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Biblos May 1, 1969

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Array UNIVERSITY OF BRITISH  COLUMBIA
VOL,   5  No.   7  of  the  U.B.C.   LIBRARY  STAFF NEWSLETTER
MAY/JUNE
1969
Summer's  here,   the  grass   is  green,
There's  faces missing  from   the  scene
As  staffers  travel   o'er  the  lands
Or  lie upon  the  local   sands,
And  though at  times  the  library  steams
It's  great  to have  the "in betweens"
Enjoy  the now - and don't   remember
It's not  too  long  till   next September
siightly  browned
around
touri sterial
bacteri al
ninety  five,
to   revive,
crowded  stack
they WILL be back
HAPPY VACATION  EVERYONE!
The Editor.   Pat LaVac.
INDEX
STAFF CHanges (many)
The Memorial Room (Woodward)
Collects
The S.F.U. "Drop Ins"
Incoming and Outgoing Mail
Collectors Item. Skeletons.
Stopgap Solution to an Emergency Problem
or the latest on the tower
St. Wibby Reports
Tour of the Public Safety Building
Your Editorial Staff
Colquhoun's Campus Capers
Page
2
4
5
7
8
9
10
14
17
23
24 APPOINTMENTS:
STAFF    CHANGES
Margaret Lambert
Sal ly Krieger
Ursula Disharz
Carol   Wilson
Man W.   Pyo
Kathy  Cheang
Margaret  Glover
Dean Olson
Sharon  Brown
Dilma Huggett
Jerilyn  Sproston
Elaine Hoffman
Karen Shaw
Moraig  Fulton
Ralph Stanton
Helen  Schmidt
Anne Davis
Suzan York
Tim Massey
Diane Anderson
Diane Ellert
Grace  Ferguson
Sheila Smyth
Marion  Price
Jean McLeod
Popy Koveos
Sandra Sloan
Kate Gibson
Diana Bverk
Sandra Smith
Dale Mei r
Linda  Redfern
Pat Lang
Carol  Kurylko
L.A. II
Woodwa rd
L.A. 1
Fine Arts
L.A. 1
Ci rculation
L.A. II
Math
Stack Attendant
Ci rculation
L.A. 1
Catalogue
L.A. 1
Woodwa rd
L.A. 1
Woodwa rd
L.A. II
Woodwa rd
L.A. Ml
Ci rculation
L.A. 1
Curric. Lab.
L.A. I
Ci rculation
L.A. II
Catalogue
L.A. 1
Acquisit ions
L.A. II
Acqu isitions
L.A. 1
Law
L.A. II
Woodwa rd
L.A. 11
Serial s
L.A. Ill
Colbeck Room
L.A. 1
Catalogue
L.A. 1
Curric. Lab.
L.A. 1
Serial s
L.A. II
Catalogue
L.A. Ml
Ci rculation
L.A. 1
Catalogue
L.A. 1
Catalogue
L.A. 1
Ci rculation
L.A. 1
Ci rculation
L.A. 1
Periodicals
L.A. Ml
Ci rculation
L.A. 1
Circulation
L.A. 1
Ci rculation
L.A. 1
Systems
L.A. 1
Catalogue PROMOTIONS:
3
John Johnston
L.A.
1 1 1
Ci rcu
lat ion
to
L.A.
IV   Periodicals
Josephine Cuff
L.A.
1
Catal
ogue
to
L.A. 1
1    Catalogue
Rick Welch*
L.A.
1 1 1
Catal
ogue
to
L.A.
1 11  Catalogue
Shirley Dahlie
L.A.
II
Acqu isitions
to
L.A.
111  C i re.
Louise Hazels-
L.A.
1
Ci rcu
lat ion
to
' L.A.
1    Woodwa rd
Betty Van der Velde
L.A.
1
Woodwa rd
to
L.A.
11   Woodward
Gudrun Hiemstra
L.A.
1 1
Catal
ogue
to
L.A.
1 11  Catalogue
Zorka Srej ic
L.A.
1
Acquisitions
to
L.A.
1 1 1  Catalogue
Giesla Mailue
L.A.
1 1
Seria
Is
to
L.A.
111  Catalogue
Jane Johnson
L.A.
1
Law
to
L.A.
1 1   Law
Carol Trueman
L.A.
1
B.M.B
•
to
L.A.
