Stella Coubaraki
L.A.
Woodward
Keiko Takahashi
L.A.
Catalogue
Joan Tonn
L.A.
Ci rculat ion
Robert Johnson
L.A.
I I
Ci rculat ion
Sylvia Harries
Clerk
I
Acqu i si t i ons
Louise Hazel
L.A.
I
Woodwa rd
Monica Lomow
L.A.
V
Hum - I.L.L.
Barbara Robson
L.A.
C i rcu1 at ion
Ronalda Jago
L.A.
1
Systems
Trudy de Wit
L.A.
1
Systems
Catherine Strong
L.A.
Gov. Pubs.
Sally Powell
L.A.
Catalogue
Lenore Mann
L.A.
Sedgewick
Jill D imma
L.A.
1 1
Catalogue
Vivian Galbraith
L.A.
Catalogue
Ann Murdoch
L.A.
Social Sciences
Margaret Blake
L.A.
Ci rcu1 at ion
El izabeth Strong
L.A.
Woodwa rd
Joyce Lannon
L.A.
Sedgewi ck
Claora Levin
L.A.
V
Woodwa rd
Heather MacAndrew
L.A.
II
Sedgewi ck
Linda MacDonald
L.A.
1
Sedgewick
Mary Akehurst
Sec re
;ary II
Gov. Pubs.
Jennifer Standing
Sec re 1
;ary II
Sedgewick
Coralie Fi sher
L.A.
1
Catalogue
Deborah DuBelko
L.A.
Special Collections
i kuko Jomoto
L.A.
1 1
Catalogue
Madelle Qui ring
L.A.
1
Catalogue
Theresa Murray
L.A.
Catalogue
Wendy Beltramo
L.A.
Hum - I.L.L.
Linda Berdusco
L.A.
Sedgewick
Eric Wi 1 1 iams
Stack
Attendant
Sedqewi ck
Barry Henderson
Stack
Attendant
Sedgewick
Samual Tao
Mail (
.1 erk
Ma i1 Room
Janet Gladstone
L.A.
Sedgewick
Margaret Murray
L.A.
Sedqewi ck
.  !—— Vivian James
Lynn Pei rson
Barbara Chambers
Steve Prokopenko
Marlene Thiessen
Corrine Adams
Pat LaVac Jr.
Gwen Tel 1ing
Susan Mellmoyle
Rosemary Cragg
Donna Cowsey
Congratulations On Their Promotions To:
L
A.
L
.A.
L
A.
Stack
Attendai
t
L
A.
L
A.
1 1
L
A.
1
L
A.
1
L
.A.
L
A.
1 1
L
.A.
Bonnie MacDonald Sec.
Martha Tully L.A.
Dean Olson L.A.
Elizabeth Planedin L.A.
Giesela Mailue L.A.
Kate Gibson L.A.
Edita Bugar L.A.
Jean McLeod L.A.
Dorothy Friesen L.A.
Margaret McCann L.A.
Clair Reynolds L.A.
I I
I I I
Sedge.
Cat.
W.W.
Systems
Cat.
Ci re.
Cat.
Cat.
Prebind
I.L.L.
Gov. Pubs
Carol Trueman
L.A. II
B.M.B
Matthew Tai
St. Att.
Ci re.
Albert Brookhouse
L.A. 1
Cat.
Heather Hodgins
L.A. 111
R.R.
Marianne Krayenho
ff
L.A. 1
B.M.B
to
to
to
to
to
to
to
to
to
to
to
to
to
to
to
to
Sedgewick
Sedgewi ck
Catalogue
Ci rculat ion
Prebi ndery
Gov. Pubs.
Admi n i st rat ion
Reading Rooms
Ci rculation
Reading Rooms
Catalogue
Sec
L.A
L.A
K.P
L.A
Cle
L.A
L.A
L.A
Cle
L.A
I I
II
.0.
. r
rk
I I
rk
. I
I I
V
L.A. I I I
St. Super.
St. Att. -
L.A. IV
L.A. I I
Ci re.
Cat.
Cat.
Systems
Science
Acq.
Acq.
Cat.
Prebi nd
Adm i n.
MacMi11 an
Li brary
B.M.B.
Sedge.
Sedge.
