UBC Publications

UBC Publications

UBC Publications

Biblos Jun 1, 1971

Item Metadata

Download

Media
biblos-1.0190792.pdf
Metadata
JSON: biblos-1.0190792.json
JSON-LD: biblos-1.0190792-ld.json
RDF/XML (Pretty): biblos-1.0190792-rdf.xml
RDF/JSON: biblos-1.0190792-rdf.json
Turtle: biblos-1.0190792-turtle.txt
N-Triples: biblos-1.0190792-rdf-ntriples.txt
Original Record: biblos-1.0190792-source.json
Full Text
biblos-1.0190792-fulltext.txt
Citation
biblos-1.0190792.ris

Full Text

Array VOL. 7. NO 6.   U.B.C. LIBRARY STAFF NEWSLETTER
SUMMER 1971
VIEW FROM WITHIN
SUMMER SCHOOL HAS STARTED
BUT SUMMER IT IS NOT
PLEASE MR. WEATHERMAN
WON'T YOU MAKE IT HOTVl
University of British Columbia STAFF CHANGES
A Hearty Welcome To:
Cec i1y May
Catherine Bel yea
George Modenes i
Marlene Triggs
Susan Lancaster
Anna Materna
Nancy Wyatt
Lorraine Jackson
Judy 01 sen
Louise Zimich
Sue Morita
L.A.
Acquisitions (Prebindery)
L.A.
Animal Resource Ecology
L.A.
1 1
L.C. Catalogue Division
L.A.
1
Biomedical Branch
L.A.
V
Serials
L.A.
1
Catalogue Division
L.A.
1
Catalogue Division
L.A.
Woodward
L.A.
Woodward
L.A.
Woodward
Sec.
1
Administrat ion
Congratulations To:
Richard Martin
Richard Moore
Sylvia Harries
Jana Abramson
Keiko Takahashi
Dinie Hunt
Margareta Thiessen
Coralie Fisher
Kathleen Farnan
Shi rley Hal 1aday
L.A. 1
Cat.
to
Asst.Ml.Clk   Acquisitions
L.A.J
Cat.
to
L.A. 1
Cataloguing
Clk. 1
Acq.
to
L.A. 1
Acqu is it ions
L.A.
Acq.
to
L.A. 1
Acquis it ions
L.A.
Cat.
to
L.A. 1
Reading Rms.
L.A.
1  Science
to
L.A. 1
1 1       Gov. Pub.
L.A.
Res.
Ecol .
to
L.A. 1
Social Work
L.A.
1  Cat.
to
L.A. 1
1       Curr ic. Lab.
L.A.
Curr
ic.
to
L.A. 1
Reading Rms.
L.A.
Woodward
to
L.A. 1
Catalogue Div
We Say Farewell To:
Jill D i mma
May Cheng
Ann Sanchez
Ann Murdoch
Marianne Krayenhoff
Pat McArthur
Marilyn Kidson
Robert Pate
Jane Kidd
Judy Gardiner
Larry Slaughter
L.A.
1 1
L.C. Catalogue Division
L.A.
1 1
Curriculum Lab.
L.A.
Government Publications
L.A.
Social Sciences Div.
L.A.
1
B.M.B.
Sec.
1
Administrat ion
L.A.
1
Government Publications
L.A.
1 1
Catalogue Division (L.C.)
L.A.
Fine Arts Divis ion
L.A.
I.L.L.
Stack
Att.
Sedgewick Farewel1s  Cont'd.
Janet  Bushel 1
Yvonne Forsythe
Marie  Kwasnica
Pat  Howard
Lynda  MacDonald
L.A.
L.A.
1 1
L.A.
1
L.A.
1 1
L.A.
1
Curriculum  Lab.
Catalogue Division   (L.C.)
Ser ials
Sedgewick
Sedgewick
STATEMENT  OF ACCOUNTS
SPRING  BREAK UP  PARTY       May   19th.    (Library  & L.A.A.   Social
Committees)
Receipts
Ticket   Sales $86.00
Beverage Sales 110.90
Biblos   (see  below) 15. 00
Total 211.90
Cheese   (Henderson's) $20.39
Tablecloths 2.50
Crackers,   pickles  etc. 5-22
Bartender 10.00
2  girls   (hatcheck & tickets) 10.00
License i _ rjO
Beverage 109.62
Glasses   (breakage & theft
there was  no
rental charge) 12.75
Rental on Cecil Green Park 37.50
208.98
Balance $2.92
BIBLOS CENTENNIAL   SILVER  DOLLARS  DRAW.
Sold 460 tickets (?)25 cents  per  ticket
Total     $115.00      Purchase of  100 silver  dollars       $100.00
Balance  $15.00       (see above)
There  is  now a  balance of  $2.92   in  the Biblos   Funds.
N.B.   Next  time the clear plastic  glasses will   be used. RHYTHM
.RAIN!   RAIN! FALLON
^\ MY FACE,
LANQONMYLIPS,
BAPTISE MY BODY
INTO A ONENESS
WITH THE PULSE OF BEING,
WAKE l\k
BLOT ME WITH THE MORNING,
BEAT TIME TO MY NIGHTS  BREATH.
DON'T LEAVE ME TO WALK ALONE,
AMIDST THE SYNTHETIC
AND UNCONCERNED
JOAN B. STUCHNER A DAY IN THE WOODS
On May 7th, 1971, three members of the Special Collections Division attended
an Archival Symposium sponsored by the Society of American Archivists in cooperation with the National Archives and Records Service and Western Washington State College in Bellingham.  An early start on a vigorous day took us
off in a cheerful frame of mind, and after a few wrong turnings w?. were very
pleased to find the conference headquarters in the highly attractive cluster
campus of Fairhaven College.  This experimental college, set in the woods
and fashioned of cedar and rough concrete, retains all the aspects of a
humane and civilized type of living as opposed to the urbanized high-rise
effect that many universities are drifting towards.  Surely, we felt, we
could bend our minds towards a new approach to contemporary technology
