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Biblos Nov 1, 1971

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Array U.B.C. LIBRARY STAFF NEWSLETTER
November 1971
STAFF CHANGES
A Hearty Welcome To:
Margaret McLeod
Flexo.
Oper.
Systems
Elaine Le Marquand
L.A. II
Serials
Linda Chan
L.A. Ill
Asian Studies
Lynnette Arnold
L.A. ||
Cataloguing L.C.
Debby Curliss
L.A. I
Ci rculat ion
Marg Chan
K.P.O.
Systems
Louise Pinard
L.A. ||
Catalogu ing
Aileen Balfour
L.A. 1
Ci rculation
Congratulations To:
Glynis Brown    Flex.
Oper.
Systems
to
L
.A. Ill Woodward
Wynne Horvath   L.A.
1 C i rcu
lation
to
L
.A. II Mathematics
Janis Lofstrom  L.A.
1 Catal
ogu ing
to
L
A. 1 I Catalogu ing
We Say Farewell To:
Sheila Konrad
L.A. II
Cataloguing L.C.
Linda Duignan
L.A. 11
Mathematics
Catherine Boyle
L.A. |
Ci rculation
Meri lee Anderson
L.A. 11
Cataloguing
Maureen Adams
L.A. ||
Catalogu ing
Heather Lacelle
Secreta
ry 1 1
Woodwa rd
Anna Lupa
L.A. IV
Serial s -2-
NATIONAL COIN CONVENTION 1971
For the second time since its inception eighteen years ago
Vancouver played host this year to the annual convention of the
Canadian Numismatic Association, which was held from August 26th.
to 28th. in the Hotel Vancouver.  Much preparation went into its
organization and this paid off handsomely in a highly successful
show.
The competitive displays, in twelve categories ranging from
"ancients" through primitive "odd and curious", medals, tokens
and paper money to Canadian and U.S. "decimals", British Commonwealth and general foreign coins, must surely have provided something of interest to every visitor, and the standards Were high.
Indeed, members of the governing body of the American Numismatic
Association assessed the overall level as higher than that achieved
at the much larger A.N.A. convention held in Washington, D.C., a
couple of weeks before.  The local Vancouver Numismatic Society had
the satisfaction of seeing its members win a creditable share of the
awards, including that for "best of show" (an excellently documented
presentation of the rare paper money of the Bank of Vancouver).  The
event attracted competitors from New York, Hollywood, Denver, New
Jersey and other parts of the United States as well as from most of
the Canadian provinces.  Non-competitive displays included the B.C.
gold patterns (courtesy of the B.C. Archives, Victoria) and an outstanding paper money assemblage from the National Bank of Canada,
Ottawa.
Bourse tables were manned by dealers from many areas and thus
injected a refreshing choice of material for beginners and advanced
collectors alike.  The daily auction sessions attracted some lively
bidding, though this writer must confess to have been somewhat disappointed at the selection assembled in Toronto for this year's
catalogue.
The educational forum included visiting lecturers of note such
as Hillel Kaslov of the Museum of the American Numismatic Society,
New York.  Bus tours of local points of interest and other general
programs were a daily feature, largely to keep non-addicted wives of visiting numismatists from restricting their husbands' time on
the floor.  Behind the scenes annual meetings of Association committees and of allied societies were held.  The Bank of Montreal put
on a luncheon for the C.N.A. executive; and the Government of British
Columbia gave the banquet, open to all, which culminated the three-day
event and at which the guests of honour included the Master of the
Royal Canadian and the Director of the United States mints.  After the
dinner the gavel was handed over by the retiring president to the first
B.C. member to take over the chair.
There was much to see and do, but the highlight of the show for
this writer was the opportunity to meet long-term correspondents in
the flesh and to make the acquaintance of other like-minded enthusiasts
- which is, one may suppose - the main function of any convention.
All that remains now is to clear up the financial jungle which has
sprung from dereliction of duty on the part of this the treasurer who
got too involved in what was going on to keep respectable records.
