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Biblos 1973-01

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 ti a ii a 11
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On February 21st the Senate received, my
annual report for 1971/72, late as usual .
Anyone who wants to read It will be able to
obtain a copy from the nearest Division or
Branch Head, and a summary will appear in
the March issue of UBC Reports.  But why go
to the trouble when you can read about
events in greater detail In this Issue cf
Biblos? Here the true Power Elite of the
Library tell It the way it is.  Or Is
supposed to be.  Or where it hurts.
Basil Stuart-Stubbs
Universitv Librarian
Vol. 9 No. 5 U.B.C. Librarv Staff Newsletter Jan/Feb 19/5 GHOSTS OF CHRISTMAS PAST
Once again the Smorgasbord in the Main Library proved
to be the highlight of the Christmas season.  It was most
gratifying to your Biblos staff, as the organizers of this
yearly' event, to note the enthusiastic participation and the
obvious enjoyment of the Library staff.
We would like to take this opportunity to thank those
people in the Cataloguing Divison who took the time to
prepare and send us a very original "thank you note" -
It is always nice to know that at least some people
aopreclate our efforts.
As  a  final,  wind-op  hare  is  a  listing of  the prizes
a:ul -p.*-ners   at   Unat   event.
Fr.HE $T.-'-?F IP.UP - Prizes donated by many department heads and
or her cep.ercniK peooie.
J. BaiyjacPn Sedge.
Pi r.i ■.  Hunt Science
S. Cnr.rad Cat.
Kathleen Hynes Circ.
Cer-.rUe Pitpatrick Gov. Pubs.
IkuP.ta Jcmoto Cat.
Sinikka Kellosalmi
David Scott
David Miller
Mary Lubbe
Ruth liovland
Anr.e MacKenzie
Woodward
Cat.
Acq.
Gov. Pubs.
Sedge
Cat
Lynn-tie Arnold
Lar.zacotta
Circ.
Cat.
Fine Arts
Cat.
Curric.
Law
Barbara Gison
Eido Nt-ufeld
Cathy Belyea
>1. Ba.lshaw
C. Carter
K. Boyes
Heather Wilson
Dianne Bell
Sylvia Harries
Woodx^ard
Cat.
R.R.
Cat.
Serials
V'oodard
I.L.L.
Law
Acq.
-iJiPvlInlliUril
P?:uh-   PtPiD
Circ.
Deb'r/ie  Ball
Sedge.
S.   Tyrras
Cat:
Mark  Perrett
Cat.
Vickl  Porris
Cat.
Carol   Delvo
Lunchroom
Mary  Pc-rtifee
Sedge.
Pat   McMinn
Woodward
Bob   Rnontz
Cat'.
K.   Waiters
Science
Shirley Halladay
Cat.
John  Curnraings
BMB
Cat.
Joan   Cesar
Gov.   Pubs
Jun  Frith
Sedge.
C.   May
Pre-bind. BIBLOS BONAZA WINNERS
Bottle of Rum
Turkey Voucher
Hudson Bay Gift Certificate
Bottle of Sherry
Bottle of Cold Duck
Eatons Gift Certificate
Bottle of Scotch
1/2 doz. Heineken Beer
Turkey Voucher
Bottle of Vodka
Bottle of Port
Eatons Gift Certificate
Turkey Voucher
Bottle of Fiasca
Hudson Bay Gift Certificate
Bottle of Rye
Bottle of Gin
Bottle of Rose
A.
Hoffman
Cat.
B.
White
Educ.
M.
Wilson
Map
D.
Bacon
B.M.B.
S.
Matthews
Cat.
M.
MacDonald
Cat.
G.
Eadie
Music
G.
Macrae
Law
p.
Vermilyea
Gov. Pubs
J.
Lanphier
Bindery
R.
Boyes
Woodward
L.
Hoffman
Woodward
M.
Balshax\r
Cat.
L.
Fricke
Cat.
S.
Westman
Music
J.
Anderson
Law
L.
Planedin
Systems
J.
Anderson
Law
AND NOW FOR THE ANSWERS TO THE BIBLOS CHRISTMAS COOKBOOK CONTEST
Maria Horvath (Humanities) 11_
Luther Chew (Info. & Orient.) 7_
Bill Bell (Administration) 8__
Pat LaVac (Law Library) 1_
Inderjit Bhugra (Cataloguing) 12_
Sui Cheong Siu (Math) 10
Anna Leith (Woodward) _3_
Matthew Hartman (Cat.) 6
Sue Morita (Front Office) 2_
Eleanor Mercer (Biblio.) 5_
Charlie Tully (Cataloguing) 14_
Tom Shorthouse (Law) 15_
Rein Brongers (Science) 9_
Percy Fryer (Bindery) 13
Muna Prasad (Cataloguing) 4
THANKS to all those staff members who sent in their entries.
Obviously it was a very tricky contest as there was no complete
correct entry.  However the prize of course goes to the one
with the most correct answers.
THE GRAND PRIZE WINNER
A bottle of Champagne goes to-
FIONA LANZAROTTA - HUMANITIES
***************************** >
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c
« ASIAN STUDIES DIVISION 5
HEW LOCATION
We have moved!  To Sedgewick!s old location. Stack Level 2,
south wing, Main Library.  Although the actual moving was finished
in 2\  days (Fri., Sat., Dec. 29-30, and Tues., Jan. 2) with the
staff-student crew working from 7:45 a.m. each day under the capable
direction of Brian Varty, following T.K. Ng's plans, we are still
not quite settled because of the continuing renovations that did
not start until we had moved in.
With the prospect of moving before the fall term began, no
major book-move had been made in the summer, resulting in a great
confusion and congestion both in the catalogued and uncatalogued
sections.  The congestion is somewhat relieved now but the confusion remains, and the staff is working hard at shelf reading.
What we need badly is a knowledgeable circulation and stack supervisor.
ADDITIONS £ PROCESSING
19 70     1971    19 72 -{Increase
Vols, added
Titles Catal.
Volumes loaned
The acquisitions-cataloguing gap was closed for the first t:
in the Division's 12 year history!  Thanks to the staff's utmost
effort, we have finally reached our goal with a "great leap forwc
in cataloguing output which title-wise represents a 17..175-= Increase
over 1971:
-BOOK BUDGET
17,102
8,15b
8,957(4,055 t.)
9.83
3.,070
3,212
4,727(8,209 v.)
47.17
8,239
7,842
9,251
17.97
, -p
bannec
Since the Cultural Revolution, 1966, publications were
from Mainland China until mid-1971.  Now materials allowed for
export are increasing steadily if not fast, costing more and more
On the other hand, both the Chinese Materials and Research Aids
Service Center in Taiwan (under Association for Asian Studies) an
dne Center for Chinese Research Materials in Washington D.C.
(under Association of Research Libraries) are collecting original
and obscure material on Republican and post-1949 China for public
ation or reproduction.  As this type of material happens to be wh
the faculty and students need for their current research, it is
■uch desirable for the library.  However, our present book budget
can only cover a very limited portion of them. tALOnUED BOOKS & SUPPLEMENTS
. i_   shortage, the October 1971 issue of our List of
__; ;-_ did not appear until January, 1972.  The three
.5  -'_ _ Issued on schedule, with the last one substituted
pr.c-i:   (A'-r) , Bibliography or Indexes and Abstracts on
les, compiled by Mrs. Chen.
. or
iring the year, 21 new requests and orders were received for
id future Issues of the List, 8 of which were particularly
Supplement #3, Bibliography of the History of the Chinese Book
Calligraphy, and 11 (Including one from LC) for Supplement #2a
odicais In Asian Studies.
NEWSPAPERS MICROFILMED
'with financial support from the National Library, the follow-
Chlnese language dailies of Vancouver have been microfilmed In
irary, with a negative copy deposited In Ottawa, and a positive
'he Chinese Tines (Ta Han kung pao) 1914 Aug. - 1970 Dec. 149r.
'he Chinese Voice (Ch'iao sheng jih pao) 1954 Jan.-1970Dec. 37r.
he New Republic (Hsln min kuo pao)  195 7 Sept. - 19 70 Dec.    27r,
- _ -     i --■t_.. . • October, 1965, when T.K. Ng visited The
 - -i_\A  j  ~" ~^z     T^l copy of the paper lying on dusty
■ -- .    -  ,~' --_ r-.c   : Ay_   -tarted In 1907, but by 1965, issues of
- -p  _ -    w        "> x _  _, u"iie.  Her microfilm proposal was gener-
- " u   -; >.' librarians of West Coast universities
- -    >. -.    -- ' ; .n hesitated to join the project due
- .  .  . -   -1 " "cial problem was solved negotiation
^ C-Z..I  a--.,cij..p -,u-...'v.ebsruilv alter six years.  At the final stage,
Stuart-Stubbs acted as chief negotiator, while Ylm Tse provided
foot-work in supervising the delivery of the paper between its
'ice. the rricrofllm firm, and the Woodward Library, in whose
rare area Its whole backfile Is shelved now.