(the conference title) in a setting such as this.
As it turned out, we could.  The morning gave us a lecture on "Research in
Archives: A Cybernetic Approach," by Frank G. Burke of the National Archives
and Records Service, which sounded ominously technical but which was in fact
an interesting and informative outl ine of the work being done in the National
Archives on the computerization of finding aids in archival work.  The overwhelming masses of material facing archivists these days makes systematization
a necessity rather than a luxury, and the new systems have been able to make
material which could never have been accessible in the past readily available
to historians.  At 10:15 we were brought into the scientific world by Roy
Chatters, Head of the Radioisotopes and Radiation Laboratory at Washington
State University, who has been working on a project of restoring faded
photographs by neutron activation.  While the processes were scientific and
probably beyond the reach of any archivist without a fully developed laboratory, the end results, as shown at the meeting, were quite spectacular.
Photographs which had faded to a point where they were scarcely visible to
the human eye were recovered through neutron activation, the images caught,
re-photographed and brought back to a state where they could be permanently
stored.
The highlight of the day (if one excludes a tasty seafood lunch at the
Yacht Club) came in the afternoon with a paper given by an earnest young
professor of history on "The Importance of Historical Research in Ecology
and Conservation." This was the new approach to history and the archival
profession which we had felt could be generated in our humane surroundings.
Mr. Keller repudiated with scorn the historical approaches of the past which
have exalted the plundering of natural resources, the conquering of the
Indians, the destruction of the land.  He demanded a new look at the old
records which would include using papers such as the ones in the UBC manuscript collection on labour unions and fish canneries. Canada was represented by an American professor of Black studies from the
University of Alberta in Edmonton (Black studies in Edmonton?) who told us
that Canadian historians  were not doing their part in pointing to ecological problems such as the pollution of the Great Lakes.
The final paper was delivered by Keith Murray, professor of history at
Western Washington State College, who gave us a witty and learned historical survey of conservation of the North Pacific fisheries.  Professor
Murray, using American, British and Canadian Archival material, outlined
the exploitation of fisheries which has taken place in the past.
A no-host social hour concluded the conference.  Here we were able to
become acquainted with many of our fellow-professionals from across the
border.  It was a most useful day.
Laurenda Daniel 1s.
A letter from Dr. Hildegard Spaulding (formerly resident psychiatrist at
Woodward):
April 19, 1971
Dear Everyone:
As usual, my thoughts of all of you have not gotten written-down or
sent.'  Too busy with seeing London, and England, my mind looks like this
towel most of the time.  [Dr. Spaulding sent us a dish towel for the staff
lounge - a tourist map of the British Isles.]  Last week-end from Good
Friday through Easter Services, was spent at Canterbury and environs.
We are serious pilgrims and saw the St. Martin's church where Bertha
(673 A.D.) then the queen of a pagan English king, took over an old Roman
building (quite probably an early Christian Church even then) and used it
for her own worship.  Later St. Augustine (who later built the vast.'
monastery here),(whose ruins we carefully examined, too) first worshiped
here, too.  If all that sounds confusing, it is only my daily meat and
bread.'  But we do not only see Churches and Cathedrals, we hear them
(which to any mind is almost more important!)  How England has kept the
boys' choirs and male singing at such an absolute perfect pitch is a
source of unending wonder (and devotion) to me.  This is the me that practically has to be coerced to attend church in Vancouver.' Although Ramsey - the Archbishop of Canterbury gave the sermon at
