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Biblos Dec 1, 1970

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 "::r    ■   ■      n-r-m-ia-n.'
VOL.   7     NO.   3 U.B.C.   LIBRARY  STAFF  NEWSLETTER       DECEMBER   1970
UNIVERSITY  OF  BRITISH  COLUMBIA ■TIs the season to be jolly
Fa La La La La, La La La La
Lots of Booze & Sin & Folly
Fa La La La La, La La La La
Christmas is coming and everyone is thinking of at least one of the
ideas in this little poem. However, one usually must start with
the first suggestion before proceeding to either of the other two.
So to help you achieve whatever ends you desire, here are some good
suggestions from Frederick Davies and his book DRINKS OF ALL KINDS,
FOR ALL SEASONS, 1895!  I hope that they will help to warm many a
heart during the coming season.
MULLED PORT (or other Wine)
'First, my dear madam, you must take
Nine eggs, which carefully you'll break;
Into a bowl you'll drop the white,
The yolks into another by it.
Let Betsy beat the whites with a switch
till they appear quite frothed and rich;
Another hand the yolks must beat
With sugar, which will make them sweet-
Three or four spoonfuls maybe'11 do,
Though some, perhaps, would take but two.
Into a skillet next you'll pour
A bottle of good wine or more;
Put half a pint of water, too,
Or it may prove too strong for you.
And while the eggs (by two) are beating,
The wine and water may be heating;
But when it comes to boiling heat,
The yokes and whites together beat
With half a pint of water more,
Mixing them well, then gently pour
Into the skillet with the wine,
And stir it briskly all the time;
Then pour it off into a pitcher,
Grate nutmeg in to make it richer;
Then drink it hot, for he's a fool
Who lets such precious liquor cool! i  ; ; i	
For those who do not aspire to the temptations in the first verse
may I suggest they try the following Temperance Drink as
recommended by Mr. Davies.
DRINK FOR DOG DAYS
Pour  a  bottle of  soda-water on  a   lemon   ice   in  a   large  glass  or
tankard.     This   is  a  beautifully   refreshing  drink,   but   it   should  be
taken wi th  caution.
*
Finally I would suggest the following mixture which is classed as a
RESTORATIVE DRINK for Lowness of Spirits, Excess of Spirits and
Fainting.  (This might be called a remedy for the remedies)
To five ounces of peppermint water add two ounces of orange syrup,
half an ounce of carbonate of ammonia, and one ounce and a half of
compound tincture of Cardamoms; shake well.  A tablespoonfj1 may
be taken occasionally.
I hope that you all have a very good Christmas and that yoj get
what you deserve!
Davey Miller The Woodward Library sent us a copy of their letter to Santa:
WOODWARD LIBRARY.
Geographical North Pole.
(Where all meridians converge)
Dear Santa,
December 1970
Thank you for the storage space you brought Woodward last year,
Main Library really appreciates it. Thank you for our big new desks
that arrived yesterday.
Since we have been good all year please send us our very own
SCM repair man (we have references to prove how deserving we are).
Please send one replacement elevator or we could make do with
an emergency kit of inflatable chair, fold down bar and small browsing
library to install in the lemon you brought us last year.
Laurie would like her windows washed, she doesn't like the dirty
ones left this summer.  Please send her a pail and some Bon Ami if
washers aren't available.
Circulation wants you to provide a library course to all students
so they can reshelve their own books.  They would also like to have
piped in music for the lonely outpost on the north-east front entrance
turnsti le.
The only other necessities you forgot last year were the staff
lounge's colour T.V. and the automatic food dispensers. We know you
are getting old but surely this reminder will produce results in 1970.
And of course everyone wants a promotion!
Remember that reference question where we found the addresses
for all Zoos with reindeer?  I'm sure you do!
Thanking you in advance for your attention to our requests .and
a Merry Christmas.
Love
The Woodwardians.
P.S.   Please don't  put coal   in our stockings.     In  this modern world
oil   drums would be  better  received... '       	
CHRISTMAS DOWN UNDER
I had heard tales that Christmas in Australia was spent sunbathing
on the beaches.  As Christmas approached I bought a new bathing
suit, sun-hat, and most important a thermos to keep the beer cold.
And since swimming at Manly is a lot more complicated than swimming
at White Rock, I even went to the trouble of finding out where to
swim if there were rip tides and what to do if sharks were about.
