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Biblos Feb 1, 1966

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Array V. 2,  NO. 5 of the U.B.C. LIBRARY STAFF NEWSLETTER FEB. I966
February marks a milestone in this year's issues of Biblos.
We actually received a note of commendation for the January
issue!  Mrs. Woodward, Head of the Curriculum Laboratory,
writes:  "Congratulations on the January I966 issue of Biblos.
We all admired and enjoyed it."
The main reason for its success lies, of course, in the contributions of so many library staff. An admirable trend, we
feel. How about continued contributions on a more voluntary
basis, group! Biblos staff thanks all those who helped make
it a real staff effort.
A couple of notes and changes to that January issue:
1. Steve Johnson (Serials) would like to give credit where
due to Richard Landon for his lucid Serials Division write-up,
2. Robert Harris (Circ.) would like to revise an error.  The
IBM loans list had 7,000 (not 700) items on it at the end of
December and now has 15,000.  Also Circ. staff searched some
7,000 (not 700) missing slips after inventory last May. When great minds meet.
2nd Meeting of the Committee on the Selection of New Serials,
Jan. 20th, in the Board Room.
Duplicatlon
(a) Duplication of materials in new Reading Rooms: Mr. Stuart-
Stubbs reported that the Senate Library Committee had
decided it would not finance the establishment of any more
reading rooms until such time as a survey of actual needs
could be made.
(b) Anchored sets:  Mr. Stuart-Stubbs further reported that
the Senate Library Committee appeared to be in favour of
reversing the present policy of anchoring the second and
less complete and of circulating the first.
Serials accession list:  Mr. Johnson said that the Serials
Accession List in its present form would cease with the
first publication of the computerized Current Accession
Lists.  It would be incorporated into the latter and
would then indicate serials received in the library, not
those ordered.
28th Meeting of the Reference Group, January 31st, in the Board
Room.
The Secretary said that the third edition of the Union List of
Serials in 5 volumes at the price of $120 had been published.
He asked for advice on where sets should be placed, bearing in
mind present requirements and future decentralization.  There
was an immediate avalanche of requests, 13 in all.  The secretary
was visibly impressed by the show of interest in his question.
The main part of the meeting dealt with some problems related
to Summer School reference service.  Anne Brearley was concerned
about the difficulties that had arisen last summer in connection
with educational periodicals. 28th Reference Group Meeting (Cont'd.)
Discussed was the possibility of sending word to visiting education profs about assignments that might be set and restrictions
on the circulation of education periodicals.  Bob Harris aptly
pointed out that the real problem is how to provide service for
such a mass influx of students,  A proposed letter for visiting
faculty will be drafted and copies submitted at the next meeting.
On February 9th a meeting was called by Robert Harris to discuss
the possibility of moving the circulation library science collection (Z 1 - Z 1035) from level 5 to a location on level 4.  It
was generally agreed that
1. Classifications Z 1 - Z 1035 will be moved to stack
level 4 in May, with the exception of a few items for
which location cards will be made.
2. Classifications Z 1037 - Z 9999 should remain on
level 5 and would not need location cards at present.
3. All other materials in the Z classification should
have location cards made.
4. The subject divisions concerned take inventory of
their collections in May, before work on the location
file is started.
The various possibilities for completing the location file will
be investigated.
INTERESTED IN LIBRARIANSHIP?
The Canadian Library Association announces its scholarships,
bursaries, and loans.  See list posted outside the Staff Lounge.
** Note:  Civil Service Commission and National Research Council
of Canada also offer generous scholarships for prospective librarians.  NRC offers to Science grads only. Of Interest to Xeroxers (and Others)
Most of the librarians have heard about Leonard Freiser, Librarian
at Toronto's Education Centre Library and his xerox duplicating
service for schools and students.  Mr. Stuart-Stubbs recently
talked with him about the problems of xerox and copyright,  Mr,
Freiser reported that he was not being sued, that none are presently threatening legal action, and that the Board of Education's
solicitor, after reviewing the situation, advised him to continue the copy service.
U.B.C. LIBRARY Appointments, Promotions, and Resignations
Appointments
Ingeborg Schafer
Hi lary Horton
Ziska Schwimmer
Kathleen Beynon
Margaret Brand
Gail McKechnie
Lib, Asst,
Cat.
Jan.
24, 1966
Clerk 11
Ci re.