the Easter Service, and also officiated at the subsequent Communion Mass
(in all the unbelievably splendid robes and cloth-of-gold mitre and two
tiny boys carrying his train, etc. etc. - a sight to remember forever)
it was the mus ic, throughout, that held me in thrall.  The triple-vaulted
arches of Canterbury reverberated with true angel-sounds.  (Sotto voce:
I can't go to church anymore without tons of hankies.  That sound real ly
breaks me up.)
If I go on telling you about Palm Sunday services of St. Pauls in
London and the absolute high point (on Tuesday evening) of hearing the
St. Matthew Passion sung there - massed choirs and St. Paul's boys'
group, I'll never finish this "added note.1.'"
Bill - I used the new "British Museum General Catalogue of Printed
Books to 1955 - Compact Edition" - for the first time last week.  Maybe
you know of it already - but if you don't - what a great thing for
Woodward to own.  It has been copyrighted by the British Museum trustees
(1966) and was first published in 1967 by the Reader Microprint Corp. in
New York.
The Readex Microprint is great. I can read it without a magnifying
glass - but one should really have one handy for too long assignments.
There are J_0 volumes of the original catalogue in every one catalogue.
I have no idea re the price - nor to how many volumes it runs - but
it takes up far less room than the old one and it is so handy. (The
Mary-le-bone District Library let me use their "inner sanctum" copy.)
Betty McAul1 ay : You should be here so we could see the thrilling
display of period clothes currently being shown in the Victoria and Albert.
Also the Huguenot woven damask s i1ks as made at Spital Fields in the 17th.
century - just mouth watering.'  Bethnal Green Museum has some outstanding
beauties.  (Bethnal Green also has some fantastic doll-houses [from 1650
onwards] which I adore.)
Peg - it is true that in London one breathes in history with the
common air.  Every time I pass the Nightingale Statue (with the Greek
lamp) next to the statue of her pal, Herbert - I think of you.  It is,
as you know, at the lower Regent St. area devoted to "The Crimea".  I
am working on the possibility of getting us (i.e. Woodward) a xerox of
another interesting Nightingale item.1)
We are so spoiled by now: theatres, concerts, ballets, two and three
times a week (though n-o-t cheap, really).  If the seat cost 70 p. (around ^2.00) it's usually "slightly obstructed view" (which means directly
behind a non-transparent post.')
Every minute counts nowdays - so I must dash.
As ever - Hildegard
P.S. Leaving for a week at Oxford on Thursday.
Going to East Germany to see my 75 year old....cousin and his
family in first 2 weeks of June.
P. P.S.  Lydia: I am in the Land of the Savers,1,  2,000 year old fragments
are saved and labelled and worshipped as Museum pieces.
COLORADO SPRINGS U.S.A. WITH BRENDA SUTTON
From April 28th. to May 1st. I attended the Annual Meeting of the
American Association for the History of Medicine held this year in Colorado
Springs.  About one hundred and forty members attended and papers ranged
from local and North American Indian Medicine through Buddhist psychotherapy and medieval German medicine to the nursing profession during the
French Revolution and the origins of the American Board of Surgery, 1913-
1937.
It was pleasant to meet several old friends and make some interesting
new ones.  In between listening to the papers everyone found time to enjoy
the comforts provided by the Broadmoor Hotel which is built in Italian
Renaissance style and situated below Pikes Peak between the southern end
of the Colorado Rockies and the flat plateau.
After the Conference we were able to visit the Air Force Academy
with its fine modern building and the former home of the founder of
Colorado Springs, General W.J. Palmer.
On May 2nd. I began my return journey to Vancouver by Greyhound,
travelling via Cheyenne, Salt Lake City and Spokane. Last months "Lib" issue generated a couple of letters.
Hey how about that - two in one month.'.1!
Aphrodite, Godess of Love and Beauty
Hail.'
The beauty  and   ingeniousness  of your words   reflects   the beauty  and
character of yours  and  every  female body.
Since   I   have been old  enough  to   love   I   have admired  and   loved  the