All things considered, 1972 has been a challenging but success-
ear, in the sense that several goals have been achieved without
lonal staff. To all our colleagues, therefore, a vote of thanks- BIBLIOGRAPHY DIVISION
1972 was a year marked by changes In the U.S. book
approval programme.  In January 1972 we changed from an approval
programme In the exact and applied science to title-by-tltle
ordering.  During the year statistics were gathered on a comparative basis and we have concluded the title-by-title method in
these sciences offers considerable advantages.
By the end of the year we came to the conclusion that
the U.S. approval programme in the humanities and social sciences
was also in need of adjustment.  Books with 1973 Imprints and on
will be supplied to us by John Coutts
Library Services. h  „
r^ %-~y  - /j ,.'.-
The constant concern through- IlV*""  --—  v -,
out the year has been the rising peril %      I ! ^_,.: rpf'i i*. j
caused by increasing prices for books -   . -. * v -- y
and periodicals loaded onto a stationary, or receding book budget.  Many
programmes are going Into the red,
notably the European blankets and * \ •" vj \ f    \
serials.  German books, British books, h"'|    (j     \
Jugoslavian books, music scores, |\J     "I   \
U.S.S.R. books, and others have i       |   \
increased in cost substantially.  Over \ \ \
one-third of the book budget goes for \    yt I    ;
serials and continuations (about \  \'A I
$408,000 this year) and the average X  |.|   \ t
increase in overall cost for these, \  -\        \ '■
projected into next year, may be close ', *   L-^—p
to S50,000 - with no increase in sight -. * \ '{
in the budget to cover it. /// * \   j<
In this year of change we lost l^^A^> "'" ■ ], "'" ff?
Heather Keate to Woodward but were for- A /      .-'  »
^tunate to be able to transfer Jack
Mcintosh from the Math Library to take
her place.  We also added Toni O'Hare to Colbeck and Michael
Elliston to incunabulum book studies.
Other Interesting problems on hand:  the shrinkage of the
-Shastri book fund and the shrinkage of office space for the serials
bibliographer together with the shrinkage of shelf space for
:;Periodical sets (which makes micro backfiles more attractive.) . ■ III GIN M,  CATALOGUING
A Short Storv
•i where the saiseman came.  He appeared
. the head cataloguer, his briefcase bulging';
- Itli awe, reverence, a touch of disbelief.
:'t new catalogue can't do.  You have
-cr h> exist.  Can't fund new positions?
> .,:t have to.**  He lowered his voice.  "In
• x   ~un lay off half your present staff."
: I.  W cl S
interested.  "You say it's very new," he said.
■ salesman said.  "No library has it.  \ve
:."  He smiled.  "It is... unworldly.  Maybe
give It to you.  It will cost you nothing.''
the head cataloguer said.  "What can it
be o nefits of a cat-
- -• n rummaged for a
_ Ay need at them,
i, ' the yellow
Don't worry about
(. - zi i  benefit, with a
.(,-. nook Is Ingested
"-'-.teen for non-
^Lo chute near the
t j O, ,!_i' u':  P'i ,
.• >'. *  !■ • sjh'--'['-, .nswered.
u-u ...-. .It. ' ,l_i .. The book appears
i   -( _ .o •■ .  number.  With
•' - o'i ' z    10 l , ' 1 number conflits;
.- , .  rt o ••- pr. inn- to two, three,
.-:.-. ;i v\;  or>   -r, on tray C,
-,-- '" ;- .--ires, "and they
d cue cataloguer.  He was
L'-ucd t'l^b Hockey Can ,1a Original Cataloguing cont'd
has assumed the functions of the Department of External Affairs.
How would the catalogue handle that?"
"No problem.  You press the 'mixr switch, near the back.  That
will make authority cards, cross references, the works.  All the
cards with the old author will automatically be updated.  You even
have a choice of using consecutive entry.  Just think.  No more
revisions.  No more typing cards.  The catalogue will duplicate
automatically.  Where I come from," here the salesman looked
longingly up towards the heavens, "where I come from, this catalogue
has revolutionized the entire library field."
The head cataloguer thought deeply.  He could see but one
hitch, but as he thought and thought, it loomed larger and larger
in his mind.
"I must have your answer," the salesman said.  "Just give
the word and we will install it by next week.  Free, of course
I don't mean to rush you but my transportation Is waiting."  He
looked out the window towards the playing fields beyond.
ine
ca
The head cataloguer made his decision.  He rose and offere
his hand.  "No.  No, I'm afraid it wouldn't work here," he said.
He peered over his domain.  "You see," he said softly.  '"We have
no damn room for it.  No room at all."
ACQUISITIONS DIVISION
Statistically, 1972 was a routine year in the
Acquisitions Division.  The number of volumes processed Increased
slightly from 56,4-26 in 1971 to 58,593.  The number of Invoices
paid will probably be up when the fiscal year  ends on March 31. _
There were 20,738 processed in the year ending March_31, 19/2 and
there have been 18,71-1 handled as of mid January, 19/3.
At the beginning of the year, we were about to consider the
possibility of collaborating with SFU and UVIC to design a new
ordering, processing and accounting system which could be used
by all three libraries.  A number of meetings were held to determine whether existing differences could be reconciled, and the
result was positive.  The librarians involved have almost completec
drafting a statement of specifications which will be considered
in conjunction with computer specialists to produce the most
satisfactory system in terms of library requirements and machine
efficiency. '72 HAPPENINGS AT THE CRANE LIBRARY
What a fantastic year 1972 has been!  For us heie at Crane,
this has been the year in which we came of age.
In January of '72 our staff jumped from 2 to 12, later on the
number increased to 16.  Part of our staff is provided by the
Federal Government under the Local Inititative Program.  This meant
that we finally were able to take on people to handle our ever-
increasing load of office work and inter-library loans.
We were also able to bring in some qualified people to assist
in the reference area and we have eight professional readers with
backgrounds in radio, TV and the theatre.  This made Crane into a
very busy place all year long.  Literally thousands of new titles
were added to our taped book collection.  In addition to being read
largely by our beautifully voiced readers, these were labelled,
tagged and pre-catalogued by our office staff.
The increased production around here was brought about by the
greater demand for our special service.  Out of our nearly 25,000
loans more than half went to colleges and universities in B.C. and
across Canada.  Our most interesting loan was several titles to the
library at the University of Stockholm,Sweden, where several blind
students needed material in English and French.
The great bulk of our reading onto tape was still carried out
by our fantastically faithful volunteer readers, without whom we
would not be.  Over 100 readers from the library staff, the
faculty and the student body made it possible for us to prepare
the text books for the more than sixty blind and special students
who have to rely on our material.
We saw as well, the greatest increase in ordinary students who
used our library this year.  With the introduction of new courses
in Special Education which focus on teaching of the blind and visually handcapped, our print collection on the subject was used
very heavily.  Students from sociology, psychology, nursing and
the language courses came in record numbers and borrowed record
numbers of our books.
Now, as we head into 1973, the most exciting news is that we
will be expanding into an adjoining area, which will give us a little
more room, and which will allow our students and staff study and
work space, something we ran out of almost three years ago.  Our
staff and students-users are now busy making plans and drawings and
everyone is hoping and dreaming that Crane will become beautiful again CIRCULATION DIVISION
11
Circulation started the year with losses.  In January, Judy
Cardin , our librarian decided to try life in Australia for a while.
A few others left around that time also.  Then came the tragic
death of Pat O'Rourke.  Pat with his great sense of humour will be
fondly remembered by all his friends on staff.
With the spring came more departures and more new faces.
During one week in July we had five new people in training.  It Is
fortunate that summer session was
fairly quiet as it gave the new
«pfP#
Ubl in]
Q
people a chance to learn how
to deal with the new minicomputer which had been installed to replace the card
punches.  As the new
system was being de-bugged
the procedures changed so
there were more lessons,
and more lessons, and more
lessons...  The real
problems with the new equipment
came in the fall when the borrowing rose to a higher level.  The
library gremlins really got to work then, going from computer, to
the terminals to the programmes and back again.  It has been a
lively year;
For months we had been coveting the space Sedgewick was to
vacate, but when.the spoils were divided, Circulation ended up with
only a small part of Floor 5 for the book collection.  Since this
wasn't enough space, it was decided that there would have to be
another storage project - this time serials
rather than books are being stored.  They
have been chosen title by title by the
reference librarians.  We removed to
storage all the designated serials from
floor 1 then started moving books from
floor 1 to 5.  With no extra staff and
with heavy load of regular shelving as
well as extra moving jobs for other divisions, the move had been going slowly.  But
by New Years' Eve Floor 5 i<;as finished and they
had started spacing out the books on Floor 4-.