II   B.M.B,
Eleanor Maze
L.A.
Ml
Catal
ogue
to
L.A.
IV   Catalogue
Trudy Lewis
L.A.
1
Periodicals
to
L.A.
II   Serials
Gerri Minaker
L.A.
1
Ci rcu
lation
to
L.A.
II   Ci rculation
Ceci1ia Wan
L.A.
1 1
Catal
ogue
to
L.A.
111  Catalogue
Marg Scott
L.A.
1
Ci rcu
lation
to
L.A.
II   Ci rculation
Huiberdina Van Elst
L.A.
1
Woodwa rd
to
L.A.
11   Science
Maureen Fromson
L.A,
1 1
Catal
ogue
to
L.A.
111  Catalogue
Carole Wisdom
L.A.
1 1
Preb*
ndery
to
L.A.
1 1 1  Prebindery
Tannis Mulcahy
L.A.
II 1
Ci rcu
lation
to
L.A.
IV   Ci rculation
Inge Fleet
Sec.
I 1 1
C? ret
i lation
to
L.A.
IV   Ci rculation
WE SAY FAREWELL TO:
Jackie Steed
L.A.
III
Law
Therese Poisson
L.A.
1 II
Catalogue
1lze Gravitis
L.A.
1 II
Catalogue
Glenda Midgley
L.A.
1 1
Catalogue
Mon i ca Lomow
L.A.
IV
Ci rculation
Elliott Bold
L.A.
1
Catalogue
Linda Cluff
L.A.
II
Woodwa rd
Anita Houston
L.A.
1
Serial s
Mariella Rodger
L.A.
1
Ci rculation
Jim Russell
L.A.
1
Catalogue
Diana Colquohoun
L.A.
1 1 1
Ci rculation
Alexandra Dobbs
L.A.
1
Gov. Pubs.
Edna Johnson
L.A.
1 1
Music
Esther Vital is
L.A.
III
Catalogue
* Transfers 4
THE MEMORIAL ROOM
The Woodward Memorial Room is the oak-panelled library of your dreams.
Besides a Gobelin tapestry, it sports a balcony, a huge chandelier,
carpets and soft leather chairs.  It also contains books.
The room houses most of Dr. Sinclair's collection which was purchased
in ig65 for $250,000. You may remember Dr. Sinclair's spending spree
(he bought two cars, one of them an Aston-Martin). He also funded his
own biochemical research at Oxford.  The collection contains two
incunabula: Gerson's "Opera" of 1494, now in Special Collections, and
"Sermones notabiles de tempores et de Sanctis" by Albertus Magnus,
printed in 1481 by C. Zainer,
In 1963, the Leake collection was acquired for $50,000 from Chauncey
D. Leake, a famous physiological pharmacologist.  Two of the books
were published before 1501.  The earlier one, printed by Johannes de
Colcnia in partnership with Johannes Manthen de Gerretzem, at Venice,
was a gift from Dr. Leake at the opening of the Woodward Library in
1964.  It is a 1480 edition of Johannes de Janduno's "Quaestiones
super tres libros Aristoteles De anima". The Memorial Rooms's only
illuminated incunabulum begins with a capital decorated with flowers
of gold leaf and blue, red, green, yellow and purple pigments.  The
bottom of the first page is bordered in the same colourings.  The
questions are introduced by red or blue Q's. All of this imitates the
manuscripts of the pre-Gutenburg era.  Like the earlier hand-written
books, this one has no title page.  The colophon at the end identifies
the printers and gives the exact date of printing as June 18, 1480.
Pl'rius Secondus' "Historia natural is" is a later volume with a
rudimentary title page indicating author and title, but for full
information, one must look to the colophon.  It was printed in Venice,
by Bartholomaeus de Zanis on December 12, 1496.  By this date, the
hand done, coloured initials seen in the Janduno volume were replaced
by a set of wood-cut letters which a printer used in all of his books.
The "Historia natural is" text was a source for many medical writers in
the 15th and 16th centuries.  It contains references to the use of
mandragora and opium for relieving pain during operations.
Dr. Sherrington donated a 15th century volume by Lorenzo Valla called
"Elegantiae linguae latinae libri sex".  Printed in 1476 by Andrea
Vendramine, it is the Memorial Room's earliest book.  This Venetian
publication has no title page and further simulates a manuscript with
its hand done rubric.ations. Our copy is bound in the original boards
with brass clasps. THE MEMORIAL ROOM (cont'd.)
