The Open Collections website will be unavailable July 27 from 2100-2200 PST ahead of planned usability and performance enhancements on July 28. More information here.

UBC Publications

UBC Publications

UBC Publications

Trek 2020-11-30

Item Metadata

Download

Media
alumchron-1.0396122.pdf
Metadata
JSON: alumchron-1.0396122.json
JSON-LD: alumchron-1.0396122-ld.json
RDF/XML (Pretty): alumchron-1.0396122-rdf.xml
RDF/JSON: alumchron-1.0396122-rdf.json
Turtle: alumchron-1.0396122-turtle.txt
N-Triples: alumchron-1.0396122-rdf-ntriples.txt
Original Record: alumchron-1.0396122-source.json
Full Text
alumchron-1.0396122-fulltext.txt
Citation
alumchron-1.0396122.ris

Full Text

 YOUR UBC CONNECTION
3|
>
■ ^^k                                                ill*   Jl^fc.              .^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^Hl
1 * j^
US
j9
IIGRATION, NATIONHOOD
AND HUMAN RIGHTS
 Is it time to reset the way
you protect your loved ones?
Alumni Insurance Plans can help.
2020 will go down as the year of the great reset. The year we all got back to basics and were reminded of what really matters:
family and protecting it. Maybe it's time to reset the way you protect your loved ones.
Alumni Insurance Plans can help protect you and your family against life-changing events that can happen at any stage of your life.
Choose from Health & Dental, Term Life, Major Accident Protection, Income Protection and more.
Reset your protection.
Ill   Manulife
Get a quote today. Call 1-888-913-6333
or visit us at Manulife.com/ubc.
underwritten by The Manufacturers Life Insurance Company (Manulife).
Manulife, Stylized M Design, and Manulife & Stylized M Design are trademarks of The Manufacturers Life Insurance Company and are used by it, and by its affiliates under license.
Available to Canadian residents only. © 2021 The Manufacturers Life Insurance Company. All rights reserved. Manulife, P.O. Box 670, Stn Waterloo, Waterloo, ON N2J 4B8.
Conditions, limitations and exclusions may apply. See policy for full details.
Accessible formats and communication supports are available upon request. Visit Manulife.ca/accessibility for more information.
 Editor's Note
A MORE WELCOMING WORLD
We've already been through a lot of change in 2020, but here's one more -
a comprehensive rethink of Trek magazine. We're hoping you'll find it one of
the more agreeable changes this year has dished up. We've kept the best bits,
created some new best bits, and have extended it into a digital-first publication
with a much more substantial online presence at trekmagazine.ca. We've also
made the shift to themed issues - in this case, human migration.
People have always moved between countries, and it's estimated that there
are more than a quarter of a billion international migrants in the world today.
But recent years have seen increasing numbers of people on the move because
they have no choice. War, persecution, natural disaster, poverty and other
negative forces have displaced approximately 70 million people, with about
26 million of them seeking refuge across borders.
Although the vast majority are hosted by less developed countries, an
influx of refugees to wealthier nations has been accompanied by a rise in
anti-immigration sentiment and a striking effect on the social and political
landscape. While some see immigration as a welcome benefit that can
counteract the disadvantages of an aging population and help create a
dynamic and prosperous society, there is also a common perception that
large numbers of newcomers from different cultures represent competition
for work and social services, or a potential threat to security and to the social
and cultural status quo.
Immigration has become one of the most divisive issues of this century,
and the number of forcibly displaced people is only projected to increase
as climate change takes its toll. The human cost has already been shockingly
high, leading to calls for international cooperation on a fairer and more
compassionate system to manage large-scale migration and allow for the
resettlement of millions of refugees. But the challenges are daunting and
complex. It's not surprising that migration has become the focus of increasing
academic attention.
At UBC, a multidisciplinary cluster of researchers is working to better
understand its roots and consequences, to address the challenges it poses and
the misperceptions that abound, to help protect human rights, and to create
dialogue around the opportunities immigration represents if it is managed
well. Over the summer, the migration research cluster learned it was to
become a fully-fledged UBC centre of research. And that development
must rank as one of the year's best changes of all.
VANESSA CLARKE
Editor
EDITOR
Vanessa Clarke, BA
GRAPHIC DESIGNER
Pamela Yan, BDes
EDITORIAL ASSISTANTS
Rachel Glassman, BA"I8
Eric Davenport
UBC PRESIDENT & VICE-CHANCELLOR
Santa J. Ono
UBC CHANCELLOR
Steven Lewis Point, LLB'85, LLD"I3
VICE-PRESIDENT, DEVELOPMENT
Si ALUMNI ENGAGEMENT;
PRESIDENT'S DESIGNATE
Heather MoCaw, BCom'86
ASSOCIATE VICE-PRESIDENT /
EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR, ALUMNI UBC
Natalie CookZywioki
TREK
Trek magazine is published two times
a year in print by the UBC Alumn
Association and distributed free of
charge to UBC alumni and friends.
Opinions expressed in the magazine do
not necessarily reflect the views of the
Alumni Association or the university.
Address correspondence to:
The Editor, alumni UBC
6163 University Boulevard,
Vancouver, BC, Canada V6T 1Z1
trek.magazine@ubc.ca
Letters are published at the editor's
discretion and may be edited for space.
ADVERTISING
Jenna McCann
604 822 8917 jenna.mccann@ubc.ca
CONTACT NUMBERS AT UBC
Address Changes
604 822 8921   alumni.ubc@ubc.ca
alumni UBC /UBC Welcome Centre
604 822 3313   toll free: 800 883 3088
Volume 76, Number 1
Printed in Canada by Mitchell Press
Canadian Publications
Mail Agreement #40063528
Return undeliverable
Canadian addresses to:
Records Department
UBC Development Office
Suite 500 - 5950 University Boulevard
Vancouver, BCV6T1Z3
£S
FSC
£™iii    FSC" C011267
TREK/ ALUMNI UBC
  With today's polarized politics, people may
not agree on the terminology - immigrants?
refugees? invaders? - but there's little doubt
that migration is reshaping the world
PHOTOGRAPH  BY MYRTO PAPADOPOULOS
 THE
MIGRATION
ISSUE / Wl
Syrians are fleeing. Americans are
building walls. Indians are battling brain
drain. And Hungary is incentivizing
childbearing so that immigrant labour
is no longer needed. Antje Ellermann
explains why.
TREK / ALUMNI UBC
 the university's Institute for European Studies. Her current focus is on the political dynamics that drive immigration policy, and why countries faced with similar situations have adopted strikingly different policy approaches.
Her new book, The Comparative Politics of Immigration:
Policy Choices in Germany, Canada, Switzerland, and the
United States will be published in March by Cambridge
University Press. We asked her about the factors at play
behind negative receptions of immigrants, and what can
be done to promote peaceful and cohesive societies.
IN THE 1990s, when Antje Ellermann first turned
her academic attention to the politics of migration and
citizenship in liberal democracies, many of her political
science colleagues considered it a niche area. Today, as
millions of people seek refuge from war, poverty, and
violence in their home countries, and anti-immigration
sentiment has established itself as a dominating factor in
politics and elections, academics are paying much closer
attention to large-scale migration and its consequences.