Later we will remove storage volumes from Floor 3 and then space out
Floor 3 and so on down to Floor 1. 12
Circulation Division cont'd
The year did bring some happy events:  The walls and ceiling
in our work area were painted.  We received new drapes (when the old
ones fell apart at the cleaners).  The new Xerox 1000's which
replaced the 720Ts turned out to be an improved model, just as the
salesman had claimed.  And a few people smiled at us.
SERIALS DIVISION
One of the most important events for Serials Division
in 1972 was the automation of serial ordering.  The system is
modelled after the Automated Acquisitions System, with changes
made to accomodate the characteristics of serial publications.
With ordering out of the way, we hope we can soon
consider the automation of two other important operations in
the Division:  claiming and payment.
To give an idea of the activities in our Division and
to keep the statistics fiends happy, here are some figures for '72,
Number of print-outs received 999
Number of issues checked in 120,974
Number of claims sent out 6,970
Number of changes made to Serials Record  78,131
Number of orders 3,624
Number of order follow-ups 1,256
Number of invoices passed 6,689
Of the 15 people in the Division, 8 are new.  They are
Linda Joe, Division head, Librarian; Cynthia Carter, LA II;
Rosemary Caskey LA II; Lillian Dueckman LA II; Mary Hudson LA II;
Edith Kenny LA II; Barbara Saint, LA IV and Bernadine Sperling
LA II.
Although we are hidden away in a corner of the 7th floor
and no one knows for sure whether the Division exists we are
responsible for maintaining the ordering, receipt and payment of
all serials ordered through the main library and its reading
rooms plus the maintenance of an accurage record of all these
titles, which now number some 17,000. We are lucky to have such
a good group of people.  It makes the conditions bearable and the
work sometimes fun? FINE ARTS DIVISION
Another busy year has slipped by, leaving us all
wondering how 1973 has crept up so quickly.  This summer we rearranged book shelves, cabinets, and carrells to make room for
more books and study space until next time.
We've had some staff changes in Fine Arts:  Maureen
Devine left in the fall to pursue her studies at Vancouver City
College and Cynthia Carter moved up to Serials Division.  We
welcomed back Lou Hamilton who spent some time travelling in
Europe, and Judy Hicks joined our staff in September.
Vacations saiv Miss Dwyer off to the Netherlands and
Britain, Peggy Wroblewski to Spain and Portugal and Jane Shinn to
visit her hometown of Portsmouth. At Christmas, Miss Dwyer followed the sun to Hawaii, while Judy followed the snow to visit her
family in Toronto.
Circulation-wise, our Checkpoint book detector is
running smoothly now that the students are used to the idea, and
we suspect that we are losing very few books these days.
All in all, 1972 has been a good year for Fine Arts,
and we look forward to more of the same in 1973.
HUMANITIES DIVISION
1972?? Well...it was winter and we were busy.  Then
Spring came.  Joan went to Portugal and later Les  and Maria
flew off for European holidays.  In August we hi-6- the
Humanities/Social Sciences team) moved a whole lot of books into
the Ridington Room.  Nice new shelves but fewer places for people
to study.  Shelves crowded already.  In September Donna Packer
left for motherhood and Bellingham, Wash.  Jennifer returned
from her sojourn in Germany and settled back into being a
Canadian librarian.  Stella left and Fiona came to be our L.A. II,
In the summer Maria's revised Doukhobor bibliography
appeared and in December Joan's Guide to comparative and general
literature was born.  Projects on biography, dissertations, the
French Revolution, and film are taking shape.
And soon spring will be here again. 14
GOVERNMENT PUBLICATIONS
One muses, as one sits and contemplates
The speed with which a year evaporates,
That 1972 could not have been so short!
As to make NOW time for our year's report!
Alas, malheureusement, it's all too true,
So here's Gov. Pubs, condensed for Seventy-two,
We lost Dorothy, Dinie, Margaret and Lynda,
Gained Wies, Mariette, Marianne and Pam.
We married off Margaret while she was still with us
And turned Miss Anne Loh into Mrs. Anne Sham.
We travelled, as usual, all over the world,
To Skookumchuck, Hong Kong, Geneva,—■   ->.
.^'oeobw cqB4fi 'ilsboq suTqsuns 'uoq.aaquiad^'
VWy., Nev., Ore., Gold Riv. and Alberta.
We slaved o'er our Kardex files all summer long,
And wrapped up the federal U.S.,
In the hope that their subs, would be under control;
Other subs, still to do? You can guess!
We now do the housing of newspaper files,
A tidier collection, it's true
Than the jumble of people and things that were there.
It's done lots for the visitor's first view.
And finally, because there are those in our midst
Who will feel the above's mere frivolity,
I must emphasize that we do at times work;
(These statistics will leaven the jollity).
DURING 1972
We received 68,920 bibliographic items.
We processed 66,734 bibliographic items.
We ordered 3,665 items.
We answered 21,216 questions. INFORMATION AND ORIENTATION DIVISION
Changes, unexpected as well as planned, characterized the year
just passed - a year also marked by some unanticipated delays.
Nancy Kubesh resigned quite suddenly in April to return to Montreal.
Her position was filled in September by the appointment of Tom
Eadie.
The delay in the completion of the new Sedgewick Library
altered orientation plans for the new school year.  And the late-ln-
the-year decision to transfer some 50,000 periodical volumes from
the main stacks to Woodward Library storage to relieve crowded conditions necessitated further adjustments.  Plans to provide improved
self-help information panels in the stacks as well as printed handouts showing stack levels and call numbers are being postponed until
the collections shifting is completed.
fcWf
*% ps&*S*
A few changes and innovations were realized w
tion. Tom Eadie took over Elsie de Bruijn's respo
Editor of Library News and coordinator of Library.
Orientation literature in loose-leaf format replac
library handbook on an experimental basis. And at
communication channel between library users and th
opened up with the establishment of a "feed-back"
board in the lower hallway of the Main Library on
read the staff's replies to their questions, sugge
plaints. The feed-back board has proven to be a p
for users and staff alike.
ithout comp
Ilea-
risibilities
a s
publication
s.
ed the form
er
long last
a.
e Library w
as
deposit box
and
which users
can
stions and
com-
oint of int
eres t 16
INTERLIBRARY LOAN - ANNUAL REPORT
Recently a Vancouver based company called us in a panic
when their mill equipment broke down.  They needed a certain article
in a journal which could tell them how to fix the machinery and were
willing to pay any amount Including taxi fare, to get the article the
same afternoon.  We were pleased to be able to do our job in good
time before the deadline fell.  There was only one delay - the taxi
driver got lost for a while in the new Sedgewick Library before he
phoned for help and new directions.
Well, they're not all as urgent or as mixed up but what
they lack In urgency they certainly make up for in number!
We think several changes in policy over the past year
have improved access to our service: graduate students no longer
require their faculty supervisors' signatures on interlibrary loan
requests; the TRIUL code has opened up the service to undergraduates;
we have been able to supply many a disgruntled patron with a loan
from another library when UBC library's copy was missing.
Among the staff leaving were Wendy, Valda, Carole, and
Monica (who decided to try another lifestyle pursuing her hobbies) .
Diane was promoted to the LA II position when Carole accepted a promotion in cataloguing.  New staff members were Heather Wilson,
Barbara Mitton and Ann Hutchison.
We received many interesting and Imaginative Christmas
cards via telex each year.  One of the most unusual telexes came
from University of Toronto and we would like to reporduce it here
for all the staff to see as we are indebted to many of you for
assisting us in verifying interlibrary loan requests.
000
0
s    s
s     s
S S WISHING YOU   ft  MERRY   CHRIST.1AS
S S -AMO   Att   TrlE   BEST    IN   THE   MEM   YEAH
000000000
CO 00
00   9        0   00
000        . 000 NOS   MEILLEUKS   i'OE'JX
coo    ---   ooo pour u-v- jo-trjx -noel
C000    C000 ET UNE PONNE AVMEE
OOC'GCOCOOOO
SS  0000000  ss
SS    00000   ss
ss    s      ooo     s    ss
ss    s .        .s    ss
sss s . s sss•
CCOC000300COOOOOO
UCC0OOO0O00O00O00 IREME   D0*BRA,      ANNE   MCGAUGHEY,
s 3 CHRIS    LAEEr.SEj    b'AN't'ARA   GKEE\IA'JS*
SSS C-SrtMT   HARLAMO,    SUS/WfE   HY\'ES
S S   S S
S S       S S SCIENCE   A\M>  asnlCIKE   I-MTEkLJ BPARY   LO.'iMS
00CC000        0000000 U.VIVEWITY   OF   70--0H0
ILLI ILLI
LLlL L!LL
ILLILL ILLILL 1/
-19 72 in the KRIK LAB-
On first looking back on 1972 it didn't seem that
anything had changed in this corner of the campus.  After
glancing at what I had written for Biblos in 1970 and 1971,
however, I wasn't so sure.  Sometimes things can evolve without
anyone really being aware that attitudes and situations are
altering.
