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Biblos Oct 1, 1972

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Array Vol. 8 No. 1
U.B.C. LIBRARY STAFF NEWSLETTER
Oct. 1971
Introducing your Biblos Staff for the year 1971/72.
Pat La Vac
Shelley Criddle
David Miller
Adrienne Clark
Tannis Browning
Georgia Macrae
Gwen Gregor
Judy Coombs
Sheila Cooper
Pat La Vac Jr.
Diana Cooper
Suzanne Dobson
Law Library
Sedgewick
Acqu i si tions
Woodwa rd L i b ra ry
Ci rculati on
Law Library
Map Division
Special Collections
Catalogu i ng
Admin i strat ion
Fine Arts
Cartoons
Government  Pubs.,
UNIVERSITY OF  BRITISH COLUMBIA STAFF CHANGES
A Hearty Welcome To:
L.
A.
Clai re Dolsen
1 1
Frances Reynolds
L.
A.
1
Dawn Sperl ing
L.
A.
1
Wendy Borden
L.
A.
1
Diane Grzebieluch
L.
A.
1
Bel von Lee
L.
A.
1 1 1
Barbara Teagle
L.
A.
1
Carol Emmons
L.
A.
III
Teresa Clarke
L.
A.
1 1
Leigh Burrows
L.
A.
1
Glynis Lowe
L.
A.
1
El i zabeth Taylor
L.
A.
1 1 1
Betty Gawd in
L.
A.
1
Rita Chan
L.
A.
1
Maxine Harris
L.
A.
1
Linda Hilts
L.
A.
1 1
Catherine Boyle
L.
A.
1
Mary Kasper
L.
A.
1 1
Carole Claus
Secretary 11
Deborah Needley
L.
A.
1
Rosalie McPherson
L.
A.
1
Sheila Konrad
L.
A.
1 1
Jean Douglas
L.
A.
1
Susan Dehnei
L.
A.
1
Judy Whitehead
L.
A.
1
Victoria Norris
L.
A.
1 1
Susan Wyngaarden
L.
A.
1 1
Katherine Plett
L.
A.
1 II
Susan Gordon
L.
A.
II
Myra Hoffman
CI
erk
1 1
Ardelle Henderson
Fl
exo.
. Oper.
Mary I en Meyer
Fl
exo.
Oper.
Shi rley Col 1 ins
L.
A.
1 1
David Goodwin
St
. Attend.
Maureen Adams
L.
A.
1 1
Moraig Nicholson
L.
A.
1 1
Marie Poulier
L.
A.
1
Jean Irwin
L.
A.
1
Russ Anton
St
. Attend.
Ser ials
Government Publications
Cataloguing Preparations
Fine Arts
Interlibrary Loans
Sedgewick
Cataloguing Preparations
Sedgewick
Cataloguing L. C.
Woodward
Woodward
Sedgewick
Cataloguing Preparations
Cataloguing Preparations
Cataloguing Preparations
Cataloguing Preparations
Ci rculat ion
Cataloguing Preparations
Serials
Cataloguing Preparations
Cataloguing Preparations
Cataloguing L. C.
Sedgewick
Acquisitions (Prebindery)
Woodward
Ser ials
Serials
Bibl iography
Serials
Acqui s it ions
Systems
Systems
Serials
Sedgewick
Original Cataloguing
Original Cataloguing
Ci rculation
Cataloguing Preparations
C i rculat ion Welcomes Cont'd.
Marija Potocnik
L.
A.
1
Honey Lord
L.
A.
1
Toni O'Hare
L.
A.
1
Brian Taylor
St
. Attend.
Brian Sloan
St
. Attend.
Leslie Kenmui r
L.
A.
1
David Sel1ers
L.
A.
II 1
Sandra Berkowski
L.
A.
1
Merrilee Anderson
L.
A.
II
Jennifer McAfee
CI
erk
1
Sharon Kenny
Secre.
1 1
Dale Burgess
St
. Attend.
Nancy Barkwi11
L.
A.
1
Patricia Buerk
L.
A.
1
John Guy
L.
A.
1
Linda Martin
L.
A.
1
Margaret Simmons
L.
A.
1
Richard Pringle
L.
A.
1
Denise Underhi 11
L.
A.
1
Lucy Ussner
L.
A.
1
Marion Campbel 1
Secretary |
Carole Wisdom
L.
A.
IV
Susan El 1iot
L.
A.
1
Maureen Carey
L.
A.
1
Linda Burkhart
L.
A.
1
Carol Sinclair
Secretary 1
Jan is McFadden
L.
A.
1
Esi Shafir
L.
A.
1
Marilyn Semple
L.
A.
1
Fiona Lanzarotta
L.
A.
1
Mary Mortifee
L.
A.
1
David Hougham
L.
A.
1
Debbie Bal 1
L.
A.
1
Wendy Palmer
L.
A.
1 1
Paula Hi Iderley
L.
A.
1
Glenna Lunde
L.
A.
1
Deborah Udy
L.
A.
II
Ava Tarn
L.
A.
1 1 1
Charles Tully
L.
A.