John Gray
ADMINISTRATIVE RESOURCES COMMITTEE REPORT
The Administrative Resources Committee (ARC) started its active
life with its first meeting on July 21, 1970.  In accordance with its
terms of reference, the ARC at first concentrated on its function as
a "committee on committees" - revieweing existing committees, recommending the continuance of some, the abolition of others, the
formation of new ones, and suggesting changes where thought to be
vppropriate.  This function continued during the year and the results
an be found in Section E of the library's Policies and Procedures
'■''Onual and also in two lists drawn up by the ARC - one showing the
-urrent composition of each committee and the other one the names of
-M committee members in alphabetical order, each name followed by a
-/'nbol for the committee(s) served.
On a number of occasions the committee also received suggestions
' rom library staff members and acted as a sounding board for their proposals or ctiticisms.  in dealing with these, committee members
tried to be guided by the interests, as they saw them, of the Library
as an institution providing a service to the public, and by the welfare of the staff as a whole - individual problems being the department
of the Ombudsman Committee.
New ARC members were elected late in September, 1971: Ann Turner,
chairman; Margaret Friesen; Heather Keate; Ian Lee; Betty McAully;
Carol Martin; Clair Reynolds; and Martha Tully.  The new committee is
presently engaged in preparing for the forthcoming elections for the
Ombudsman Committee, the Committee on Salaries and Benefits of Supporting Staff, and the Librarians' Salary Committee. Annual reports for
these and other committees will be published in the Library Bulletin.
Staff members are encouraged to submit their suggestions or criticisms
to the appropriate committee.  For their convenience, the telephone
numbers of the committee chairman have been included in the library
telephone list.
Rein Brongers, chairman, 1970-71
Ann Turner, chairman, 1971-72
INFORMATION PLEASE       _____»_—___—___.
Many of the library, office, clerical and technical employees at
UBC have expressed the need to be represented by an effective, responsible union.  In the expectation of achieving this objective, several
open meetings have been held with the Office and Technical Employees
Union.
The Office and Technical Employees Union is a member of the Canadian Labour Congress, the B.C. Federation of Labour, and the Vancouver
and District Labour Council.  In B.C. this union represents approximately
4000 people, employed by such organizations as B.C. Hydro, Freightway
Companies, Macdonald's Consolidated and MacMillan Bloedel.  The principal
objective of the O.T.E.U. is to set out the working conditions of office
employees with emphasis on developing a harmonious relationship between
working people and management. Myths About "The Union"
If you join the union:
1. "You will have to punch a time clock"  In truth, time clocks
have never been instituted at O.T.E.U.-member offices and
UBC will be no exception.
2. "You will have shorter coffee breaks" None of the O.T.E.U.
contracts provide for less than 2, 15-minute coffee breaks.
3. "You may have to strike when you don't want to" The O.T.E.U.
has an agreement covering more than 2,000 office employees
at B.C. Hydro - in their 26 year history, they have never
gone on strike!  Only the members at UBC would have the right
to make a decision regarding a strike.
k.   "I'll get fired if I try to join a union"  The Labour Relations
Act protects you.  No employer can interfere with the formation of a union or refuse to continue to employ any person
because he becomes a member of a union.
5. "The staff will be reduced"  One of the most basic offers of
the union is job security, not unemployment.  We now operate
with an optimum number of employees and there would be no
reason to change this.
6. "Unions are for heavy industry, not for white collar organizations" Office employees are the least organized of any group
and consequently their salaries and benefits have fallen
behind.  Union membership makes it possible to improve your
salary and working conditions through negotiations.
7. "The union will adversely affect our relationship with our
supervisors and employees" Progressive employers recognize
the essential need for employees to have an effective voice
in their working conditions.  They welcome the opportunity
to work together to make this a reality.
What Does the Office and Technical Employees Union Offer YOU?
- better salaries - fair hearings on job grievances
- night and shift differential - job security (Unemployment Ins.)
-job classification protection - continued health benefits
- seniority rights - short work year
Remember the UBC motto - Tuum Est - It's up to you!  If you have
any questions or comments, please don't hesitate to speak to: Dick
Martin (Acquisitions), Carol Emmons or Debby Savage (Sedgewick),
Carole Claus (Serials) . -6-
Xhe Pacific Northwest Regional Group of the Medical Library
Association rnet^Tn"¥ahcouve r, October 15th. and 16th.  BelirTTTcCTea ry ^
welcomed the delegates, sketching the history of medical education at"
UBC.  The American members were impressed by the concept of interprofessional education for teach practice - a radical approach.