Just last year, for example, I mentioned that there
were half a million children out in the world of "Bennettland"
waiting to be shown the way to the "Good Life".  "Bennett Who
you say?"  And speaking of political happenings, does anyone
now pay much attention to such old news items as 10856 budget
restrictions for school boards, 6.5 salary increases for teachers
and civil servants, elimination of compulsary members in the
B.C.T.F. or the rejection of a few construction referendums.
Times do change and people bend with them.
I remember a couple of years ago complaining a little
about the problems created by nearly 4,000 students working out
of a building made for something like 1,500.  Well, now the
number of Education students has dropped to 2,500 and everyone
Is worried about budgets and empires.  The word is obviously
out that beginning teachers can no longer pick and choose where
they will work.  It's a new game but the remaining students
have reacted by looking upon the situation as a blessing that
gives them a chance to get away from the big ugly city and laugh
all the way to Pouce Coupe.  For the staff of Curriculum Lab.,
the drop In enrollment has meant a little bit of peace and quiet
from time to time and somewhat less to be constantly cleaning up.
Would you believe that I have heard complaints about how quiet
and dead the place sometimes is???  I told you all that you
really did like those hectic days!!
One thing that doesn't change from year to year,
though, is the hard "routine" sort of work that library .-people
do which shouldn't go unnoticed just because it Isn't "newsworthy".  Despite the drop in enrollment we still loaned out
229,448 items last year -- an Increase of nearly 756.  We also
added 5,228 volumes of books and many AV Items to the collection KRIK LAB cont'd
even though Inflation was cutting our budget badly.
of notices have been sent to
erring students.  Complaints
have been dealt with.  The
whole collection has been
weeded.  A list of education
journals taken in the Lower
Mainland has been compiled.
Books have been moved onto
new stacks.  Tours have been
conducted.  Classes have been
shown how to mount pictures.
Another television production
has been made to help students
use our materials  In short
we have spent most of our time
keeping the place running
as It should.
Thousands
If it was a year of "consol
of services it was also one in which
Harlan Dorfman decided that he had se
shelves, and panicky future teachers
yielded his place as stack attendant
he needs a year of honest toil before
Earlier In the year Janette Munro had
business and Linda Senum the telephon
as L.A. I's in the Education Faculty.
than a year ago???
idation" in the development
few players came or went,
en enough books, messy
for one lifetime and
to Rob Kerr who feels that
starting university.
abandoned the drugstore
e lines to come and work
Does it seem like less
EXTENSION LIBRARY
Extension Library is alive and well and still living
on floor 2.  Blanca disigned and delivered numerous beautiful
signs so I am becoming territorially oriented....
Texts continue to flow In and out to opir hundreds of
correspondence students., scattered across Canada, the United
States, Mexico and occasionally Europe.  Twenty two courses are
currently being offered.  Seventeen Off-Campus courses are using
approximately 2600 titles sent out from Extension.  Stage plays
for reading and studying are available for both on-campus students
and theatre groups in British Columbia and a collection of
Canadian plays is growing larger each month. 19
A letter from the Haile Selassie. University library
in Addis Ababa, Ethiopia, requesting information on how a
correspondence type library works was probably one of our most
unusual but the communication that provided me with the chuckle
of the week was a form from the registrar's office indicating
the withdrawal of a student from one of the correspondence
courses.  Reason for withdrawal?? - "he escaped from prison
before the course manual arrived".
Sheila Neville
Extension Library
LAW LIBRARY
It xtfas the year that Burt Reynolds (in his celebrated
all-together) was prominently displayed in a showcase, that
the First Annual Law School Tricycle Race roared to a Monza
finish in the main reading room, that fleas (from dogs?) forced
the closing of the building while fumigators did their deadly
work, and that activist female students painted WOMEN on
the faculty washroom and forced their male professors into
nervous and perfunctory visits for several days.
However, connoisseurs of the truly dramatic would
undoubtedly have selected a quite different event as the
most gripping of the year (other than Robert Stanfield's
visit) : the long-awaited reshelving of about one-third of
the law library collection into call-number order.  Preparations for this signal achievement took over two years
of conscientious work by the Catalog Division and our own
staff to complete and has made life a great deal easier than
it used to be.  Not only that, but automated circulation
cards have now been punched and once they have been matched
with the books who knows what electronic marvels we will be
able to inaugurate!
While we await that brave new world we have occupied
ourselves with little projects such as refiling the entire
shelflist, fielding a team ("The Loaners") in the First
Annual Law School Charades Tournament, and deciding on our
favourite reference question of the year.  The 1972 winner:
"I think my neighbour is reading my mind. Can I sue for
invasion of privacy?" MACMILLAN LIBRARY 1972 20
There's no denying that in its present staff the MacMillan
Library has what everyone who is losing the fight against inflation
would love to have, viz. stability.  Together, we four have seen
three Biblos reports come and go.
With this potential it really does seem a pity we have no room
to develop, but since the no-growth policy alone seems viable In th?
finite world of MacMillan our talents have had to be turned towards
containment rather than expansion.
Thus most of our plans for the library, past, present and
future, revolve around the question of room - or rather the lack of
it - and each year sees another expedient designed to contain the
new volumes added \cithout moving out into the corridors.  Last
summer's effort involved Inserting shelves into two out of every
three cross aisles.  While this may seem trivial to the uninitiated
it provided 16?-6 more shelves and required the combined push and pull
of three strong men from Main stacks.  We remember them with
gratitude and sincerely hope that no slipped discs nor other lumbar
trials have befallen them as a result of their good offices.
Later In the year when Main embarked on Storage II the opportunity offered to make some more space and we retired another
2000 vols, from MacM. in addition to all our pre-1950 backfiles froif
Main.  And that move taught us something about the use of these
backfiles which became this year's most popular reading simultaneously iv'ith their removal.
A space crisis also overtook our Gov. Pubs, catalogue and we
had to admit at last that not one more entry could go into Kardex.
Nor could we add another unit because there was nowhere to put it.
So Clair's summer project, undertaken and accomplished single-
mindedly and singlehandedly, was to transfer the contents of the
four Kardex units on to 3X5's.  Now, after a full term's use, any
doubts we entertained about the direction we were being forced in,
whether backwards or forwards, have been dispelled by the convenience of new arrangement.
Timed nicely to miss our summer-time lull, a turnstile was
slowly Installed and after many misadventures became reasonably
functional once the boys became reconciled to waiting for it to
open instead of striding over.
We were also able to get away with cutting back our hours from MacMillan Cont'd
11:00p.m. to 10:00 p.m. closing on week-days, without seriously
hampering our students' efforts to study.  On the contray, a substantial increase In our circulation figures for the fall term over
the same period the previous year lend support to our feeling that
we were busier than usual in all areas.
The staff continues to maintain excellent relations with
clientele, though one does grumble that the students are beginning
to call her 'Ma'am', a sure sign of the passing years.  (Another
of us has always been Ma'am, or maybe worse!)  However, they still
cherish fond memories of another sumptuous Christmas lunch as
guests of Forestry, so too much pity for those wasting years need
not be spared.
Also on the social side, that old-fashioned institution called
marriage isn't being forgotten.  Indeed Dec. 20 seems to have acquired some special appeal for LA IV's from MacMillan.  Entirely
without collusion we are told, our present incumbent Clair and her
predecessor Mab Belford chose that date to enter Into double
harness.  Clair's marriage to a graduate from Forestry (name of
VandenBoom) was a clever piece of statecraft, we feel, and we hope
to enjoy even better relations with the Faculty as a result of the
alliance.
And now you're left with the Impression that Clair is the star
of this production you should know that she has a very able support
cast in Cathy and Leona.  Even Mrs. M. has been known to help.
SOCIAL SCIENCES DIVISION 1972
Our morale and our face were both lifted
When Ridington books were all shifted
To be all in one place (so be easy to trace)
On shelving so colorfully tinted!
To temper our days answering queries
We've waxed eloquent (our bib. lecture series)
We visit our profs, which puts them not off
Tho' response to our newsletter varies. 22
LC CATALOGUING AND BIBLIOGRAPHIC SEARCHING DIVISION
REPORT FOR 1972
This division has, for the past year, been able to
maintain a high degree of currency In LC cataloguing.  The P.O.
Storage material awaiting shared or LC copy has reflected this
up-to-date situation by having the "wait" period considerably
reduced.
