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Biblos Sep 1, 1972

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IS EVERYBODY HAPPY?
According to the chronicler Holinshed, as Mary Tudor lay dyir
she remarked to ar: attendant "When I am dead and opened, you shall fiiic
"Calais" lying in my heart." When Biblos staffers go to their last reward, I am sure that "participation" will be found written somewhere or
their body.
Between September 1 and September 7 of this
nominations to four committees vitally important to t
general welfare of the U.B.C. Library were sent to ev
system. It grieves me to report that, up to the time
sponses lias been r.nything but overwhelming. These fra
ARC, Ombudsman, CCSBOS and Librarians Salaries, were
. is.tration and receive its solid backing. These commi
entirely of Library staff, drawn from all levels, and.
made are studied carefully and impartially by t!
necessary and worth-while changes in practice and poll
the work of the ccirraittees.
year.
calls
ioi
he  op>
rarior;
li 11C
erv  er
nloyee
in
of wi
iting,
the.
tir  con
mi t tec
.   t
set v.r
hy  th<-
A r
t L'-es
a r c1  r o'
ey have
.su t re a iron
truth in
Cliches, we are told arc to' be avoided but there
this one - these are YOPR committees.  Many older staff members will remember what it was like before committees were established.  have we beeor;
so complacant that the majority feels that there is no longer any roo-;
for improvement?  I think this is not true at the university level any
more than it is in government, or at any other institution;! or corporate
level.
BIBLOS urges you to think seriously about this situation -
nominations for all committees close September 19th and in many eases
there are NO nominations at all for many of the positions open.  Please
talk to your friends and get your nominations in.
Vol. 9 No. 1 U.B.C. LIBRARY STAFF NEWSLETTER  Sept. IS' A  ileartv Welcome  to:
C3\
Karen Kay
Lynn Pe i.'rson
Greg Alia ret
Sally Blake
Donna iiorriott
Diane Proulx
Nancy Mooney
Edith Kenny
Bai'-ry Henderson
Reg in a Bar /. y n ska
Bonnie Sullivan
Sylvia Woodcock
Lawrence Jones
Linda Wornor
Marilyn Kaye
Susan.ne Dot)gins
Barbara von fritschen
Susan Crossby
Loveron Paumoroff
Diane Paollni
Emily S'neldan
Chrlstine Patmore
Christina Mallalue
Megan Kinwood
Heather Steele
Judy Hicks
Gillian C'hamberlin
L.A; I
Sedgewick
L.A. II
Sedgewick
L.A. I
Cat. Preparations
L.A. T
Circulation
L.A. I
Woodward
L.A. 1
Woodward
L.A. I
Cat. Preparations
L.A. II
Serials
Stack Atten.
Sedgewick
L.A. I
Prebind
L.A. I
Orig. Catal.
L.A. 1
Cat. Preparations
Stack Atten.
Sedgewick
L.A. I
Woodward
L.A. I
Sedgewick
KPO I
Systems
L.A. I
I.L.L.
L.A. I
Cat. Preparations
L.A. I
Orig. Catal.
L.A. I
A.R.F..L.
L.A. II
Cat. Preparations
Clerk I
Acquisitions
L.A. I
Sedgewick
L.A. I
Circulation
L.A. I
Circulation
L.A. I
Fine Arts
UA. II
Map
Congratulations To:
Carol. Sinclair
Shirley Rudolph
Denise Leahy
Mary Kortifee
Christine Jones
Cathy Belyea
Toni O'llare
Cynthia Carter
Teresa Ranftl
Susan Mcllmovle
David Miller"
Sec.
I  Admin.
See.
II Admin
L.A.
I Cat. Prep.
L.A.
II Cat. Prep.
L.A.
I Sedge
L.A.
II Sedge.
L.A.
I. Sedge
L.A.
II Sedge.
L.A.
II Circ.
L.A.
Ill Circ.
L.A.
I A.R.E.L.
L.A.
II Read. Rooms
L.A.