III
Cataloguing Preparations
Cataloguing Preparations
Circulation
Circulation
Sedgewick
Cataloguing Preparations
Government Publications
Cataloguing Preparations
Cataloguing Preparations
Acquisitions
Acquisitions
Circulation
Curriculum Laboratory
Sedgewick
Cataloguing Preparations
Map
Government Publications
Curriculum Laboratory
Sedgewick
Biomedical Branch
Adtnini strat ion
Original Cataloguing
Sedgewick
Cataloguing Preparations
Circulation
Administrat ion
Social Sciences
Circulat ion
Sedgewick
Woodward
Sedgewick
Special Collections
Sedgewick
Cataloguing Preparations
Woodward
Sedgewick
Law Library
Asian Studies
Cataloguing Preparations Congratulations  To
Kathy Weyer
L.A.
1 II L.C. Cat.
to
L.A.
IV Cat. Prep.
Grace Ferguson
L. A
. II Serials
to
L. A
. Ill Serials
Debbie Savage
L.A.
1 Sedgewick
to
L.A.
11 Sedgewick
Josephine Cuff
L.A.
II L.C. Cat.
to
L.A.
111 Cataloguing
Q.u i Yong Poh
L.A.
1 Preparation
to
L.A.
111 L.C. Cat.
Judy Lee
L.A.
11 Sedgewick
to
L.A.
111 Woodward
Sheila Cooper
L.A.
II L.C. Cat.
to
L.A.
III L.C. Cat.
Karen Shaw
L.A.
II Orig.Cat.
to
L.A.
Ill L.C. Cat.
Lizanne Reveley
L.A.
II Cat. Prep.
to
L.A.
111 L.C. Cat.
Barbara Wragg
L.A.
1 Woodward
to
L.A.
II Orig. Cat.
Kay Tomiye
L.A.
11 Serials
to
L.A.
111 Asian Studies
Phil Vacheresse
Cler
kill Circ.
to
L.A.
IV Curr. Lab.
Patrick Gibson
St.Att. Circ.
to
L.A.
Ill Ci rculation
Elizabeth Strong
L.A.
1 Woodward
to
L.A.
11 Woodward
Jessica Lyth
L.A.
1 Sedgewick
to
L.A.
11 Sedgewick
Karen Pep low
L.A.
II I.L.L.
to
L.A.
III  I.L.L.
Louise van den
Wyngaart
L.A.
1 S.S.D.
to
L.A.
1 1 S.S.D.
Bill Dudley
L.A.
1 Spec.Col 1.
to
St.
Att. Sedgewick
Janet Yuan
L.A.
IV Acq.
to
L.A.
V L.C. Cat.
Stella Coubaraki
L.A.
1 Woodward
to
L.A.
1 1 Human it ies
Lynn Peirson
L.A.
1 Sedgewick
to
L.A.
1 1 Sedgewick
Marlene Hamakawa
L.A.
11 Serials
to
L.A.
111 Serials
Martha Tully
L.A.
III Cat.Prep.
to
L.A.
IV Acquis it ions
We Say Farewell To:
Suzanne Ruzicka
L. A. II
sy
stems
Cathy Paris
L. A. 1
Government Publications
Heather MacAndrew
L. A. Ill
Se
dgewick
Diane Butterfield
L. A. Ill
Sedgewick
Doris Warkentin
L. A. IV
L.
C. Cataloguing
Mary Akehurst
Secretary 11
Government Publications
Vera Sebb
L. A. II
Ser ials
Pat Lamphear
L. A. II
Woodward
Anne Von Renesse
L. A. 1
Ci rculation
Janice Roy
L. A. Ill
L.
C. Cataloguing
Maria Maros
L. A. 1
Cataloguing Preparations
Barry Henderson
Stack Attend.
Sedgewick
Gerry Hollett
L. A. Ill
Bi
bliography (G&E)
Linda Berdusco
L. A. 1
Sedgewick Farewel1s Cont'd.
Kate Gibson
Frances Haywood-Farmer
Karen Cowgi11
Janet Gladstone
Sally Hubbard
Barbara Robson
Louise Hazel
Brigitte Duvigneau
Kate Millar
Joy Korman
Mary Chow
Gina Sen
Vivian Galbraith
Janet Taggart
Josie Bannerman
Steve Prokopenko
Gudrun Hiemstra
Barbara Chambers
Elaine Will son
Ruth Fahlman
Margaret McCann
Kathy Walters
Phyllis Miles
Diane Goudey
Sally Chan
Marg Colclough
Judy Rennison
Eri k Will iams
Louise Hami1 ton
Trudy Lewis
Judy Fiene
Nancy Clarke
Ronaldo Jago
Susan Kent
Betty van Assum
Helene Schmidt
Clerk
1 1
Acquis it ions
L. A.
1
Sedgewick
K. P.
0.
Systems
L. A.
1
Sedgewick
L. A.
1 1
Catalogue Preparations
L. A.
1
Ci rculat ion
L. A.
1 1
Woodward
L. A.
1 1
Original Cataloguing
L. A.
II
Serials
Secretary 11
Acquis it ions
L. A.
1 1
Original Cataloguing
L. A.
1 1
Original Cataloguing
L. A.
1
Cataloguing Preparations
L. A.
1
Map
L. A.
1 1 1
Interlibrary Loans
Stack
Attend.