Feb.
21, 1966
Clerk 1
Wood.
Feb.
1, 1966
Clerk 1
Acq,
Feb.
14, 1966
Clerk 1
Ci re.
Mar.
1, 1966
Lib. Asst.
Serial s
Mar.
1, 1966
Promotions
Derika de Beauchamp-
Dennigan
Catherine Haley
CI.
1 to
R.B.C.
ci.
II
Ci re.
Jan.
14, 1966
ci.
to Cl.l1
Wood,
Feb.
1, 1966
Resignations
Mary Alford
Margaret Parker
Roger Sperle
Greta Jones
May Vool
Joyce Chu
Margaret Litzcke
Boni ta Col 1 ins
Penny Ki11
Woodward
Jan.
31, 1966
Acq.
Jan.
31, 1966
Serial s
Feb.
4, 1966
Cat,
Mar.
1, 1966
Ser ial s
Mar.
1, 1966
Circ. (RBC)
Feb.
28, 1966
Ci re.
Feb.
18, 1966
Cat.
Marc
h 4, 1966
Acq.
Feb.
28, 1966 5
TIDBITS (or - clear out the files)
Who is it?
A package of books addressed to:
Mr. Perry Ericson
Cedric Library
Helen Allan enjoys infinite variety in her work at Woodward.
She now finds herself
watering the sponges
which moisten the air
which surrounds the books
which are in the Memorial Room
which does not have humidified air-conditioning
as previously advertised.
An Interlibrary Loan request addressed to:
Inter! ibrary Loan Service
University of British Columbia Library
Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada
Attn:  Mr. Simon Fraser
A pocket dictionary - for large pockets.
Schroer, M. M. Arnold
Englisches Handworterbuch in genetischer Darstellung
auf Grund der Etymologic und mit phonetischer Aussprache-
bezeichnung und Berucksichtigung des Amerikanischen und
der Eigennamen. Heidelberg, Winter, 1937. FEATURE OF THE MONTH - THE WILSON LISTENING ROOM
Did you know that the Wilson Recordings Library was named after
Ethel Wilson, a famous Canadian author, and Dr. Wallace Wilson,
a well-known Vancouver Physician.  The Wilsons, married in 1920,
reside in Vancouver.
Ethel Wilson was born in 1890 in South Africa, lived in England
until she was eight, and came to Vancouver to live with relatives
after her parents died.  Then, she took her schooling in Britain
and returned once more to Vancouver.  Among her novels are Hetty
Dorval (1947), Innocent Traveller (1949), Swamp Angel (1952) and
Love and Salt Water (1956).
Dr. Wallace Wilson is a retired physician, an honorary lecturer
in Medical Ethics at U.B.C,, and was Head of the Canadian Medical
Association from June 1946 to June 1947.
Notes ^ £ * from Ground Under
About half a dozen persons regularly audit the Wilson Listening
Room, checking, they say, our contributions to culture. This is
something that changes greatly, it seems, with the weather.  One
of our regular checkers, BSS, has noted that when the weather
turned bad a week or so before Christmas exams everyone put.aside
the bop and beatle records and started spinning Shakespeare and
Chaucer.  Now the weather is good again and our clientele are
back to the lighter things, at least until the March winds do
blow.
The turntables in the listening room are probably the simplest
ever designed, with but one lever to run the works.  One lever
turns on the power and lowers the tone-arm (the thing that holds
the needle).  It's so easy that a one-armed, one-fingered person
should have no trouble.  The only problem is that the two actions,
that of the turning on the power and that of lowering the tone-
arm, are not simultaneous.  The power comes on first when the
lever is only half turned.  Now when a student gets to this point
he invariably goes blank.  There, the disc is turning but the
needle is not touching it.  He lifts the tone-arm and examines
the other side.  Then he puts it down again but it still does
not touch the record.  However, with a little downward push
(about ten to fifteen pounds pressure) contact can be made. 7
But one cannot sit in comfort while exerting ten to fifteen
pounds pressure with one's hand.  Obviously, the impediment
must go.  Now the impediment (commonly called a cuing device)
is only made of metal.  With a twist of the wrist, off it
comes and the piece that held it in place falls into the works
jamming the whole operation.  Now don't laugh, this happened
three times last month.