I Circ.
L.A.
II Biblio.
L.A.
I F.A.D.
L..A.
II Serials
L.A.
II
K.P.
0. I
L.A.
I  Circ.
L.A.
II  Circ.
Cler
k III Acq.
. Cler
k IV Acq.
A Fond Farewell To:
Kristine Knminskl
P-M-iiso MeCormae
Ke rry Lu k enohuk
Roselina Koo
St el 1 a C( H.ibaraki
Edith Brown
Marija Potenik
L.A.
I
L.A.
II
L.A.
II
L.A.
III
L.A.
II
L.A.
II
L.A.
I
Woodward
Serials
Cat. Preparations
Special Collections
Humanities
Cat. Preparations
Cat. Preparations C A J U N
FRENCH
After nearly a week in New Orleans, where French, though
apparently not dead, is not noticeable to the visitor unarmed with
introducations, a few days among the Cajun French of south-west
Louisiana were more linguistically rewarding.  In and around
Lafayette, St. Martinville and New Iberia - and doubtless much
further afield - French is still widely spoken.  But to appreciate
this situation perhaps an historical digression is justified:
The first Frenchmen to reach the area were soldiers, followed
by a very meagre trickle of settlers and missionaries from France.
But it was not until the advent of the Acadiens (or Cajuns, as
they call themselves, pronouncing the word rCadginsT in French
and 'Caijans' in English) that substantial settlement occurred.
As every good Canadian knows (I did not) , Acadian was officially
handed over to the English under the Treaty of Utrecht In 1713.
Its French agrarian population was not intolerably harassed and
remained in Nova Scotia until 1755 when their rulers, anticipating
the Seven'Year's War and fearful of a strong pocket of dissident
Frenchmen in their midst, expelled them ruthlessly and ividespread
over the thirteen colonies.  In time most of the survivors found
their way to their fellow-countrymen in New Orleans, where they
were helped to move on and settle in the wild country to the west,
now largely under sugarcane.  (Others, instead of filtering down
the Mississippi, eventually managed to take ship to France.)
In the bayou country occasional French forts were, already
to be found as protection form prospective settlers from the
fierce Attakapa Indians.  Around these the Cajuns struggled to
out an agrarian existence, and here their descendants still li\.
around huge churches towards which their ancestors-.mi.
tributed a large share of their hard      -^\l / j J_,
won earnings.  Eventually word that " ' "
they had found a new home reached        y
their relatives who had taken refuge    c-
in France, most of whom were glad to    ^
rejoin them and leave the country of
their forefathers which yet seemed so -——
foreign to them.
/' /
' ,U
J Cajun French cont'd
conspicuous signs put out by a Conseil pour le developpement du
francais en Louisiane advocating French speech.  How many can
read them I do-not know, but there they are:  "Parlez francais
avee vos enfants a la malson.'",  "Soyons fiers de parler
francais;" "Soyez a. la mode: parlez francais!" and other such
catch-phrases.  I believe that the Roman Catholic Church is also
not entirely disinterested in this campaign.
The French spoken by the Cajuns is easily understood.  It
tends to be rather simple, a language of the countryside, but it
offers no problems.  Its exponents seem to have rather an inferiority complex about their speech, more is the pity ("main nous
autres ne parlons pas un beau francais comme vous"), but they are
nevertheless clearly delighted to be addressed in their mother
tongue ( a storekeeper calls up an assistant, adding "...et vous
pouvut bien parler francais avec Monsieur").  When talking with
one apparently quite cultured lady I encountered the constant
curious combination of 'tu' and:Monsieur'.  This anomaly Is a
direct result of Illiterate oral tradition, by which a person
follows blindly the speech to which, he is exposed.  I remember it
among the natives of francophone Africa who, always 'tutoyes' by
the French colonials, knew only how to reply in the form which
tooy heard.  It also occurred in the fluent speech of a New York
stucient of French parentage who convulsed, all who met him in
Switzerland, having clearly never heard the word 'vous' In his
s a parallel speech to Cajun French also, widely used
.. and this I defy anyone born outside the precincts
ome with.  I refer, of course, to the 'patois negre',
enly called 'Creole'"1*'.  This speech corresponds with
sh in that It appears totally to lack grammar or
gh in fact it does have a modicum of syntax taken
Ti Senegalese and thus hard for a westerner even to
A sample phrase Is 'M'ailer courir' (= 'moi aller
-in rrn -"un' , I.e. 'je vais vlte') .  But the speech is
i  t    • the infiltration  of Spanish and
usage.  The Spanish stems from the fact
^  n^ a staging period in the West Indies before
i   d lo New Orleans. I tried speaking French to a
x    oes (God knows some of them were hard enough
j i    7> i y     tith their delightful southern tones!).