"De nuptiis philogogiae et mercurii" by Martianus Capella was printed
at Modena by Dionysius Bertochus, May 15, 1500. At that time a title
page was customary. Here it reads "Opus, Martiani Capellae" followed
by a list of contents. The printer's device identifying the workshop
in which the book was produced appears at the end of the book.
Adrienne Clark
These five books are a basis for the history of medicine and science
collection kept in the Memorial Room.
COLLECTS.
Trudeaumania
Authur Lismer  (83)
Toronto    Maple Leafs
John Mason  Brown    (68)
Charles  Libre
Don Messer's Jubilee
Franz  von  Pappen
Mother Goose  (Xerox Corp.   suppresses 3,000  copies   reprint ed.
because   it's "anti"  -)
Dawsons of  Pall  Mall   (Booksellers expelled from Antiq.   Booksellers
Assoc,   for hanky-panky,)
The Canadian university  professor.
St  Christopher
Smother Brothers
Abraham  Fortas
Negro   (the word) "Where do you stash the porno, Cookie?" And now a word from our honourable associates, the S.F.U. Drop-
ins .
Hidden in a dank, windowless corner of the main circulation office
is the exiled inter library loan department of Simon Fraser Univeristy.
Unknown to many, the three staff members unobtrusively accomplish
monumental amounts of work with only an occasional whimper.  The
three are paid (little) and equipped by Simon Fraser but spend
all their time at UBC.  Dale Liberty (ostensibly) heads the
department with strong (albeit clumsy) supporting roles played
by Jean Swindells and Bill Watson.
Their duties involve searching for and xeroxing articles for
faculty and staff at SFU, University of Victoria, and BCIT, as
well as locating and shipping books.  SFU maintains its own xerox
machine down in the lobby of level one.
These duties are, alas, becoming more and more arduous.  The
total number of requests sent during April of last year was 336.
Last month 1,097 requests were handled.  The total number of pages
xeroxed April of 1968 was 5,918; last month's total was 11,49).
Originally only one staff member was required to handle requests
from SFU  An increase in the number of SFU requests and responsibility for the University of Victoria necessitated the addition of
another staff member.  Ever increasing requests and the addition
of BCIT requests have forced the addition of yet another full-
time worker.
If the present rate of increase continues SFU will require no
staff members at UBC at all by 1977.  They will have worked
themselves out of the job by having xeroxed every book in the
1ibrary.
Dale Liberty 8
INCOMING AND OUTGOING MAIL
Recei ved 	
Dear Sirs,
My wife's name is Dona Rawlins (see
Mr/Mrs/Miss Dino Rapanos got a surprise,
received his/her library card in the mai
the envelope la
1 bet, when he
1!
bel)
/she
Actually, it's rather heart warming to have been involved
(in a minor way, of course!) in the University's little mistake;
it's sort of nice to know that even in such an academic atmosphere, one can find evidences of the human hand.
"Do nothing my halves" is the rough translation of some
German writer's words.  Thus I'm constrained to suggest that
perhaps when you can see fit to err again, you might just slip
into the mail my wife's degree in Education - mine too perhaps?
In the meantime, here's Dino's card;
accept my thanks and best wishes.
send out Dona'
s, and
Thoughtfully yours
John T. Rawlins.
OUTGOING 	
and incoming.
ced wi th outs ide
and back in on 1
mai 1 .
y five
See what happens
This notice went
months 	
when campus mail is mi>
all the way to Germany
MICHAEL S. BATTS
German
Returned for insufficient address!!!!. Collectors I tern  from the Law Library	
SKELETONS — Minimizing the Effect of Exhibiting a Skeleton
to the Jury.
Problem Presented  In recent years attorneys appearing for
the plaintiff have quite frequently made use of skeletons.
The subject matter of the litigation may involve solely a
broken bone in the leg but the attorney for the plaintiff
will exibit the entire skeleton to the jury.