W.W.
B.M.B.
We Say Farewell To:
John Denison
Kathleen Harrington
Judy Schmuland
Mab Bel ford
Michael Gale
Anita Harris
Susan Carter
Maureen Otterson
Laura Funk
L.A. I I I
L.A. I
Clerk I
L.A. IV
L.A. II
L.A. IV
Secretary
L.A. I I I
L.A. II
Catalogue
Social Sciences
Acqu i si ti ons
MacMi 11 an  Library
Catalogue
Woodwa rd
Gov.   Pubs.
Biomed.   Branch  Lib
Prebi ndery Patricia  Bearrs
Terry Hoffman
Rosemary Ambrose
Dawn Wi1lems
Diane  Brehm
L.A.   II
C1e rk   III
L.A.   II
L.A.   I
L.A.   I I I
Catalogue
Mai 1 Room
Catalogue
Catalogue
B.M.B."
Shrinkage  - while you wait,
W=-
uw* Ml"—*
LlnAl ••rrtuic*
Erie «lll»*
Urry H^Mrw.
hV" ""rr,» •■■■■
Heather MacAndrew
Llnd«  MacDonald
Mary Akehurst
Jennifer Standing
Coralie  Fisher
Deborah  DuBelko
Ikuko Jomoto
Madelle Quiring
Theresa Hurray
Wendy  Be 11 ramo
Linda  Berdusco
Eric WI I Wans
tarry Henderson
Samual   Tao
Janet  Gladstone
Margaret  Hurray
Linda Berdusco
Eric Williams
Barry  Henderson
Samual  Tao
Janet Gladstone
Margaret  Murray
L.A.   HI
L.A.   M
Secretary  11
Secretary   11
L.A.   II
L.A.   I
L.A.   Ill
L.A.   II
L.A.   I
L.A.   I
L.A.   I
Stack Attendant
Stack Attendant
Mall   Clark
L.A.   I
L.A.   I
L.A.    I
Stack Attendant
Stack Attendant
Mail   Clerk
L.A.   I
L.A.   I
Catalogue
Catalogue
Woodward
Catalogue
Circulation
CIrculation
Acqui sitions
Woodward
Hum -   I .L.L.
CIrculation
Systems
Systems
Gov.   Pubs.
Catalogue
Sedgewick
Catalogue
Catalogue
Social   Sciences
Ci rculation
Woodward
Sedgewick
Woodward
Sedgewick
Sedgewick
Gov.   Pubs.
Sedgewick
Catalogue
Special   Collections
Catalogue
Catalogue
Catalogue
Mum  -  I.L.L.
Sedgewick
Sedgewick
Sedgewick
Ha i1   Room
Sedgewick
Sedgewick
Sedgewick
Sedgewick
Sedgewick
Ma i1 Room
Sedgewick
Sedgewick
An  example  of
what   the  new
machine   in   the
Li brari an's
Office  can
accompli sh.
Thought   for  the
day   from your
edi tor:     Wi sh   it
could  do   the   same
thing wi th  people] ■ ■■■  ■  ■ I. I-
PAGE 4 U AGAIN PAGE  5
This poen and message was addressed to all.  "Pour La University
of British Columbia Library" and has been translated for our enjoyment and appreciation.  This could be entitled, "As Others See us".
Dear Si rs,
I am a young Italian of 23.  I present you with a copy of my
poem which I wished to dedicate to Canada.  I hope it will
please you.  I salute you and wish you well.
Canada
Up there at the top of the world
along the snow white glaciers
under a blue sky stands blooming
-like a girl full of life and
dressed in a rainbow -
the flowered, the sweet country,
Canada.
In this flowering garden
rolling like a colourful ball in
the blue sky
Canada is fairest of all flowers
planted there by the Creator
in order to ornate our earth
and be its enchanted garden.
People from everywhere overseas
go to the north west of our earth
where a hospitable people
await them with open arms
Because united they all
can work in that country
in the service of progress, peace,
fraternity and love among peoples.
oalvatore Cau. 6
A LITTLE LATE BUT NEVERTHELESS, A MOST INTERESTING REPORT OF
The Association of Canadian Map Libraries Conference
The Association of Canadian Map Libraries held its fourth annual conference from June 1-3, 1970, at the University of British Columbia.