ell
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1 Cajun French cont'd
Among the soldiers and the peasant farmers a third class of
Frenchmen was soon to be Injected.  Just before the Revolution
aristocrats who saw the writing on the wall began to anticipate
the Impending cataclysm by shipping mountains of their belongings to New Orleans.  They then followed with their families,
expecting to have to sit out civil strife at home of at most
one year.  But things failed to work out as they had planned.
On arrival they were surprised to face the threat of deportation
back to France, so they decided to put a six-weeks' journey between themselves and the authorities.  St. Martinville became
their goal and here they had fine houses built and proceeded to
do the only thing at which they were adept - to entertain each
other and amuse themselves.  They had brought slaves to do all
the work, they had fine furniture, beautiful wardrobes and costly
jewels, and they succeeded so well In their endeavours that this
wayward outpost, which even aspired to having the first opera
house in North America, soon earned the sobriquet of "le petit
Paris".
It was some time before social links between the aristocrats (who had in the meantime been joined by wealthy Creole
planters from the West Indies, where the French Revolution had
also left its mark) and the peasant Cajuns began to be forged.
But eventually Intermarriage became the norm.
The French Language in the Cajun ,---/
country is largely an oral tradition,    -:"""\>f ■. -.. iV      *    ~r--
the peasant majority of Its exponents. /?   ^'f\  xoi.. "' -"""
having been illiterate.  Today toosl_  Af, _     X"y;^  •""""""
most people claiming French as their  Vvi-  )/  V""
mother tongue are unable to read or -^  i\   /.        j
write it (and this they readily \\T\       "~"7/ \
admit m conversation with a j/yV
stranger) , though they may be well       ii
schooled in literate English.  It
is thus possible to meet a man, as
I did, actually speaking English
with a French accent ( though the
great majority speak unaccented
English), yet only literate in his secondary language.  Until
now French has survived unaided as the preferred language In the
home.  But the current crop of children are resisting this tradition, and artificial stimulation has begun to be applied in an
effort to perpetuate French culture.  Store windows blossom with "■ h	
Cajun French cont'd
Some were able partially to understand me, but I was almost totally
unable to reciprocate.  If I got the merest gist of an answer I
felt that I had done well!  A white man helped me to understand
my difficulties when he explained that 'nous venons', vous venez',
'ils vlennent' all come out to sound like 'eux vint'!
This 'patois negre' is by no means confined to the coloured
people.  Well-to-do white folk needed to speak it in order to
communicate with their slaves, while all those born in a slave-
served household spoke it fluently, as they were taught it by
their 'mammies'.  Thus children spoke patois In the nursery and
French in the drawingroom.  Many Cajuns, though not slave-owners,
also picked It up.  Today many French Louisianans often enjoy
speaking patois (and refer to it confusingly as 'creole') among
themselves.  I was told that for all Its practical inadequacies
they like it for its musical intonation and poetic effect.
It need hardly be added that August Is not the ideal month
to visit this fascinating area.
^Creoles are defined as people born in the Caribbean or Gulf
areas of mixed white ancestry (in the early days most commonly
Franco-Spanish).