C i rculat ion
L. A.
IV
Original Cataloguing
L. A.
1
Cataloguing Preparations
L. A.
V
L. C. Cataloguing
L. A.
1
B. M. B.
Clerk
1 1
Administrat ion
L. A.
1
Ci rculat ion
L. A.
1
Cataloguing Preparations
L. A.
1 1
Social Sciences
L. A.
1 1 1
Asian Studies
Secretary 1
Administration
L. A.
II
Human it ies
Stack Attend.
Sedgewick
L. A.
II
Fine Arts
L. A.
1 1 1
Serials
L. A.
1
Sedgewick
L. A.
1
Catalogue Preparations
K. P.
0.
Systems
L. A.
1
Ci rculat ion
L. A.
1II
Woodward
L. A.
11
Law Edi tor ial.
I am on soap box this month about the disappointing lack
of interest shown by the 410-j members on the Library Staff
in participating in the series of educational tours that
are being arranged through the Library Assistants Associat ion.
We hear the constant cry for "involvement" does this showing mean that the staff both non-professional and professional only seeks to be involved in their own field
and are not interested in seeing how other industries
and professions work.  Or perhaps there is a feeling of
superiority that other walks of life have no bearing on
our own.
Is the cry for involvement only a lip service to the
pattern of work, home, T.V. and bed, or that further
education can only be found in the academic atmosphere
of extra courses, night school or C.B.C. documentaries,
but never in a foundry or commercial enterprise.
Possibly a night in Gastown holds more excitement than
an evening at C.P. Air, Dairyland or Gulf Oil, but what
does one actually learn.  Possibly it is much more
exciting to carry a banner in an anti-pollution parade
than to go to a refinery and view the problem from the
other side and to find out what is being attempted, but
is this honest especially when the opportunity is there.
The Library Assistants Association does thank the 12
people who showed up for that most interesting tour of
the Gulf Oil but what happened to the rest of the 24
who signed up? We ask for a pre-tour registration to
make sure that we can meet the minimum numbers required
for any such outing.  It seldom matters if more than
the required numbers attend but, as in the last tour, it
is most embarassing and disappointing for everyone when
less than the minimum puts in an appearance.
It m-ight be added that of the 12 who did tour Gulf Oil
only 5 were actually members of the Library Staff	
My.' 5 out of 410^...How inspiring.'.'
PAL LIBRARY ASSISTANT ASSOCIATION NEWS
GULF OIL REFINERY TOUR
On Tuesday August l6 the Library Assistants Association
and friends toured the Gulf Oil Refinery in Port Moody.  The
tour began with a movie explaining the refining process.  Then
one of the Gulf engineers held a question and answer period
where we learned some astounding facts.  For example:
- There are fourteen types of diesel fuel alone
which come from crude oil during the refining
process, not to mention gasoline, propane,
butane, stove oil etc.
- A refinery becomes obsolete within fifteen
years therefore it must constantly be rebuilt
and modernized.
- AND according to the Gulf engineer, leaded
gasolines cause LESS not MORE pollution than
unleaded gasolines.
Apparently, the controversy began with the proposed future
use of a catalytic muffler for cars.  This muffler cleaned the
car exhaust but the lead in the gasoline poisoned the catalyst
in the muffler thus causing even dirtier exhaust.  To be
effective, this muffler could only be used only on a car
burning unleaded gasoline.  However, today's cars don't have
catalytic mufflers and won't have them before 1975, if then.
Meanwhile, the NO or LOW lead gas is causing more harm than
good.  Lead in today's gas leaves deposits around the valves
which keep your car   running more smoothly and lead also raises
the octane level of gas for cleaner burning and fewer exhaust
emissions.  No lead gas doesn't.  SO SAY THE GULF EXPERTS.
Next we toured the refinery which covers over 200 acres
with storage tanks, labs, a control room, cracking towers
and pipes.  The pipes, if laid end to end, would cover a
distance of 50 miles.  The refinery employs about 100 people
and supplies the lower mainland with Gulf gasoline and other
petroleum products.
Information for those interested in the pollution
problem.  Five tons of liquid sulphur per day are reclaimed
from the wastes that used to be released into the air.  Gulf
Oil has really tackled this problem with success thereby
protecting the many homes which have grown up around them
during the years and incidently all of us as well.
Melissa 6- Carol-Anne Baker SOME AFTERTHOUGHTS OF THE CLA CONFERENCE
By now, detailed reports on the Vancouver Conference
have appeared in the professional literature.  Rather than
cover the same ground, I will ask the editor's indulgence
and change my assignment to offer a few personal opinions on
one of the matters discussed at this meeting.
The Conference theme was "Reorganization, Recruitment,
Results." Basic to the exploration of this theme was the
report of the Ad Hoc Committee on Aims and Objectives.  This
report was based on submissions from the membership as well
as the deliberations of the Committee itself, and was subsequently accepted by the Council and the general meeting
after minor modifications.  Thus the priorities established
therein must be regarded as an accurate reflection of the
thinking of Canadian librarians on the relative importance of
the problems confronting themselves, their institutions and
the Association.  This being the case, one can only despair
at the failure of the profession to manifest an intelligent
appreciation of the facts of life.  The priorities assigned
to the objectives identified in the report reveal a preoccupation with issues that have a high titillation quotient
and a propensity to moralize in the absence of any evidence
that perdition is imminent, while relegating more crucial
matters to the background.