Dr. George Szasz gave a sense-appealing multimedia show describing
the program.  Dr. Gibson's History of Health Sciences course is
a part of this concept.  Students from all health fields take the
course together, building mutual respect as they plan displays of
medical history for the Woodward Library.
In the afternoon, the program moved from the Psychiatry Lecture
theater to Woodward.  The Nemetz Commission was meeting in the room
reserved for the conference so the 55 delegates crowded into the
Memorial Room to hear Miss Anna Leith on Canadian Medical School
Libraries and Mr. William Fraser on Developments in Canadian Regional
Medical Library Service.  The scarcity of regional service (except
in B.C.) and lack of government support surprised the Americans
who think of us as Socialists.  Their regional scheme is elaborate
and well funded.  Dr. McKechnie spoke on the early history of the
Pacific coast at the banquet.  On Saturday, the business meeting
decided to convene next year in Wenatchee.  A very profitable meeting
thanks to Chairwoman Diana Kent.
BOWLING LEAGUE REPORT
We are very pleased to report that the L.A.A. Bowling League
is progressing very well.  We have an exceedingly enthusiastic
group!
There are 32 regular members and 8 spares.  The members are
spli t-up as follows:
REGULARS:  10 Staff Members SPARES:   3 Staff Members
7 Husbands 1 Husband
2 Sons 1 Fiancee
1 Cousin 1 Daughter
1 Daughter I Brother
1 Fiancee 1 Friend
1 Aunt TOTAL:   8
9 Friends
32
P. LaVac Jr.
TOTAL: -7-
ST. WIBBY REPORTS
Sincere <^polog ies to our resident
artist DIANA KRAETSCHMER who was
identified as Diana Cooper on the
front of our last months Biblos.
Sorry Di.  Put it down to lapse
0f memory.
HISS NG of Asian Studies attended
the Canton Delta Conference at the
University of Washington, Seattle,
(lore details of this conference in
the UBC Library Newsletter.
CONGRATULATIONS to Dr. Sam
.Rothstein, founder and first
director of the School of
.ibrari anship (up there on the
;th. floor) who has been awarded
he honorary degree of doctor of
'■otters by York University in
"oronto.
'HE LIBRARY can take a bow in the
•"ict that we helped to solve the
-/clro strike.  Mr. Justice Nathan
■ oietz, arbitrator of the IBEW-BC
-."!ro dispute, expressed his sincere
"inks, in the form of a letter, for
"-'. use of the Sherrington room and
-hers at Woodward Library during
"j ten days of negotiations.
:;0X on the person(s) who pulled
•'->■■'"' all the Library Assistants
delation notices announcing the
■r of the B.C. Telephone which
ji be on Wednesday Dec. 1st.,
"■'A  n.m.  IF YOU WANT TO KNOW WHY
"•■'J'.'T GET THAT NUMBER,' sign up
for the tour
and find out
or forever
hold your
peace,
PHONE Claudia
Kerr, 2304 and
tel1 her how
many will be
in you r party.
FUTURE DATES:
Pacific Press
- Jan., CP Ai r ■
- Feb., Publ ic
Safety BuiIding
- March.
IT'S A girl for Betty van Assum,
late of Woodward Library. Betty
is now mother to Elizabeth 2nd.
and Bess Rivett, a grandmother
agai n, i t's a boy.
BACK FROM a holiday in Hawaii,
Barbara Saint of Periodicals.
A SEARCH for a lost book at the
back of a card cabinet in Social
Science produced not the book,
but an empty Rum bottle - empty,
unfortunately!
RECORD dept. Doug Kaye's wife
Claudia, who many will remember
in Cataloguing, gave a recital
jointly with Mel Erickson at the
West Point Grey United Church on
November 7th.
continued on page 11 -8-
IMPRESSIONS OF A TRAVELLER CIRCLING THE GLOBE IN 2k  DAYS
Blue skies and white clouds, strange faces and strange tongues,
some more blue skies, noisy tourists, quiet havens of religion and
nature and more endless skies with sunsets and sunrises melting into
one continuous process.