The agenda for the conference included the presentation of ten papers,
a tour of the U.B.C. Map Library, and a general business meeting.
The first speaker, Mr. Basil Stuart-Stubbs, the University Librarian
from the University of British Columbia, spoke on the historical
development of Japanese maps.  At present, the Library at U.B.C. houses
the most valuable collection of historical maps outside of Japan.
This collection was acquired over a seven year period by an importer
living in the San Francisco area.
The second paper, as presented by Dr. C. Verner, from the Faculty of
Education at U.B.C. summarized the development of the Arrowsmith
Map of Canada.  He emphasized that it was the first map of Canada to
be based on scientific principles.  There were several revisions of
the map after it was compiled and published by Aaron Arrowsmith in
1795.
Mr. R.W. Sandilands, the senior Field Hydrographer with the Hydro-
graphic Service, presented a resume of the history of hydrographic
surveying on the coast of British Columbia.  Although the Spanish
performed the first surveys of the coastal waters, the real push for
hydrographic surveying did not come until the second half of the 18th
century with the establishment of the Hydrographic Department of the
Admiralty.  The gold rush and the establishment of the International
Boundary Commission marked the beginning of the most important phase
of hydrographic surveying on the coast in 1857.  By 1859 the volume
of coastal traffic warranted the establishment of a system of navigational lights.  As a result of the need for this system, the coastal
survey was largely completed by 1918.  The Hydrographic Service has,
for the last thirty years, been involved in the resurvey of many
strategic areas.  The development of hydrographic surveying has been
inseparable from the prosperity of the western maritime trade.
Dr. T.K. Peucker from the Department of Geography, Simon Fraser University, concluded the first day's proceedings with a talk on computer
cartography and its potential use in map production.
The second day of the conference commenced with a paper on air photo-
  ! .. '"  •  	
graphs presented by Mr. H. Stibbe, Map Librarian from the University
of Edmonton.  When a map library acquires a large collection of air
photos it is important that each photo be readily available to the
user.  This necessitates the adoption and use of a rather unique
filing system.  A system in which a graticule is assigned to each
photograph was developed for the University of Edmonton.  The addition
of a time element to this reference makes this a workable system for
filing and storing air photos.
The next paper dealt with remote sensing and some of its practical
applications.  Mr. K. Valentine, a research officer with the Soils
Section of the Federal Department of Agriculture, basically defined
remote sensing as the detection, recognition, or evaluation of objects
by means of distant recording or sensing devices.
Mrs. Kate Donkin, Map Librarian at McMaster University, based the
next paper upon a rather rhetorical question:  "are map libraries
obsolete?" After an analysis of the changing role of the map library
in the academic world, she concluded that it is only the concept of
the map library that is obsolete and not the map library itself.
The lending of maps to users presents a problem to most map libraries.
Miss Joan Winerals from the University of Toronto, in summarizing
the results of a survey of 82 map libraries, showed that only 37 of
these made loans.  Of the 37 only 16 (including S.F.U.) made loans
available to the whole of the academic community.  There are three
basic problems which act as a deterrent to an open loan policy:  the
preservation, availability, and replacement of the maps.
Miss Betty May, the chief cataloguer for the National Map Collection,
Public Archives of Canada, opened the third and final day of the
conference with a stimulating paper dealing with maps as sources of
historical evidence.  Maps of all shapes, sizes, and subject content
are invaluable sources of historical evidence throughout the visible
spectrum of academic discipline.
William Salter, head of the Cartographic Division at Mitchell Press,
presented the final discussion paper of the conference.  He spoke
on the cartographic development at that firm.  He displayed and
discussed many maps which that firm has produced.  He also enlarged
upon future production and expansion plans of Mitchell Press.
After the conclusion of these presentations, the delegates toured the U.B.C. map library which currently houses 80,000 sheet maps and
1,000 atlases and gazetteers--overal1, a very impressive collection.
The 37 attending the conference enjoyed a delicious dinner and a high
'spirited' evening at the U.B.C. Faculty Club.  I think that those
who attended the conference would concur that the scholarly standard
of material presented, the open exchanges among the delegates, and
the jovial social functions, contributed to making this a conference of
superlative quality and exceptional value--a conference which, I
believe, will prove to be both beneficial and rewarding to those
individuals who attended, and the institutions that they represented.