I was all prepared for a sunburnt holiday season.  Christmas Day
arrived - freezing cold.  The closest thing to heat that day was
the fire on top of the telephone pole that was started by a flash
of 1ighteni ng.
The holiday season was shared with friends in a place called
Cabramatta.  We spent the day huddled around a little gas heater
while quantities of liquor and sweets were consumed.  People would
drop in and greet us with a friendly, "How you going mate, alright?"
The Australian hospitality was warm and their humour slapstick.
And while there wasn't snow outside and the tree wasn't a six-foot
fir,  the spirit of Christmas was the same.
Karen Pep low
Interl ibrary Loans Basil Stuart-Stubbs
THE LIBRARIAN
Dri ves a clean ai r
machi ne.
Bill Bell
Assoc. Librarian
Lover of good
jokes
Bert Hami1 ton
Assit. Librarian
Orchid Fancier
Rita Butterfield
Head, Ci rculat ion
Champion of the
Midi
Suzanne Dodson
Head, Gov. Pubs.
Painter of wild
flowers
Cut below thi s 1ine
WHO'S WHO IN THE PHOTOGRAPHS
Anna Leith
Head, Woodward Lib.
Expert in renovation S- moving
Pat LaVac
Law, Biblos Ed.
Poet of sorts.
Nick Omelusik
Head, Acquisitions
Fancier of fine
wines.
Lynne Maclver
Admin. Assistant
Coper wi th panics
and planes.
Yvonne Forsythe
Catalogu ing
With Library
22 years.
Erik de Bruijn
Admin. Services
Li brari an
Interviewer ex-
t raordinai re
Joan Selby
Head, Humanities
Lover of unique
jewel 1 ry
Tom Shorthouse
Head, Law Library
T.V. personali ty
Ture Erickson
Head, Sedgewick
In search of an
excavation.
Basil   Stuart-Stubbs
Bill   Bell
Suzanne  Dodson
Bert  Hami1 ton
Rita  Butterfield
Anna
Leith
Pat L
.aVac
Lynne
i Maclver
Joan
Selby
Yvonne   Forsythe
Erik  de   Bruijn	
Tom  Shorthouse	
Nick  Omelusik	
Ture  Erickson
THIS   IS  MY  ENTRY
Name
D ivi si on 	
• • • - '•• -
*%   or
EVERYONE   CAN   PARTICIPATE.   EVEN   IF  YOU  DON'T KNOW
THE  FAMOUS  OR   INFAMOUS   INVOLVED  TAKE A  GUESS
TO  PARTI CI PATE;   Each  photograph   is  numbered.     Fill   in  the  number of
your  choice  beside   the  name   listed  on   the entry   form  on
page       and  place   in  the "CONTEST  BOX"   in  the   Front  Office,
DEADLINE:     5  p.m.   December 29th.     All   entries   received  after that
date will   be  automatically  disqualified.
BRANCH  LIBRARIES:        Can   send  their entries  via  Campus Mail
addressed  to "CONTEST"   c/o  Lynne Maclver,   Librarian's
Office,   Main  Library.
WINNER; The  one who   identifies  correctly   the   largest  number of
photographs.      In   the  case of  a  tie  correct  entries will
be put   in  a "hat"   and one  drawn.
WINNER WILL  BE ANNOUNCED 30  DECEMBER AND  THE   PRIZE AWARDED   IN  TIME
FOR NEW YEAR'S  EVE
GOOD  LUCK Sr  GOOD  HUNTING!  1
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How accurate are you in matching the personalities?