The contractor has a remedy; as each turntable bites the dust,
the piece that falls into the works will be suspended somehow,
an armrest will be installed in the hole formerly occupied by
the cuing device and the turntable will have to be operated
manually,
OJiBKO^WP
If the summer ever comes again we will have music across the
library lawn with programmed lunch-hour sessions during
Summer School, And during tiose wonderful, carefree, happy
days when we are not overwhelmed by the student boy and student
bodies, we will have random oroadcasts most of the day, and of
anythink that you wish to hear.  Christmas Carols will be
played only when the thermometer goes above 80°.
And NOW - as also announced in the January issue - a special
release from our man in the rront Office, Mr. Basil Stuart-
Stubbs.  (applause please) SPECIAL RELEASE TO BIBLOS
The Librarian wishes to thank the anonymous admirer who gave him
as a Christmas present a fine copy of Kalyanamal1 a's Ananga-Ranga,
or Indian Art of Love, translated by Tridibnath Ray, M.A., B.L.,
with a foreword by Dr. Gerindrashekhar Bose, D, Sc., M.B., F.N,I.,
and an appreciation by the Hon. Mr. P. Chakravarti, Chief Justice,
Calcutta High Court.
In order that the wisdom distilled in this fascinating tome will
not be lost to other interested staff members, the Librarian will
permit reprints of particularly enlightening and useful passages,
such as the one that follows:
The defects of a Bride
The wise should reject the girl as a bride having the following characteristics, viz., who comes from an unknown family, whose stature is either very short or very tall; whose
body is thin, skin is rough, very hard and covered with dense
body pile, hair and eyes are of tawny colour, eyebrows are
straight, lips are projecting and of dark colour, and teeth
are long, protruding, or uneven; who allows her tongue to
loll out, whose ears are like winnowing fans, lips and cheeks
bear signs of moustachio and beard, neck is thick, breasts
are uneven, i.e. one is bigger than the other; on whose
cheeks dimples appear when laughing or there are constant
depressions on both the cheeks; who possesses less or more
limbs (e.g. have additional fingers or toes, etc.), walks
fast and while she walks the earth trembles by the violence
of her gait, whose second toe is larger than the big toe,
and the fourth toe does not touch the earth while walking;
who is-by nature cruel, very fickle, irascible and ill-
mannered, speaks too much, eats too much, sleeps too much,
or is called by the name of a bird, hill, tree, river, or
star; who is grown up in age, or is suffering from some
chronic disease.
And here she is, ladies and gentlemen - the girl you've all
been waiting for - that paragon of all defects - Miss
Magnolia Lynn-Creek Seymour! 9 And yet ANOTHER communique direct from the front. Just released
from the "classified" files - a UBC-Guelph Library Telex conversation of extreme importance to us all.
UBC LIB VCR
U LIB GLPH
FEB 3/66
UNIVERSITY OF GUELPH LIBRARY GRATEFULLY ACKNOWLEDGES GREETINGS
WE ABD XX AND OTERSXX OTHER PICKERS UP OF LEARNING'S CRUMBS
ENCIURAGED XX ENCOURAGED BY ROUMOUR B STEWART STUBBS AND R M
HAMILTON ARE GIVING UP BOOKSTORES FOR LENT AND SUGGEST INDEF
INITE EXTENSION OF TERM IN INTERESTS OF NATIONAL UNITY
L F MACRAE   CHIEF LIBRARIAN
UBC LIB VCR
E
OT
U
IBIC      BY THE WAY ARE YOU ON FREE TIME
YES GOOD MAYBE WE CAN HAVE A SHORT CONVERSATION
IS YOUR TELEX MACHINE IN THE LIBRARY BUILDING TSELF
YES IN THE ASSICIATE KXXXLIBRARIANS OFFICE AT TE OTHR SIE
PARDON ME AT THE OTHER SIDE IF TH ZXX THE BUILDING
OUR TELEX IN XX IS IN THE SCIENCE DIV OF THE MAIN LIBRARY
AND WE ACCEPT MESSAGES FROM THE WHOLE CAMPUS SO OUR USE OF
THIS MACHINE IS QUITE VARIED FROM ILLO TO MESSAGES IN THE
U.S. ABOUT ORDERS FOR COMPUTERS
OH DO YOU HAVE A REGULAR OPERATOR
NO NOT YET THIS IS THE FIRTXXX FIRST TIME I HAVE USED THIS
MACHINE
ITS QUITE DIFFERENT FROM A TYPEWRITER ISN'T IT
I HAVEN'T DISCOVERED THAT YET BUT THEY HAVE ERRORS IN COMMON
MACRAE ON THE LINE NOWM RQUST YOU TYPE TH SOUN OF POINT ATKNSN
FOG HOTN
THERE ARE TOO MANY THICK CONCRETE WALLS AND ITS JUST NOT FOGGY
TODAY SORRY TO DISAPPOINT YOU WHAAAOOOMPH
IS THAT SOME SORT OF CODE OR ARE YOU TRYING TO IMITATE YEE OLD
FOLXXX FOG HORN
YES YES POXXX POINT ATKINSON CALLING
MESSAGE ENDED  THANK YOU
YOURE VERY WELCOME 10
To interrupt with a piece of useful information
February 22nd to March 5th Fine Arts Gallery
" A selection of Japanese Maps from the Tokugawa Era" from
the U.B.C. Library collectior and an exhibition called
Announcements, which comprises notices, posters and other
publicity devices used by galleries and museums will be
on display. The latter is a study of typography, imagination, artistry and flexibility of approach.