Gateway to Asia, Istanbul, city of the mosques, transports
one back in years; old cars, old fashions, handcarts and horsecarts
piled high with melons, apples, tomatoes; shoeshine boys with elaborate, decorous brass kits; old men with bent backs carrying sacks,
street stalls and tiny shops on cobbled side streets, noisy traffic
and heads turning at the sight of a tourist.  And still the most
memorable part of Instanbul was the mosques, old and new alike.
St. Sophia and Kaariye, built by Christians, converted into mosques,
now museums with colorful frescoes and mosaics, restored from under
Moslem whitewash; Suleymaniyeu and Sultan Ahmet Mosque (known also
as the Blue Mosque) are the favorites among the people, and countless
small ones scattered throughout the city.
The other favourite for a tourist in Istanbul was the Grand
Bazaar.  Originating from the times of the Sultans, now the Bazaar
is an enormous building of 1^00 shops under one roof.  Locals as
well as tourists mill in by the thousands to look and choose and
bargain endlessly.  The tourist becomes a special target, as soon
as he walks in the shopkeepers look him over trying to guess his
nationality and then approach and accost him in his own language
with certain well memorized phrases in English, French, German,
Swedish, you name it.
World's shortest intercontinental trip takes one from Europe
to Asia in 15 minutes; remembrances of Florence Nightingale; the
legend of Hero and Leander; gypsy villages - these are part of
turkey that is emerging, growing, modernizing.
A short two hour flight away from the ancient capital of Roman
Empire, is another world, Beirut, Lebanon.  The city that has no
basis of existence on the land flourishes, cosmopolitan, modern,
fast moving, almost out of place in the Labanon of history, found
only minutes away.
Jebail, or Byblos, 25 miles north, on the Mediterranean shore is  dominated  by  the massive  castle  of  the  Crusader  Lords  of Gibelet
Below   it   spread   the  unearthed   ruins  of   16  cities  of  various civilizations   from  Stone  Age  through   Romans   to  Ottomans;   temples,   theaters
burial   grounds,   city walls  have  been  brought  to   light  from  the   ruins
of  Byblos.
Trip   inland  to Baalbek,  with   impressive,  well   preserved   ruins
of  three  great   Roman  temples,   takes  one  over  the mountain   range  to
the plain of Coelesyria.     Up on  the mountainside  are  the  summer
residences  of  Lebanese,   from most  apartments,   to modern mansions  to
sumptuous  hide-aways  of  the  Sheiks  from Middle  East.     Further   inland
the  buildings  disappear  and  nomad  groups with  herds  of  sheep  and  black
open  tents  take over the countryside which   seems much   too dry  and
fruitless   to  support   anything.     Descending   into  the  valley  one
encounters  a  few clusters  of  trees,   green  fields  and   red   soil,   grass
huts  and  camels  on  fields  and more  sheep  herds.
In  Baalbek   itself,   the   ruins of the  temples of Jupiter,   Bacchus
and Venus  are massive,   awe   inspiring.     The  smallest  of  these  are  of
greater dimensions   than  the  temples  of  Greece.
From  sunny   and  dry  Beirut with  brief   stops   in  Karachi   and  New
Delhi,  we  descended   into  hot   and  humid   Bangkok,   13°  above  the
Equator,   where   in   the   rainy  season   temperature   rarely  drops  below
85° F.   during   the  day.     "Think  cool" was   to  be  our motto  for  the
next  fou r days.
Bangkok   is   full   of  strange  sights  and   smells;   women   in  sarongs,
bright   silks  or  baggy  Chinese  pajamas,   erratic  traffic,   cooking  on
streets,   strange  and  delicious  fruits  and  very   spicy  Thai   food.
