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Biblos Apr 1, 1972

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Array SPRING IS HERE!
and like rhe world around us, Biblos has
a new look.  We have changed the format
and we hope that you will find the many
new features informative and amusing.
J\
In this period of the Library's history..
personal contact between the 400 staff
members is almost impossible.  We trust
that the Biblos will help to implement
the channels of communication between:
the branch libraries and the Main Library, Professionals and non-professionals, administration and the staff.
This is your magazine, and you are welcome to express your views here, although the editorial staff will have to
protect contributors from libel suits
(if feelings are running that high) -
freedom of expression being no license
to be unnecessarily hurtful to people.
So this is your publication. Biblos -
The Staff Newsletter. Let's hear from
you.
Vol. 8 No. 5 U.B.C. LIBRARY STAFF NEWSLETTER  Aor.il
.y/. !oC •
A Hearty Welcome to:
Dale Thomas
Joan Swan
Holli Donnelly
Helen Kellosalmi
Lillian Dueckman
Denise McCormac
Sheila Kerrad
Valda 01sen
Rosemary Caskey
Andrea Paterson
Mark Perret
Katsuko lida
L.A. I
K.P.O. I
L.A. I
L.A. I
L.A. II
L.A, II
L.A. Ill
L.A. I
L.A. II
K.P.O. (L.A.II)
L.A. I
L.A. II
Circulation
Systems
Cat. Preparations
Woodward
Serials
Serials
Cat. Preparations
I.L.L.
Law
Systems
Cat. Preparations
Cat. Preparations
Congratulations To
Maureen Sturgess
Margaret McLeod
Lenka Novak
L.A. Ill Cat.
L.A. II Systems
L.A. I Woodward
L.A. IV Cat. Prep
K.P.O. Systems
L.A. Ill Law
A FOND FAREWELL TO:
Judy Sangha
Judy Olsen
Mary Jane Chan
Wendy Beltramo
Judy Whitehead
Trudy deWIt
Shirley Collins
Leigh Burrows
Susan Gordon
Claire Dolsen
Sandi Lindberg
Cherie Millard
Jean Irwin
Laurie Quisle
Ruth Bruckshaw
Jeff Barker
Madelle Quring
Pat Bolton
Esi Shafie
Carol Emmons
Bev Smigelski
L.A. Ill
L.A. I
Key.P. Operator
L.A.I
L.A. I
K.P. Operator
L.A. II
L.A. I
L.A. II
L.A. II
L.A. I
L.A. I
L.A. I
LA. II
L.A.II
L.A. I
L.A. II
L.A. Ill
L.A. K'
L.A, Ill
L.A. II
Law
Woodward
Systems
I.L.L.
Woodward
Systems
Serials
Woodward
Serials
Serials
Sedge.
Circ.
Catal.
Woodward
Catal.
Catal.
Catal.
Systems
Circ.
Sedge.
R.R. a
Allen was There
The Copyright Committee of the Canadian Library Association met
in Toronto on Tuesday, March 14.  The committee agreed on certain
matters of principle and left details to be worked out at a later
date.
The Copyright Committee opposed any restrictions on the present
freedom of Canadian libraries to purchase books In the worlds
markets.  The committee also considered and approved of a "lending"
right.  Fundamental to any "public lending right" in Canada was the
proviso that it benefit Canadian authors and creators, and not be
used as a trick for diversion of Canadian tax dollars to foreign
countries.
The committee discussed photocopying and its impact on libraries
at length and concluded that any new copyright law give libraries
the clear right to copy for the purpose of preserving the collection;
we presently have the right to copy for purposes of research.
The status of non-print media is not yet clear.  However, the
committee thought that the same general principles in respect of
printed materials would be our guide.
^-f£&,
Allen H. Soroka
Assistant Law Librarian
Chairman, CLA Copyright Cornmi"
BOUQUETS AND BRICKBATS DEPARTMENT
How about send us your* oberservations on the Library scene,
nothing heavy, just every day comments.  Here's two to start. .,?%
1  "V
Some rose coloured glasses to
A dozen theoretical roses to
Claudia Kerr, Cat/Maint.,
Jane Ainsworth,Curric. Lab.,
and Nick Omelusik, Acq. who
keep the L.A.A. private ordering project rolling
merrily along.  'Tis a great
i job they are doing
Send your future Bouquets or Brickbats to David Miller, Acq.
improve the sense of humour of
the Idiots who add their witless
comments to Library signs.