Dave Da i ron
Map Curator, Social Sciences
S.F.U. Library Information
Bul let in  Vol .   5  No.   10
June  1970.
"It can print information at the rate of 5,600 words per minute. Run
a help wanted ad for someone who can read 5,600 words per minute." : i ;	
Biblos takes great pleasure in introducing a new Arts and Marts
venture and wishes it every success.
THE HANDMAIDS CORNER
I am quite sure that all of you will agree that the staff lounge in
the Main Library could use a bit of colour and something should be
done to brighten the 10.00 a.m. coffee blues.
With the help of the Coffee Room Committee and the Biblos staff, Rick
Welch of Cataloguing and myself have come up with some possible
solutions.
Firstly.  Every month on the first monday after pay day there will be
a table set aside in the corner of the lounge for the purpose of displaying and possibly selling, anything that anyone in the Library has
made, i.e. leatherwork, clothes, jewelry, pottery etc.  We are sure
that there are many staff members who would like to gather together
samples of their wares and bring them out here to sell once a month.
Articles on the table would be available for sale from 11.00 a.m. to
2.00 p.m. and the display would be staffed by the people having goods
for sale.  So please make something, anything, and participate.  There
will be no discounts or charges so that you may set your own prices.
The second suggestion for brightening the lounge will be a changing
show of paintings by artists in the library and collections from local
Vancouver galleries. Any painting for sale will be hung with titles
and prices so that if they can be sold so much the better.
Staff members who would like to have their paintings, wall batiks,
drawings, sketches etc., included as part of a showing please contact
Rick or myself.  We will mat the work for you and will have a number
of assorted frames to cover almost anything we get.  You may keep the
mat when you receive your work back from the show.  With a little
luck who knows, we may have some special opening parties for "one man"
shows.  (editor.  I'll drink to that).
If you have any further suggestions, or if you would care to put
anything in either sections of the venture, please contact Rick or
myself. All help and HANDMADES gratefully received. 10
MORE ABOUT THE "HARVEY" THAT WAS PRESENTED TO THE WOODWARD LIBRARY
JUNE 1970
A Physician For All Seasons
Two master bookbinders have bound 'De Motu Cordis' in the books's
3-f centuries existence, William Fitzer in 1628 and our own Percy
Fryer in 1970.
The book has had a precarious existence.  Written in Latin and
printed in Frankfurt in 1628, the distance between publisher and
author in London made communication difficult, resulting in two
errata lists, the first of which listed 126 corrections.
Dr. William Gibson, Head and Professor of History of Medicine and
Science at UBC, discovered the book bound inside very old play-tracts
in Britain.  In celebration of the opening of Woodward Memorial Room
extension, it was decided to acquire the book, which had to be purchased complete with play-bills.
Both author and book altered the prevailing knowledge and practice
of medicine and its attendant sciences.  William Harvey was born
in Folkestone, England, in 1578, the eldest of nine children.  He
was a contemporary of Shakespeare, whom scholars believe influenced
Harvey; he later became physician to James I and Charles I, and included many prominent people among his patients, including Francis
Bacon, whose literary efforts did not impress, for Harvey later
commented "He writes like a Lord Chancellor".
Caius College, Cambridge, which Harvey entered in 1593, had connections with Padua, Italy, then the nucleus of medical learning and
experimentation.  Upon receiving his Cambridge degree, Harvey selected Padua University for his medical training.  He became a pupil of
Fabricius Acquapendente, the most famous exponent of physiological
science in the 16th century.  The lecture room, lined with carved
oak, where Harvey heard his teacher's lectures by candlelight, still
exists.  Whilst at Padua, he embarked on researches which eventually
led to his greatest discovery.
Receiving a Doctor of Physics degree in 1602, he returned to England,
where he was capped Doctor of Medicine at Cambridge and opened a
practice in London.  Two years later, he was appointed to the staff
 ————r— of St. Bartholomew's Hospital, and married the daughter of a
physician, Lancelot Browne, who had attended Elizabeth I.