An early morning  trip  down  the  Chao  Phraya   (or Maenam)   river,
•*vJ away   into  the  side  canals  of  the  Floating  Market   area where
people   live  on  and  from   the   river.     The   river   is   their  street,   buses
••■'ith boats   loaded   to  brim with  wares  and  food   to marker,   and   school
:;oats stopping  from  door  to   door.     The   river   is  the place  for morning
•iash and  shampoo  and  dishwashing  as well   as  garbage  disposal.     Houses
3re built on   stilts   because of  constant   flooding.     And  every  house,
"o matter how  small   and  humble,   has   a   little  house  for  the  Spirit -10-
of the House.  In Thailand it is believed that the land is owned by
a spirit and if one builds a house for oneself, he must also build
a house for the Sprit and daily supply the Sprit with fresh flowers
and food.
Bangkok has about 300 colorful Buddhist temples.  The most
impressive of these were the Wat Po with its reclining Buddha of
some 136 feet long covered with gold, and Wat Phra Keo, with its
most precious Emerald Buddha made of one single piece of Jade.
Timland (Thailand in Miniature) offers the visitor a whole range
of Thai life and culture; preparation of finest Thai silks from worms
to ready-made clothes, rice milling by hand, elephant rides, Tai
boxing, cockfighting and Thai classical dancing.
And last, but not least, one must not forget to visit the
Snake Farm at Chu Ial ongkorn University, where cobras    vipers are
kept for the purpose of extracting venom used in producing anti-
venine serum.  And it really is quite an experience, not at all as
creepy as it sounds.
Through the cloudy skies of Southeast Asia into jewel of the
Orient, Hong Kong.  To me at least a complete surprise in its beauty
and spirit, crowded yet colorful, commercial yet authentic, gourmets
delight, photographers joy and shoppers paradise.
Climb to Victoria Peak on Hong Kong Island is a must, either in
the quiet of the middday with sweeping view of the mainland and of
the South China Sea, or at night with the city below flooded with
thousands of colorful lights.  Also, one should take a leisurely
walk through Wanchai, the older part of Hong Kong where few tourists
tread and where original buildings of Chinese decor have not yet
been torn down to make way for new apartment blocks and department
stores.  Here one can come closer to the sights, sounds, and smells
of the Hong Kong that once was.
Tour through the new Territories, transports one quickly away
from the hum of the city into peaceful, almost empty countryside of
rice paddies, duck ponds, rural markets, tiny gardens watered and ■11-
tilled by hand, grave stones on hillsides, walled villages and
refugee colonies on land and on water (in junks and sampans).
There is space in New Territories that is lacking in Hong Kong and
Kowtoon yet people continue to build and develop because of the
looming date of 1997 when the lease to Britain of The New Territories
expires.  That is why hills on Hong Kong island are sliced and moved
into the harbor for more land, more buildings.
An hours ride on a hydrofoil from Hong Kong takes one to Macao,
the Monte Carlo of the Orient, a piece of Portugal planted in the
Orient. A little less prosperous than Hong Kong, Catholic churches
next to Chinese Buddhist monasteries, Portugese mansions, next to
Chinese style floating casinos, then ferry to Hong Kong and Canton
about to depart up and down the river patrolled by a Chinese gunboat.
One short hop from Hong Kong to Tokyo where we departed 10:30 p.m.
Wednesday, October 13 only to arrive in Honolulu the morning of the
same day to find two days of peace and sun and white sand and absolute
laziness with the dreadful thought of having to go back to work looming
over' it all.
  Ritva Tavela
St. Wibby continued:
SHEILA FRASER of the Law Library became the wife of Roland Porter on
November 13 at Nelson, B.C.  Lots of happiness Sheila.
SEPTEMBER 18th., Jim Lanphier of the Bindery and formerly with Sedgewick
completed his k  year apprenticeship in Bookbinding and received his
certificate from the Provincial Government.  Congrats to Jim.
WE HAVE a report that Les Karlinski is feeling much better, in fact,
he popped in to the library for a short visit.
Don't forget your tickets for the BIBLOS BIRDS AND BUBBLY CHRISTMAS DRAW
- 25 cents.  The more you buy the more prizes to be won.  All proceeds
■ '"ill go to the purchasing of those turkeys and bottles.