Tis a great pit© they have so /^
little else to do! ctrS u
LETTERS TO THE EDITOR:
Dear Biblos Editor: April 5, 1972
I would like to know why the Brock Faculty and Staff parking lot
at the back of the library cannot be watched by the Physical Plant
Department and kept in good condition.  I can understand when a few
pot holes appear and remain for a short while, expecially in our
inconsistant weather, but I cannot understand why, when each staff
member pays a yearly parking fee of $22.00 (and I'm sure the price
will go up), we have to put up with dangerously deep holes for weeks
at a time.
The present conditions are not safe for drivers or vehicles and
even pedestrians have to watch out for swerving cars which are trying
to avoid the ruts.  This is to say nothing of the tempers which are
aroused upon seeing that one more day has gone by without anything
being done to alleviate the conditions.  Surely the administration of
the library could put pressure on the Physical Plant Department (or
whoever takes care of these things) to improve the parking lot conditions and keep the lot in good shape.
Thanks for whatever you can do.
Signed
A Very Disgruntled Staff Member
P.S.  Please do not tell me that if I am unhappy with the situation,
I should park elsewhere.  First of all, other parking lots are often
full, Second, I expect to be able to park conveniently in the Faculty
and Staff lot I choose; and Third, parking elsewhere is not the
question involved.
ED. NOTE:
If everyone would phone the Traffic Office anytime the
condition of the parking lot annoys them, it would greatly
help to Improve the said conditions.  A quick memo written
in the heat of the moment and mailed to the Superintendent,
Traffic &.< Security Department, would be even better.  This
does bring results.  The number to phone is 4721. ST. WIBBY REPORTS.
Tuesday, April 4th, was a record
breaking day for the Circulation
Division when they handled
22,411 transactions!:'.
HOPE there is no connection but
this month we extend our get
well wishes to three members of
that department who have all
been in V.G.H. for surgery.
Pat Gibson, Hilda Uit den
Bosch & Pat O'Rourke have all
been sadly missed from the
Circulation Division.
AT THE SAME conference,
Suzanne Dodson of Gov. Pubs,
will be exibiting a collection
of paintings of B.C. Orchids and,
as an added attraction, her
illustrations of the Dogwood.
Unfortunately she will not be
present at the conference.
CONGRATULATIONS to Nick (Acq.)
Omelusik and wife Judy on the
birth of a baby girl, Kim, born
Easter Sunday.  What an Easter
Present that was!
THE PERIODICALS survey carried
out in the Main Library from
March 13th - 22nd ran smoothly
although the results will not be
available for several weeks.
We will try to keep you posted.
VACATIONING in the sun!
Walter Harrington, Reading
Rooms has just returned from
a leisurely trip to Hawaii and
Mavis Balshaw of Cataloguing
has been travelling in Peru
and Mexico
CONFERENCE travellers.
Maureen Wilson, Maps and Frances
Woodward, Sp. Coll., attended a
Tri-University Map Conference
in Victoria April 2nd.
Judy Combs, Spec. Coll. attended
the Pacific Northwest History
Conference in Walla Walla, Wash,
on April 13 and 14.  Bert
Hamilton, Admin, will be travelling
to the World Orchid Conference
in Medellin, Colombia Apr. 18-27.
ALSO to Wendy Chambers formerly
of S.S.D. who announces the
arrival of a daughter named Morgan
in February.
AND to Rosemary (formerly of
Sedgewick) and John McCandless on
the birth of daughter1 Suzanne
Elizabeth who weighed in March
29th at 71bx. 1 oz.
-
Three gals all in a row.
Acquisitions - Hey Martha, that's
quite a pin-up above your desk.
If anyone hasn't seen THE Centre
Fold that's where it's at. &
St. Wibby Reports cont'd...
TWO DISPLAYS of interest in
Woodward Library this month
HOLIDAY READING set up by Brenda
Sutton In the main entrance hall
features cookbooks, and books on
travel, birds and animals 2nd
floor display case AUSTRALIAN
TRAVEL with information material
collected by Helen Allen
Go over one lunch hour and have
a look at the displays which
will be changed through the
Summer months.