unadorned  female body.   (I'm very sensual)
Perhaps we'll   meet  someday.
Love f~~\
Taurus      LJ
6
I was born under Venus.  I supposed you guessed.
May 19, 1971.
Dear Adrienne:
Personal postscript to your excellent article on Stopes, the birth
control pioneer:
From the '30's on Marie Stopes lived at Hindhead in Surrey, where
the village of my birth was none too kind to her.  She appeared heavily
to dominate her mild little husband, and local gossip was quick to
establish his role as that of experimental assistant, while their only
child was inevitably maligned as being a misconceived test case.
Even the medicine-men resented her use of the title "doctor,11 which
to their way of thinking gave her books a bogus medical authority.  (it
may be remembered that doctors of anything but medicine were not wont to
use their title in pre-war England - perhaps from inverted snobbery akin
to the custom of specialists and surgeons who still like to revert from
"Dr." to "Mr." as they progress.)
My own (and probably the only justified) prejudice stems from the
day when I opened the front door at home and a meek little man, thinking
that I was answering the doorbell (which I had not heard), thrust a very
damp wrapped package into my hand before retreating hastily to his car.
My father had requested a specimen of his patient, and her husband had
somehow managed to crack the bottle.
John Gray ST. WIBBY REPORTS.
JUNE  the month of Brides and
Conferences and Vancouver was the
host city for the 1971 Annual
Conferences of the C.L.A. (Canadian Library Association) and
C.A.C.U.L. (Canadian Association
of College and University Libraries.)
You might have noticed a marked
absence of Librarians as many of
them and several members of the
supporting staff attended various
worksops, lectures and meetings
at the Hotel Vancouver...  Many
visiting librarians from across
the nation also dropped in for a
look see at our operations.  We
understand Cataloguing played
host to quite a few visitors and
included a small party in the
lunch-room as part of the agenda.
We hope to have a few reports for
you next month on the activities.-
THE DRAW FOR THOSE 100 SILVER
DOLLARS was made on the eve of
Dominion Day June 30th. in the
staff lunch room.  460 tickets
reposed in the box and were
thoroughly mixed by several
people who were in the room on
that day.  Doug Mclnnis of the
"Front Office" drew the winning
ticket.  MRS. INGEBORG SCHAFER of
Cataloguing was the lucky recipient of the Sack of Silver Dollars.
Needless to say she was most happy
to accept the award.  Many thanks
to everyone who worked to make this
CENTENNIAL PROJECT a great success.
WOODWARD LIBRARY called to say that
Brenda Sutton of that department
attended the
Annual Masting
of the ATrre&ica
Associat
the Histo
Medicine at
Colorado Spr
April 28th.
May 1st.  She
also added a
note that if
you are going
that way she
can recommend
marvelous hotel .'.'
Sounds as if she had
fun
RETIREMENT OF THE YEAR.  All her
many friends in the Library will
sadly miss Mrs. Forsythe of Cat/
Searching who retires as of June
30th. 1971.  Mrs. Forsythe, as she
has always affectionately been
known, joined the old Extension
Dept. library, then very shortly
after moved to the Acquisitions
Division where she stayed for many
years.  In the latter period she
has been with Cataloguing.  Over
the years she has seen many changes
not the least in the area of salaries and opportunities for the
supporting staff of which she was
a member, also in the number of
people employed in the system.
I understand that the staff
numbered approximately 40 when
she first joined.  Many social
events were arranged for the
occasion of her retirement including an evening with members
10 of the Library Assistants
Association and other friends,
luncheons with Basil Stuart-Stubbs
and Mac El rod and a staff get
together in the lunch room on
her final day when she was presented with a lovely set of
luggage.  We will miss Mrs.
Forsythe but wish her much
happiness in her retirement-
she has assuredly earned it.
THERE is again a great coming
and going of the library staff
to the far flung corners of the
globe.  To name a few... Eleanor
Mercer of Bibliography to England and Ireland...Melva Dwyer