MNALLY. What must be a first for Cataloguing - in fact the library -
'"'e have a report that a wedding was performed by Mac Elrod, an ordained
minster, in his office, during a coffee break, on Tuesday the second day
'°f November 1971.  The bridal party was last seen heading towards the
coffee room.
3nd on that happy note s'all for now        WIBBY THE CHRISTMAS
SMORGASBORD
#r\ /ft)
.1
iblos is once again sponsoring this
inual event and invites you to participate
WEDNESDAY December 22, 1971
10 a.m. - k  p.m.
Everyone participates and everyone enjoys.  Bring your
favourite food and donate it to the general table of g<
COFFEE & TEA WILL BE ON THE HOUSE FOR THAT DAY!
During the day prizes, donated by division heads and o- ■ ■ -■ ■
generous people, will be drawn-for-free.  Every staff r'.-
whether in Main, branches, hourly, has a chance to win so
plan to be around.
The Biblos staff will be on hand from 8:30 on that day
to receive contributions.
Lists will be circulating throughout the divisions for
you to note your offerings.  If you want to know more
about how it works ask any staff member that was there
last year.
Anyone with national and/or culinary talents please contribute your specialty.
Branches staff do drop in during the day - we so seldom
see you - and this is the time for visiting.
i '-- :' .
Biblos BIRDS AND BOTTLES will be drawn
for between 1 5- 2 p.m. in the staff room.
©
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■,A'A& ■■y.-:br:L-;   •      -
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'wctf/ie &lHt$<2A#L
y~ i
^o-Mo
Suzanne Dodson
John Gray
Lynda Johnston
Bert Hamilton
Ruel1 Smi th
Mavis Belshaw
Basil Stuart-Stubbs
Pat Gibson
Joan Selby
Joan Cosar
Bill Bell
Jul ius Benyov its
Betty McAully
Alan Soroka
Tom Shorthouse
Er i k deBru ijn
WHO DOES WHAT?
Vocal i st
Archeology
Pa int ing
Ornotholog ist
Jewel 1ry
Bat i ks
Hort icultur i st
Tenni s
Scuba Diving
Miniatures
Mounta in Cl imbi ng
Jogging
Bal let
Canoeing
Numismat ies
Yoga
@T
f—
Match  the people above with  the hobbies
k.         7._______       10.     13
5.         8.       11.     \k
6.         9.       12.. -   15
16 SINTERKLAAS
In the early days of December, when Holland's marine
climate is at its foggy, drizzling worst, the Dutchman will
look out of his window and happily announce, "It's real
St. Nicholas weather I" Thus he welcomes a delightful
annual event which for centuries has been uniquely Dutch
and Flemish - the Feast of SINTERKLAAS.  December 6th, is
observed in most Roman Catholic countries, primarily as a
feast for small children.  Sinterklaas is a kind of
benevolent Superman, whose feast on the evening of Dec. 5th
is the merriest and.most beguiling event of the Dutch year,
when Hollanders exchange gifts and poke fun at each other
to their hearts' content.
St. Nicholas (Sinterklaas) is based
fact.  He did exist.  He was born and he
of us.  He lived from 271.A.D. to
December 6, 342.  Born of a wealthy
family, Nicholas was brought up as
a devout Christian.  When his parents
died he distributed his fortune
among the poor and entered the
priesthood.  Later he became
Archbishop of Myra, a town not
far from his home, and it is from
here that the fame of his good
deeds and saintly ways began to
spread across the Mediterranean.
In due course St. Nicholas became
the patron saint of sailors and
merchants and, expecially of
children.
In the 12th and 13th centuries Holland built no fewer
than 23 St. Nicholas Churches, many of which are still
partially standing.  Amsterdam, along with other European
towns, adopted St. Nicholas as its patron saint and Rome
decreed that Dec. 6th be his official Calendar Day.
Once established his fame as the benefactor of
f-hilctren took precedence.  In the 14th century choir boys
r-'r St. Nicholas Churches were given the day off on Dec. 6th. J).
Sinterklaas cont'd
Somewhat later the pupils of convent schools would be rewarded or punished by a teacher - monk disguised as the
bishop - just as he Is still presented today with his
long white beard, his red mantle and mitre, and his goldpi
crosier.  Quite likely these very same schoolboys Introduced St. Nicholas in their homes, for gradually his name
now corrupted to Sinterklaas, became a household word.