TWO RETIREMENT this month:
Margaret Jamieson of the
Bindery will be retiring
at the end of April.  Congratulations to Margaret on complet-'
ing 15 years of service and
for tolerating our Percy,
Fryer, that is, for that
length of time 11
Margaret is planning a trip to
Memphis, Tenn. to visit her
son who teaches at Memphis
State University, then on
through the Eastern U.S. and
Canada as so to retirement in
sunny Richmond.       "---,
Molly Buckingham of the Law
Library will also be retiring
at the end of April after 8
years of faithful service as
head of Law Circulation.
Molly will be sadly missed
by her fellow workers and by
the many students and faculty
to who she gave service above
and beyond the call of duty.
Mrs. B. as she is affectionately
known was guest of honour at a
dinner given for her at the home
of Tom Shorthouse and to which •
the members of staff had donated
their culinary specialities.
Amongst those present were Mr.
and Mrs. (Doreen) Ingram and Mr.
& Mrs. (Donna) McKenzie.  Doreen and
Donna of course were with Mrs.
Buckingham at separate periods
during her career.  Mollie B. was
presented with a broiler oven which
will no doubt be most useful In
her new home at Sydney on Vancouver
Island.
Aurevoir and loads of luck to
both ladles in' retirement,  :.;. ;•■;:':■'..
And until next month s'all for
now, happy gardening....Wibby
BIBLOS EDITORIAL STAFF
Pat LaVac - Editor
Tannis Brov7ning
Sheila Cooper
Gwen Gregor
Pat LaVac Jr.
Joan Stuchner
Shelley Criddle
David Miller
Georgia Macrae
Judy Combs
Suzanne Dodson i j ; _J  ' '■■ T'-' I *"—•	
t
SPECIAL EVENTS REPORT
The First Annual Tricycle Race was held in the Faculty of Law
March 17th, 1972 under the auspices of the Law Student Association
Mr. Paul Ayriss, Administrator for the Faculty resplendent in bowler
hat and long school scarf, and equipped with stop watch and pistol
conducted a ten count'down to the official start in the Main Reading
Room of the Library.
Competition was great with 15 enthusiastic starters comprised of
students, faculty and staff members racing to find their tricycles in
the pile, at the explosion of the starting pistol.
The riders pedalled with great vigor round the course which ran
through corridors, down the ramp, round the faculty office building
and back to the main steps where each vehicle, complete with rider,
had to be carried up the steps by the waiting pit crews , and back
through the halls to the finishing post in the Main Reading Room.
Fortunately the Red Cross Student personnel on duty where not
needed and a course time of 1 minute and 45 seconds was recorded.
The first track record for this event.
Mr. Grey a "dignified entry" according to the green sheet, came
in first, Mr. Peter Barton, member of Faculty, "used to more agile
machine" came second and Rob Fenton, "student at large" was third.
One large plastic dill pickle on wheels was presented to the
winner.  The trophy, suitably inscribed, is now on show in the Law
Circulation department.
Consolation prizes were presented to all entrants complements of
Mr. Tom Shorthouse and the Law Library Morgue.
Everyone agreed that a most entertaining time had been had by
all.  Female members of the Library staff pratically broke their
respective necks dashing from starting post to front door, to see the
competitors carried up the steps and back again to the finish line.
It is to be hoped that the first "annual event" will not be the last-
next year you can all come and see the great TRICYCLE RACES in the
Law School. A SURVEY OF THE READING OF THE U.B.C. LIBRARY STAFF
SURVEY GROUP
There are 397 employees on the staff of the U.B.C. Library.  Of
these, 274, or 69.8% responded to a questionnaire during the period
March 1 - 6, 1972.  Of the respondents, 217 were female and 57 were
male.  Over half of the respondents are between 20 and 29 years of
age, and nearly a quarter are between the ages of 30 and 39.
READING FREQUENCY AND LEVEL OF EDUCATION
For the purpose of this analysis, a division was made between
respondents with thirteen years or less of formal education, and
fourteen years or more of formal education.
In the questionnaire, frequent reading was defined as reading
almost every day.  Occasional reading was defined as reading at
least once a week.  And infrequent reading was defined as reading le:
than once a week.