Trial Strategy    If the court permits the exhibition of
the skeleton to the jury it is important for the defense attorney to adopt a method for counteracting the effect the
gruesome exhibit may have on the jury.  One effective method
is not to appear too tense but consider the exhibition of the
skeleton as a joke.  Referring to the skeleton by given name
such as "Oscar", "Clarence" or "Elmer" will relieve the tenseness in the courtroom. An alert defense attorney, when his
apponent unveils the skeleton may nonchalently ask if it is
the skeleton of his grandfather or one of his uncles.  He may
also inquire if it is one of the skeletons in the plaintiff's
attorney's closet or if it is merely one of his clients which
has been picked.  It is reported that.on one occasion when
the plaintiff's attorney unveiled
his skeleton he found to his utter
astonishment that there
was a cigarette protruding from the skeleton's
mouth.  Just how the cigarette
happened to be in the
skeleton's mouth is unknown.
If some of these methods are
adopted the jury will
probably be doing more
laughing than giving
serious consideration
to the gruesome exhibition!!!,
(Defense Law Journal Vol. I 1957.
tributor furnished upon request)
Contributed. 10
As Eiblos likes to keep abreast of the times, herewith the latest use
for the "erection" on the Library Lawn.
A STOPGAP SOLUTION TO AN EMERGENCY PROBLEM - or A PROPOSAL FOR A NEW
UNDERGRADUATE LIBRARY COLLEGE, UNIVERSITY, AND RESEARCH LIBRARIES.
MR. W. WATSON
In response to students demands, made clear in a library survey of
stucent traffic routes, we propose the conversion of the existing,
but virtually unused Bell Tower into the NEW SEDGEWICK UNDERGRADUATE
LIBRARY.
This proposal, we think, has many attractive advantages, A
close examination of the structure will reveal that it consists
of ten convenient levels.  What good librarian could resist the
urge to reclassify the undergraduate collection using the
Dewey Decimal System, and reshelve it in the tower - one section
for each of Dewey's ten divisions.  It is proposed that the interior walls of the structure be faced with book shelves. A
narrow spiral (ascending only) staircase would provide student
access to the shelves.  There is obviously no room for studying
in the stack area, so we suggest a quite reading area built
directly under the chimes.  The Spiral Stair-Case should be
constructed in such a way that it leaves enough space for a
central dumbwaiter to be used by the sub-professional bookshelver.
You may have realized by now that the plan as it has been described leaves no route for exit from the library.  Herein lies
the genius of the proposal. We propose to limit exits from all
floors, except the tenth which houses the BELLREL REAL * TIME
ON * LINE Computer Check-out System. This way, students would
get their required amount of physical exercise (ask any library
school student!) and a more acute awareness of the library's
total collection, each time a book Is borrowed. As the book is
checked out the student is supplied with a colourful parachute
with which he descends from the library heights.  (Students with
overdue books could be threatened with use of chutes packed by
newly trained student assistants!)  We believe that this may add
a little fun to a student's dreary life.
Undergraduate students have long been the under-dogs on univer-
sity campuses. We believe that to give them an under-ground
library would be the final insult.  But, being served by the
tallest library on campus will give them a feeling of well-being
and enable them to hold their heads up high within the university
community. 11
Please see the appended, diagram for other library services.
We hope that our proposal will meet your approval and beg you
to remember that this is only a preliminary draft. We are
willing to meet you and your coleagues to discuss improvements
on our proposal. You need only drop us a line.
Professor Aldon Norbury and Colleague
Slash - Burning, Indian Arm. . i
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^^ ST.?? WIBBY REPORTS...
PARDON me if my column seems
a little garbled this month
but I'm not quite sure whether
I'm a "has-been" or a "never-
was" but anyway here goes:
CONGRATUALTIONS to Mrs. Anne*-
Brearley, School of Librarian-
ship on her appointment to the
University Senate.
HAPPINESS is the birth of a boy
Tuesday April 8th, Robert John
"Jay" 5 lbs 10 oz. 19" long,
born to Gwen Deachman, former
head of Sedgewick Receiving..
MARRIAGES. MANY...cupid working over time...then he's no
saint.. .
BEST WISHES to...
Mrs. Ron Niessen who was the
former Vera  Wall of Circulation.
The Miss, that was, Jerilyn
Sproston of Curric. Lab. now
Mrs. Thomas Garnet.  And old
friend Jean Lindsay of Searching, now Mrs. Barr Hall. Jean
was entertained at a surprise
party prior to the wedding at,
of all places, her own home.
We hear it was a great "do".
GOVERNMENT PUBLICATIONS busy
binding their DBS. - sounds
rather risque but actually this
is the reason that Gov. Pubs,
have been closed until 11 a.m.
every morning.  All members of
staff are engaged in the horrendous job of assembling material
for the binding.