In 1615 Harvey was elected Lumleian Lecturer, a position held for
forty-one years.  The second portion of manuscript notes used for
the lectures contain description of the circulation of the blood,
12 years prior to the publication of his book on the same subject.
The main characteristic between his notes and the anatomical works
of his contemporaries, except for Fabricius, was his extensive
knowledge, through dissection, of anatomy.  Harvey acknowledged
indebtedness to Fabricius for his earlier example.  The manuscripts,
difficult to decipher, are preserved in the British Museum.
In 1628 Harvey's major work was published 'Exercitatio Anatomica
de Motu Cordis et Sanguinis in Animabilus"; agreeably abbreviated
to "De Motu Cortis".  Harvey's significant contribution to medical
knowledge was to scientifically prove former theories of motion and
functions regarding the heart and blood "from actual inspection and
not from the writing of others".
Dedication of his book to Charles I further added to Harvey being
suspected a Loyalist during the Cromwellian Civil War, during the
early stages of which, in 1642, a mob forced entry into his home
and stole, scattered and destroyed papers, including records of
dissections, observations on the development of insects and notes
on comparative anatomy.
Withdrawal from public life resulted from existing political situations and from failing health.  He died on June 3rd, 1657, and is
buried in Hempstead, Surrey.
De Motu Cordis is now handsomely bound in blond parchment decorated
with 2 leather thongs, and is housed in air-conditioned comfort in
Woodward Memorial Room, under the custodianship of Miss Brenda Sutton,
William Harvey would have approved its home in the New World.
Martina Cipol1i 12
An interesting article about a fascinating man, who, at various times
has been associated with the Library.
Introducing Father Charles Brandt.   Black Creek, B. C.
Binder of rare books.
Father Charles Brandt is a "self taught" book-binder who learned his
trade when he was a Trappist monk, by binding the choir song books.
He lived as a Trappist monk for seven years at the New Malleray
Monastery which stands on the banks of the Mississippi at Dubuque,
Iowa.  From Iowa Father Charles moved to the Hermitage on Vancouver
Island.  The Hermitage is situated north of Courtenay B.C. and is the
headquarters for the Order of St. John the Baptist, a group of independent hermits.
Father Charles has been a book-binder for thirteen years and he
specialises in the binding of rare books and the restoration of rare
book collections.  He has worked for the University of British Columbia,
Simon Fraser University and the University of Washington in Seattle
as well as for Mr. H.R. McMillan and Mr. Walter Koerner.
Father Charles enjoys working on Family Bibles and has also bound
many current books published on Vancouver Island.  These include
limited editions such as Diamond in the Rough by Helen Mitchell, Kattza ■
a book about the Cowichan Valley - by Saywel 1, and About Victoria and
Vancouver Island by Avis Walton.  The last named was commissioned by
the Union Club of Victoria.  Currently he is binding, for the Alcuin
Society, The Immigrants Guide to Canada by Catherine Parr Traill.
(This is a limited edition of fifty copies).
Father Charles has a complete bindery and his "shop" is part of his
log home on the Oyster River, where he now has his own hermitage.
This hermitage is on a high bank overlooking the river and surrounded
by wooded acreage.  Besides working on the books Father Charles loves
to spend quiet hours fishing, reading and just admiring the magnificence of the mountains and island scenery.  Truly a peaceful existence.
From notes by Mrs. I.M. Shark
(Judy Cardin's Mom) MSaStxK/ 14
APATHY
apathy (ap a,thi) 1. Want of feeling; lack of passion,
emotion or excitement.  2. Indifference to what appeals
to feelings or interest.
To be apathetic is to be indifferent.
There is scarcely an organization in existence which is not
hampered in its activities by the apathy of its members.
All of us tend to rest our case for fair and equitable treatment
upon the mere fact of membership.  We pay our dues and expect a
return and leave the finding of solutions to our problems to those
who refuse to be indifferent.  We reserve the right to criticize
when the efforts of the few fail to produce instant solutions.
We have chosen to use the principle of Association and Committee
rather than the method of individual endeavour.  We must therefore
also accept that the majority rules.  The majority should be
healthy both in number and in attitude.
If we are not the indifferents, we should be those whose aim it
is to ensure that participation is as rewarding as it can be made.