Two years ago, Professor Ellermann founded UBC's
Migration Research Excellence Cluster. It's a group of
about 60 researchers from various disciplines who collaborate on research that "seeks to understand the causes,
consequences, and experiences of global human mobility,"
everything from forced displacement and statelessness
to border governance and refugee integration. This year,
the research cluster successfully applied to become a
new centre in the Faculty of Arts - a development that
she hopes will boost fund-raising efforts in support of
its work.
As well as being founding director of the new UBC
Centre for Migration Studies, Ellermann directs
THE NUMBER OF FORCIBLY DISPLACED PEOPLE IS AT
A HISTORIC HIGH. WHAT ARE THE MAIN CAUSES AND
CONSEQUENCES OF THIS?
Today, about one in every 110 people on Earth has been
forced to flee. Another way of thinking about this is
that every two seconds someone is forced to leave their
home. Armed conflict is the number one reason for this.
Over the past decade, the number of major civil wars has
almost tripled, civil conflicts have become more protracted and more violent, targeting civilians. We just need to
look at what has been happening in Syria, Myanmar, and
Afghanistan, or in Somalia, the Sudan, and Congo. A second driver of displacement is the inability of governments
to ensure the political, economic, or physical security of
their citizens. Think Venezuela or El Salvador. In future,
we will see a lot more displacement as a result of climate
change, because of widespread crop failure and the fact
that entire regions will become uninhabitable because of
heat, desertification, and flooding.
To make matters worse, the historic high in human
displacement in the Global South has triggered nationalist
responses across the Global North. The wealthy democracies of Europe, North America, and Australasia for the
most part have sealed and externalized their borders,
which means that those fleeing violence or poverty cannot
even make it to those countries who have the fiscal and
administrative capacity to offer protection.
There is a drastic imbalance between the need for, and
the provision of, protection. More than half of all refugees have been displaced for five or more years, many for
several decades. Millions of children grow up in refugee
camps, deprived of their childhood. Of all the refugees
in UN camps awaiting resettlement to countries in the
Global North, only one per cent will ever be resettled.
WHAT FACTORS LIE BEHIND THE RISE OF RIGHT-WING
POPULISM IN EUROPE AND THE US?
Explanations of the rise of right-wing populism focus on
two sources of insecurity. The first is a sense of economic
insecurity, prevalent among those in the lower half and
middle of the income distribution. This reflects a pattern
of stagnating wages and increases in precarious employment associated with globalization, as the postwar era
of sustained economic growth and rising wages came to
an end in the 1970s. Increased economic insecurity is not
only the result of a structural shift from manufacturing to
service sector employment, but it is also the consequence
TREK/ ALUMNI UBC
 of political choices made under neoliberal
policy agendas that led to the retrenchment of
the welfare state and the weakening of trade
unions.
The second source of insecurity that is
driving anti-immigrant populism is cultural
change. It is associated with major societal
changes over the past decades, including
changes in family structure, increasing
female labour-force participation, a decline
in religiosity, and, most importantly, increasing social diversity resulting from high levels
of immigration from non-Western and, in
some cases, Muslim-majority countries.
Social psychologists tell us that humans
tend to overestimate differences between
"us" (the in-group) and "them" (the out-group),
whilst underestimating differences within the
in-group. So we end up with an exaggerated
sense of difference in relation to those with
different social group characteristics from us,
whether that is linguistic, ethnic, or religious
difference. When this process takes places in
a context of widespread feelings of insecurity,
heightened by the threat of terrorism, then
populist leaders have an easy time mobilizing
the public with anti-immigrant and anti-
Muslim policy agendas.
WHY HAVEN'T WE SEEN THE RISE OF POPULISM TO THE SAME EXTENT IN CANADA?
It is not the case that there is no populism
in Canada - think Doug Ford in Ontario or
Jason Kenney in Alberta. But, at least outside of Quebec, we haven't seen the kind of
success enjoyed by anti-immigrant parties
and agendas elsewhere. There are a number
of reasons for this. Most important, perhaps,
is the fact that no major Canadian party
can afford to alienate immigrant and ethnic
minority voters. The "ethnic vote" is critical to
electoral success in urban ridings, especially
in Metro Vancouver and the Greater Toronto
Area. Canada's electoral system amplifies the
power of geographically concentrated groups
such as immigrant communities, at the same
time as Canada's high levels of immigration
and high naturalization rate combine to give
immigrants electoral clout.
There are also other reasons that discourage
anti-immigrant populism. Canada has done
a better job than most countries at managing
immigration. To a much greater degree than
is the case in Europe or in the United States,
Canada's immigration policy privileges
high-skilled immigrants. As a result, many
Canadians consider continued immigration
to be in the national interest. In addition,
ANTJE
ELLERMANN
Born and raised
in Germany, she
is the founding
director of the
new UBC Centre
for Migration
Studies.
CLAIM
TO FAME
She is the
co-president
of the American
Political Science
Association's
Migration &
Citizenship
section.
NEXT
PROJECT
She is leading an
interdisciplinary
team of UBC
migration scholars
and local organizations to study
how long-term
residents and
newcomers
to Vancouver
negotiate
belonging in
a city built on
unceded Coast
Salish territory.
Canada's geographic isolation allows for
controlled immigration. Unlike the EU and
the US, Canada does not share a border with
refugee-producing regions, and relatively few
refugee claimants and undocumented migrants manage to make their way to Canada.
WHAT DO YOU CONSIDER TO BE THE
MOST PRESSING ISSUE IN MIGRATION IN
CANADA TODAY?
One of the most pressing issues today is the
situation of refugee claimants who seek protection in Canada, for two distinct reasons.
First, in response to COVID-19, the Canada-
US border remains closed to non-essential
travel, including refugee claimants. Despite
the fact that there is a long list of exemptions
to these travel restrictions, they do not include
refugee claimants. In other words, travel
for the purpose of making a refugee claim
is considered "non-essential," comparable
to travel for the sake of tourism, recreation,
or entertainment.
A second reason why humanitarian protection is such a pressing issue is the Safe Third
Country Agreement between Canada and the
United States. The Agreement, which came
into force in 2004, rests on the premise that
Canada and the US have roughly equivalent
systems for adjudicating refugee claims, which
means that refugee claimants arriving at a
Canadian border crossing can be legitimately
turned back to the US to make their claim
there, and vice versa.
In July, Canada's Federal Court ruled that
the Agreement was unconstitutional, because
the US is no longer a safe country for refugees.
Refugee advocates have long made the case
that the many policy changes that have been
implemented in the US since the Agreement
came into force have undermined the integrity
of the US refugee adjudication system. Even
when the border re-opens, the US has in place
an asylum transit ban and refuses to adjudicate
refugee claims from anyone who has travelled
through any country other than their own
before arriving in the US. These measures
were imposed by the Trump administration
to counter the rising number of families from
Central America who filed refugee claims in
the US. The US also returns refugee claimants
to Honduras, Guatemala, and El Salvador to
pursue their claims from there, even though
these countries are among the world's most
violent. As the Federal Court's ruling recognized, Canada returning refugee claimants
to the US amounts to a violation of the rights
guaranteed under the Charter of Rights and
TREK / ALUMNI UBC
 Freedoms. Yet, despite these concerns, the
government has decided to appeal the ruling,
with the effect that the Agreement remains in
place for now.