In the case of books, magazines and newspapers, I.e. all readin;
it appeared that the greater the number of years of formal education
the greater the likelihood that Individuals will be frequent readers
This is most striking in the case of books. Conversely, the greates'
percentage of infrequent book readers is found in the group with
fewer years of formal education.
READING FREQUENCY AND AGE
In the case of all reading, it would appear that reading activi'
reaches a peak between the ages of 40 and 49, and drops off thereafter.  For the frequent readers, the book appeared to be the most
popular format, except for those oyer forty, who turn to newspapers
in greater number.  Over half of the persons under twenty years of
age described themselves as occasional readers of magazines and news'
papers.
As might be expected In the case of library employees, response,
to questions about reading frequency revealed the group to be heavy
readers; the great majority read books, magazines and newspapers at
least once a week.  This degree of reading would probably not be foui
within the general public. Survey of the Reading of the U.B.C. Library Staff cont'd
OURCES OF READING
Not surprisingly for a group of library employees, libraries
roved to be the main source of books.  Of the books being read by
he respondents, or which they had last read, nearly half came from
ibraries.  About a third were purchased, and a fifth were borrowed
r came as gifts from a friend or relative.  Almost equal numbers
f hardbacks and paperbacks were read.
Very few hardback books were purchased, the preferred source
'or these being the library.  Paperbacks, on the other hand, were
urchased in nearly three-quarters of the cases.
ANADIAN CONTENT IN READING
Of all the books which staff members were reading or had last
'ead, 13.2% were by a Canadian author, or on a Canadian subject,
■t  both.
,00K SELECTION
Of the factors influencing reading selection, serendipity-
roved to be the strongest; most respondents simply happened upon
he book.  In the case of men, references In other sources were the
trongest second Influence, whereas In the case of women, a re-
ommendation from a friend or relative came second.  Interests and
.obbies were factors for many readers.
NFLUENCES ON THE READING HABIT
Parents, university, friends, and school were the dominant
'actors In developing the reading habit, in that order.  Some re-
pondents were unable to attribute the development of their frequent
■eading habit to any external influence, and suggested that they
'ere self-motivated or curious.
iOOK READERS AND THEIR CHILDREN
A strong and direct correlation was established between frequent
>ook reading on the part of parents, and their practice of making
looks available to their children.  It seems clear that the reading
tablt is to a large extent rooted in family tradition.
1IBL0S will now be published monthly — without fail.
DON"T FORGET TO SEND YOUR ADS TO TANNIS / y.
NEWS FROM THE LIBRARY ASSISTANTS ASSOCIATION
International Book Year
How can you help to celebrate this occasion? Watch for information on the UNESCO Gift Coupon Programme, which will be coming
your way In the very neat future.  See how "Penny Power" can help
those less fortunate than ourselves.
The Choice is Yours!
Interim Report to Members of the J.C. Community
JAPANESE CANADIAN ARCHIVES PROJECT
VANCOUVER — The project
has had a pencrous and ■ enthusiastic reception frora the Japanese Canadian communities in
ih'iiish Coiniii!)i;» and Ontario.
Over one hundred individuals
have contributed or loaned
materials to tlio Library. Since
'he Rummer, we have received
over forty books,'ten directories
•nnd three hundred r.nri fifty
pictures, none of which are
known to: be available in any
other archives. The Library has
also received files of three
newspapers and three bulletins,
-did is receiving four gift subs-
bulletins. In the category of
criptions to newspapers . and
unique, unpublished archives,
the Library has-received about
f tteen cartons of diaries,
.memoirs, correspondence and
other   personal   documents.
Among the contributors to
the project have been many
■well-known Japanese Canadians: Mr. & Mrs. T. Sato have
donated long files of newspapers, and have offered much
helpful advice and information;
Mrs. Hide Shimizu has kindly
consented to the copying of the
tJiiU'ier. of her la'c h*r<band <he
l!ev. Shimizu; numy important
(hicumenls and pictures have
Ken contributed by Mr. Toki-
k.T/.u Tanakn, the Hov. Yoshio
Ono, and Mr. Sasaki; books of
r.ieat historical interest have
i>crn provided by Mr. X. Kndo-
jaichi, Mrs. A. Tsuji, Mr. J.