Are you contributing your ENERGY, INTEREST AND IDEAS?
Apathy may be the result of frustration caused by numerous unsolved
problems either of a personal concern or of prime importance to
all members.
An attitude of "What's the use" can easily be the result.
However, opting out, or the apathetic approach will ensure us of
one problem - - - NO PROGRESS.
Progress is hard to come by at the best of times and is much
slower in the making if we allow ourselves to become apathetic.
Are you among those deserving "A" for effort or are you an
"A"pathetic?
Vol 2 No.3.  The Thin Blue Line July 1, 1970. 15
Quite by accident, of course, we are following the article on the
previous page by introducing you to the following committees in the
Library who are open to approach from any member of the Library staff.
They invite YOUR cooperation.
ADMINISTRATIVE RESOURCE COMMITTEE - Advises and assists the Librarian
in the development of Library policy and in the general operation of
the Library by recommending the formation of committees and their
method of formation and suggesting methods for selection of members.
Reviews at least annually the composition and work of all Library
committees.  Makes recommendations where appropriate for direct action
on the part of the Library administration.
MEMBERS:  REIN BRONGERS, Science; ANNA LEITH, Woodward; CHUCK FORBES,
Sedgewick; JOYCE HARRIES, Circulation; GEORGIA MAC RAE, Law;
ANN HUTCHINSON, Science; LYDIA LOBACH, Woodward; BERNIE OLSON, Woodward.
OMBUDSMAN COMMITTEE -  Receives in committee or as individual members,
in confidence, from any staff member or members, suggestions and/or
complaints regarding matters affecting the relationship between employee
and employer or between employer and employee.  These problems may or
may not be referred to a higher authority upon the request of the staff
member approaching the committee.  May refer matters to higher authority and assist him in arriving at solution to problems suggesting
changes in policy or procedures if necessary.  Also the committee may
explain and interpret to affected staff members decisions taken in
respect to indivdual cases.
MEMBERS:  ANN NELSON, Science; LEAH GORDON, Cataloguing; GRAHAM
ELLISTON, Serials Bibliography; MARTINA CIPOLLI, Serials.
STAFF ROOM COMMITTEE -  Responsible for operation of the lunchroom
along lines which are acceptable to the majority of the library staff
members and within the resources of the lunchroom management.
MEMBERS:  DIANE GOUDEY, Social Sciences; MARILYN DUTTON, Social
Sciences; MARTHA TULLEY, Cataloguing.
BIBLOS COMMITTEE -  Issues the U.B.C. Staff Newsletter 8/9 times per
year.  Includes contributions from the library staff, articles, cartoons, reports of travel and other information pertaining to life
within the Library.
EDITORIAL STAFF:  PAT LAVAC, Law (Editor); PAT BOLTON, Systems,
ADRIENNE CLARK, Woodward; DAVID MILLER, Acquisitions, GEORGIA MACRAE,
Law; JUDY CARDIN, Circulation; SHELLEY CRIDDLE, Sedgewick; DEANNA
NORRIS, Information and Orientation. 16
STAFF TRAVEL COMMITTEE -  Who receive requests from professional
and non-professional staff members for grants to enable them to attend
Library Conferences, Workshops, etc.
MEMBERS:  JOAN SANDILANDS, Humanities (Chairman); ERIK DE BRUIJN,
Administration; LOIS CARRIER, Social Sciences; DIANNA FRASER, Sedgewick; GEORGE FREEMAN, Marjorie Smith Library.
MaAu Q>\-
(\
THERE'S THAT NAME AGAIN
Mrs. Marilyn Freeman assumed the duties of Head Circulation Librarian
on August 24, 1970.  She came to librarianship with experience as a
library assistant in public and college libraries in Michigan and
California.  In 1964, she spent one year as a Professional Trainee at
Wordsworth Public Libraries in London where she completed the Intermediate Examination of the Library Association of the United Kingdom
and was appointed to the first professional grade.  From 1966-69, she
served in the Serials Section of the Library of the University of
British Columbia.  Just prior to coming to the University of Washington,
she served as a library systems analyst at the University of California,
Irvine.