14
DBS stands
for Dominion
Bureau of
Stati sties
and the staff
in Gov. Pubs,
are discovering*
material as far
back as the
twenties and
some material
that even the
Bureau does
not have,
Happy Heatwave!
Suzanne
Dodson-very
sensibly-has joined the general
exodus overseas.  She is
holidaying in Austria,
OTHER TRAVELLRS ABROAD include:
Hilda uit den Bosch, Social Work,
visiting her home-land, Holland,
Maria Haas, Searching, off to
Germany.  Rosemary McAndless,
Sedgewick, Hawaii.  Georgia
Detwiller likewise of Sedgewick
making the scene in Greece,
(incidentally best wishes on the
engagement) Bev Richards, Social
Science, New York and Europe.
Jennifer Gallup, England and
Scandinavia. And a trip to end
all trips, Gillian Stoneman of
Searching to Montreal and the
Eastern Provinces then on to jolly
old England where she and her
husband will commence a tour by
car to include Morocco, Spain,
France, a meeting with Maria Haas
in Munichsometime in July then on
to Scandinavia through the Middle
East to India and from there to
Australia in time for Christmas.
(Just colour me green). 15
NEWS FROM WOODWARD
An unusually rare showing of
colour photos depicting old
European hospitals (1400-1800)
is on display currently at Woodward Memorial Library.  Lent to
the Library by Mrs. Grace Golden
of Connecticut (who took the pictures on a U.S. Public Health
grant in the history of medicine)
this is its first travelling appointment.
Dr. Gibson was instrumental in
bringing it to our University
for a limited engagement after
its original showing at Yale.
It will remain on extended exhibit until around July 15th and
should interest students of architecture, fine arts and literature
as well as those in the history of
medicine.
The large foyer case, all 3 cases
in the Memorial Room and 4 large
cases on the second floor are
devoted to the exhibit.  Leave
yourself enough time to enjoy every
item thoroughly.
GREETINGS AND BEST WISHES to
Mrs. Larry Lacelle, nee Heather
Jones of Woodward.
and WELCOME BACK to Adrienne
Clark after hertour of Holland,
Belgium and Scandinavia.
OTHER RETURNED TRAVELLERS include
Pan Piddington, Cataloguing,
Czechoslovakia, and Mary Macaree,
Forestry/Agriciul ture - Scotland,
With all these overseas visits who
can tell what collisions will occur.
Drive carefully the one you run
over might be a fellow worker.
We see our "BEATLE BABY" is
back in the news the lucky
recipient of a $100 Canada
Savings Bond. As every one
knows, wee Kate is the daughter
of Dave Thomas of the Science
Di vision,
TALENT UNLIMITED,  Cheers to
Joan Cosar of Serials Div. who
took first place in her solo
singing division at the B.C.
Kiwanas Music Festival.  Her coworkers were very thrilled to hear
Joan sing at a party given by
Mr. Johnson for members of his
staff.
The LAW LIBRARY STAFF also
enjoyed a buffet supper at the
home of Mr. and Mrs. Tom
Shorthouse Tuesday, May 13th.
MORE MARRIAGES.  Biblos drawer
of fine cartoons, Diana Cooper,
now Mrs. "Willie" Kraetschmer,
Diana is still riding a pink
cloud. Cliche! Cliche!  Trouble
with cliches is that they fit
the situation so well. Loads
of happiness, Di. Anyway, at
last our two cartoonists have
different initials.
AND STILL ANOTHER.  Best wishes
to Heather of Special Collections.
Formerly Paterson now Mrs. Ronald
Fearn.  Rumour has it that the
marriage was performed on board
ship. True?
CONFERENCES
Those attending CLA too numerous
to list, you know them all, but
we are looking for reports.
Hope to include some in next
month's Biblos. 16
Peg Leighton of Woodward off to
the 14th Quadrennial International
Congress of Nurses in Montreal
June 22-28.
Hildegarde Spaulding, Woodward
has already attended the
Conference of the American Assoc,
for the History of Medicine,
Baltimore, May 8-10.
Georgia Macrae, Cataloguing, to
the third I nternational Cong ress of
Medical Librarianship.  Amsterdam,
May 5-9 & an extended tour of
Europe.