HOW CAN WE PROMOTE PEACEFUL AND
COHESIVE SOCIETIES?
Let me share three thoughts. First, I believe
that peaceful co-existence and social solidarity will only have space to develop when a
society is willing to confront its dark side. If
that doesn't happen, conflicts will continue to
fester below the surface, ready to erupt. Here
in Canada, we are just beginning to face up to
the truth about our settler colonial past and
the ways in which Indigenous dispossession
continues today. Coming to terms with our
dark side is not a pleasant process, but it is a
necessary one if we want to move forward as
a society. In my view, this is the foundation on
which everything else needs to be built.
Second, assuming that we want to continue
to open our doors to immigrants, we need
to do so in a welcoming way, valuing what
immigrants have to offer us, and treat them
as future citizens. Canada's multiculturalism
BETWEEN
BORDERS
When one in
every 110 people
on Earth has
been forced
to flee, some
nations respond
with barriers,
like "the wall"
between the
United States
and Mexico.
policy has done a better job than most integration policies elsewhere in doing so - even
though it struggles to recognize the reality of
racism - and we have a relatively open citizenship policy. But Canada also recruits a huge
number of temporary foreign workers, many
of whom will never be able to transition to
permanent residence, and I don't think this is
sustainable over the long run without creating
societal tensions. The pandemic has exposed
how much Canada depends on the work that
many of these workers perform, and we should
recognize their contributions by allowing
them to remain here.
Lastly, I believe that investing in our public
education system is critically important.
Strong public schools can serve as a kind of
equalizer among kids and youth from diverse
socioeconomic backgrounds, and also nurture
relationships that bridge social divides.
TREK / ALUMNI UBC
 THE
MIGRATION
ISSUE /LANDCRABS
1
 A
THEORY
OF
VIOLENCE
Global sociologist Jasmin Hristovis
uncovering the secretive forces at play behind
land dispossession in Latin America.
BY ANTHONY A.  DAVIS    I    I LLUSTRATION  BY DAQ
TREK / ALUMNI UBC
 THEY SPED AWAY FROM
THE VILLAGE, AS FAST
AS THEIR CAR COULD
CO ON RUTTED ROADS
THROUGH SUGAR CAHE
FIELDS. STOPPINC WAS
NOT AN OPTION.
AT THE WHEEL that day was a
member of a peasant organization
who had been driving Jasmin Hristov,
assistant professor of sociology
at UBC's Okanagan campus, and
filmmaker Benjamin Cornejo to
a remote village in the Mexican
state of Chiapas. Hristov, fluent in
Portuguese and Spanish, planned
to interview families who had been
forcibly displaced from their land
by paramilitary forces. Cornejo was
there to film the encounter for a documentary he and Hristov are making
on displaced peoples.
Nearing the village, their driver was
warned by phone that a paramilitary
group was shooting at dwellings
there. "We turned back," recounts
Hristov. "But we worried the group
might catch up with us as we were
driving away."
It's not a typical scenario for an
10 TREK/ ALUMNI UBC
academic researcher, yet this wasn't
the first time Hristov had been in a
dangerous situation.
As part of her research unearthing
how corrupt capitalism, hand-in-
hand with paramilitary violence, has
stolen land from generations of Latin
American peasants and Indigenous
peoples, Hristov has made many
trips to such countries as Colombia,
El Salvador, Brazil and Honduras.
It's academic work of a courageous
nature that connects this professor to
activists, victims of land dispossession and journalists in many parts of
Latin America.
She recounts her Chiapas experience reluctantly. Not because that
particular trip frightened her - she's
had more harrowing experiences
doing research in Colombia - she
just doesn't want the dangers of her
research sensationalized. "The risk
I face is minimal compared to the
people who are activists and live
there," says Hristov.
ACADEMIC EMPOWERMENT
TO THE PEOPLE
Hristov teaches political sociology,
globalization and human rights, gender
and women's studies, and sociological theory. Her research examines
a wide span of political violence in
South and Central America, including
violence carried out by state forces
and irregular armed groups, and the
social ailments, such as sex trafficking and other abuses of human rights,
arising from economic globalization.
Hristov's research, contrary to much
of the existing sociological literature,
posits that land dispossession cannot
be explained solely as a product
of abuse of power or criminality.
Neither can the parallels between
 the activities of armed groups and
capitalist interests be considered coincidental. She has developed a novel
theory of "pro-capitalist violence,"
offering a new way to see and understand the secretive relationships
between paramilitaries, large-scale
capital, and oppressive governments.
"My fieldwork with different actors
involved in these conflicts... shows
that violence and legislation work
in tandem towards achieving the
economic objectives of capitalists, as
well as those set out by international
institutions such as the World Bank,"
she says.
Hristov has done more than
100 interviews with victims of land
dispossession. She has used those interviews to illustrate - in her books,
courses and forthcoming publications
- the massive human suffering and
injustice that is still taking place in
Latin America.
People are dispossessed of their
land through market mechanisms
(such as free trade agreements),
judicial mechanisms (such as the
commodification of collectively
owned land), or through violence.
Land dispossession, says Hristov, is
"a process that destroys sustainable
rural livelihoods and the social
fabric of communities, and generates
'surplus humanity' - people with no
livelihood and no job prospects."
Many migrate to nearby urban
centres and end up living in slums.
"Given the lack of economic opportunities and the extreme food insecurity - as well as being trapped in spaces
ridden by gang and organized crime
violence - young people are left with
few options: mainly to join the criminal world or to be victimized by it."
During her research Hristov heard
first-hand stories from people and
families involved in land struggles
in Honduras and Chiapas, Mexico.
Without access to land, they felt
their only chance of survival was
migrating to the United States and
seeking asylum.
Yet the large-scale suffering
propelling involuntary migration
was largely invisible to the North
American public until caravans
of desperate immigrants from
Central American countries such as
Guatemala amassed at an unwelcoming US southern border, where tens
of thousands of them were detained
in inhumane conditions.
During the month of May 2019
alone - at the height of this flight to
illusory safety - the US made 132,865
border apprehensions. By last fall,
that number had dropped by 75 per
cent, suggesting the Trump administration's unsympathetic immigration
policies, backed by a false narrative
that the Central American wave was
largely composed of murderous gangs
and drug dealers, were having their
intended effect.
"We often hear of explanations
for the Central American exodus
being centred on poverty and gang
violence," says Hristov. "While
these are certainly key reasons,
poverty and gang violence have a
deeper structural driver, and that is
land dispossession."
LOCAL RESISTANCE
In Hristov's office, the walls are
brightened by a colourful blanket
from Chiapas and other craftworks
collected from research trips. The
walls also sport a red flag with an
image of Marxist revolutionary
Che Guevara and a poster of Berta
Caceres - one of Hristov's heroes.
Caceres was an Indigenous
Honduran activist trying to stop
construction of an internationally
financed hydro-electric dam on the
Gualcarque River, a river considered
sacred by the Lenca people, whose
land was threatened by the project.