ARIES
Mar 21-Apr 20
Bill   Bell
Rein  Brongers
Mac  El rod
Leah  Gordon
Nick Omelusik
Pat  O'Rourke
Tom  Shorthouse
Doug  Kaye
CANCER
June 22-July 23
Shelley Criddle
Joan Sand i1ands
Allen Soroka
LIBRA
Sept  24-0ct  23
Rita  Butterfield
Graham  El 1i ston
George  Freeman
Ann  Gardner
Mary  Macaree
CAPRICORN
Dec  22-Jan  20
Julius  Benyovi ts
Elsie  de   Bruijn
Marg   Friesen
Peg  Leighton
Dee  Norris
Dorothy   Shields
Ann  Yandle
Diana Kraetschmer
TAURUS
Apr 21-May 21
Marilyn Dutton
John Field
Chuck Forbes
David Miller
Bill Parker
Ph i1 Vacheresse
LEO
July  24-Aug  23
Mavis   Balshaw
Joyce  Harries
Howard  Hurt
SCORPIO
Oct  24-Nov 22
Luther Chew
Martina  Cipol1i
Melva  Dwyer
Ture  Erickson
Barbara  Gibson
Anna  Leith
Lynne Maclver
Mau reen  Wi1 son
AQUARIUS
Jan  21-Feb   19
Suzanne  Dodson
Steve  Johnson
Eleanor Mercer
Georgie Macrae
Basil   Stuart-Stubbs
Bob  Tudge
GEMINI
May  22-June  21
John   Cummings
Gerry  Dobbin
Yvonne   Forsythe
Dave  Thomas
Emily   Woodward
VIRGO
Aug  24-Sept  23
Judy  Cardin
Gwen  Gregor
Richard Hopkins
Les  Karpinski
Janet  Lenko
Bob MacDonald
Doug Mclnnes
Jack Mcintosh
SAGITARIUS
Nov  23-Dec  21
Hans  Burndorfer
Adrienne  Clarke
Erik  de  Bruijn
Linda  Joe
Pat  LaVac
John  McKinley
PISCES
Feb  20-Mar  20
Lois   Carrier
John  Gray
Shannon  McJannet
Joan  Selby
Jim  Sharpe a
ST. WIBBY REPORTS	
AN INVITATION TO all the staff
at the Branch libraries to
drop in sometime during the day
of Tuesday the 22nd, and participate in the Main Libraries
Smorgasbord.  We don't see too
much of you people so how about
a visit for the festive season.
DON'T FORGET you Main Library
people to bring in your offerings, 9 a.m. and on, to the staff
room on the seventh floor.  The
Biblos staff will be on hand to
set out the goodies.  Already
the pledges are rolling in and
it looks as if the prizes and
goodies will be scrumptious.
One and all help to make this a
success.  Remember the smorgasbord goes from 10 am-4 pm.
WE HEAR on good authority that
Claudia Kaye is coming home
from Zurich for Christmas. Hope
she will visit and tell us all
the latest on her singing career.
LATEST'BEAUTIFUL B.C.' Winter
issue.  Included is one of
Suzanne Dodson's lovely wild
flower studies.
THE DESIGN for the new Sedgewick Library has won one of the
Canadian Architects yearbooks
Annual Award.  If you would like
to see the design it is on Page
46 of that publication.
HOPE YOU have all got tickets
for the Lib. Assts. Assoc, draw
First prize would make a very
nice Christmas outing.
The Winning
ticket entitles you
to dinner
for two at
the Bayside
Room,  (Bay-
shore Hotel)
drinks,
floorshow,
and dancing.
Value $18.00.
Winning
ticket will be drawn 1 p.m. Staff
Lounge Dec. 22nd.  2nd prize -
bottle of bubbly.
CONGRATULATIONS to the Social
Committee on the successful pre-
Christmas bash - and the wine
flowed like water. Must say B.B.
makes a very convincing Santa.
That HO! HO! HO! showed hours of
practice.  Thanks B.B. for being a
good sport.
CORRECTION - Nov. issue 2nd Sangria
Recipe "bitter" should be "bottle".
AND VERY HAPPY LANDINGS to Ritva
Sjoman of Cataloguing who caught
everyone unawares with her marriage
to Matti Tavela a pilot for Pacific
Western.  Future happiness also to
Susanne Crawford of Sedgewick who
has become Mrs. Allen Lester.
ON THAT HAPPY NOTE and with A VERY
GOOD WISH FOR CHRISTMAS AND THE
NEW YEAR I will say aurevoir for
1970.  See you in the New Year.
Your saintly snoop,
Wibby §*
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FILL IN THE BLANKS BESIDE THE CLUES LISTED BELOW AND TRANSFER THE
LETTERS TO THE CORRESPONDING NUMBERS ON THE NEXT PAGE TO FIND THE
CHRISTMAS MESSAGE.