Washington Library Letter
University of Washington Libraries
Seattle.  Vol. XI No. 16 Sept. 15, 1970
AN UNBIASED 1970 REPRINT - YOU MIGHT SAY
A SKETCH OF THE INTERNATIONAL CONDITION
OF THE UNITED STATES OF AMERICA AND OF
THEIR POLITICAL RELATIONS WITH EUROPE
by a
Russian
(translated from the French by an American)
1826
$11.50 163 pages
-r-——r ST WIBBY REPORTS...
BELATED congratulations to
Don Dennis who is the new
head of Systems.  Sorry
Don, but you are so far
away up there on the eighth
floor.  That goes for all you
people in Systems.  How about
a communique now and again.
APOLOGIES to Mollie Buckingham
of the Law Library for not
including her name at the end
of that most interesting item
in the last issue "Basle by
Bottel". Many people have asked
who was the author.  Mollie's
promotion from L.A. Ill to
L.A. IV back in July also seems
to have been overlooked.  Sorry,
Mollie, and congrats, on both
counts.
LIBRARY personnel, active in
the Arts of our city, during
the past month include:
Leszek Karpenski, Humanities,
who appeared in the Vancouver
Operatic Companies producation
of "Aida" at the Queen Elizabeth
Theatre.  Les was in the chorus
of the highly successful presentation.  Noticed Hans and
Sheila Burndorfer enjoying the
opening night performance.  We
also hear that Sheila Neville
and David Miller of Acquisitions
were producer and co-producer of
the Little Theatre's production
of "Private Lives" Noel Cowards
delightful play
17
OUR UNDERGROUND
in the Woodward
Library reports
that Betty McAu1ly
is positively
radiant over the
bi rth of a fi rst
grandson.
CHANGE OF name
Ruth Evanchyshin
of Cataloguing
became Mrs. Ron
Bruckshaw on the
29th of August
and Lynne Wishlow
of the Biomedical
Branch Library at
VGH married John Holloquist October
3rd at the University Chapel, Toronto.
And then there were the two Lindas
who pulled a surprise on everyone.
Linda Kwong of Gifts and Exchange
married Barry Joe on Saturday 5th
September and departed for a month's
tour of Europe.  And...Linda Putnam
of Cataloguing/Serials married Howard
Johnston (they met scubba diving)  on
October 8th.  We wish a great deal of
happiness to one and all.
SUSANNE DODSON.  She of the radiant
picture in the U.B.C. Reporter and
also of Gov. Pubs is journeying in
Europe at the moment, and Joan Selby
of Humanities has at long last managed
to take that holiday in Greece.  Last
year's planned vacation was cancelled
through i1lness. 18
IF YOU CAN'T find the Programmers
they have moved from Floor 5 to
Floor 8 and have taken over some
of the carrells in Special Collections.
LOST and not found note from
Sedgewick.  "Lost! enroute, one
8 foot window pole.  Anyone knowing
the whereabouts of such item please
send to Sedgewick where it is
desperately needed".  P.S.  They
might consider an eight foot man,
proficient in opening and closing
windows, as an alternative.
HEALTH AND WELFARE.  All you sedentary types pay attention to those
guys and gals who are dashing around
the track at lunchtime.  It doesn't
appear to be organized, purely
voluntary, but many of the Library
types are out there, and I am told
Lockers in the gym are available at
$5 a head.  Go join the "trotters"
apparently it does wonders for the
muscles and morale.  See Doug, or
Claudia, or Bob or... P.S. to the
beginners.  You are expected to show
up for work in the same afternoon.
FINE ARTS tells us that Carol Wisdom
of that department and David Wisdom
of Woodward Library (her husband, who
else?) are now living in England.
NEWS of an ex member of Humanities.
Barbara Walden who very lately left
that department is in the Inter-
library loan Department at the
University of Minnesota. Also
visiting Humanities during the past
month, Sue Port from Selkirk College.
MUST SAY the newest member of
the Humanities staff has been
a very busy person this month.
Oct. 15, Les Karpenski gave a
lecture for the Archeological
Society of B.C. in the Auditorium of the Centennial
Museum.  "Invention and Development of the Alphabet and
Middle Eastern Archeology".
Nov. 1st, Les is to give another
lecture at the same location
entitled:  "Palmyra Syria".