Caceres was murdered in 2016 by
now-convicted former members of
the state military and employees
of DESA, the company building
the dam.
Tragically, Caceres is one of many.
"Some [peasant] leaders are under
constant threat," says Cornejo, who
met Hristov in Toronto during the
early 2000s. "Some of them have
been shot, kidnapped and seriously
hurt. We have to be careful when
we interview them and with the
locations we choose."
Just this March, as COVID-19
quarantine and lockdown measures
were imposed in Colombia, local
NGOs reported that armed groups
had taken advantage of the situation
to murder three rural activists -
Marco Rivadeneira, Angel Ovidio
Quintero, and Ivo Humberto
Bracamonte - and they feared
more victims would follow.
Hristov regards herself as part of
a small but growing number of "global
sociologists." She hopes her particular
research, books, and teaching -
exposing the veiled mechanisms of
greed and profit behind the atrocities
of land dispossession - will empower
its victims in Latin America and
elsewhere to find the lives and justice
they deserve.
Both the Office of the UN High
Commissioner for Human Rights
and the UN's Food and Agriculture
Organization recognize the dire
situation peasant populations in developing countries face today because
of economic power imbalances and
a lack of protection from violence.
In 2018 the UN General Assembly
approved the UN Declaration on the
Rights of Peasants and Other People
Working in Rural Areas. The next
step - effective implementation by
nation-states - is a "huge challenge,"
frets Hristov, given that those who
hold power in countries such as
Honduras, Guatemala and Mexico
can still manipulate laws to their own
advantage. "Countries in the North
should support the will of the popular
movements seeking change on the
ground in these countries," she says.
"They should not recognize illegitimate political regimes, such as the
present one in Honduras."
AN INGRAINED SENSE
OF INJUSTICE
Hristov authored Blood and Capital:
the Paramilitarization of Colombia
in 2009, and followed that five
years later with Paramilitarism and
Neoliberalism: Violent Systems of
Capital Accumulation in Colombia
and Beyond.
In simple terms, neoliberalism is
an economic philosophy that supports
a free market, deregulation, government austerity and privatization of
business and services.
TREK/ ALUMNI UBC
11
 L
ABOVE THE
GROUND
Paramilitary forces
(above left) guard a
contentious mining site
in Guapinol, Honduras,
where in 2018 police
and military personnel
violently evicted approximately 100 unarmed
peasants protesting
against the mine's
alleged contamination
of local water sources.
Indigenous Honduran
activist Berta Caceres
(depicted above right)
was murdered in 2016
after preventing
construction of a
hydro-electric dam on
her people's land.
Yet her preface in Paramilitarism
and Neoliberalism makes it clear that
Hristov sees neoliberalism as a ruthless dog-eat-dog ideology that favours
the rich and powerful and locks more
and more people into an inescapable
cage of poverty.
In Latin America, neoliberal
governments and other actors often
use paramilitary groups to do their
dirty work. Paramilitaries - armed
groups organized and financed by
sectors of the elites but unofficially
supported by the state - have been
involved in widespread human
rights violations.
Corporations too, including some
in developed countries outside South
and Central America, have had a
hand, wittingly or otherwise, in Latin
American land dispossession. Foreign
corporations benefit from operating
under repressive states that protect
their economic interests, and some
Canadian, US, and European corporations, says Hristov, "have been
directly implicated in land conflicts
in Latin America." Private security
forces working for such companies,
as well as state security acting on
their behalf, she contends, have
"grossly violated" human rights
among the local populations,
particularly those opposed to the
operations of these companies.
Hristov is angered by the misery
and injustice created by uprooting
people from their land and is fiercely
committed to fighting the forces that
generate poverty and dehumaniza-
tion. The roots and impacts of land
dispossession is not a field of study
Hristov chose for herself. "It chose
me," she says.
She was just five when she began to
have a growing sense of the injustice
in the world. "When I was growing
up, there was a part of me that
rebelled against, or felt indignation
towards the ways in which poor
people in Brazil did not matter and
were silenced - and had to, on a daily
basis, swallow the humiliation as if
they were lesser human beings than
12
TREK / ALUMNI UBC
 the wealthy. The bloody conflicts
over land in the Brazilian north were
a product of the landowning elite
robbing the rural poor of their human
dignity, and having the power to
decide who had the right to exist."
It all left an indelible impression on
her. "I know millions of people live
in these countries that are very unequal, and are accustomed to the way
the poor are robbed of their dignity.
And it has become as natural as the
air they breathe. But it was never that
way for me."
Even after moving to Canada with
her parents as a teenager, part of
Hristov always wanted to, one day,
have the power to make oppressors
pay for what they do.
THE REBEL IN THE RESEARCHER
Today, Hristov is the principal investigator for two major projects funded
by the Canadian federal government's
Social Sciences and Humanities
Research Council.
With the "Violence and Land
Dispossession in Central America
and Mexico" project, Hristov leads
an international team that includes
three UBC research assistants, two
international research assistants, the
documentary filmmaker Cornejo, and
collaborators in each of the countries
where research is being conducted.
The team is documenting the
prevalence and core patterns in
the relationship between land
dispossession and paramilitary
and/or state violence in Honduras,
Guatemala, El Salvador and Mexico.
They have also funded and created
a website that the peasant movement
in Honduras can use to post news
and urgent action alerts.
In her role as principal investigator
for the "Human Rights Monitor of
Honduras" project, Hristov is working
in partnership with a Honduran NGO,
the Association for Democracy and
Human Rights, and 15 researchers in
that country. The team is collaborating with 20 community organizations
in Honduras and has conducted more
than 220 interviews in the process
of creating a database documenting
political violence and human rights
violations over the past decade.
"I KNOW
MILLIONS OF
PEOPLE LIVE IN
THESE COUNTRIES
THAT ARE VERY
UNEQUAL, AND
ARE ACCUSTOMED
TO THE WAY
THE POOR ARE
ROBBED OF THEIR
DIGNITY. AND
IT HAS BECOME
ASHATURALAS
THE AIR THEY
BREATHE. BUT IT
WAS HEVER THAT
WAY FOR ME."
- JASMIN HRISTOV,
UBC PROFESSOR OF
SOCIOLOGY
Hristov's research garners
wide-ranging attention from the
media. In 2019 she received the
Early Investigator Award from the
Canadian Sociological Association
in recognition of the theoretically
novel nature of her work and her deep
commitment to human rights. But her
commitment goes far beyond theory.
The central goal of her research is to
contribute to social change, and she
wants her work to reach audiences
beyond academia. She hopes her findings will be published in journals read
by policy-makers from the Canadian
government and the World Bank, and
wants to raise awareness about the
ways economic legislation architec-
tured by international entities such
as the World Bank create conditions
for investment conducive to violence
and dispossession.
Hristov has also written expert-
witness reports for human rights
violation trials in the US and Canada
related to incidents in Latin America,
and she is not averse to directly
challenging those in influential
political positions. In December 2017,
when Juan Orlando Hernandez was
installed for a second term as president
of Honduras, Hristov gathered signatures for a collective letter to Chrystia
Freeland, Canada's Minister of Foreign
Affairs at the time. The letter asked
Freeland and the Canadian government to take a stand against what
was widely regarded as a fraudulent
election. Hristov also was involved in
urging Canada to take a stand against
a wave of violence, including 30 murders of civilians, by Honduran police
and military. The minister, Hristov
says, took a year to reply, only to say
that Canada is monitoring the human
rights situation in Honduras.