In addition to blanket order and regular order books, the
division has also been searching and processing two interesting
collections:  the Jansen collection and the Scottish history
collection:  The former is an anthropology collection containing
valuable material relating, in particular, to the North American
and Australasian culture areas.
ti    Jt\
"t^T"SL_
A major task undertaken this year was
the up-dating of the
Authority File
filing. This file,
because it contains
"temps" for material
catalogued, was givei
low priority compared to other files
maintained by the
Cataloguing Div.
When we began, we
were confronted with
a 180-foot back-log.
With the help of
Orig. Catal., we have
brought this figure
down to 32 feet.  The
great In-road on the
filing back-log was
.also aided by the
decision to exclude
title added entries,
except when specifically required, from
the Authority File. d5
LC Cataloguing and Bibliographic Searching Division cont'd
A great event occurred two months ago.  For years, UBC
has been trying to convince the Library of Congress and those
libraries who receive LC copy, that a title arrangement of the DCF
(rather than main entry) was a most accurate and efficient system.
This year, with LC's approval, we circulated a letter advocating
this change to all participating libraries.  The effect of our
letter was demonstrated by the results of a vote taken by LC - and
from January 1973 onwards, DCF cards will be sent out pre-sorted
by title.  This considerably reduces our work In maintaining the
file as, previously, all cards had to be re-alphabetized.
Pre-order searching, the other major part of this
division's work, has - as always - kept us busy.  We have averaged
between 4,000 and 5,000 requisitions and out-of-print book requests
searches per month.  Nevertheless, more requests are received
than can be processed.  However, we have established a very strict
priority system which ensures that urgent requests are searched
immediately, and all other requisitions are processed in order of
receipt.
In summary - It has been a good year!
MUSIC LIBRARY
Two notable gifts were received In 1972:  First
editions of Beethoven's Music (Donor:  Mr. Jan Cherniavsky) and
two unpublished letters by Joseph Joachim (Donor: Mrs. Leonard S.
Klinck).  The ethnomusicology collection has been enlarged; the
collection of complete works and historical sets is steadily
improving.
The annual meeting of the Pacific Northwest Chapter of
the Music Library Association was held in the Music Library.  Topics
included: the Canadian Association of University Schools of Music,
Music Libraries and Collections in Eastern Europe and a multi-media
introduction to Reniassance Music Instruments.
Grace Edie sang, Larry Thiessen played the accordion
and Sylvia and Hans, well	
Again, thanks to all our friends, especially Eldo
and Thorn. 24
MAP DIVISION - 1972
Contrary to all predictions, the Map Division did not g|
crashing through the 8th floor to the Science Division below
(although no chances are being taken in 1973 - we're moving to
"Old Sedgewick")
New maps were received at approximately 550 a month
(adding more weight to the floor) and increased borrowing, reference and browsing through the tourist brochures kept us all on
our toes.  We set up displays to illustrate different types of
mapping and reference materials for the Department of Education
and the Library School and Maureen Wilson was' kept busy planning
the Division's move to the 3rd floor and spent hours at the inevitable meetings.
Nora Williams' daily current events displays continued
to attract many faculty, students and staff; some of the "regulars"
dashing in, early In the morning to see what they had missed in
the morning paper!
During the summer Maureen attended the Association of
Canadian Map Libraries Conference in Ottawa.  Nora went 'back
east' to visit long lost relations and visited Niagara Falls and
Upper Canada Village.  We lost our morale booster, Linda Martin
in marriage to Craig Jordon-Knox but in her place we were very
fortunate to acquire another bright and shiny star, student
assistant and "almost Librarian" Skip Wilson.  When Skip returned
to Library School, we welcomed Jill Chamberlin as our L.A. II.'
As long as people continue to go on holiday, go fishing,
canoeing, sailing, hiking, dig up fossils or just plain want to
use maps to complete assignments, the Division will continue to
grow and we shall be busy.
1972 did close on a rather sad note - we were ousted
from the 8th floor!  No more shall we be able to gaze out the
window at beautiful sunsets or keep an eye on student activities
outside S.U.B. but we  are sure there must be some compensations
in living in "OLD SEDGEWICK!" 2o
PREBINDERY
That time again for Biblos eh?  The year does surely roll
around.  That is not a complaint because it is not difficult to
jot down a few notes to entertain library oriented personnel, with a
capsule history of Prebindery's past years events.  Especially If
the writer has some statical figures with which to glue a few paragraphs together.  Here is a little glue.
Prebindery figures are hashed up'at the end of the fiscal year.
I am sure no one Is interested in knowing that Prebindery processed
over forty-four thousand bound volumes during 1971/72, an increase
over the past ten years of three hundred percent.  It is anticipated
that this record will not be exceeded again but will stand with
other extra ordinary events of 1971/72 that make history.  Forty-
four thousand bound volumes is the mark.
The first six months of life in Prebindery was without Incident
of note - the blow came during the latter half.  Have your Scottles
handy for the sad part.  Like a sudden unexpected gale out in
Georgia Straight the first howl of disaster struck.  And it was my
howl.  Kathy Rankin, the good old number two of Prebindery and long
time servant of the Library, decided for some strange domestic
reason to become a devoted housewife.  Keeping the homes fire burning.  This I understand was the ritual of Adam's first rib long
before man learned to rub two sticks together.  I guess Kathy Is
following some dormant basic Instinct, like birds flying south In
the winter.  These fundamentals are not generally acknowledged In
todays modern womans freedom fighting philosophy.  Hurray for Kathy,
too bad for Bob.
A quick shuffle was executed by the remaining staff.  Jane
Abramson leaped into the breach left by Kathy.  Marget Hess leaped
into Jana's breach.  Arleigh Shandler volunteered to do her duty to
the income tax office by accepting work in Prebindery.  This was most
unfortunate for Arleigh.  She became 111 after a short time and had
to retire from the labour scene.  At that very moment just off stage,
behind the curtains, Cecily May waited for the call.  Remember
Cecily? A couple of years ago she Intended to go astray in Europe.
Tendering her resignation effective December 31st. she broke her leg
skiing December 12th.  However she did enjoy Europe much later.
One other personality added during the year.  Regina Barzynska.
Everytime Regina sings a few happy carefree notes, some miserable
soul phones Physical Plant, complaining the elevator squeaks. Preblnderv cont'd
2&
Helen Goetz and Sheila Neville are still at their old stands..
Breathing re-circled air from Prebindery's fan system.  One thing
can be said about modern lighting.  The fields that Helen and
Sheila labour in are lit by daylight tubes, just like having a
window.
A recent exploratory examination of Prebindery's floor and
walls by the people who do such things, resulted in a plan to teai
up the floor, tear down the walls, replacing all with fire-proof
cement.  The intention is to raise the floor six inches.  This
should give the illusion of entering a yellow submarine if we can
only persuade the planners to paint the walls yellow.  For those
unfamiliar with Prebindery; the workshop is approximately forty
feet long, 12 feet wide and siven high.  In the new layout the
height will be six feet six inches.  Prebindery is located on the
second stack level.  The bindery is on the first.  Stairs connect
the two departments.  Anyone climbing the stairs having a cold and
coughing after the second step up, causes a breeze which rolls
along the whole length of the workshop creating the effects of a
wind tunnel.  Workers at their benches receive the full results of
the blast.  An attempt to improve the situation by wearing gauze
masks during A,B,C,and E influenza epidemics was not a success.
When Prebindery does get torn apart we will let you know our
forwarding address.  In the meantime Good-bye.
'*M£f3   H READING ROOMS DIVISION
"Nothing is stationary and not to move is to go
backwards."  I don't know to whom I can credit this piece of
garbage and It makes never mind!  I needed some x\'ay to open this
Biblos effort and to imply that this year seems to have been one
of moves of collections and changes in staff.  With the completion
of Buchanan Tower the Faculty of Arts reading rooms played musical
chairs as departments moved to new quarters and like Mary's lamb
their reading rooms followed along behind them.  Three reading
rooms, English, French and a combined Economics-History Reading
Room got the wall-to-wall carpet look in the Tower, and there
must be something to this new library look because use picked up
many fold.  With the moves the Social Sciences Reading Room disappeared.  Anthropology-Sociology retained the old location in
Henry Angus but Political Science acquired a reading room all
their own in Buchanan.  Even venerable Geography Reading Room
found a new location three times in size and with an airy look:
in all, this spring and summer the staff supervised the moves
and rearranged the collections of eleven departmental reading
rooms.  The relocations have resulted in improvements in study
areas, collection space and furnishings.  And, to satisfy those
who might accuse us of empire building, two more departments were
authorized reading rooms, Audiology and Agricultural Economics.