John Gray /
"BIBLIOTHECAE HISTORIA"
1918— 1949 Total Staff 50
The opening of the new North Wing.  New areas were created,
the Ridington Room, Fine Arts, Music Room, Acquisitions Department,
and a Bindery.
All Library fines were collected by a Mrs. Arnott and placed
in the vault.  She was asked to learn the combination so as not to
bother her fellow workers.
Each member of the staff was appointed a turn of duty to clean
up the staff-room (including the professionals!)
Staff were asked to please remember to close the door leading
from the lean-to into the stacks!!?
Three more Army tables were supplied for the Education workroom on Floor 3 making it a seating capacity for '20:
Our first grocery buggies were obtained from Woodward's Dept.
Store at a cost of $2.50 each!!
yy~y~ yf
t  ( 'A N5-. N _„_™— •* S"^ j
s~-.y \ /   \       \\—;~~:...vivA.^^*^»-*rt ". r t /   ?^ s
Staff "performance" sheets began.
Catalogue Division had 13 staff members.
Our first Library "BLITZ", Operation Harmac!  The cataloguing
of 2,000 books in the home of H.R. MacMillan.
Periodicals Division was transformed Into Serials, staff 10.
- 87,470 volumes were circulated at the Loan Desk.  Staff 16. .
In October of '19 a mall-boy was added to our staff, no mall
room yet! -- •„- 8T
The Truth About the RIddington Room.  Or,
I'm sorry sir, I won't be able to find
that book for a week.
You may have wondered, along about the end of August, just
what was going on In the Ridlngton Room.  Why all those books
stacked on fables? Why all the shelving knocked down and carried
away? Why the wild-eyed H.D. and S.S.D. people staggering upstairs for frequent cold drinks?
Well, dearie, it's like this.  Ever since Humanities and
Social Sciences moved in together about three years ago, their reference books have been shelved In two call number sequences,
simply because there wasn't enough shelf space In the Ridington
Room for everything.  The books they liked and used a lot were in
the Ridington Room; the ones they thought they might need someday
but not just now, were shelved out back on stack level 5, just
west of Bev Richards's magazines.  Not a Good Arrangement, because those books out back were needed more than you'd think.
Also it was confusing for students and professors and cataloguers
who could never understand WHY.
Well, then, when everybody started talking about the Great-
Shift-VJhen-Sedgewick-opens, H.D. and S.S.D. thought they'd get in
the act.  Wouldn't it be splendid (they said), to have all our
reference books in the Ridlngton Room??  Then Circulation could  ;?
have the space on level 5 they've
save on shoe leather.  V^T  -^"^
And so it was.  Quantities o
beautiful beige shelving were ord
and duly arrived.  Then, dearie, all.3$;
the books had to be taken off the
shelves so the old shelving could
be taken down and the new stuff put
up.  The books were stacked on tables
In call number order.  Sort of.  It . Y> \ \UA
was during this period (endless it      \ !
seemed) that embarrassed librarians ><
coveted for so long, and_jwj2'd/?f^
^?" ^y^g0l\\ijz^yy
s~fJ?   \\t~>'''\   -
A
might have been heard asking bewildered patrons if they would mind golng^'dbwn to Sedgewick or
phoning the Public Library:  "Somewhere, someone must be able to
find the American Library Directory!!"
When the new shelving was up, the Varty team from Circ. The Truth About cont'd
along with Forbes, Carrier and Associates swung into action.  The
books from the back were brought in, filed in with the Ridington
books, and everything was re-shelved.  Slowly, but by Friday of
Registration Week, all was peaceful again.
So dearie, that's what happened.  But don't go asking for
the American Library Directory just yet.  It ain't where Is used
to be, and they haven't quite figured out where It Is now.
! ':
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//II
LUCKY CANADIANS!