Hristov acknowledges that in some
academic circles there are those who
are uncomfortable with her social
justice approach to academic investigation - seeing her as too much
the activist, rather than an impartial
researcher. "Being a passionate
academic seeking social transformation can be harmful to one's career in
many ways," explains Hristov. "But it's
not something that I planned for. It's
part of me. And I can't change that."
TREK / ALUMNI UBC
13
 THE
MIGRATION
ISSUE/THE NEW JOURNALISM
 Inside Out
UBC's Global Reporting Centre steps away
from traditional "parachute journalism"
in favour of empowering local voices.
 "99.999 per cent of Germans don't want you here."
MOHAMED AMJAHID LAUGHS, reading from a piece
of anti-immigrant hate mail. Amjahid is not an immigrant -
he's a 32-year-old native of Frankfurt - but that doesn't seem
to matter. His skin is brown. His name is foreign enough.
And the emails pile up, sometimes hundreds in a day.
But he laughs, and the audience laughs with him.
This is "Hate Poetry," an evening of humour and incredulous eye-rolls, where German journalists turn xenophobia into sketch comedy to highlight the growing nativism
and rise of the right wing in 21st century Europe.
The scene is hyperlocal - if you weren't in the room, you
wouldn't have seen it were it not for the digital storytelling project Strangers at Home. An initiative of UBC's
Global Reporting Centre (GRC), Strangers at Home offers
unique, locally told perspectives on the state of attitudes
towards immigrants in modern Europe.
But it's not just the stories that stand out, it's the way
they are told. The short films are authored by the subjects
themselves. Rather than going the traditional route of
reporting on the subjects, the GRC is reporting with them,
providing production and technical support, but allowing
on stories that affect the local community but still carry
ripples of international relevance.
Such experiments are unusual in the competitive media
landscape. The large companies that dominate the
markets are profit-driven, lacking the stomach and the
expertise to take risks. Independent media simply lack
the funding, relying on donations and grants just to keep
afloat. So it falls to rare organizations like the GRC to
innovate in the reporting arena.
Built on a three-tier system of studying global journalism,
experimenting with reporting techniques, and teaching
their findings to the next generation of reporters, the GRC
resembles a lean start-up as much as a news organization.
"Most media organizations just produce journalism,"
says Klein, who officially founded the GRC in 2016 but
began creating its content nearly three years earlier.
"But because we're part of a university we want to take
advantage of that, to really bring some scholarly rigour
to what we're doing."
To blend scholarship with practice, the GRC teams
reporters and academics who work together on stories
through every phase of the project - from conception to
field reporting to critical analysis of their techniques.
U
99 999 per cent of Germ
the subjects to write and direct their own tales.
This new kind of experimental reporting is called
"empowerment journalism," putting control in the hands
of the first-person storyteller. "Hate Poetry" is just one of
10 short documentaries that make up Strangers at Home,
ranging from Roma life in Macedonia, to migration in
Greece, to the intersection of fascism and charity in Italy.
Born from a desire to challenge traditional methods of
international reporting, empowerment journalism is an
attempt to overcome the blind spots and bias inherent in
having local stories told by outsiders.
"There seems to be a growing sense among journalists
that traditional foreign correspondence is antiquated," says Peter Klein, professor at the UBC School of
Journalism, Writing, and Media, and executive director
of the GRC. "It has traditional neocolonial trappings that
most journalists are unaware of. You're basically sending
a privileged, usually white, western reporter to some far
off place to see the poverty or disease or war or whatever,
taking something from that place, and bringing it back
home and telling everybody about it in a way that's relevant only to them. There are a lot of missing perspectives
and missing voices in that model."
By supporting locals in telling their own stories about
the intersection between immigration and human rights
in Europe, Strangers at Home uses empowerment journalism to offer a much different, more personal perspective
This replaces the traditional model of reporters simply
interviewing academics for a small slice of the story.
One challenge for the GRC has been addressing the
issue of "fixers" in the practice of "parachute journalism."
A Western reporter drops into a place they know little
about and relies on a local journalist (the fixer) to translate
the language and make the connections needed to tell
the story. But it's an exploitative relationship that favours
the outsider's narrative at the expense of the local, often
marginalized, community's perspective. "It's easy and
convenient to use fixers," says Klein, "but once you take
that traditional methodology out of the equation, then
you've got to come up with new things. You're sort of
forcing yourself to experiment. So we've intentionally put
ourselves in this awkward position of saying let's try to do
global journalism in a new way."
When Strangers at Home was first proposed in 2013, its
working title was History Repeated, focusing on the rise of
right-wing nationalism similar to that which brought the
Nazi party into power eight decades ago. The initial plan
followed the traditional path of international journalism:
get some funding, go to Europe, interview subjects, and
tell the obvious story - the nationalists rise to power,
the world looks away, and we unleash another holocaust.
"That was an interesting historical touchstone from
a simplistic storytelling standpoint," says Klein. "But
then we started talking to scholars and experts on refugee
16
TREK/ ALUMNI UBC
 issues, experts on xenophobia and nativism and the rise
of the right, and consistently what I heard from them was,
'Please, please don't do the predictable story of history
repeating itself.'"
As it turns out, Nazi-era Germany is a poor historical
analogy for what's happening in today's interconnected
world, and the various forms of racism and xenophobia
throughout Europe are too diverse to be understood in all
their complexities by outsiders. Foreign journalists often
approach these issues in sweeping brushstrokes, assuming there is little difference between Greece's Golden
Dawn and Italy's CasaPound, or between anti-semitism
in Hungary and anti-semitism in Sweden, chalking them
all up under the simplistic rubric "the rise of the right."
"So we thought, rather than us coming in as outsiders
imposing our own view on these issues, why don't we
empower people to tell their own stories?" says Klein.
"Why don't we embrace that complexity and nuance?"
The project was renamed Strangers at Home, and the
first person Klein tapped was the series' project manager
Shayna Plaut, a PhD student in UBC's interdisciplinary
program who was teaching a class on human rights at the
School of Journalism. With Plaut taking the academic
dependency in their community. The powerful documentary reimagined the newsroom as a first-person account
rather than a third-person observation, illustrating the
need for journalists to transition from gatekeepers of
the information to collaborators with their subjects.
"We wouldn't have done Turning Points if it weren't for
the lessons we learned from Strangers at Home," recalls
Klein. "Alcohol dependency in Indigenous communities
is one of those topics a lot of people in those communities
want told, but they don't want it told in the traditional
way of outsiders coming in and - intentionally or unintentionally - perpetuating stereotypes. So we handed the
storytelling power over to them. Just like with Strangers,
it was proof of concept that you can empower people who
are not professional storytellers and get really compelling
stories out of them."