There are four groups of objectives in the report.  The
first, and "over-riding", priority is communication between
the Association apparatus and the membership.  No one can
deny the need for an informed and involved membership.
However, one wonders whether such a piece of conventional
wisdom should logically belong in a statement of organizational
objectives, let alone be assigned this degree of significance.
An organization's aims and objectives are its justification
for its existence.  But communication of the type specified
is a means to an end, not a raison d'etre, and it seems that
an administrative truism has been allowed to overshadow
more substantial requirements. These fundamental considerations are discussed in the
second and third ranked groups of objectives, which pertain
to librarians and libraries respectively.  The report
stresses "the necessity for putting greater emphasis on what
the Association can do for librarians, as distinct from
libraries, if it wishes to attract the support and active
participation of larger numbers of the profession." The
most prominent of these objectives include the promotion of
high standards of librarianship and professional conduct, the
protection of rights, duties and responsibilities against
extraneous pressures and the development of standards related
to working conditions and employment practices.  To achieve
these objectives, the preparation of a code of ethics, a
librarians' bill of rights and the promulgation of the existing statement on intellectual freedom are recommended.
Having emphasized these things, the report moves on to
an area "concerned with libraries as institutions rather than
with librarians as individuals." The key aims here are to
promote public knowledge, interest and support for the
development of libraries and "to promote library interests
directly and actively at the federal level of government and,
as appropriate, at provincial and other levels of government."
Here, at last, we have found something of transcendent importance.  Anyone with a modicum of perception will appreciate
that libraries are not among the most cherished of services
available to the community.  This being the case, it must
certainly be of the first order of importance for those who
believe in the value of libraries to devote maximum effort
to the reversal of this state of affairs.  Everything hinges
upon public awareness and acceptance, for with it comes
financial support, which is the key to most of the things
that librarians seek for themselves and their clientele.  If
libraries achieve stature and prosperity within the community,
the people who operate them will share the glory and be
heard.  If the institutions themselves are ignored and misunderstood, the aspirations of their servants will be unrealized.  Success will not come easily, if it can come at all,
given the nature of our offering and the habits of society,
but the effort must be made.  Can it be argued seriously that 10
baubles like a code of ethics and a bill of rights are our
most pressing needs?
Finally, buried deep in the last group, the general
objectives, is a statement of the need to guard against
government action which would infringe on fair copying
practices, equitable customs treatment and effective channels
of procurement.  These matters are contral to the day-to-day
operation of libraries.  That they should be considered less
than the objectives given the highest priority is ludicrous.
The Canadian Library Association is seeking greater
participation from members of the profession, particularly the
more recent graduates.  The greatest single deterrent to
membership is the high cost of belonging.  Although the fee
structure is scaled according to one's ability to pay, the
cost remains prohibitive in the eyes of many librarians.  A
beginning librarian would pay approximately forty dollars at
current salary levels.  Considering that many, and perhaps
most, graduates have debts to discharge upon taking employment, a fee of this magnitude is discouraging at that point
in time.  Todayj.s employment situation, in which many
graduates will wait months before finding a position,
accentuates the problem.  The Association should consider
establishing a special fee for recent graduates, perhaps
fifteen dollars per annum for the first three years after
graduation, to stimulate membership among those whose lack
of support is of greatest concern.
The future of the Canadian Library Association is foreshadowed in the report of the Ad Hoc Committee on Aims and
Objectives.  If one understands correctly, the Association
will allocate its energy and resources according to the
priorities established in this document, which is cause for
the greatest pessimism.
Nick Omelusik 11
RE-CYCLING HOME WASTE
You know it's the right thing to do.1  You know our natural
resources are dwindling and our waterways are becoming more
polluted as the weeks go by.  Almost everything can be recycled.
ON
T    OI5CARJ) irf
/
but
Newspapers are the most obvious
are the least marketable.  They
should be tied tightly with twine
in bundles about 12" thick.  Cardboard food boxes, cigarette boxes,
brown paper bags should be folded
flat and tied tightly in about 15-
pound bundles.  Waste paper includes
junk mail (how about returning this faithfully to sender instead), writing paper, envelopes and most other household
paper (toilet paper cores, paper towelling, etc.) should be
sorted into a box or bag, tied and labelled.  Glass returnable
bottles, washed liquor bottles, washed jars can be packed and
colour sorted if you have a large quantity.  Metal scrap, tin
cans and aluminum utensils, containers and foil can be sold
directly if you wish to any neighbourhoos junk dealer.  Egg
cartons, both plastic and cardboard, should be opened and tied
of
in bundles
boxed or put
1abel1ed.
25.  Rags can be
in bags, tied and
Removing the above items
from your home garbage could
return, for the average household, about 3 pounds of resources a day to the economy.