Audiology which is located in the James Mather Building (Henry,
that's off Fairview Avenue, Acadia Park) is presided over by-
Helen Constable whom some will remember from her days in Science,
and Agricultural Economics is in charge of Lolita Cortez: so
reading rooms now number forty-one.
During the year we had just a few organization and staff
changes.  Two LA III positions were made IVs and Laura Kueng
and Cathy Taylor were promoted into the positions.  This meant
super power to the supervisors and one more worker in a LA II
position, and Maja Maros, formerly of Cataloguing, came just in
time to straighten out Slavonic Studies (a little Russian helps!)
Kathy Becker left to return to Toronto and later to a life as a
U.B.C. student.  Keiko Takahashi decided in July that she again
wanted to see Japan.  We missed her and also the cherry blossom
notif in the office, but Catherine Belyea came over from Animal
Ecology to bring snowflakes and an infectious laugh.  Kathy
Farnan and husband left to vagabond in Europe - in January yet.
However, along came Laura Brechin, who last year was Laura Funk,
a single girl in Prebindery, to use all her many languages in Reading Rooms cont'd
French, Hispanic/Italian and "English" reading rooms not to
mention Asian Studies where the students like to use oriental
characters to sign out books.  In June, Bev Smigelski, a mother-
to-be, resigned.  Fortunately we were able to get Linda Hilts
from Cataloguing, and who quickly mastered what mysteries there
were concerning reading rooms and now keeps all of us functioning
smoothly.  With all this, Bess Rlvett still reigns over Woodward's
reading, rooms preparing such entertaining projects as bibliographic exhibits In "Renal Physiology","Gastrointestinal
Hormones" and "Endocrinology"
MATHEMATICS LIBRARY
Growth & Statistics
After 5% years of operation our collection has grown from
a mere 6,500 volumes to approximately 10,000 volumes.  If
the growth rate keeps up like that for the next couple
of years, we have to plan for another expansion project.
 this time, possibly upwards Instead of sideways.
Last year our statistics showed an increase of 22% in
circulation.  We were really busy.
Staff Changes
Surprise!!!  No deserters until the very last day of 1972.
But for 1973   no predictions.
Vacation Time
Wynne spent her holidays touring the big ports along the
coast up North.
Siu went to Tahiti to enjoy the natural beauty of the
Pacific.
Jack basked in the sun of Palm Springs for a few days in
March, but ventured no further than the Kootenays in July, PREPARATIONS DIVISION
~zs
The Preparation Division spent another busy year battling backlogs.  Victory appeared to be within our grasp in April when author-
title filing was current for the first time in years, and the card
typists had reduced their backlog to the point where we could talk
realistically of an eight-day cycle for card production.  Author-
title filing continues to be current, but alas, staff turnover of
nearly 100% in the Card Preparation Section played havoc with the
typing backlog.  It more than tripled in size before the introduction
of title highlighting in October enabled us to begin gaining ground
once again.
The Book Preparation Section also suffered from chronic staff
turnover of over 100%.  The markers spent much of the year struggling
to avoid being buried alive under the incoming work, suffocated by
the airless Marking Room, poisoned by the label spray, or crushed
by overloaded book trucks.  Despite the turnover and the appalling
working conditions, the markers processed over 180,000 items in
1972, up slightly from the previous year.
The Revision Section and the Catalogue Maintenance Section were
kept busy expanding and maintaining the Main and branch catalogues,
and dealing with this year's crop of "snags".
A major project
in which all three
Catalogue Divisions
participated was  (V
the re-filing of t^QlJS^
the Main subject  Vfr» ^AAs^
catalogue by date  "^
in April.  Date filing
has proven to be faster tha:
alphabetic filing of subject
cards, and places current
material on each subject at
the beginning of the file
of cards for that heading.
1972 has been busy
and productive, if not
entirely worry-free; we
have high hopes for '73. 30
SCIENCE DIVISION
1972 turned out to he a year of upward and outward
mobility - for both people and hooks In the Science Division.
Ann Nelson and Ann Hutchison left for the greener
fields of Animal resource Ecology and Interlibrary Loans. Vreny
Kuhn and Anna Materna went in search of peace and new adventures
on the slopes of the Andes and Whistler Mountain. And each time
we said farewell we tried to sweeten our loss by the consumption
of large amounts of Black Forest cake.
Most of those whom we welcomed to fill the gaps were
not entirely new to the Library.  Both Kathy Walters and Janet
Taggart had been here before (in RBC and Maps respectively) and
both have shown it in finding their feet very quickly after a
year of travelling the world in which they must have decided
that after all there was no place like home.  Dinle Hunt who had
left us for the Government Publications Division in 1971 returned
"enriched", giving us the satisfaction of having got back a bit
of our own - for once!  That leaves Ron Clancy as the only brand
new asset.  He joined the Division in September, having graduated
from the University of Western Ontario's Library School, and has
already managed to give us the benefit of his chemical knowledge
and his horticultural advice.
Heather Keate, our guest from the Bibliography Division
moved to the Woodward Library - having left her mark on the ever
growing science collection.  To replace her we "lost"Jack
Mcintosh, but our loss was to be our gain:  having said good-bye
on New Year's eve, we greeted him as our new "guest" in 1973!
The books also showed some mobility:  upwards from
level 4 to level 5, outwards into storage, and In every direction
by another 8%  or so.  That at least Is the preliminary figure for
the growth of the TA to W section (now on level 5) .  The final
figure will not be known until we have measured the whole
collection after" the move on level 4 will have been completed.
All of which provides another strong indication that
before long we'll just have to move out altogether - to that new
Science Library which so far seems to have remained an illusion
just beyond the horizon. - ~n
SPECIAL COLLECTIONS
In our report last year we said Special Collections might be
bursting out all over; this bursting has happened in the dying hours
of 1972 but, like the Arabs, the Map Division did not fold their
stents and silently steal wasy.  The commotion has now passed and
in the wake of their departure to the old Sedgewick Library, it has
left us with a wide expanse of Reading Room.  The silence is all the
more ominous by the empty void that is le^t behind.  We miss their
cheery faces., and we now have to turn to our newspapers to find out
where the event of the day has taken place, since Nora's daily
»newsboard has gone.
Those of you who are unaware of what dire deeds we perpetrate
'on the 8th floor can now read it all in the latest Alumni Chronicle.
Our acquisitors, Judy and Laurenda (we can dream up new titles
too) have been busy ferreting out and cataloguing new manuscript
collections, among the more notable of which are:  Papers of Hoff-
meister Electric;  Matthew Lindfors (notable member of Swedish
community);  Senator J. W. deB. Farris;  Leon Ladner, B.C. Federation of Labour; Mine, Mills, Smelter Union; N.D.P. Party;
A.E. Richards (Great Trekker) ;  Dean MacPhee, U.B.C. School of
Nursing;  Ian McNairn; Collie Verner; N.A.M. MacKenzie; and early
Alma Mater Society records.
Our display case has been kept filled all year, and star
billing was given to displays of Underground Comix; Henry Miller;
Oral history;  Book-plates; World War I Posters; and Art in Maps.
From time to time we supply materials for the cases in the front hall.
The yearning for other pastures took Dave Hougham to parts unknown, and Rosina Koo to Trail, B.C.  We now have in our fold, to
replace them, Laurie Godfrey and Penny Heath-Eaves.  We hope they
find the grass green on our side of the fence.
Tenants of some of our locked carrells often become as familiar
as our own staff members, especially those eager beavers who work
there morning, noon and night.  Quoting from a recent letter from a
Malcolm Lowry scholar in Europe, here is an example of the philoso-
ophical discussions that take place on the top floor when all is
quiet:  "That reminds me of the nightguard at the University of B.Cr
no it was the man who did the cleaning, a husky fellow.  He saw me
one night in that carrell outside Special Collections, all by myself
He wondered what I was still studying so late.  I told him:  literature.  "Ah", he said, "about Shakespeare and all those guys, ain't
it? Yeah, I know that guy, they have foisted him on us for many 32
Special Collections cont'd
years.  Oh, I hate that bastard!  When I told him that Malcolm did
not write in pentameters he seemed to like him better, and when he
heard that Malcolm was an alcoholic who wrote about drunks, he
seemed Inclined to think that maybe literature could be funny."
See you next year.
SEDGEWICK
1972 was the year it all came true for Sedgewick.  In the last
few days of December, Sedge staff and books were moved to the new
building, after six years of planning and a 1972 filled with delays,
hopes, and excitement.
The last year in the old Sedge was busy as always for the
staff, with approximately \  million books circulated, 12,900 titles
processed in course processing, and 16,284 reference questions
answered.  Sixteen new faces joined us, Including a fifth reference
librarian, but after September there was a definite slowdown in
staff turnover, no doubt due to the impending move to our modern
home.  A major re-organization of the circulation staff resulted in
the'addition of eighty student assistants, who have been a great
help at the turnstiles and book bins.