But the stories don't come easily. Empowerment
journalism is expensive, risky, and producers give up
a lot of control - the occasional failure is inevitable. In
traditional newsrooms, people get fired if they fly around
the world chasing a story and then come back without
one. Staff journalists can't take that risk, and freelancers
can't afford to - there's an unspoken pressure to contort
ans don't want you here."
lead, and Klein providing the journalistic support, they
assembled a team that ranged from journalism students
to a Pulitzer-winning producer, ultimately working with
two dozen researchers, reporters, producers, technical
professionals, and storytellers to help locals deliver their
niche perspectives.
But to what end? What is the point of telling stories
from a local perspective for an audience on the other side
of the world?
Because we are more interconnected than we think. Many
North Americans have attributed the rise of the right in
Europe to an extension of the emboldened American white
nationalists after Trump's inauguration in 2017. But the
Strangers at Home project began in 2013, and was completed in 2016, when the political climate in the United States
was much different than it is today, and anti-immigrant
ideologies such as the Tea Party movement seemed like
they might be more of a fashion statement than an established base. These small stories from the corners of Europe
revealed the roots of what soon became a global trend
in nativism. Traditional foreign reporting wouldn't have
told them until the issues were on our doorstep.
The success of Strangers at Home - which has won
several awards and was presented at the United Nations -
led to other projects such as Turning Points, which empowered members of Indigenous communities in Yellowknife
to tell their own stories about the problem with alcohol
your story to fit some preconceived idea that may not
be accurate.
Because funding for the centre also defies journalistic
norms, this issue is easier to sidestep. The GRC accepts no
corporate sponsorships or commercials, relying primarily
on academic backing and philanthropic support from
foundations and individuals. Strangers at Home was 100
per cent crowdfunded. But so far the GRC has managed to
produce dozens of award-winning projects in partnerships
with leading media organizations around the world, including NBC News, the BBC, the CBC, and the New York Times.
The GRC's biggest challenge, Klein admits, is raising operational support. "It's great for a foundation or individual
to have a connection to a documentary or book project,"
he says. 'I funded a documentary' sounds awesome.
'I funded the infrastructure to allow an organization to
grow', well, that's less interesting, but it's what we need
most. You can't grow an organization without that kind
of funding, and you can't take the risks."
"The system isn't designed for experimentation and
failure," he continues. "But this is the value of a non-profit
journalism model - we can take risks, we can fail. As long
as we can afford to fail and accept the occasional loss,
then we're learning a lot from it."
The Strangers at Home documentary series and more can
be viewed atglobalreportingcentre.org
TREK / ALUMNI UBC
17
 THE
MIGRATI
ISSUE /
 DEAR NOUR
BY DANNY RAMADAN
Winter here is a freshly cleaned glass
building no one lives in and I wonder if you would curse
the clouds the way you cursed me when your husband went to the sea.
There is no open fire in houses here unless it's a decorative fireplace
on TV with a mysterious hand flipping burning woods I stand by it
hands extending      it offers no warmth.
No one knows how to play backgammon and I haven't
played since you and I last battled      in the living room with heavy tea
and the dices twirled around like a dervish.
Danny Ramadan,
MFA'20, is an
award-winning
novelist, speaker,
and LGBTQ-
'efugee activist.
His debut novel,
The Clothesline
Swing, won multiple
awards, and he is
also the author
of the children's
300k Salma the
Syrian Chef. H e
talked about his
experiences as
a Syrian refugee in
the popular TED
talk The Refugee
Tree: A Queer
journey from
Syria to Canada.
You slam the table with your hand
and the dices stop twirling they rested on        two sixes you won that
round and made me Turkish coffee that healed my broken soul.
Your home tucked away in the old corners of Damascus
neighboured by abandoned wooden houses      waiting forgotten filled
With the dust of old souls abandoned waiting forgotten.
Your hair is waiving tales on your shoulders      freed
a nightly sky with a hidden moon    you wash it with olive oil
to keep it nourished and soft.
My hair is humid like a wet cloth. I can clean a
kitchen floor with it. I can even clean the
salt and snow off my boots.
Every time I pack for a new place I remember you
packing my bags
begging me to stay.
I wanted to tell you that yesterday
I bought myself a bottle of olive oil
I called it home.
made in California
TREK / ALUMNI UBC
 THE
MIGRATION
ISSUE / RESLILIENCE
V
A new exhibit on Chinese
immigration and British Columbia
highlights belonging, racism,
and resilience
BY MADELEINE DE TRENQUALYE,  BA'07
TREK / ALUMNI UBC
 *  :
U
 MANY SCHOOLCHILDREN IN BC
today (at least those who pay attention
in their history classes) are familiar
with the milestones of discrimination
that Chinese Canadians have suffered:
the head tax of 1885, the race riot of
1907, the Exclusion Act of 1923, and
segregation in housing and jobs until
the 1960s. In 2006, the federal government formally apologized for this
omnibus of past wrongs. In 2014, the
province followed suit, and in 2018,
so did the City of Vancouver.
"You have to remember the parts of
the past that did damage in order to
move forward together," says UBC
historian Henry Yu. Yu says these
public apologies help promote a more
inclusive society. Learning about
histories of discrimination can also
teach us how us-versus-them narratives emerge. As xenophobia takes on
new but familiar expressions - including a recent surge of anti-Asian hate
crimes related to COVID-19 - that
lesson seems more relevant than ever.
But Yu says it's equally important to
learn how victims of racism - both
then and now - respond to and fight
for justice.
STORIES OF RACISM
AND RESILIENCE
As the co-curator of a new temporary
exhibit that opened in August in
Vancouver's Chinatown, with a sister
exhibition opening in November at
the Museum of Vancouver, Yu hopes
to inspire audiences with stories
about how Chinese Canadians battled
exclusion and helped to build a better
society. Curated with PhD candidate
Denise Fong (BA'03, M A'08) and MOV
curator Viviane Gosselin (PhD'll),
these exhibits, entitled^! Seat at the
Table, are also the launching pad for
a new multi-sited provincial Chinese
Canadian Museum that will have
hubs and spokes throughout BC.
"What we're trying to do is
humanize the stories and not just
see Chinese Canadians as victims of
racism, but instead to look at stories
of resilience," says Fong, who is completing her PhD on cultural heritage
and identity in museums.
"We understand what was done
to the Chinese, but often we don't
understand as well their strategies
for resistance, whether it was creating alternative business networks or
building partnerships with Indigenous
communities," adds Yu. "97,000
Chinese came to Canada during the
head tax era. What motivated them to
cross an ocean and be separated from
their families?" And what continues
to motivate newer waves of migrants?
JOURNEYS OF HOPE
Both Henry Yu and Denise Fong can
turn to their own family histories for
answers. Yu was born at Vancouver
General Hospital in 1967, the year
of Canada's 100th birthday. (He was
a "Chung baby," one of over 7,000
infants delivered by legendary OB-
GYN Madeline Chung, who was for
decades the only Chinese-speaking
obstetrician in BC.) Although Yu's
parents had immigrated to Canada
migrants. He paid the $500 head
tax (a fee amounting to two years'
wages) and spent four decades as a
cook on a CPR cruise ship, returning
to China just once to marry. Because
of Canada's Exclusion Act and the
Chinese Communist Revolution, it
was 28 years until he would meet
his daughter (Yu's mother), when she
immigrated to Vancouver with her
husband and children in 1965.