Steve Johnson, Serials, to the
Special Libraries Assoc. 60th
Annual Conference.  (Prelim. Prog.)
Montreal, June 1st and 2nd,
Chuck Forbes, Sedgewick, to the
ALA Conference and Preconference,
Atlantic City, June 19-28,
Tom Shorthouse, Law, to the Ameri'
Association of Law Libraries. 62r
Annual meeting, June 29-July 2,
Houston, Texas.
MARIA HORVATH, Humanities, has
published again, this time in the
Art publication KERAMOS Heft. 43 -
1969.  Title of article. "Ceramic
Expression of the Mediaeval Tile".
Maria has credited Dr. Spaulding
(Woodward Library) with giving
considerable aid in her research
for the article.
HUMANITIES.  We hear that Jennifer
Gal Tup's research for the Bibli
ography on T.S. Eli
preparing has recen
New York and Harvard
UNUSUAL VACATIONS.
Carol Trueman, Bio-Medical
Branch is to live on an
Indian Reserve at Lake Labin
for three weeks, both to
help and to learn.
ALMOST FORGOT.  Best wishes
to the former Liz Howatson of
Social Sciences who is now
Mrs. Col in Fussel1.
Hope   I   haven't missed  anyone.
And  aurevoir  till   next month.
Must go join  George,
Christopher and  Wenceslas.
We're  thinking of staging  a
sit-in...you  know where...
Might  see a  few library  types
around.the piazza.
&*&>
f £9\
„->>
\\\vl(i/Wi'llWU, 17
TOUR OF PUBLIC SAFETY BUILDING
Although there was no connection, it was All Fool's Day that a group
from U.B.C. Libraries and their friends took a tour through Vancouver's
Main Public Safety Building as arranged by the U.B.C, Library
Assistants Association.  Considering the "Public Safety Building"
in the vernacular is "Police Station" it was surprising that over
thirty persons turned up for the tour (some of the gals dragged their
husbands along).
Duty obliged our Biblos editor's better half to be present and it was
he who was elected to conduct the tour. Most of us have met up with
Gerry socially (like the L.A. Association wine and cheese party) and
therefore know that he cuts a fine figure...you should see him in
uni form.,.perfect!
As one of the group I was asked to give my impression of the tour.
To give a detailed description of all we saw would take more time
and space than is available, so this report will be brief.  If you
wish to learn more of P.S.B. (Public Safety Building) contact the
other thirty persons or better still, arrange for a visit to P.S.B...
it is worth the effort if only to realize how well your safety is
being protected! We visited the following sections: Starting at the
sixth floor and working down.
FIRST STOP FINGER PRINTS ROOM
Any person arrested is fingerprinted so you can imagine what
volumes of files this room holds. Fingerprints are also "lifted"
at the scene of any crime and if possible matched with those on
file thereby narrowing down the search for the suspect.
The fingerprint room is small, dark and dingy, crowded with file
cabinets and other necessary equipment; comparative readers, mounted
magnifying glasses, two desks, no windows - airless, we were relieved
to move on.
DETECTIVES OFFICE - IDENTIFYING
In contrast to the fingerprint room, this room was well-lighted
but with a purpose. A battery of lights is directed to one end
where a suspect, together with non-suspects, are  1ined-up.
Witnesses are called upon to identify the person involved in the
crime.  Due to the strong light persons in the line-up cannot 18
descern the witnesses, thereby protecting them from recognition by
the suspect.
Here also we were most interested in thumbing through the case
files. Any call requiring police attention is given a case no.
Starting with number one (1) each current year on January 1st.
The night we visited the case numbers were in the mid 19 thousand
(three months of the year having passed).
In this room also there are dozens of bound volumes of identification photos.  Each page carries approximately a dozen pictures,
two of each person that has violated the law, crimes ranging from
petty larceny to homocide.  A complete description is also recorded
with all known identifying marks; likes, dislikes, habits, aliases
and vital statistics.  Beside this hard copy, all data is stored
in the computer.  When a crime has been committed, clues are fed
into the computer making it no longer necessary for a weary witness
to thumb through thousands of pictures.  By a process of elimination the computer assists detectives in narrowing down the suspects
for identification.  We were amused to find that one person
in the picture gallery "liked jam sandwiches and was prone to take
them for lunch whilst on the "Job".  This fact too was^Torfed
in the memory of the computer.     m*
SO ON TO THE PARADE ROOM
Hot much of interest here since
no one was on parade.  The room
is best described as a barracks,
its function however serves
well as it is here that all
members of the Force are duly
inspected before going on duty.