More explicit instructions for
sorting, tieing, etc., are
available from the Library
fcC-fCLE^-fl 12
Recycling Committee:  Joyce Harries, Circulation, 2668;
Claudia Kerr, Cataloguing, 2304;  Leagh Carrel 1, Woodward,
4445; or Carol Martin (nee Litz) Animal Resources Ecology,
3324.  The above items can be turned in directly to the Joshua
Society warehouse, 115 E. 2nd. Ave., Vancouver (2nd & Main).
Their telephone is 872-8674.  There are depots at:  5641 Barker
St., Burnaby;  953 Finn Road, Richmond;  2241 Haywood, West
Vancouver;  4511 Capilano Road, North Vancouver.
Now comes the part that Joshua can't do and that's to see
that you make the maximum use of everything you buy.
Use envelopes and paper scrap as scratch paper.
Share your newspaper with a neighbour.
Re-use envelopes, plastic bags, paper bags,
aluminum foi1.
Do lists on the backs of old letters, envelopes,
cereal boxes, computer paper.
Re-use gift wrap, elastic bands, string.
Donate old magazines to hospitals, or library
staff room.
When it can't be used once more, recycle it.
Re-use glass jars for preserving.
Store leftovers and dry foods in
jars or cans.
Return all soft drink bottles
to depots.
Give wine bottles to a friend
who brews.
Trade in cars, appliances, tires,
etc., don't dump them.
Return coat hangers to cleaners.
When it can't be used
once more, recycle it.
Start a compost heap for your
organic wastes.
Donate useable clothes to
r»*
T7- 13
Salvation Army, Welfare Industries or X-Kalay
Free Store.
Buy fresh produce instead of canned.
Buy milk in re-usable plastic or glass jugs.
Avoid disposable paper products of all types.
THINK.'
Recycling goes beyond the maximum use of consumer goods.
The most important part of a "recycling awareness" is intelligent buying.  Ask yourself:
Do I need this?
Do I need to buy i t new?
Is this product overpackaged?
Is this product economically and ecologically sound?
Can I use or recycle the product and the container?
That's easy.  Now comes the hard part, and that's increasing the market for goods made from recycled materials.
Until the public uses these products in large quantities
there is no way recycling can work, it just won't pay.  So,
as usual, it comes down to you.  You decide to consume goods
that leave the least possible waste.  You decide, recycle that
waste.  Finally, interest your friends in what you are  doing
and why.;. Who knows, one of them may care enough to follow your
example.
It's a lot to take on all at once. Try to get into recycling slowly. Save paper only this month, add glass next,
then metal later when you are organized. It's the awareness
that counts.' J. Harries & C, Kerr 14
COMMITTEE ON SALARIES & BENEFITS OF SUPPORTING STAFF
Election time is at hand.  Time, therefore, to review a year's
work.
Our primary concern this year was to recommend increases in
supporting staff salaries, not only to meet the rising cost
of living, but also to seek parity with other major university
1 i brar ies.
Our secondary concern was with staff benefits, such as, vacations,
shift differential, increase in the LA II salary scale and
superannuation.  Based on our recommendations and on the Library
Administration's negotiating with University Personnel on our
behalf, the following has resulted:
Shift differential
Because of the inconvenience of shift work, staff who must
work regular evening and weekend shifts may now receive a pay
differential of 5%, not as much as we hoped for but it does
give us a figure on which to base further recommendations.
This amount compares favourably with that earned by other UBC
employees who work a similar shift schedule.
LA II Salary increase
Acknowledging that LA ll's are unique, that is, unlike Clerk
ll's, they are required to train and supervise other employees,
must be more specialized, have increased responsibility in
public services during evening hours, etc., University
Personnel have readjusted the LA II salary scale upward.
Superannuat ion
The Committee recommended that the discriminatory practice of
requiring female employees to contribute to the plan for
three years before UBC would contribute its share be discontinued. The results were announced in the August 9th issue of
the University of British Columbia library bulletin:  "As of
July 1st, 1971 the employer's contribution will now start at
the same time as the [female] employee's."
Vacat ions
Although we have recommended a reduction in the waiting time
for 3 and 4 week vacations, no word has yet been received in
this matter.
Claudia Kerr[Chairman] St. Wibby Reports.
CONFERENCES AND TRAVELS again in
the news this month.
Judy Coombs, Spec. Coll. will be
attending the Conference of the
Society of American Archivists in
San Fransisco October 12 - 15.
Ann Yandle and Larenda Daniel Is of
Spec. Coll. attended P.N.L.A. and
Ann also took part in the meeting
of the Society of State and Local
History in Portland.
Rein Brongers (Science) and Don
Dennis (Systems) will be going to
the annual meeting of the Western
Chapter of American Society for
Information Science at the Banff
School of Fine Arts Oct. 3-5.
Maureen Wilson (Map Div.) has been
holidaying in Great Britain where
she attended the Historical
Cartographers Conference in
Edinburgh.  She also travelled to
the Continent and visited a map
dealer in Stuttgart.
FINE ARTS report additions and
changes in that division include
1. The installation of CHECKPOINT (an electronic device
for monitoring books which
have not been officially
signed out).  Hopefully this
will cut down on losses in
the future.