By then, Canadian society had
evolved. Although discrimination
endured in subtle and not-so-subtle
ways, the legal framework of racism
was being dismantled. Yu's father,
equipped with an engineering degree
from a top Chinese university, quickly found employment in BC's booming mining sector, despite speaking
little English. "Within weeks he'd
landed a job that paid three times
what my grandfather ever made,"
"My father's seat at the table was
earned by people who fought
discrimination, who literally fought
for the vote by going to war for
Canada. They're the ones who
made Canada a better, more
inclusive place."
- Henry Yu, UBC professor of history
just two years earlier, making him
the first the Canadian-born member
of his family, he is simultaneously
a fourth-generation Canadian whose
great-grandfather was one of the
earliest Cantonese migrants to arrive
in BC in the 1880s.
Like many of his compatriots,
Yu's great-grandfather spent his life
isolated from his family, working a
string of difficult jobs to send money
home. He gradually saved enough to
bring his four sons to Canada, one by
one. The youngest was Yu's maternal
grandfather, Yeung Sing Yew, who
crossed the Pacific in 1923, just before
Canada shut its doors to Chinese
says Yu. "That really astounded my
grandfather, who until that point had
figured his son-in-law was sort of
useless as a new immigrant."
But Yu says it's only thanks to earlier
generations that his father was able
to saunter into an industry that had
previously been off limits. Until 1947,
Chinese Canadians were banned from
practicing as engineers, doctors and
lawyers. "My father's seat at the table
was earned by people who fought discrimination, who literally fought for
the vote by going to war for Canada.
They're the ones who made Canada
a better, more inclusive place."
Yu hopes that's a lesson people
22
TREK / ALUMNI UBC
 BRINGING
STORIES TO LIFE
In anew exhibit
at the Museum of
Vancouver, Henry
Yu and Denise Fong
trace the histories
Chinese Canadian
reflect on as they look forward. "If
you want to know why BC is a great
place to live, but can be an even
better place to live, look to those who
aren't enjoying all the privileges of
living here. They're the people who
will make Canada a better society."
NEWER WAVES OF MIGRATION
Having migrated from Hong Kong
in 1990, Denise Fong's story reflects a newer wave of cosmopolitan, educated, Cantonese migrants
who bypassed Chinatown, settling
in affluent places like Richmond
and Kerrisdale.
Fong wanted the exhibit to reflect
this more recent history of Chinese
Canadian migration, but wondered
how newer migrants would connect
to stories about earlier migrants who
built railroads, ran laundries, and
endured forced segregation, when
their lived experiences appeared to
be so different.
But in her interviews with different
communities, Fong discovered that
while migrants' trajectories and reasons for migrating have shifted, there
are several common threads: belonging and identity, family businesses,
a sense of being pulled between two
cultures. The split family is another
enduring theme that has found a new
expression in the 21st century - with
so-called "astronaut families" whose
lives straddle Canada and Asia.
"There's been this reversal where
now it's often the families who are
here raising their kids so they can
have a good quality education and
better upbringing, while Dad is
overseas making money."
COMMUNITY ENGAGEMENT
Fong says the exhibit and Chinese
Canadian Museum broadens the idea
of Chinese Canadian by incorporating a tapestry of stories from diverse
communities while highlighting
these universal themes. Visitors
will also be invited to share their
own stories of exclusion, belonging
and resilience.
Yu says that reflecting the diversity
of Chinese Canadian experiences is
critical. "It's no longer from eight
small counties in southern China,"
says Yu. "We have Chinese Peruvians
who speak Spanish as a first language;
Chinese from Malaysia or Trinidad
or South Africa; Sino-Vietnamese
and Sino-Cambodians who spent
four generations in Southeast Asia
before coming to Canada as refugees.
Surfacing that complexity and creating an ongoing mirror is crucial."
To that end, Yu has empowered
his own students at UBC to expand
on textbook histories of Chinese
Canadians. For the past 15 years,
instead of only assigning scholarly
articles and exams, he has sent
students into the community to
conduct oral history media projects.
The relationships they have built form
a network of knowledge exchange
that Yu and his colleagues have drawn
from for projects like the Chinese
Canadian Museum. Many of his
former students now work as filmmakers, museum curators, journalists
and digital storytellers, continuing
to expand the story of Chinese
Canadian history.
Yu emphasizes that it took 15 years
of capacity-building to get to this
point. "We don't just collect histories,
exhibit them, and archive them. It's
a continual process of reciprocal
relationships. That's what community
engagement has to look like."
TREK/ ALUMNI UBC
23
 Racism and
Resilience
The story of Chinese Canadians -
from boycotts to beauty queens.
CAPTIONS BY PROFESSOR HENRY YU
<9Bt  qw '"'"■■ '    '
f. HIHESE IHDU5TRY n R  HOME INDUSTRY
VaKfe LABDflJl" WHITE LM9DR
1. AIRBRUSHED
FAMILY PHOTO
Early Chinese migrants
to BC were often separated from their families
for years or even decades. This made family
photos, like this one of
the Wong Chew Lip family, particularly precious.
The photo uses an early
form of airbrushing to
stitch together family
members who were
split across the Pacific
- a common practice
at this time.
2. THE CANTONESE
PACIFIC (1926)
From the 1840s to the
1930s, Cantonese
migrant networks
connected ports
such as Victoria and
Vancouver to Yokohama,
Melbourne, Sydney,
Honolulu, San Francisco
and Hong Kong.
Chinese merchants
and labourers moved
across and around
the Pacific as well as
throughout Southeast
Asia, the Caribbean,
South America, and
Africa. The transcontinental Canadian
Pacific Railway, which
Cantonese workers
helped build in the
1880s, was part of a
global transportation
network that included ships such as the
Empress of Asia, which
carried many Cantonese
migrants between China
and Canada.
3. THE CHINESE
SOCCER TEAM
(1926)
The Chinese students'
soccer team won city
championships in
Vancouver year after
year. After a victory,
players like Quene Yip,
Dock Yip, William
Lore, and Tong Louie
would be celebrated in
Vancouver's Chinatown.
At a time when they
were treated as second
class citizens and considered inferior, soccer
provided a set of rules
and a level playing field
that allowed Chinese
Canadians to prove that
they were inferior to
no one.
4. CITY-SANCTIONED
RACISM (1890)
In its grant to the BC
Sugar Refining Co.
Ltd., or Rogers Sugar,
the City of Vancouver
stipulated that it would
o o
^r co
O CO
co o
[^ o
CD O
og
< o
69
Ik °>
CO [^
ce co
Ce tj
Ce ■=
•S.S
grant land for the
establishment of a
O &
sugar-refining business
§2"
"on the condition that
f§
the said Company shall
0 ce
not at any time employ
0 0
Chinese labor in and
=  01
about the said works..."
5 <o
LL     1
5. A WHITE MAN'S
So
> CO
PROVINCE (1879)
2 co
& ce
In 1872, one of the first
legislative acts in the
..  CM
newly formed province
0 ?
of British Columbia
<: °
was to disenfranchise
Chinese and Indigenous
O <2
residents. The politics
0 6
of white supremacy
<
^ 6
imagined a "white"
2 CO
O q:
Canada that would be
D_ CO
24
TREK/ ALUMNI UBC
 cleared of Chinese and
of Indigenous peoples
who were already here.