Orders for the day are on the
wall, stolen car lists are
on the desk and notices of
social functions and "naughty
jokes" are on the bulletin board.
TARGET RANGE
Without giving it too much thought we accept the fact' TrYSt our
police officers are armed, and being armed must keep in practice 19
to use the weapons they carry.  Dummy bullets are made at the
range for target practice (thereby saving the taxpayers money)
It was interesting to examine the melting pot, the molds and the    3
finished product.  There are four target ranges, the target distance(^y
being 66 feet.  We learned that arrangements may be made
to practice at any time.  However,  A jAm
tests are mandatory and officers   rV 1;
are called upon, without prior notice
to exercise their skill at
least once in a three-
month period.  The score is
entered on record, (ed. not the
ones in the ceiling) We were
also told that there
an outside range for
long range target
practice elsewhere.
MAGISTRATES COURT.
The further we travelled on
the over-crowded conditions
became at
v _3
this tour the~"more
Fortunately our group was not
on official business when we visited the courtrooms; I doubt if
the space could have accomodated us! Most of us are familiar
with the Perry mason-type court room so to inspect these court
rooms was quite a contrast.  The facilities were all there but
on a reduced scale.  Offices for court room officials and stenographers are small, windowless, hot and depressing cubicles
again fantastically over-crowded.
The elevated witness box stood out starkly. A black-covered
Bible rested on the ledge of the witness box and I wondered how
one could swear to "tell the truth, the whole truth and nothing
but the truth, so help me God" when ones belief was that "God
is Dead".  (ed. oath can be taken by "affirmation" and also
there are copies of the Koran, Old Testiment and other Sacred
books.  Many of the older Chinese witnesses still take the
"chicken blood oath" which is quite a colourful  procedure.)
These are the "lower courts" presided over by a magistrate.  Trials
are held here and sentences passed.  On more serious cases
preliminary trials are held and when necessary referred to the
"county court" which is presided over by a judge. 20
COURT CLERKS OFFICE
Open 24 hours a day with a Justice of the Peace in attendance at
all times to set bail, swear out warrants and advise police
Officer's on due process of Law.
WEAPONS CUPBOARD
Our next scheduled stop was the Phone Room but an armed hold-up
had just occurred in the city so the Phone Room was out of
bounds to us at that time.  We moved on to the arsenal, the
Weapons Cupboard, which is kept locked at all times.  Our guide
obtained the key, unlocked the cupboard permitting us to view
the contents.
Anyone interested in weapons has much to see here.  Guns of all
description, bullet proof vests, tear gas and one small can of
the notorious Mace which we gathered dwells in lonely state as
a sample. At this time I was at the tail-end of the group and
couldn't hear too well what was being discussed on weapons supply.
I sauntered around the outer office, noticed a sheaf of papers
hung under a sign "Daily Reports' and upon reading the first
report I became aware that this was not just a tour of the Public
Safety Bldg.  I was experiencing but the law in action.  This report gave the details of a theft that had taken place at 5 p.m.
that day. A young man had been arrested stealing meat, from a
supermarket.  The stark details of how this person was caught and
under detention at that very moment saddened me.  I felt compassion for this unknown; what prompted the action? was it bravado? was it for profit? or did he take the meat because he was
hungry?  I shall never know;  at that point along came the Sergeant -of-the day, to take my attention.  He was very subtle but
I realized that I was reading confidential material.   Embarrassed
at the faux pas,  I was relieved to catch up with the group and
move on to the Records Room.
RECORDS ROOM
Records are kept of all persons that have committed crimes within
the city limits of Vancouver and they fill many files and book
shelves.  These records are   retired only upon the absolute proof
of the persons decease.
PHONE ROOM
The crime that was being committed while we were on weapons in -
spection was now under control so we proceeded to the phone room. 21
Not too long ago we had the minister of education visit the
library so that he could see the crowded conditions under which
we work.  Someone, soon, should invite the minister of justice
to the P.S.B. to witness the cramped conditions under which these
people work!., by contrast ours are palatial.
A very small, poorly-lighted room with four desks pushed together
as one. A corner of this room is set aside as a "lunch room".