2. A new office for Melva Dwyer.
TALKING about new offices, ;pop
I.L.L. has lost Josie
Bannerman to Library School
and Karen Peplow has been
holidaying in Hawaii.
Honeymooning in Hawaii
Carol-Ann Baker of Psychiatry
Read i ng Room who became
Mrs. Court Gladstone on the
25th of Sept.1
and
Bev Richmyre of Reading Rooms
w'll be honeymooning in Mexico
after her marriage to Danny
Snigeski on the 9th of Oct.
Cataloguing informs us that
Rosemary Ormerod of that dept.
gave birth to a baby girl.
7 1 bs. 7 ozs.
QUESTION:  Who is the man
with the mirror toed shoes?
WOODWARD LIBRARY called to 16
report that Peg Leighton is off to
Nanaimo Friday, October 1st to lecture
the Lab. Technicians of B.C. on
Library Service - emphasis on regional plans that are m operation
now.
Anna Leith will be in Edmonton Oct.
4th - 7th chairing the meeting of
the Association of Canadian Medical
Col 1eges.
FRIENDS of Bev Roper who used to be
with Cataloguing will be interested
to know that she and her husband are
now in town for a few months.  Bev
is apparently having a problem
trying to get permission for her pet
mongoose to enter the country.  The
mongoose joined Bev and her husband
i n Algeria.
DURING the last few weeks many staff
members have left the Library to
travel in Europe.  These include
Nancy Clark of Cataloguing whose
many illustrations for Biblos will
be sadly missed.  Janet Taggart of
Map Dept. and Marg McCann of Admin,
left together for England and they
will be joined there by Marg
Colclough also of Admin.
OTHER temporary travellers abroad.
Ritva Tavela (Cat. Div) is presently
on a Flying World Tour.  Ritva's
husband is a pilot for one of the
major ai rlines.
and Mavis Balshaw of Cat. was also
in England.
A new and unusual home for Inge Fleet
of R.B.C. and her husband.
They will be launching it,
a 42 foot ferro-cement ketch,
named "Gandolf" on Sept. 30.
I am sure every one will join
in sending "get-well" wishes
to Henry - the heating man
and Les - Library delivery,
both of whom are recovering
from hospital visits.  Les,
we understand will not be
with us for a while, he
would probably welcome some
ma i 1 .
The item below appeared in
the Daily Mirror in England:
S0UVENIR--from grandpa's
door:  CANADIAN Basil Stubbs
bought a hammer and chisel
yesterday and, with official
permission and watched by
a friendly policeman prised
an old knocker and letter
box from the front door of
a partly-demolished house.
The house, in Hal 1 -
Street, Hull, was where his
grandfather lived in 1880.
Mr. Stubbs, 41, Librarian
at the British Columbia
University in Vancouver,
came to Hull on holiday to
trach down his family background.
ON YOUR travels around the
Main Library, take a look at
some of the personal collections
in the various divisions,
cont'd on back page. 17
THE TWO-YEAR M.L.S. PROGRAMME FOR LIBRARIANS
This September, a new programme for the training of
librarians will commence at the School of Librarianship.
Since there has been a certain amount of curiosity concerning the rationale behind the change from the traditional
one-year, B.L.S. programme, perhaps a few words of explanation from "the top of the stairs" will be helpful.
In I960, when the School's programme was initiated, the
B.L.S. was the standard first professional degree in Canada.
The other two accredited schools in Canada, at McGill
University and the University of Toronto, awarded the B.L.S.
after one academic year of course work.  Library schools in
the United States, on the other hand, had already by this
time gone over to the M.L.S. as the first professional degree,
typically offered after one calendar year's study (two
semesters plus summer session).
The situation in Canada began to change completely.  The
Graduate School of Library Science of McGill University dropped
the B.L.S. degree in 1964 and now awards the M.L.S. only,
after a course of study requiring two academic years.  In
1969 the library schools at the University of Toronto and the
University of Western Ontario adopted similar programmes.
The University of Montreal secured approval for a similar
approach, to begin within the next year.
The result was that the University of British Columbia
School of Librarianship would soon have been the only
accredited library school in Canada - indeed in North
America - still offering a B.L.S.  To retain the B.L.S.
programme simply meant that the U.B.C. School of Librarian-
ship would speedily have come to be regarded as sub-standard.
Its power to attract good students and faculty members and
its ability to place its graduates in first-class libraries
would have been severly reduced and its continued accreditation in question.  In consultation with the Council of
the School and members of the academic and professional
community therefore, the new programme was designed, and was 18
passed by the Senate in May of 1970.
The general movement towards the lengthening of the
library education programme reflects two basic changes in the
nature of librarianship:  growth of the field of knowledge
and change in the kind of work done by librarians.
Librarianship is a rapidly expanding profession.  Many
standard areas of library studies have grown to encompass an
amount of material impossible to cover within a single year.
More important, the emergence of new areas of concern and
new methods require treatment for which no time was available.
Among these, the computer and its effect on library procedure
and the storage and retrieval of information must be singled
out for mention.  The revolutionary effects of the computer
are changing the work of the 1 ibrarian and the 1 ibrarian's
preparation must be altered accordingly.