What dominated all our activities, of course, was The Move.
We had been working in the old building for years, but as we
watched the developing, tantalizing view across the way, our walls
seemed dirtier, the shelves more tightly packed, our heating
pipes more raucous and the students grumpier than ever before, and
the big word x»?as "When".
"When" is now, and we love It!  Except for a few minor difficulties, such as the omission of 7 out of 8 front door handles,
everything seems to be running smoothly.  We've tried a few new
projects (a suggestion box and board, a slide tape show for
orientation purposes, etc.) and have been encouraged by their
success.  The students' reactions to the new building have been
positive, and we're pleased to see how quickly everyone has settled
in and is feeling at home.
It would be putting it mildly to say that we're looking forward to our first year in the new? Sedgewick! WOODWARD LIBRARY
View from the rear-end of '72
Way back at the beginning of the year, the adjoinin;
I.R.C. building was completed, and the Main Entrance to Woodr.p-
was finally opened. We proceeded to move into the newly carp;
Reserve Book area, and the completed lobby area. Elsewhere ir
the building, total seating arrangements (9SO) and total srsc"
capacity (220,000 volumes excluding compact storage) were completed, and all skeltons have been stored in available closet;
As soon as the Spring rush was past, ,   1 "--
Diana Kent, Bill Parker and others reorganize'. : . — -
Collection into subject alcoves.  The staff is s:'-.: : r_ --  :
the area, but many benefits have already been r.r;c: .
The Faculty of Medicine Administrative Offices move:
out In April. By Fall the vacated space was available for Individual studies or seminars; and by December, keys
doors were finally available.
The day that Fall term ope"". ~y   >■    i~ z
unheard of pace.  The average monthly <'u„-. ..-•- ~ y.
previous year was 6,000 which put a f .. ". . .  -I  ;
in providing adequate service, but s:r:r h y   ~< - zl
smoothly.  All library duties were a""Ic ':-' .  _ ~ .
good co-operation and organization b^ <~ " y  Hrr*^-
Stack Supervisor were very evident.  ; ' ':r     s . * j
course were of great benefit.
In the Memorial area, access _ -  , " -
was rearranged so that it is controlled z>~   r    .     r -
Room.  Barbara Gibson arrived from Carpi _ ■!-_  j -
with the help of a regular staff member. /.   " p
volunteer, Judith Jardine, has reorganize r_ .~
The Improved atmosphere of welcome (no
evident.
L U 34
'MUSICAL CHAIRS AT BMB'
X
A lot a changes have taken place at BMB in the past
year.  These include a new head librarian, George Freeman, from
Social Work.  John Cummings has gone to the Marjorie Smith Library
as the head librarian there.  Joyce
Davidson left us last spring to
become a reference librarian at
Woodward.  Next, Lucy Ussner left
to go travelling.  Carol Trueman
had a son the middle of August
and so is now enjoying her new
role as a mother.  Far away
places, ie Europe, lured
Marlene Triggs away in
August.  The new members of
our staff Include Heather
MacNaughton who came here
after one year arts at UBC
Peggy Kielplnski joined us
in August; she formerly worked
in Xeroxing at the Main Library.
In November Terry Lymer left the
Metallurgy reading room to become a member of the BMB staff.
David Robinson is now part-time reference librarian here as well
as maintaining his work at Woodward.  The only old standby is
Dee Bacon who has been at the branch three years this year.
The last year has been quite uneventful for her except for becoming accustomed to these 'few' changes.
Ifi-jictitvG muy
rfA\y\/t^)..
^r/Wr«% -'-yA-'- *
rs^nr-v^VI wryyA- y
11 K Y  £ ,   „ --*- P~-
t.y~ %XA
,\f
y*
r- y A
y-i  -T-^e Woodward Xmas bash was a roaring success, If we say
so ourselves.  Dorothy Shepherd played Mother Christmas in a strike
on the side of women's lib. 'She handed out white elephants to the
staff (John, whatever are you going to do with that garbage can lid?)
while we all partook of beverage and ate of the festive fare, part
of which was supplies by staff members (I pity anyone who did not
get a taste of my chopped liver) and some of which was catered (we
are terribly posh over here you know).  There were visits from the
Branch staff, and from Basil Stuart-Stubbs and other dignitaries,
and also from past Woodwardites, two of whom brought along their
little reasons for having left us in the first place (i.e. babies).
We all left (at five of course) wishing it could be Xmas at least
once a week. WILSON RECORDINGS COLLECTION
"Oh!  You've moved to the hole In the ground?  Gee,
doesn't it feel like you're in a mineshaft?"   That's the type
of question, or observation, that I seem to meet quite regularity
But standing on the verandah I notice that the questions are not
proper; we are not down In a hole, and we are at almost exactly
the same elevation as our old premises in the big stone building.
Regardless of the similar altitudes, I feel that we have come up
in the world -- we have moved from the bottom of the one building
to the top of the other!!  And the quality of the new surrounding
is beyond compare.
The first week or two that we were open was so hectic 1
we wished we were back in the quiet old corner In Main, but now
the "pop" music buffs, the country and westerners, and the
curiosity-seekers have departed and left us to the serious busln:
of running our show.  The exposure has given us some Interesting
statistics:  Borrowers cards Issued In the month of January
doubled last year's figures, circulation was up about a third an:
the total shelving was up to 22,730 from last year's modest figui
of 12,285.  And In our spare time...
Now things are settling down and. we are able to appreciate our gains, our new respectability, and our new
The greatest of these new conveniences was switching
automated circulation system (old hat, you say) and rteurg
IBM 1031 terminal - the girls have nicknamed It FRED, that didn
like carols.  Incidentally, FRED stands for ridiculous, electron.
device.  The next of these conveniences Is that carpeting on th
wall:  now we can climb it In comfort.
If you haven't paid us a visit, please do, and If you
have,come again. And make sure to listen to a record on one of
the new record, players - it's the only way to fly.
''Onv en
P O  P r~s
-ppi
TRADING POST
5 month old female tabby cat needs a new home
Is affectionate, playful and has had shots
Phone  738-6936 36
PENNY - POWER
The end of 1972 also marked the end of the Library's drive for
the International Book Years' Penny-Power Project.  Thanks to the
efforts of the Library Assistant's Association, who sponsored the
program, and a few loyal souls who gave a tremendous amount of their
time, $370.22 was collected for this worthwhile project.
The program was set up during the summer by a small committee
from the L.A.A. which was headed by Livia Fricke of Cataloguing and
Jane Ainsworth of Curric. Lab.  Jane also volonteered to be treasurer.
A questionnaire was sent to all Library staff members requesting
help in picking our one of the eleven projects UNESCO offered. BOOKS
FOR REFUGEES was chosen.
Colourful display tables designed by Richard Moore and Rick Welch
of Cataloguing were set up in the Main Library, Woodward Lib. .,,Sedge.
and the Curric. Lab.  The smaller branches and divisions received
money cans and pamphlets describing Penny-Power.
A Bank account was opened in the Bank of Montreal at the SUB but
by raid-October only $57.11 had been collected.  Jane contacted twelve
University libraries across Canada to find out if they had Penny-Power
projects and what the response was like.  Only one of the twelve,
Queen's University, was participating in the project.
A tag day for Penny-Power was set for Nov.20, 1972.  Bert Hamilton
of Administration kindly offered to donate some of his orchids for
sale.  Although the orchids went on sale for 15c each, many people
gave more.  Thaks to Mr. Hamilton $107.00 was added to Penny-Power.
The Association also gave a Tupperware party and the proceeds,
$32.00 was added to Penny-Power.  The girls in Systems kindly offered
to  make Christmas wreaths from IBM cards.  This offer was quickly
accepted, and Claudia Chew organized the sale of same.  Approximately
$28.00 was added to the fund.
Who in the Main Library will forget the anonymous benefactor who
nonchalently dropped a $50.00 bill into the can by the fifth floor
stack entry.
All these things along with the donations from the cans and the
cheques came to agrand total of $370.22. This money as been sent to
UNESCO and the receipt will be put on display.
The Library Assistants Association would like to thank all these
who helped to raise this money and those who donated to the project in
any way.  After such a bleak beginning The International Book Year
at  the U.B.C. Library was quite a success.
  _ jane Ainsworth.  Curric.Lab.
N.B. The L.A.A. Exec, would particularly like to thank Jane and Livia
who headed the committee and who gave so much time and effort to making
the project the success it x^as. St. Wibby Reports....
CRANE LIBRARY has a new
acquisition, a"Talking Typewriter".