1. DIVISION ON FLOOR TWO
25 "8~ "4T 51 T5 21 22 3  15 10
2. HEAD OF BINDERY
26" 7  T5 11 31   35 13 27 29 ~k~
3. BIOMEDICAL BRANCH        _.
~k~3    17 51
4. DON DENNIS' DIVISION
T+2 5  19 "41 3  "6~ 54"
5. SOCIAL SCIENCE FLOOR _.
"4"8" 50 "4T T5" 4"o
6. JACK MCINTOSH'S LIBRARY
3^1  39 23
7. FILE ON FLOOR FIVE
52 "47 11 T8" 39 T4" 53 21
8. STUDIES.
20  15 50 T+4" IS
9. HEAD OF CURRIC LAB _.
12 37 30 24" W    22
10. LYNNE IN THE FRONT OFFICE
11. MISS DWYER'S DIVISION
1 2. HEAD OF MACMILLAN
3$ 24"  11  50 2  7  3*6
4T 74" IT "47   24"'3TT6"'4"2" /
17 1  11 33 9  32 3 MESSAGE:
ft
1 2     3     "4"   5 F"7"8~9
TT   12   TJ   T4"   T5   To"   T7
TS
20    21     22        23    24"    25    IS"    27        IS    29    30        31     32    33    Jk
35    3S    37    3$        39    T^   T^"       TnTTJIffil^I^       T^T^
^    50    51    52    53    54"
ti # ?
We bow our heads in shame and apologi
Division for any false impression ere
in that "Looking backward" article in
Methinks we left off an '0'. We prin
working and highly efficient departme
se to the Interl ibrary Loan
ated by our reference to them
the November issue of Biblos.
t herewith a note from that hara
nt.
Just in case you're wondering.,
what keeps six of us swamped wi
let me set the record straight,
erroneously that we process app
In fact, in the Main Library al
months received about 1100 requ
libraries, (excluding S.F.U.-I.
requests a month to other libra
requests were filled. In addit
75 loans and xerox copies per m
loans and xerox copies per mont
why you may see us rushing arou
any day of the week.
th work in Interl ibrary Loans,
Last month "Biblos" stated
roximately 183 loans a month.
one we have, in the past few
ests per month from other
L.L.) and sent off about 600
ries.  Well over half of these
ion, Woodward receives about
onth and sends out about 200
h.  Perhaps this will explain
nd frantic and breathless almost
— . /;
BOOKS AND  BITTERS   IN  LONDON
In  the galaxy of  riches which  confront   the  visitor  to London,   book
shops and  public houses number many  and  shine  brightly.     For most
bibliophiles,   this   is  a happy   situation,   for  browsing  can  be  a
desiccating  business.     A good  place  to  start your  bookhunting
peregrinations   is   in  Hatchard's   (south   side  of  P i cad illy,   about  halfway  between  the  Circus  and  the   Ritz).     They  have "all   the  best  books"
and  poking  about   in  their carpeted  confines  can  only  be  described  as
delightful.     Here  you  can  pick up  a glossy  coffee  table  book on  the
Renaissance,   the   latest  best-selling  biography of Wellington,   or just
a  small   colored picture guide  to Dorset;   all   at  about  half the  price
you  would  eventually  pay   in  B.C.       Having  consigned  next week's  pay
cheque  to  this  august  house you will   be   ready  for a half-pint  and  a
"banger".     Nip  south  of  P i cad illy  to Duke of York
St.   (running off Jermyn  St.   into  St.   James
Square).     In  this  street   is  the   illustrious  Red
Lion,   a  small   pub with  a Victorian  decor.
Pork  pies  and  sausages  are  particularly  good
here,   and   I   urge you   to partake  of   them.
Following   refreshment,   slip  down   into  St.
James Square and past  the London Library   (private members only).
Turn  east  out  of  the  Square,   walk  directly  at   the  Haymarket  Theatre,
continuing  east where you  will   then  come   to one  of  the   few   remaining
areas of London where book  sellers  are  concentrated  (Charing  Cross
Road).     On  this  street  and  very  close   together  are,   among others,
Foyles   (the  biggest   in  London),   E.   Joseph   (a good   second  hand  dealer),
Ascroft  and Dew  (paperback  specialists),   and Zwemmer's  (one of  the
finest  houses  for  art  and  architecture  titles).     Time  and money  can
be  freely_but  pleasurably  squandered  along   this   row.