of Fine Arts - Spain £• Portugal..
Lynne Maclver, Front Office to
Great Britain where she visited
Derica Roberts (de Beauchamps) &
then on to Spain...Monica Lomow,
I.L.L. to Wales...Georgie Macrae,
Law & Dorothy Shields, Bibliography with the Extension Dept.
tour of Greece...Joan Selby of
Humanities to Israel and Turkey..
Paulina Kirman, Cataloguing also
to Israel, London, Greece and
other European spots.  Helen
Schmidt of Law off to Germany...
Shirley Dahl ie of Circulation to
Norway...Francis Wong, Law to
England and the Continent, Mollie
Buckingham also of that department to Barbados. .. George Read £•
Louise Axen, Circulation to Great
Britain (separately) and of course
Judy Cardin also of Circ. has just
returned from Austral ia.  I'm sure
we have missed many of our wanderers but never the less it does
not look as if many parts of the world
will be untravelled by our library
staff during the course of 1971.
Watch for a letter from the Biblical
lands next month.
MARRIAGE SEEMS to have been on many
minds this month too.  The former
Anne Brearley of the School of
Librarianship married George Pit-
ernick of that same department on
May 6th.  TANNIS MULCAHY of Circ.
became the wife of Walter Browning
on June 19th.  MARGARET BLAKE also
of Circ. became the wife of Peter
Kielpinski June 5th.  WYNNE ANDERSON
of the same department also chose the
romantic month of June to become
Mrs. Joseph Horvath.  LYNDA NEAL of
the Math Library answers to the name
of Mrs. Larry Duignam since June 26th.
Long life and prosperity to all the
happy couples.
AND IN the births department :
Remember Pat Blacklock of Circ.
She gave birth to a son Justin on
May 19th.
And Bess Rivett of the Reading Room
is most proud to announce the arrival
of a 6 1b. grand daughter named Carmen.
THE LADIES of the Woodward Library
are all joining a Macrame course on
Thursday evenings.  They plan to
manufacture more of those string
curtains or perhaps dividers for
the seminar rooms.  Possibly they
might take orders?...
S'al1 for this month
WIBBY
11 LIBRARY ASSISTANTS ASSOCIATION NEWS
Many of the Library Assistant's in the Library system
have been asking "What do we get for our quarter a month?"
This is a very good question especially in this day of inflation
when a quarter buys very little.  However, through the medium
of the Biblos we will try in the future to inform all personnel
in the Library what the Library Assistant's Association is doing.
ITEM
There was the Annual General Meeting which took place in April.
A new executive was elected for the year 1971-72 as follows:
Chairman Pat LaVac Law Library
Vice Chairman Claudia Kerr Catal. Prep.
Secretary Treasurer Jane Ainsworth Curric. Lab.
1st. Member at Large Janet Lenko Sedgewick
2nd. Member at Large Gwen Gregor Map Division
Reports were presented to the members by the Chairman,
Secretary-Treasurer and Social Committee.  A more effective
membership program was discussed and voted upon.
Since the Annual General Meeting there have been several
meetings of both the Executive and Committees with a view
to re-grouping and reorganizing the Association so as to
make it a more efficient body.  The results of these efforts
are already beginning to show in a sharp increase in membership
due to the work of a committee chaired by Claudia Kerr and
also in increased attendance at the various other duscussion
and committee meetings.
N.B. See below for items already on the agenda of the Social
Committee which we hope all the Library Personnel will find
interesting and informative.
ITEM
Another new project of the Association is a BOOK ORDERING
PROGRAM.  This will undoubtably be of interest to all personnel
on staff, both supporting end professional.  As has already
been outl ined in the Li brary bul1et in by Nick Omelus i k of
12 Acquisitions this program can result in considerable savings
for the individual.  For further information contact Claudia
Kerr of Catalogue/maintenance at 2304, or Jane Ainsworth of
Curric. Lab. at 2141 - local 132.
ITEM
Carol Ann Baker, Chairman of the Social Committee, along with
the other members of that committee are already coming up with
some fantastic ideas for your entertainment.  Tours have already