The other main trend has been in the direction of
specialization and managerial responsibility.  Until recently
the chief demand has been for "general librarians", that is,
for graduates with relatively little intensive training.
This situation has changed in two ways.  More and more routine
library work is being done by machines or by trained sub-
professional personel; formal training of such personnel is
now offered in many community colleges and technical institutes.
Conversely, as libraries become larger and more complex,
the need has grown for librarians who can assume administrative responsibilities or specialized duties.  Computerized
storage and retrieval of information, as already mentioned,
is one such area where further training is required.  Another
important new role for the librarian is that of the literature
specialist and bibliographer.  As universities become more
and more dependent upon such specialists to develop collections
and to offer research assistance, their training requires
greater subject and technical knowledge.
The purpose of the new programme is to prepare students
to deal effectively with the problems that present themselves 19
in the administration, design and operation of library
services.  To provide such preparation, the programme will
devote the first year to a sequence of required courses covering those aspects of professional knowledge which should be
common to all librarians.  In the second year students will
build on this core by specialized studies relevant to their
particular background and proposed d'rection of professional
development.  In most instances, the second year will combine
studies within librarianship proper with those in other
university departments.  As fields such as statistics,
computer science, public administration, etc., impinge
directly on important aspects of librarianship, students
should have the opportunity of taking courses in those areas.
Moreover, in line with the growing requirement for librarians
to serve as literature specialists and subject bibliographers,
it is desirable that students have the chance to take more
courses in other departments so as to reinforce their subject
knowledge.
Candidates for admission will be of two types for the
first few years of the programme:  1) those beginning study
in librarianship for the first time, and 2) those who have
already earned the B.L.S. degree or its equivalent but desire
additional specialized education.
The curriculum for the First Year is prescribed, while
details of the Second Year programme are designed to meet
the needs of the individual student in terms of this educational and occupational background and his special field of
1 ibrary interest.
The first year of the programme requires attendance on
a full-time basis.  The second year of the programme may be
taken on a part-time basis and need not begin immediately
after completion of the first year.  However, all degree
requirements must be met within a period of five years after
registration in the M.L.S. programme in the case of a student
already holding the B.L.S.
Registration for the first year of the course now stands 20
at 60, while approximately eight former graduates of this and
other library schools will be registering for the second year
on a full, or part-time basis.  Members of the faculty of
the School are confident that the new programme will do
much to alleviate the traditional pressures which seemed to
be exacted by the pace of the former highly concentrated
course.  There will be more time available to students to
complete assignments, and to pursue specific areas of study
in greater depth than had previously been possible.
The opportunity of taking classes "outside the School"
should also help to generate new interests and allow students
a greater sense of relationship with the university as a
whole.
We have, in short, done all we can to provide the best
possible education for librarians and at the same time, to
make attendance at library school a worthwhile, and perhaps
a pleasant experience.
Wish us luck.' Margaret Burke
'So What's New?"
Linen or Cotton RAGS, though they appear of but little
confequence to each family who may fave them; yet in the
courfe of one year, if carefully referved, they will amount
to fomething: perhaps fufficient to pay for a year's newf-
papers or to purchafe a few quires of writing paper, a bible,
a pfalmbook, or fchoolbooks for chi1dren--and are as eafily
thrown into a fmall bag, as swept into the fire, or out of
doors.  The benefit to the publick will be very great, as
no writing or printing can be done without paper, and no
paper can be made without Rags.  Every perfon, therefore,
who wifhes well to the manufactures of his country, to the
education of his children, or the MEDIUM through which al1
knowledge is derived, muft be convinces of the importance of
faving that trif1ing but moft effential article.  The families
in town and country are earneftly requefted to attend to
thefe obfervations, and to be careful in referving their Rags,
whether linen or cotton; and every thing made of cotton or
flax.  They will be received at the office of the fubfcriber,
for newfpape's, or books - or for any printing which may be
wanted.
The Concord Herald, and
Newhampfhire Intelligencer May 4, 1790. FROM THE LAND OF THE OLD TESTAMENT WE HAVE WORD.
21
From the forefront of Abraham's bosom in the eleventh
day of Sivan, nineteen hundred and seventy-one years after
the appearance of the prophet, Jesus, in the land of his
forefathers.
"It came to pass that a Vancouverite entered the land
of Israel through the city of Tel Aviv.  And there did she
approach the government tourist desk.  Now this desk was
sorely beset and ringed around by the people known as
tourists.  And these people did press around and make great
noise about their reservations and their confirmation by
telephone to the ancient city of Jerusalem.
But this Vancouverite har1 no reservation and did stand
quietly and wait her turn which came at the very hast.