Another brew   is   in  order?     No  better place
can  be  sought  than  the  Salisbury,   at  the
corner of St.   Martin's  Lane and St.  Martin's
Court.     A decorative  Victorian  pub,   with
very ornate cut-glass windows,   brass  fixtures,
and gilt-edged mirrors,   this "local"   for
many  actors  serves  tasty,   inexpensive  food
with  their mild  or  best  bitters.     After your
bit of  sustenence,   you  are   ready  for the
treasures of  St.   Martin's and  Cecil   Courts,   paralleling each other
between  Charing Cross  Road and St.   Martin's Lane.     Good antiquarian ft
second  hand  dealers  abound   in  these   two  short   lanes,   the most  notable
of which  are  E.   Seligman   (art  books),   Watkins   (religious),
Suckling's  (general),   Harold Mortlake   (Victorian),   and  Pleasures of
Past  Times   (a  not-to-be-missed  shop  specializing   in  theatrical   books,
prints,   photos,   etc.   and Victoriana).     Some  stay open well   past  the
customary 5.30  closing,   so browsing  can  be prolonged until   curtain
time at  the Duke of York,   New,   Wyndham's,   or Garrick Theatres,   all
of which  are within  one-half block of  these  book  shops.     A noisy
little pub to end  the  day   is  the Nell   of Old Drury  (on  Catherine  St.
across  from  the  famous  Drury  Lane  Theatre);   but  don't  expect  to  find
a  seat.     The  British Museum   is  a magnet   for  tourists  and  no  visiting
book  lover should miss   investigating  the concent rat ion of both  new
and  second  hand  dealers when   in  this  area of
Bloomsbury.     A must   is  Stanley  Crowe
(Bloomsbury St.,   but   the entrance   is  around
the corner of Streatham St.),  who has just
about  any  book,   print,   or  pamphlet  on
British   local   history.     When   in  his "catacombs" you  are  surrounded by  shelves
crammed  from  top  to bottom with dusty
treasures.     A cup of tea may be offered
you  but unless you   like your "cuppa"  very
black,   better pretend  to be  a coffee drinker,
the  strongest  tea   in London.
Stanley  Crowe  has
Also  in  this   immediate area are Louis W.   Bondy   (Little  Russel1   St.)
and B.   Weinreb  (Great  Russell   St.).     The  former   is  an  antiquarian
shop,   the   latter has one of the world's greatest  stocks of architectural   books.     A nearby  place  to  rest  the weary  legs  and  sip  a
fine pint of Double Diamond or Guiness   is  the Museum Tavery on  Great
Russell   St.   (directly  across  from  the  British Museum).     Here you will
see  (especially at   lunchtime),   a goodly  array of scholars,  "feeding
the   inner man"   in  preparation  for an afternoon  assault on  the
"keeper"   and his precious hoard of books  and manuscripts.     Within
easy walking  distance of  this  tavern   is  also Dillon's Bookstore
(in  the heart of  the University  complex).
For  the "true-crime"   buff  (l   confess   to  being  one),   Wildy  and  Sons
(Lincoln's   Inn Archway behind  the Law Courts)   is Mecca.     Second
hand editions of  the notable  British Trial   series adorn  the  shelves
and great   restraint must  be exercised  to   resist  the   lure of  the
Seddons,   Crippens,   Bartletts,   Palmers,   Creams,  Maybricks,   and  Smiths n
(Joseph  and Madeline)   in  their scarlet  bindings.     All   are principals
in  famous  trials  and have,   as  George Orwell   has  said,  "withstood  the
test of time".     Most  have  their  likenesses enshrined   in wax at
Madame Tussaud's on  the Marylebone  Road.     From Wildy's  (another week's
cheque gone),   a sense of   Tightness  dictates  that  thirst must  be
quenched at  the  Sherlock Holmes on  Northumberland Ave.     "Photos"  and
"memorabilia"  of  the great detective  festoon  the walls,   including a
"cast" of the pawprint  of the  Hound of  the  Baskervi1les.     Emerging
into a misty  street   (london,   alas,   no  longer has a "particular"),
hard  by  Charing  Cross  Station,   one  sees Moriarity's  likeness   in   the
passers-by  and  feels  that  the "game   is again afoot".     Equally
acceptable  after Wildy's   is a visit  to  the Magpieand Stump,   across
the  street  from the Central   Criminal   Court;   it  at one  time  sold  space
in  the upstairs window for a view of  the  public hangings carried out
in  the Old Bailey.     Now,   however,   its  frequenters are mostly   lawyers
and  reporters associated with the trials at  the Court.
*"    * ;' . -to
Edward Stanford on the Long Acre is London's bes*^
map house.  A visit here (they also have travef
guides as well as multi-scales or ordinance
maps) is a pleasurable experience and brings
you near another historical public house. Just
behind Stanford's on Rose St. is the celebrated
Lamb and Flag Tavern.  Dickens and Dryden both
frequently drank here and Dryden, after leaving
the Lamb one evening, was a victim of a
seventeenth century version of mugging. The
Lamb and Flag is a tiny place but decidedly
worth a visit.