been announced for such places as C.P. Air, Dairyland, and Gulf
Oil.  (for dates see below)  Look for further announcements
regarding tours to the Skagit Valley - Ross Dam, Chinatown etc.
Keep an eye on your bulletin boards.  These tours will be
arranged for the evening and weekends and of course all members
of staff are most welcome to join in, also family members.
ITEM
The Association is looking for bowling enthusiasts to join our
THURSDAY NIGHT BOWLING LEAGUE.  (unfortunately last years
Tuesday nighters renewed their contract)  Lanes have been
booked at S.U.B. and even if you have never bowled before,
you will still have fun learning with the rest of us.  Bring
your husbands, boyfriends, what have you.
ITEM
The Association is also interested in the matter of Honorary
Membership for supporting staff who are not L.A.'s and who
may feel that they have no representative body to belong to.
ITEM
Don't forget we have an arrangement with the City Hall Association as honorary members to take advantage of their charter
flights and trips.  (Reno was great.1  Some of our members
have also taken advantage of their charters to England.)
ITEM
The evening meetings are proving popular as there is more
time for discussion and members can relax with refreshments,
in a more informal atmosphere.
Altogether this looks like a very exciting year for the
Library Assistants Association - in fact for the Library.
See you again next month.1
Jane Ainsworth,
Secretary-Treasurer.
13 The first Library Assistants tour of the season June 30th. attracted
28 people to the new C.P. Air building at the airport.  As Nell Bradley
of Acquisitions remarked, "I feel so sorry for all those people who missed
this because it would be impossible to tell them all we have seen".  The
decor in the office area alone is enough to make all drool with envy.
Colour is rampant and beautiful tropical foliage (real) is everywhere.
The whole building is the epitome of excellent taste and thoughtful planning
for the absolute comfort and well being of the staff - you should see the
staff lunch room.
Our tour included, amongst other things too numerous to list an
inside view of a few of the class rooms where instruction covers every
area in the operation of an airline.  We were most interested in the survival
rafts and the amount of equipment each holds and in the Hostess training
area, even though the practice bottles proved to be empty.
Personnel from all over the world, in all aspects of the business,
come to train and take refresher courses in Vancouver.  It was most interesting to realise that this is the International headquarters for C.P. Air.
Even payrolls for staff in Hong Kong, Rome, in fact everywhere that C.P.
Air has an office is handled right from the Computer Center here and,
incidentally, even those are in psychedelic colours.  We also looked down
into the huge spotless kitchens (32,000 square feet) where "in flight
meals" are prepared.  We saw the paint shops where enormous screens of
water absorb the excess overspray and fumes and we visited the Navigation
Instrument overhaul and repair area into which we could only look through
glass partitions as all dust is sucked from the air and where the workers
wear special lint free clothing so that not a particle of dust can disturb
the delicate instruments.  Even the temperature is rigidly controlled,
and of course we wandered through one of the huge stretch jets from tail
to pilot's cabin and saw all the dozens of dials that have to be watched to
keep us in the air.
Unfortunately space permits only a brief outline of a most interesting
three jour tour which ended with coffee and do-nuts in the staff lunch room
- a room which has to be seen to be believed - there should be such elegance
and comfort.  Too bad so many of you could not come along.  Hope you can
make DAIRYLAND July 20, at 7:30 p.m.
FLASH.1.'  What are you doing for Thanksgiving?
How about a trip to RENO via Air Canada
Leave Vancouver 8 p.m. Friday return Monday p.m.
CHAMPAGNE FLIGHT GOING - STEAK FLIGHT COMING BACK.
Accommodation at the Wonderlodge (Back of Harrah's)  3 nights
ALL INCLUSIVE $89.00
If interested phone Pat LaVac. 4696 or Claudia Kerr 2304.
TOUR ARRANGED THROUGH L.A.A. via CITY HALL.