And the tourist agent was very .     ^X^SU
weary and did make many calls and    >1t^*V
did yell upon the instrument
known as the telephone.  At last,
it came to pass that she engaged
a room in a hotel designated as
class "c", and verily, named the
"Savoy Hotel".  It also happened
that she was able only to give
the directions "near unto the pos
office" to the Vancouverite who
had sought earnestly the address
of the hotel to which she would
come.  "Knoweth thou not the
post office? Then must thou ask.1
Whereupon the Vancouverite did go out to seek the bus to
Jerusalem which was said to run each hour upon the hour.  She
did find that she had missed the bus that was designated
as being due at three, because, verily, it had arrived fifteen
minutes earlier than its appointed time of departure.  The
Vancouverite was filled with wonderment, but sat and waited
patiently for the bus which would surely arrive at four. 22
She did sit, arraigned in her cases, under the sign
which did say "Jerusalem".  And she had made careful inquiries
and many of the natives of that place had assured her than
the sign under which she waited did say "Jerusalem", for the
writing of that land was strange in the eye of the Vancouverite
and she could read it not.  She did ignore the signs that
read the names of Haifa, or Jaffa, or Pesah-Tikva, and other
names unknown and strange to the Vancouverite.
And the bus that was destined to arrive at four and
for which she waited did, indeed, arrive at twenty-five
minutes to four.  But it stopped not at the sign "Jerusalem"
but chose, rather, to stop at a sign reading another place,
and so it came to pass that the Vancouverite also did miss
this bus, and, within her wonderment at the customs of this
land did begin to harden into anger.
But at length did she arrive in the Holy City having
at last caught the bus of the next hour.  And she was weary
and decided that, this once, she would take a taxi against
her vow to use only the public transportation of the countries
through which she travelled.  But the taxi-driver knew not
the hotel called "Savoy" but undertook to convey her to
the post office.  He did offer no assistance with her bags,
nor did he open the door, and when they did arrive at the
post office, neither did he alight, he did gesture to her to
assist him to close the door as he could not reach it from
his position in the forefront of his taxi.  Because of the
anger which was growing within her, the Vancouverite did say
"Asketh thou for help from me when thou helpest not me?"
However, she did give the door a bunt with her foot and the
taxi driver did, at last, smile upon her.
But at the post office they knew not the Savoy Hotel
and there were many consultations, and, at last, a telephone
call.  And after that it came to pass that they said to the
Vancouverite that she must take up her bags and walk to the
gate called the Haifa gate and near unto that would she find
another post office, and surely, near that would be the hotel 23
she so earnestly sought.  And they answered the Vancouverite
when she did ask for directions "Knowest thou not? Then must
walk straight and ask of the people".
And she did so but the people she asked answered in a
strange tongue, or with shrugs, and none offered to help or
lead the way.  She found no good Samaritan, but she did find,
at last, two of the Jewish faith from the City of New York
and they spoke a tongue not unlike her own.  And, indeed,
did they give her true directions, but then came the bus they
must catch and they were swept
" •^CliAjJV
And so it came to pass
that she took up her bags again
and walked to the gate named
Haifa and she was sore, weary
and the people of the land
turned aside from her and
helped her not.  And inside
the gate she came to a square
where there were many small
shops and within sat the
Isreal ites.  And she did ask
of them "where is the post
office", and they did say
"there", and she did look, and
and then did she say "where is
And they did say "the hotel known as the
the gate known as Haifa, but rather, it is near the post
office at the gate known as Herod's gate." And further they
said "thou must take up thy bags and walk "
And it was then that anger rose in the Vancouverite and
she did lift up her voice in the square and did berate the
people saying that they were an unkind people, and an unhelpful people, and many other things of a like nature did
she say unto them.  And the people did run out from their
houses and their shops and did gather around her and did
listen in amazement.  And she did call upon the Lord to
behold she saw tr
the hotel known as the 'Savoy'?"
'Savoy' is not at 24
smite them, and then did the Lord smote them, and then did
they real ize that there was a prophetess risen among them,
and they remembered the fate of Sodom and Gomorrah, And
then did the Lord scatter them and they fled to aid the
Vancouverite- one did lift her bags, and another did invite
her into his shop, and a third drew a map to direct her to
Herod's gate, and a fourth offered her refreshment, and a
fifth came and said unto her that he would guide her to a •
vehicle which would transport her to the hotel named Savoy.
And it came to pass that he did so, and did carry her bags,
and did accompany her in the vehicle of the kind known as
taxi.  Nor would he allow the man who drove the vehicle to
make any charge.  And so it was that the Vancouverite came
at last in triumph to the hotel known as Savoy.'  And she
who had been an outcast in the land of Is real and among the
children of the Isrealites was no longer so, and dwelt among
them in contentment.
Joan Selby
St. Wibby continued;
Cataloguing has some very interesting postal displays on the
pillars and Leah Gordon's desk features colorful book covers.
Take a look in passing at the fancy posters on  the back wall of
Nick Omeiusik's Office, Acquisitions.
DON'T FORGET the Library Assistants Bowling league starts on
Thursday October 7th at the Alma Bowling Alley 3500 block W
Broadway 7 p.m.  Turn up and tone up.  Everyone welcome.
WATCH for announcements next month re. another grand Xmas
Sweepstake...Turkeys and other Christmas cheer as prizes
Not to be confused with the annual Smorgasbord.
Any announcements or notes of interest for the next St. Wibby
column must be in my hands by 22nd October.  Address any such
items to me St. Wibby, c/o Librarians Office.  Main Library or
phone my earthly agent Gwen in the Map division 2231.
Thank you and until next month happy haunting on Oct. 31
Wibby

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