This wondrous machine is connected
to the main computer and produces
a regular sheet of typed copy
for the students.  It does such
things as to repeat phonetically,
via speaker', letters as they
are typed, tells the students
when they have reached the
bottom of the page, repeats a
whole sentence by letter
when requested so that an error
in typing can be caught, searches
out words on demand so that they
can be altered and types the
whole page at the pressing of a
key.
The "Talking Typewriter"
will be demonstrated at Open
House and you will be able to
see it in use after that any
Friday afternoon - which is the
time slot that has been
alloted to Crane for Computer use.
WE ARE HAPPY to announce a boy
baby has been born to Peggy
Wroblewski, ex of Fine Arts.
Andrew James weighed in at
71bs. 3 oz. on Sunday 18th February 19 73.  We hear that Andrew
has already had trouble with the
spelling of his name.  It was
spelt wrongly on the crib.
A SPEEDY recovery is wished to
Nora Williams of the Map Div.
who is recuperating at home
after surgery and will not be
back for a few weeks yet.
also to Janet Lenko of law who
was involved in an auto accident
which completely totalled the
car she was driving.  Janet is
i lAj
recovering from severe bruises
and cuts but hopes to be back
at work shortly.
WE UNDERSTAND that our favourite expectant mother in Circ
is spending a great deal of
time teaching fellow workers
the art of weaving.  Tannis
also cards and dyes her own
wool. •
HAWAII was the Christmas destination for Melva Dwyer of
Fine Arts and Paulina Kieman of
Catal. is also sporting a
Hawaiian tan.  Elsie and Eric
deBruljn with Bert Hamilton
of Admin are preparing a safari
to Mexico and other interesting
places.  We hope B.H. will find
time to write us another- Interesting piece on his travels.
WE HEAR that a few leaks have
appeared around the trees in
Sedge and talking about plants
reminds us that Ivy Is climbing
on the Inner west wall of the
Law Library.  The ivy has
travelled through the air conditioning from the outside word:
STILL on things green how about
that new carpeting in the front
hall of the Main Lib.  Brings t:
outside in so it does. J,H
More.
OUR SPIES tell us that Richard
Hopkins of Sedge is open to
future film offers.  We understand he did a really fantastic
job of acting in the Information
film for the new Library.  Watch
for a screening at Open House.
SHOW BIZ news.  Jerry Andersen of
Law Lib. regaled his fellow
workers with behind the scene
glimpses of the great Nureyev & Co.
Jerry was one of the local dancers
who provided background for the
National Ballet on their recent
visit to Vancouver.
Bernie Olson and Glynis Silbernagel
of the Woodward Library appeared In
the Vancouver Operatic Company's
production of the Mikado.  They
also appeared In the Victoria
Production.
'ENN
•all
sQl n
'xlp
.•all
Y POWERrS Jane Ainsworth
ed to tell us that the only
illtely full cans came from
Law Library. Law managed to
i in two cans filled with
is obtained by sale of paper
s. loaning of pens and pencil's
t for a moment" payment for
crap of paper'" to write down
number and just plain coaxing.
LAW alos wants to remind everyone
the Grand Tricycle race this year
is to be run on Friday, March 16.
Plan to visit in the lunch hour.
THE L.A.A. Bowling teams continue
on their merry way Monday evenings.
Lots of enthusiasm and a few good
Hutchinson of the same locaticr,
came up with a 299. Congrats tc
them both .from an envious 146
average enthusiast.
TOUR OF CHINATOWN - Friday 16th
March. A lk  hour tour, by a
very knowledgeable Chinese guicpj
of some of the more interesting j
spots in Chinatown. ]
Hear the history of this faseir/
ating area as you see the print-1
ing of the newspaper, a theatres
a glimpse of the ganbling dens ■:'
and many other little known plac^;
All this to be followed by a 10* i
course dinner with commentary bw
a Chinese chef.  And all for the!
price of $5.00.  $1.00 to be paid
on registration, the balance pay^
able on the night of the tour. ]
DON'T BE DISAPPOINTED, register
now.
Phone either Gwen Gregor  2231
Pat La Vac  4809
Carol Ann Gladstone  2039
Arrangements will be made to pid
up your $1.00 registration.
Tour will start 7:00 p.m. from
the Pender & Carroll parking lotj
Stay as long as you like over
dinner.
Thanks from the L.A.A. to all the!
people \*;ho attended the annual
Wine and Cheese Party.  It was as;
usual a very happy event.  The
two door prizes were won by Matt j
Hartman of Cat. and Ernie Yungen \
And a top of the morning to
you  -  Wibby.
fowle^s
racked uo
/nrss
Maclver  of Admin.
306  game  and  Pat \ HEARTY WELCOME  TO:
[erry Lymer
Judy Shaw
/avian  James
)wayne Lunden
[,aura  Brechin
Maureen Carey
Ian  Edirards
^nn Logue
feather MacDonell
Sizella Maszaros
[Crista Bos
Janet  Taggart
Catherine  Fong
Joey RIvey
Barb Swankey
Teresa  Gagne
Bonnie Letcher.
Joanne   Pozer
Debra Martin
Ann Sleeper.
'Mary Kaufman
Pat Heap
Janet Maler
Karen NIcol
Donna Carpenter
Elizabeth Baxter
Donna Costello
L.A. II
Clerk I
L.A. I
Stack Attendant
L.A. II
L.A. I
Stack Attendant
L.A. I
L.A. I
L.A. I
L.A. I
L.A. II
L.A. I
L.A. I
L.A. Ill
L.A. I
L.A. I
L.A. II
L.A. I
L.A. II
L.A. I
L.A. II
L.A. Ill
L.A. II
L.A. I
L.A. Ill
L.A. I
B.M.B.
Acquisitions
Sedgewick
Circulation
Reading Rooms
Cat. Preparations
Circulation
Sedgewick
Circulation
Circulation
Circulation
Science
Cat. Preparations
Cat. Preparations
Woodward
Cat. Preparations
Law
Cat. Preo arat ions
Circulation
Cat. Preparations
Circulation
Cat. Preparations
Sedgerrick
Cat. Preparations
Woodward
A.R.E.L.
Woodward
CONGRATULATIONS  TO:
Wies   Pukesh
L
A.
Deborah  Johnson
L
A.
Aileen Balfour
L
A.
Cheryl  Krem
L
A.
Richard Moore
L
A.
Gale  Paterson
L
A.
Maria Hu
L
A.
Coralle  Fisher
L
A.
Janice Austin
L
A.
Susan Crossley
L
A.
Jennifer Mackenzie
L
A.
Margaret MacDonald
L
A.
II Social Sc.
I Circulation
I Circulation
I Systems
II L.C. Cat.
II Systems
III A.R.E.L.
Ill Curric.
II Curric
I Cat. Prep.
I Cat. Prep.
I Cat. Prep.
L.A. Ill Gov. Pubs.
L.A. II Soc. Sci.
L.A. II Clrcul.
KPO I Systems
L.A. Ill Cat. Prep.
K.P.O. I Systems
L.A. IV Reading Roc-
L.A. IV Cat. Prep.
L.A. Ill Curric.
L.A. II Orig. Cat.
L.A. II Cat. Prep.
L.A. II Cat. Prep. A FOND FAREWELL TO:
40
Shirley Halladay
Anna Materna
Betty Oraas
Magen Winwood
Ann Shandler
,rn
Kay K:
Jean Lund
MaxIne Williams
Greg Allard
Barb PrIngle
ulnda Mrnaker
Ayako Yan-o
Sue Fesluk
Claudia Chew
Cathy Taylor
y
.enn:
riilbernagel
Dale xhomas
Marg McLeod
George Read
Leslie LeMarquand
Sallv Blake
Vicki Norris
Man Woong Pyo
L.A.
III
L.A.
II
L.A.
II
L.A.
I
L.A.
II
L.A.
III
L.A.
I
L.A.
II
L.A.
I
L.A.
I
L.A.
I
L.A.
III
L.A.
II
L.A.
IV
L.A.
IV
L.A.
I
L.A.
I
L.A.
I
K.P.
0. I
Stack Atten
L.A.
III
L.A.
I
L.A.
II
Stack Atten
Cat. Preparations
Science
Cat. Preparations
Circulation
Prebind
Woodward
Cat. Preparations
Cat. Preparations
Cat. Preparations
Circulation
Law
Asian Studies
Cat. Preparations
Cat. Preparations
Reading Rooms
Woodward
Woodward
Circulation
Systems
Circulation
Sedgewick
Circulation
Original  Catalogue
Circulation
BIBLOS STAFF
Editor:
Assistant Editor:
Georgia Macrae    4809
Pat  La Vac    i*809
Mis c ellane ous:
Gwen Gregor 2231
Shelley Criddle k908
Pat Hutchinson 3310
Judy Coombs 2521
Cartoonist§:
Suzanne Dodson
Diana Kraetschmer
If you would like to join us please contact
one of the above.'

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