WE CAN AFFORD TO TAKE HOOKS FOK Gil ANTE!).
t\   I
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ii;
i u
i'::
THIS YEAR. SHAHi: YOUR HEADING WITH THOSE LES? FO
EVEHY TIME YOU BUY OR BORROW A HOOK. HRO!'A PE
THE HANDY TRIANGULAR UNESCO PENNY GO!-!.ECTOR
HOOK STORK OR LIBRARY COUNTER.
JUST TflINK WHAT BOOKS ARE WORTH TO YOU.
SHARE A PENNY-A-fSOOK. /o
From Our Resident Reporter in Woodward Library...
We want to welcome Barbara Gibson to the Woodward Staff.  She
is now situated in the Memorial Room (for the Information of any
old Main Library friends who miss her and want to see how well we
are treating her.)
Claora Styron has been very busy arranging displays both
inside and outside the Mem. Room.  These displays are worth
seeing.  In one case there Is a selection of engraved portraits of
famous men of .medicine from Hippocrates to Banting.  There Is a
case devoted to the history of Anatomy, one on Dentistry, another
depicts the history of physical therapy and yet another honours
nursing.  The latter is expecially Interesting as It contains one
of Woodward Library's original letters of Florence Nightingale.
There are medical illustrations from medieval manuscripts, and one
very precious book from the library of King Henry 8th, believed
to be his only medical book.  On display is reference on the
history of medicine and a number of works on the history of
aviation medicine.
In two weeks the students will begin arranging their own
displays of the development of the health sciences, but many of
the cases I have mentioned will continue to show what Is in the'm
right now.
Anyone interested in seeing these may do so anytime.
Joan B. Stuchner
Woodward Library //
St. Wibby Reports....
ATTENDING the Association of
Canadian Map Librarians
Conference in Ottawa Aug. 28
to Sept. 1 was Maureen Wilson
(Maps) and Francis Woodward
(Special Collections).
BACK in his office after a
vacation spent in the
Chilkoot is Bill Bell of
Administration. ■
INFLATION must be worse than
we thought.  One of the
penny banks in the Curric.
Lab. has been ripped off.
If possible maybe members of the
staff could keep an eye on the
Penny Power Banks. We understand donations have been a
little slow coming in but
the AMS has promised to give
us some help with publicity.
APOLOGIES to Jerry Andersen
of the Law Library who we
married off in August.  The
actually date of the wedding
was 27th of July.
l\
J^  i -
Cfy,n
CONGRATULATIONS to Joo Sim
(Periodicals) who had a baby-
son named David, .August 22nd.
ALSO congratulations to
Marie Horvath (Hum.) for producing a further supplement
to her Doukhobor Bibliography
which was originally printed
two years ago.
Several x-jell known members of
staff are presently in the
hospital.  We wish a speedy-
recovery to Elsie de Bruijn
and Janet Yuan. /£.
<(■//!■■
)■•,'
)/\ 11
•*--1;
7-'\\//\
'' \ //
i   :  \     /      <J
i/Ai /
■X
FOR SALE
.3 orange Cosmo swag
lamps - 2 matching.
Like new.  $13.00 eacl
Phone Julie at 3097.
ROOM & BOARD for girl
Single room, breakfas-
dinner, sandwich luncl
washer, dryer, transportation to and from
Library - 8:30 a.m. -
5 p.m.  Home atmosphe]
$90.00 per month
Call M-809.
FOR SALE
A pair .of almost new ladies black
leather boots.  Size: 5%
Price:  were $4-8.00 now $20.00
Phone Deborah at 228-4-809 - work
or 731-0193 -  home
BOWLING LEAGUE-
Don't forget,anyone
interested please
contact - Carol Claus.
Serials or Gwen
Gregor, Map for more
information.
NOTICE
There will be a special meeting
sponsored by the Library Assistants'
Association on Friday, September 22nd,
in Room 835, School of Librarianship.
The object of this meeting Is to Introduce Informally, nominees for the
various committees.  12 noon - 2 p.m.
DON'T FORGET:
Send
your ads to Tannis -
Circulation Dept,
Main Library or phone
228-3115.

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