14 "INNOCENTS ABROAD" by Kirman
Travel enriches our knowledge of the world and of ourseives-sometimes to
the point of absurdity. We suddenly realise that the real world is much
richer than the one offered to us by reproductions of paintings, photos,
movies or even literary accounts.
During an evening dedicated to a recount of our recent visit to Europe
and Israel the editor suggested that the Biblos readers would like to
share our experiences, so here are just a few of the rather unique happenings which occured during our journeyings.
went to a London post office to send a telegram home.
"Would you like to send a Normal or a Speedy one?" asked
"What is the difference?"  I enquired.
"Well you see Madam, the normal telegram would be more exp
than the speedy one."
"How come the normal one is more expensive than the speedy
I asked.
"I have it written in the instructions Madam." answered the clerk
with great finality.  End of conversation.
the clerk.
ens ive
one?"
Scene...
A group of foreign students taking a non-sinking
dip in the Dead Sea.  If a drop of the oversalted
water gets into the eyes it causes a very painful
burning sensation.
Suddenly two girls ran from the sea with tight
closed eyes, arms outstretched heading for the
shower on the beach.
Oh the comfort of the first spray of sweet water.
" Hey ladies, don't you see the line-up?" a man's voice shouted.
Their eyes opened with difficulty...There were only two outlets with the
sweet water and a 1 ine of Israeli soldiers waiting patiently for their
turn to wash off the salt.
"Sorry" smiled the girls.  "We didn't know there was a line-up.  Can't
we both share one outlet?"
"You had better get into line" threatened the soldier stubbornly.  The
girls continued to shower.  All of a sudden with a dramatic gesture the
first two soldiers dropped their bathing trunks and awaited the expected
embarrased re-action. •>
5 "rood heavens" said one of the girls, an American student at the Sorbonne
"Sights like that are not new to me" and she continued to wash the salt
from her body under the troubled shower.
We had been warned by friends who previously visited Rome to watch not to
be cheated when buying merchandise there.
At every bus stop and at every point of interest there are the peddlers
looking for the tourist and for business.  They carry all sorts of things
like postcards, pictures, books, toys, etc.  They are very persuasive and
wave their wares under your nose.  While we were touring the stadium a
peddler approached.  Somehow it was impossible to escape.
"Would you buy something Madam?" He offered a list of merchandise.
"No thank you."
"Look, I have beautiful slides of Rome.  They normally cost eight dollars"
The price was printed right on the sealed package.  "I give it to you
for five."
It was hard to get rid of him.  He followed us all the way, he pestered,
we wavered, we bought.  We don't have a slide projector at home but who
knows we might acquire one - to show our si ides of Rome - and anyway
five dollars instead of eight seemed 1ike a bargain.
The next day we visited the souvenir store near our hotel,
same slides for two dollars.  BEWARE.1.'
V *-1
They had the

Cite

Citation Scheme:

        

Citations by CSL (citeproc-js)

Usage Statistics

Share

Embed

Customize your widget with the following options, then copy and paste the code below into the HTML of your page to embed this item in your website.
                        
                            <div id="ubcOpenCollectionsWidgetDisplay">
                            <script id="ubcOpenCollectionsWidget"
                            src="{[{embed.src}]}"
                            data-item="{[{embed.item}]}"
                            data-collection="{[{embed.collection}]}"
                            data-metadata="{[{embed.showMetadata}]}"
                            data-width="{[{embed.width}]}"
                            async >
                            </script>
                            </div>
                        
                    
IIIF logo Our image viewer uses the IIIF 2.0 standard. To load this item in other compatible viewers, use this url:
http://iiif.library.ubc.ca/presentation/cdm.biblos.1-0190792/manifest

Comment

Related Items