This "Lunch room" aprox 3x4 feet, could accomodate one electric
kettle and one chair only. A young woman having lunch while we
were there remarked that the area (Main and Hastings) was not a
good-neighbourhood for eating out.  (ed. the coffee shop in the
basement is only open whilst court is in session - closing at
5 p.m.)
The desks had phones manned by four young women, only one being
a regular police woman and while we were there the phones were in
constant use (remember this was a
Tuesday night, the weekends
must be h...! ) Messages were
jotted down and passed through
a connecting chute to the Radio
Room,  Perhaps I have
been fortunate in that I have
never had occassion to
cal1 a police station.
The visit to the station
has given me full confidence of the attention I
would receive if I were
ever in trouble and a call was necessary!' The women
incoming calls were efficient, getting all data pertaining to the
call. All four phones are inter-connected permitting one operator
to switch in on another operator's call.  We were permitted to listen
in on calls when given the okay by an operator.  One call was from
a dear old lady reporting that she was going away on holiday!  She
wasn't asking that her premises be gaurded but rather chatting that
she was tired and needed a holiday, one of the many lonely persons
that phone the police department.  The operator was very gracious
and kind, wished her a happy holiday and terminated the call.  I
listened in on the report of a stolen car, the operator asked the
person calling the necessary questions, jotted down the replies
and the report was passed into the chute connected with the Radio
Room 22
RADIO ROOM
The radio room is the hub of public safety operations since the
officers on duty at the switchboards are in direct contact with
all police cars patrolling the city.  Before entering this
section we were asked to be silent; it was explained that if
and when the officers on duty could accept questions they would
so indicate.  Our group was too large for all to visit this
section at one time so we split into smaller groups of seven
and tiptoed in.
There are two switchboards manned by officers wearing headphones.
A magnetized map of the city and small squares of metal are used
to track the location of each ladio patrol car on duty.  At frequent intervals patrol cars report their location and the control
officer moves the "car" on the map.  At all times this radio
room is in command of the safety of the citizens of our city.  One
wonders how they can handle the volume of work a city this size
must entail at peak hours and weekends.
The chute in the phone room leads directly to the switchboard.
The officer picks up a report from the chute, contacts the patrol
car that is in the vicinity of the reported trouble and the patrol
officers take it from there.... Car.. Man wishes to give himself
up at the corner of Robson and Granville ... Car ... reporting
What for? ...  We have no further information caller incoherent..
... We111 check it out .."
There was a brief lull; the officer enquired if we had any questions,
We learned that each patrol car has a specific area to cover and
unless instructed must not go out of the assigned area.  When
so instructed orders are promptly obeyed.  For instance, responding to a reported bank reobbery (alarm system) patrol cars are
dispatched to the bank from all quarters to surround the area.
The lull had passed so there was no time for further questioning.
We silently tip-toed out nodding our gratitude...
The jurisdiction of P.S.B. extends to the Vancouver City limits....
city limits ends at UBC gates!  One of these days we must
arrange a tour of the RCMP station.... 23
The personnel of the Public Safety Building are to be commended
for the interest they take in the protection of our safety; for
dedication to duty under trying conditions and the dispatch in
which these duties are carried out. A very special thanks is
extended to Gerry LaVac for conducting this very instructive
tour.  His patience and endurance while playing "Pied Piper" was
remarkable... and appreciated.
Ann Gardner
NEWS FLASH:  dateline "Vancouver Sun" May 12/69
ALL B.C. COURTS TO BE RE-LOCATED
Block 61 Skyscraper planned to Hold every Level of Court
All levels of Courts in Vancouver will be accomodated in
the proposed B.C. Bldg. Block 61, says Chant (Hon. W.N.
Chant, Minister of Public Works) "and not a moment
too soon says I".
YOUR EDITORIAL STAFF.
Pat LaVac. Editor
Georgie Macrae
Shannon McJannet
Joan Sandilands
Pam Piddington
Diana Colquhoun
Martina Cipol11
Heather Hailey
Donna Richards
Bruce Stephenson
Diana Kraetschmer (Cooper)
Law
Catalogu ing
Cataloguing
Information & Orient.
Cataloguing
Ci rculation
Systems Development
Searching
Cataloguing
Acquisitions
Fine Arts These are the
of Colquhouns Campus capers.Look carefully
these pictures are of you      &~&
5e)tctn.oJ> ml

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