Sad it is for the book hunter to contemplate the demolished
Paternoster Row and Holywell St., and one mourns the lost opportunity
of "having had a go" at these treasures.  Sadder still, however, is
the knowledge that five million books were lost in the bomb destruction of Paternoster Row during World War II.  Close to the site of
Holywell St. is the Devereaux Tavern (eastern confines of the Temple)
and this haunt of G.K. Chesterton is an appropriate place to raise a
gladd in silent salute to the booksellers of yore.
These are only a few of the thousands of bookshops and taverns in
London - a few that I have visited. You, who go to London in the
near future will see and enjoy these and many more during your stay.
I hope to see many more - next time! Ai? •jk   <& JcJL>^ &"^
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21
a multitude of quivering candies we watched the young mothers -
presenting their new born babies to Our Lady of Pilar and the
children lining up to kiss the veil and we envied them in their
uncomplicated simple faith.  We also visited the church of Seo
one of the many mosques built by the Moors and converted to a
Christian church with the coming of the Catholic Kings.
After dinner we sat in the square beside the beautiful fountain
"talking" to the people and watching the strollers go by (brandy
is as easy on the budget as rum).  At 11:30 p.m. we were still
there - warm in our short sleeved dresses and the streets were
still crowded.
Next day, Zaragoza to Madrid past towns and villages that have
changed very little since Moorish times.  It was very hot and
Mr. B. from Ontario, already being fingered as the "complainer"
was being shooshed by his obviously long suffering wife.  It was
at this point that Juan told us a little of his background.  Born
in Barcelona of working class family, school, two years compulsory
service in the army, which, though a very hard life, gave him a
feeling of comradship and confidence, with pay ridiculously low
about 10 dollars a month.  University of Barcelona and then to
England to finish an education working as a waiter, where he
graduated with a history major.  Married to an English girl Juan
finds great satisfaction teaching seven months of the year in
England and travelling four months of the year with Global.  We
were most lucky to have him as our tour guide because everywhere
we went he filled us in on the background history and interesting
local gossip.  The long periods of driving were never dull and
the local custom of Siesta after lunch is to be highly recommended
although poor old Icidro always had to stay awake.
This day we stopped at a small family run Inn for lunch, you have
to watch those washroom arrangements - "Cabal 1eros and Senoras" -
they can be quite interesting.  At this particular inn everyone
went through the same door'.  There was a most fascinating display
of dolls and woven goods in the entrance hall and the pile in the
bus started to grow.  Louise from Seattle acquired a rug which
was to become the bane of her existence, (nothing could be left
in the bus overnight).  Nowhere in Spain could she find a post
office to handle the mailing of same.  "You come back manana"
which of course never came, Mara had the same problem.  Upon our 22
return to England she and her young son walked off the plane looking like padded pedlars.
Next stop Madrid, the capital of Spain, seat of Government since
1560, and certainly not enough time to visit all its wonders.
History and beauty crowd around.  The visit to the Escorial, burial
place of the Spanish Kings, was one of the highlights of the tour.
The Escorial overlooking the beautiful valley of the Juamara is
a magnificent building, palace and monastery combined.  It was built
in the 15 hundreds and has 30 miles of corridors and houses priceless treasures of tapestries, paintings, sculptors, glasswares,
books etc.  The high altar is an opulence of gold and exquisite
paintings and a 55 metre (220 ft.) hall contains a single complete
wall covering fresco depicting a battle scene.  The Library holds
a magnificent collection including hand printed and illustrated
volumes from the fourth century, Arabic manuscripts, the diary of
St. Teresa with the history of the Carmelite nuns and many writings
of the early explorers.  Paintings by Goya, El Greco, Titian they
and many others are all there and it is awesome to stand in the
council chamber and see the very simple, worn leather chair from
which Phillip 11 ruled most of the known world of the 16th century.
We went down into the sumptuous domed vault where lie the past
Kings of Spain and the Queen Mothers in richly ornate caskets,
tier on tier.  The remains of the last king of Spain is waiting
elsewhere to join his ancestors in the burial chamber as only a
ruling monarch can authorise the placement of the body within the
sanctuary.  Franco has invited the old King to return to Spain
but he steadfastly refuses.  However, his son, Juan Carlos, is
apparently not of the same mind and one gets the impression that
when the old king dies so will the monarchy return.