\>>make, Mr. Tagashira and
Mr.   Miyamoto.
With the help of these supporters and many others, the
basis of a Japanese Canadian
Archives has been well established, Dr. M. Shimpo of the
University of Waterloo, and Mr.
T. Gonnami of U.B.C. Library
ore continuing -their work of
contacting members of the
community and obtaining their
cooperation in these developments. The University Library
is seeking assistance from a
Canadian foundation, ir. order
to expedite and accelerate the
growth of the archives.
B.  Stuart-Stubbs
University Librarian
Oriental  Times //.
VANCOUVER LITTLE THEATRE
...has been around for the past 51 years, beginning in 1921.
We have been located, in our theatre building, the YORK, since 1923.
The YORK is located at the corner of Georgia and Commercial, a 20
minute drive from the University gates, and is one of the very few
old live theatres left in Vancouver.  The acoustics are marvelous.
A wonderfully happy place to work, the YORK has been the beginning
home of many professional theatre people.
Currently, VANCOUVER LITTLE THEATRE continues to produce plays
of all types, usually 5-6 shows each season (Sept. - June) with workshops and one act plays being done in between the major- shows to
train new mwmbers.  The training that one would find,when working
with the theatre, would be lighting, sound, makeup, costuming, set-
design, set-construction, set-painting, set-dressing or properties,
acting and directing.  All these disciplines are combined to give the
audience a good show.  To belong to V.L.T.A. does not mean that one
expects or wants to go on the professional theatre.
Community theatre is an activity that is probably one of the most
rewarding to be found.  It combines liveliness and thoughtfulness,
joy and sorrow, love and hate, individuals from all different walks
of life working and laughing together.  Working on a production is
a tremendous experience; a family feeling is usually developed and
it is not unusual to hear people speaking of shows they were in
together 10 or 15 years ago.  You do not have to be rich to belong.
A $5.00 membership gives you four tickets to our shows, the right
to work as hard as you wish and the right to call the YORK "my
theatre".  If you do become actively involved it will cost you time,
but timespent in some of the happiest days of your life.  Having
been with V.L.T.A. twelve years, loving and hating it, I know I
Our (V.L.T.A.) productions are, on the whole, good ones.  They
are reviewed by the two or three critics in Vancouver, and receive
mostly good reviews.  The audiences always seem to enjoy the shows and
I would say that there are only about three shows in the past 5-6
years that I have been unhappy  about.
Interested?  If you would like to sit in on a rehearsal, phone
me and I will give you our working dates.
Sheila Neville  (4608) WANTED
Anyone interested in
forming a noon-hour
bridge club?  If so caL
Tannis at 228-3115
WANTED
Coloured shag rug.
10 or 5 speed Bikes.
Cheap typewriter.
Phone Joyce
Home  263-3545
Work  228-2668
1 nn'o
WANTED
m .LooKang ior- a
-Fa T^l
irXY
modern stero in good working
order and an old couch at a
reasonable price
call Rhonda
223-3115
FOR SALE
Atomic metal skiis, 175 cn.
with bindings.  Lange Standa:
ski boots - like new Size 9
Phone Georgia  228-4809
FOR SALE
Antique Japanese hibachi, brass
inlaid with cooper and silver, on
wooden stand, round, 17" diameter.
Appraised by expert at....$100.00
Canadiana-type straight backed
wooden chair.  .$10.00
.303 rifle $25.00
Flight bag (large suitcasei$ 2.00
Picture frame, 25:'x29", thin black
frame, linen mat, and glass $5.00
Moccasins, afprox.size 9-1.0 $2.00
Phone Inge 228-2519
■■ ■nm-iiim jh ii ■ i"  .1"    — I'l"    'V»'IP I11J!!1"
FOR SALE
Exercise board . $15 . 0i
Motorcycle wind screens
1. Never used  offers?
2. Almost new
Play pen, wooden, square  $3.!
Phone Joyce - Home 263-354.
Work 228-266:
NEEDED
Car pool from S. Burn. , Imper:
& Walker (or thereabouts) to
U.B.C.  Starting Immediately!
Will share expenses.
Gall Jan - 524-3367 Or 228-48!

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