And now to continue - our esteemed BSS recently had a birthday and received a Bibliothecarial Birthday Ode Upon the
Name of BASIL
Basil   1.   (bae'zil).     1481.     (a.   OF.   basile,   ad.   L,   basilisca,
f.   basiliscus BASILISK;   in  Gr   'royal1,   whence basilicum,   supp,
to be an  antidote to the basilisk's venom.     Herb,   1.   Popular
name of a genus of aromatic  shrubby plants,   incl.   culinary
herbs Common or Sweet  B.   and  Bush or Lesser B.     2.  A book-
name  for:   Wild B.,   Field or Cow B.;   also B.-balm,   -thyme.
Basil   2.   rare.   1565.     An   iron   round  the ankle of a prisoner,
HAIL BASIL!     Shall  we call   you   'royal'
Or "aromatic shrubby plant"?
We cannot cal1   you common  B
Nor  (beardless)   BUSH -  nor LESSER B.,
But culinary  and SWEET B.
- A name with which we all   agree.
You've never been "an   iron around
The ankle of a prisoner,   but when we've  found
You painting Gottis,  or dancing   reels,
Or driving cars  at  dead  of night,
We've guessed WILD  BASIL might  be   right.
But  best of all   is  BASIL BALM,
That's  guaranteed  to cure  from harm,
From Basilisk's  bite,   or Friday bores,
HAIL  BASIL!     May  long   life  be yours.' 11
TO DISPLAY OR NOT TO DISPLAY.  .  .
"The right display at the right time can promote use of the
library's services and materials, strengthen good public relations... and generally contribute toward the successful accomplishment of the library's goals."
If you believe the above statement, read on, for the Display
Committee needs your help! This Committee has been formed to
find a home for display materials (or what's left of them), to
formulate policy decisions and to draw up a manual of suggested
practices.
Although displays are an intrinsic feature of any progressive
library, our efforts have tended to resemble more a chugging
steam engine, than an effective communications satellite.  If
this irks you, remember that we need your suggestions, inspiration, encouragement, and latent artistic talent!
Here are some displays we would like to put on, with the help
of academic departments, Fine Arts and Architecture students,
the Art Gallery and the Museum of Anthropology, various students
organizations, and YOU:
The Pre-Raphaelites
The Art of Haiku
New Canadian Poets
Malcolm Lowry
Exi stentialism
The work of local printing presses
A series on the Art of the North American Indian -
Salish Art; Haida Art; etc.
The work of Canadian Universities Service Overseas
The work of The Company of Young Canadians
The world of Legend and Romance - from the Niebelun-
genlied to Tolkien's Lord of the Rings
The Doukhobors
A huge chart boldly depicting the salient points on
how to take a book out of the library, to be placed
on an easel in the main concourse.
AND LOTS MORE...
Please give any suggestions to:
Jennifer Gallup, Chairman
Evelyn Roth
Mary Adolph
Gisele Crotogino 12
TO OUR VALENTINE
(But now you've got me all confused!
For "Sant" and "Cupe" have interfused,)*
Pat LaV.
See "Santa Baz" in
BIBLOS. Vol. 2, No. 3 p. 1

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