One also gets the feeling that Franco has mellowed in his old age
rather like good wine.  All religions are now able to practice
freely and many of the Jewish synagogues have been returned to the
Jewish people completing a cycle.  The "green olives" so called
because of their green uniform and heart of stone keep the country
surprisingly free of crime.  Violence is practically unheard of
and is rather a nice feeling to know that you can walk anywhere,
any time with little fear for ones safety.  The general honesty
of the people is like a breath of clean air.  Many times we were
called back because we did not wait for change once being literally
1     ,. 1.-11  M.I...I ■ ■T ' ' '■ I , . -.i —
23
chased down the street.  We understood the "green olives" are
almost inhuman in their detached approach to the wrong doer or
the traffic violater.  Results, very little crime and a traffic
picture that looks chaotic but works.
Fourth day, Toledo, the ancient capital of the Peninsula with a
history stretching back to Phoenician times.  Romans, Visigoths,
Arabs and Jews have all left their imprint on this fascinating
city, a natural fortress, bounded on three sides by the River
Tagus.  As you look down on the city from the opposite bank of
the river and see the grey white buildings, rising towards the
great square Alcazar, standing starkly outlined against the hot,
bare rock you are reminded again of the timeless history of this
land.  Down in the town the heat bounces at you from the thick
walls and the narrow streets mock the small cars that try to
navigate their sharp corners and unpredictable steps.  The street
vendors offer ceramics and leathergoods whilst the small donkey,
on which their wares hang, stand patiently waiting with almost
an air of detached, sardonic amusement.
The city is a museum and a National monument to a past splendour.
No new buildings can be erected in Toledo and the population has
remained static for the past hundred years.  No family moves in
until others move out.  The churches and the palaces and the
great fortress are all there but so is El Greco's house which
offers a glimpse of the great painter as a man, not the mystic.
In the Jewish quarter are the craftsmen still fashioning the
famous Toledo steel, not into weapons, but into exquisite jewellery and tableware.  The women, the old ones, heat defying in
their all black clothing, still go to the wells for water and
the cameras clicked.
Back in the bus, Icidro rested after his morning off and an
afternoon siesta.  He has seen this scene many times before,
and so on the road, heading towards the border and the next
stop PORTUGAL	 '*%: ^ 4^
HEAR YE - HEAR YE
IBRARY CHRISTMAS EVENTS.
A cordial invitation is extended to one and all to participate
in the following events for the Xmas Season   ^Jtttir
>4
DECEMBER 10 Thursday CECIL GREEN  5:30 - 11:30 p.m.
A pre-Christmas bash.  All library staff and guests welcome.
ADMISSION  $2.00 per person.  REFRESHMENTS will be served both
liquid (beer or Andre's wine) and solid (cold meats,rol1s, cheese
and crackers). The surroundings are beautiful and the party
should swing.  Come and enjoy	
^m
DECEMBER 22nd Tuesday  LIBRARY STAFF ROOM
8:45 - 5 p.m.
favourite food and do-
Lists wil  be circulated
During
be
The annual STAFF SMORGASBORD.  Bring your
nate it to the general table of goodies.
through the divisions for you to note your offering
the day prizes, donated by division heads and others, will
drawn for (free).  All left over food is sent to the Salvation
Army or some other worthy cause.  Forget your calories and parti
cipate and don't forget those National goodies.  You will have
the weekend to cook up a storm.
JANUARY 16th Saturday CECIL GREEN PARK  8 p.m. - Midnight
The Library Assistant's Wine and Cheese Party.  Dancing to a
live band (they will play anything you request)  Many varieties
of delicious Andre's wine to drink and cheeses to eat.  All
Library employees and their friends are welcomed.  ADMISSION $2.00
Tickets will be available from the Library Assistant Representa
tive in your division.  This is an appropriate wind up to the
Festive Season so come and enjoy it with us.
%-
COMING SOON
The Library Assistant's Raffl
Draw to be held at the Library Smorgasbord 1 p.m.
Tickets available from your Library Assistant Representative
Price 10c each or 3 for 25<J.
Pri ze.
Prize.
Dinner for two in the Bayside Room
of the Bayshore Hotel  (your choice of date
Bottle of Christmas cheer
©       ti # f
^r

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