But now, Sinterklaas came accompanied by his Moorish
servant Piet, a grinning fellow with a birch rod, whose
sack full of goodies, when emptied, is large enough  to
carry away any naughty children.
All Dutch children know that
Sinterklaas lives in Spain.  In
Spain, he spends most of the
year recording the behavior of
all children in a big red book,
while Piet stocks up on presents
for December 5th.  After mid-
November Sinterklaas mounts his
milk-white steed, Piet swings
the sack full of gifts over his
shoulder, and the three board a
steamship to set course for
Amsterdam harbor and a formal
welcome by the Mayor and a delegation of citizens.  A fabulous
parade through town, watched
live and on TV by the whole
nation, marks the beginning
of the St. Nicholas season.
pres
A Sinterklaas present is not at all like a Christmas
ent, Dutch tradition demands that all packages be
camouflaged in some imaginative
/f?j? t^TT)    £") )        way, and that each gift be
vj o!   \»^    > JV  ,<-^  accompanied by a fitting poem.
To be truly appreciated, presents
must be concealed or disguised.
The emphasis here, is on giving
rather than on receiving, because so much work and thought
goes into it - one reason why
continued on pape 8..., GUESS WHO 5
THE BIBLOS CHRISTMAS CONTEST
Just fill in the form that you will find in this issue and drop
it in the Interlibrary mail addressed to:  BIBLOS - Guess Who
Contest,  Librarians Office,  Main Library.
Deadline for entries - Friday, Jan. 7th, 1972.
Winner will be announced Tuesday, Jan. 11th, 1972.
Prize - A bottle of cheer to help that after Christmas let
down feeling.
Match - the letter on the picture to the number of the person
you think it might be!
1. That blue-eyed skier of the Administration,
Co-ordinator of Technical services.
2. Lord of the Files, master of Cataloguing
3. Ever hopeful Lion's booster in Bibliography
4. End of the trail in Cataloguing
5. Mr. Calm himself of Sedgewick
6. The red headed bombshell in Laiv
BOB MACDONALD
MAC ELROD
ELEANOR MERCER
CLAUDIA KERR
CHUCK FORBES
GEORGIA MACRAE
Handy Andy with candid camera from
Information and Orientation
LUTHER CHEW
Lost and FoLind tres excellent in Cataloguing  LEAH GORDON
The B in the Bindery..Lovable though.      PERCY FRYER
That ever optimistic and cheerful doll in
Social Sciences
Curling enthusiast and groovy seamer from
Bibliography
Our happy, crew cut "sparks" the electrician
Translator and soother of lost souls-Systems
?'-lr. Exuberance of Sedgewick
LOIS CARRIER
DOROTHY SHIELDS
HENRY ZUCHT
GERRY DOBBIN
RICHARD HOPKINS
Tf> IT, MATCH 'EM UP AND WIN THE PRIZE  GOOD LUCK! < %i£.
\
-*"%£-"
\y I
Sinterklaas cont'd
Sinterklaas is such a delightful event.  But it is als.
a merry and a refreshingly artless feast.  That, at le;u-
is the way the Hollander feels about it. and he wouldn' 1
without it.
By the 17th Century the Dutch were settling In th
New World where, among other customs, they introduced
their venerable Sinterklaas. His image later merged wi
that of Fat and Jolly Father Christmas of British fame
The American Santa Claus has developed strictly on his
own. All that remains of his Dutch phase is his name:
Santa Claus is a direct derivation of Sinterklaas.
\-r.X
fo-. %yfy\&{!^
g
CI
"1-- )^y   <"  X^ ?<r '< -V )t~~	
'I  Q
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<^W-,| Jl//'
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K'^Mi'r
o^
Information for the above story
supplied by Hilda uit den Bosch ,
Circulation. (Who still celebrates Sinterklaas day.) %sf
DUTCH HOLIDAY TREAT
OLIEBOLLEN  (New Year's Eve Dough Balls)
2 cups all-purpose flour
3/4 cup lukewarm milk
2/3 cup raisins
Grated Peel of 1/2 lemon
pinch of salt
1 package yeast
1 egg
1 heaping tbsp. mixed candled
fruit, chopped
1 tart apple, peeled, cored
and minced
Soften the yeast; combine all ingredients. Cover
and let rise one hour. Shape into balls with two
tablespoons dipped in oil, and drop into deep fat
(365 degrees), a few at a time. Fry until puffed
and golden on both sides. Drain on paper towel.