This will be one of a series
on the Nine Famous cities of
the East under the direction
of Dr. Kassis - and is one of
the Continuing Education courses.
CONGRATULATIONS and commiserations to Barbara Ross of Acquisitions who acquired a fiance
and waved goodbye to him almost
immediately when he was re-called
to Vietnam.
AND FINALLY from the "drinking
crowd" up in Cataloguing we have
this recipe just in time to
practice on before the Festive
season (2 months away)  It was
found in the Seven Ages of
Justerini.  Wheatley Dennis
London 1949.  Offer your guests:
A SYLLABUB UNDER THE COW.
"Pour a bottle of Red or White
wine into a bowl, sweeten it
with sugar and grate in some nutmeg.  Then hold it under the cow,
and milk into it till it has a
fine froth on top.  Strew a handful of currants and chopped almonds over it before serving".
With a little imagination this
could replace the "Wine 5- Cheese
party".  Something new in social
events.  S'all for now. Burp!!
—-
	 1 —1—I i	
19
.
WORD FROM WOODWARD
The Pacific Northwest Group of the Medical Library Association met
in Spokane September 25th and 26th.  Bill Parker, Brenda Sutton, along
with Linda Einblau of the B.C. Medical Library Service, enjoyed a
beautiful drive via Grand Cooley Dam.  Lydia Lobach and Adrienne Clark
travelled via Boeing Field, Seattle, where they shared the runway with
a big earthquake commonly called a jumbo jet.
The first morning session on Medlars was a repeat for most but some
emphasis was given to the method of subject analysis and its relationship to machine search inadequacies.  There was a display of the Washington/Alaska Regional Medical Program videotapes which are available
for medical education purposes.  A session on financial sources for
hospital libraries was too American in orientation for our purposes.
After a long day the evening session featured the Doctor's Band - a
large group of doctors who like the Glen Miller sound.  After the Conget
line broke up, we learned everyone's drink preferences and met a lot
of faces.  Lydia met all the nice ILL staffs to whom she has been
writing nasty overdue notices.
On Saturday, we had a detailed bindery tour by a delightfully proud
craftsman.  It was the highlight of the convention.  A local doctor
gave a breathtaking persona] narrative of medical advances during his
50 years in general practice.
The business meeting nominated Diana Kent of Woodward as Chairman and
Linda Einblau as Secretary for next year's meeting in Vancouver.  Bill
Fraser of B.C. Medical Library Service is the regional representative
to the National Nominating Committee for the Medical Library Association.  (Any questions?)
HISTORY DISPLAYS AT WOODWARD LIBRARY THIS MONTH AND NEXT
Dental Instruments:  October 26  Concept of the Doctor:  November 4
Early Surgery:  October 27 Contraception:  November 5
Antibiotics:  October 28 Red Cross:  November 6
Childbirth:  October 29 Small Pox:  November 9
Leprosy:  October 30 Surgical Instruments:  November 10
Plastic Surgery:  November 2 Quackery:  November 12
Taking of Vital Signs: Nov. 3 Polio:  November 13 20
VIEW FHOM WITIIII
lio. 7.
Question. Fire extinguisher, Insurance Policy, Commissionaire
how are they alike.
Answer.   It's nice to have them around when you need then.
" "■«'—■  ■'■'.!
!	

Cite

Citation Scheme:

        

Citations by CSL (citeproc-js)

Usage Statistics

Share

Embed

Customize your widget with the following options, then copy and paste the code below into the HTML of your page to embed this item in your website.
                        
                            <div id="ubcOpenCollectionsWidgetDisplay">
                            <script id="ubcOpenCollectionsWidget"
                            src="{[{embed.src}]}"
                            data-item="{[{embed.item}]}"
                            data-collection="{[{embed.collection}]}"
                            data-metadata="{[{embed.showMetadata}]}"
                            data-width="{[{embed.width}]}"
                            data-media="{[{embed.selectedMedia}]}"
                            async >
                            </script>
                            </div>
                        
                    
IIIF logo Our image viewer uses the IIIF 2.0 standard. To load this item in other compatible viewers, use this url:
https://iiif.library.ubc.ca/presentation/cdm.biblos.1-0190839/manifest

Comment

Related Items