Sprinkle thickly with, or roll in, confectioners'
suger.  Serve warm
ENTRY FORM FOR THE "GUESS WHO" CONTEST
1. BOB MACDONALD..
2 .  MAC ELROD	
3. ELEANOR MERCER.
'I. CLAUDIA KERR. . .
n. CHUCK FORBES. . .
b. GEORGIA MACRAE.
7.  LUTHER CHEW	
8. LEAH GORDON	
9. PERCY FRYER	
10. LOIS CARRIER	
11. DOROTHY SHIELDS,
12. HENRY ZUCHT	
13. GERRY DOBBIN	
14. RICHARD HOPKINS.
Fill In the spaces with the letter of your choice and
leposit the entry form In the box In the "Front Office" or
■synd by Interlibrary mail to BIBLOS "GUESS WHO" CONTEST. ,
-V.lininistration Office, Main Library.  Deadline for entry will
'■><■•  Friday, January 7th, 1972.       GOOD LUCK! SOLUTION TO THE PUZZLE ON PAGE X
NAME LETTER HOBBY
Painting
Numismatics
Scuba Diving
Horticulturist
Miniatures
Archeology
Ornothologist
Mountain Climbing
Jewellry
Vocalist
Canoeing
Tennis
Batiks
Ballet
Yoga
Jogging
1.
Suzanne Dodson
C
2.
John Gray
0
3.
Lynda Johnston
I
4.
Bert Hamilton
G
5.
Ruell Smith
J
6.
Mavis Belshaw
B
7.
Basil Stuart-Stubbs
D
8.
Pat Gibson
K
9.
Joan Selby
E
10.
Joan Cosar
A
11.
Bill Bell
N
12.
Julius Benyovits
H
13.
Betty McAully
F
14.
Alan Soroka
M
15.
Tom Shorthouse
P
16.
Erik deBruijn
L
CCM&z, St. Wibby Reports
THE ANNUAL LIBRARY ASSISTANTS ASSOC.
Wine 5 Cheese "Party will be held on
Saturday Feb. 19th at the Cecil Green
Park.  8 p.m. - 12.  Live Band.  Lots
of Prizes, and good fellowship.  Watch
for sale of tickets directly after
Christmas.
We wish a comfortable and happy
Christmas to Bev Richards of Periodicals
who unfortunately had a car accident
early in December.  Bev will be missed
at our Christmas functions and we will
be looking forward to her return.
Take it easy Bev.
Pat LaVac of Law celebrated a 25th
wedding anniversary Dec. 2nd. and was
feted by the Law Library staff who
even managed to smuggle her husband
in for a surprise coffee party.
Thanks again gang.  Several members of
the staff also attended a surprise party
hosted by daughters at her home.
WE HEAR Mavis of Cataloguing will
be holidaying in the New Year in Peru
with possibility of a stop in Mexico.
CHRISTMAS in Hawaii for Jane
Shinn of Fine Arts - Have fun in
the sun Jane.
THE BOWLING club of the Library Assistants Association is
having their Christmas party on December 16.
DON'T FORGET to pick up those tickets for the BIBLOS BIRDS &
BOTTLES draw and watch for your number to come up at the
Smorgasbord Dec. 22nd.
AND A LAST MINUTE REMINDER.  THE SMORGASBORD is for everyone
we will be there all day serving goodies and will be ready from
8:30 on to receive the offerings.  The coffee and tea will be
free and please bring those appetites because if past years are
any indication there will be lots to eat.
SO - we will close this last column for 1971 with a wish to
you all for a very Merry Christmas and Prosperous New Year from
St. Wiborada - patron saint of Libraries -
affectionately known as  -  ST. WIBBY. fy.
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