Struggling alongside
other people of colour,
Chinese Canadians
fought to be treated
fairly, forcing Canada
to become a more
equitable and inclusive
place to the benefit
of everyone.
6. ANTI-ASIAN RIOT
(1907)
Anti-Chinese legislation
was one tool to prevent
Chinese people from
entering and surviving
in Canada. Another
was organizing unions
around white supremacy
to drive Chinese workers out of industries
such as mining, logging,
fishing and manufacturing. By the 1890s,
these techniques were
also targeting Japanese
and South Asian communities in BC, under
a broader category of
"Oriental," "Asiatic," or
"Asian" exclusion. The
1907 anti-Asian riots
targeted Chinese and
Japanese residents
and businesses in
Vancouver, especially
those in Chinatown and
the Powell Street area.
7. BUILDERS OF BC
(1900s)
Most early Cantonese
migrants began their
lives in Canada as
labourers who worked
in mines, logging
camps, canneries,
farms, restaurants, and
laundries - nearly every
industry. They built the
railroads that allowed
mass migration from the
Atlantic coast, and they
cleared trees and grew
food for others to eat.
Despite the discrimination they faced, early
Chinese migrants played
a vital role in the building
of BC and Canada.
SEE FOR
YOURSELF
One exhibit,
two locations:
Hon Hsing in
Chinatown,
Museum of
Vancouver at
Kits Point
This UBC and MOV
collaboration is
the launchpad for
a new multi-sited
provincial Chinese
Canadian Museum
that will have hubs
throughout BC.
9 museumof
vancouver.ca/a-seat-
at-the-table
TREK / ALUMNI UBC
25
 8. HOLLYWOOD
CAFE OPENING DAY,
PRINCE RUPERT
(1946)
Many Chinese restaurants and cafes across
Canada employed
white and Indigenous
waitresses. In 1919, after
years of lobbying from
moral reformers who
considered the mixing
of Chinese with white
women and children to
be immoral and dangerous, the provincial
government passed
the Municipal Act for
the protection of white
women, which prohibited Chinese restaurants
from employing them.
When the City started to enforce the Act strictly in 1937,
waitresses held a public
march outside City Hall.
9. W.K. GARDENS
CHINESE RESTAURANT
IN VANCOUVER'S
CHINATOWN (EARLY
1950s)
Why do so many small
towns and cities in Canada
have a Chinese Canadian
cafe or restaurant? The
exhibit's title, A Seat at
the Table, refers both to
the fight for inclusion as
well as Chinese Canadian
culinary history. It highlights
the importance of food
and restaurant culture as
a strategy for success and
26
TREK / ALUMNI UBC
 explores how family-run
Chinese restaurants and
other small business-
0)   =i
<o o
es spread into nearly
_j   cz
every town across
the country.
10. MISS
"5
CHINATOWN (1961)
-g
In the 1950s and 1960s,
0  =>
> -—
ZJ  CO
when beauty pageants
"?
were popular and yet
s§
non-white contestants
8-?
were almost never
a
included, alternatives
5^1
0  L±J
such as the Miss
s°
Chinatown pageant
.E o
> t
became a way for young
£8
Chinese Canadians to
° s
experience a parallel
O J=
o0-
form of acceptance
d;W
and belonging. The
pageants were the
creation of a supportive and close-knit
community.
11. LOCAL FOOD
NETWORKS
(1939-1951)
Most Chinese people
who came to Canada
in the 1800s and early
1900s left farming villages in southern China,
and many knew how
to grow food crops.
Chinese Canadian
farms grew much of
the fresh produce sold
in BC supermarkets
and Chinatown stores,
delivering it to every
neighbourhood by hand
basket, and then truck.
In the 19th and 20th
centuries, Chinese
market farms helped
feed growing urban
populations all around
the Pacific, and established sustainable and
locally-sourced fresh
food industries that
still endure.
12. EDMOND LEONG
ON HIS FAMILY
FARM, MUSQUEAM
(1964)
From the turn of the
20th century until the
1970s, Chinese migrants
from Guangdong farmed
on the Musqueam
reserve, supplying
produce throughout the
Lower Mainland. Close
ties were formed, and
the social and economic
impact of Chinese farms
became region-wide.
Many farms in the Big
Bend area of Burnaby,
BC, started out on the
Musqueam reserve.
One of them is Leong's
Nursery, owned by
Edmond Leong, who
grew up at Musqueam
in the 1960s.
13. PROTESTS THAT
SHAPED BC (1970s)
For over a century,
Chinese Canadians have
fought discrimination.
Their struggles have
shaped who we are,
where we live, and even
what we eat. During
the 1960s and 1970s,
Chinese Canadian
residents of Strathcona
organized to successfully block a proposed
freeway downtown, thus
ensuring the survival
of Vancouver's vibrant
and livable core. When
health inspectors shut
down Chinese BBQ
shops, Chinatown merchants and protesters
fought back, proving
the food was safe by
serving it at a banquet
whose guests included cabinet ministers
from Ottawa!
TREK/ ALUMNI UBC
27
 THE
MIGRATION
ISSUE / MOVEMENT
EMENT £
it
ILLUSTRATION  BY GRACIA LAM
^
 Birds migrate
according to season.
Long musical compositions
are divided into movements,
sound stretching across time.
MOVEMENT
BY DORETTA LAU
When I moved to Hong Kong,
for two months I lived on the street
where my father spent his childhood.
I was steps away from the escalators
that appear in Wong Kar-wai's
Chungking Express. The song
"California Dreamin"' runs
through that film-
"I could leave today"
-fantasies of other times and places.
The five-thousand-year history
of China can be summed
up in a single word:
migration. The phrase
for overseas Chinese
contains the word bridge.
Doretta Lau,
BFA'01, BA'03,
splits her time
3etween Vancouver
and Hong Kong.
Her collection
- How Does a
Single Blade of
Grass Thank the
Sun? - was
shortlisted for the
City of Vancouver
Book Award,
onglisted for the
Frank O'Connor
nternational Short
Story Award,
and named by
The Atlantic as
one of the best
aooksof 2014.
That cold winter in Hong Kong
I wrote an unauthorized
biography of the actress Keke Palmer,
listened to her song "Keep It Movin'"
on repeat.
In the movie World WarZ,
Brad Pitt's protagonist
says, "I used to work
in dangerous places
and those who moved
survived."
Aristotle knew it too,
said: character is action.
I think of my friends
who came to Canada
as children, refugees
from war and genocide,
who travelled so far
to become professors
and writers and parents.
We leave. We live.
We know nothing of inertia.
TREK / ALUMNI UBC
28
 THE
MIGRATION
ISSUE / BORDER LAW
Changing the locks
on the Canada-US border
In a post-COVID world, UBC legal research may help
illuminate a once-unexamined Canada-US border
BY RICHARD LITTLEMORE
ILLUSTRATION  BY FEDERICO GASTALDI
THERE WAS A TIME, it seems years ago now, when
the Canada-US border was something you could almost
ignore - when the average Canadian could wheel through
a land crossing without showing so much as a driver's
licence. Then came the turn-of-the-century terror attacks
- 9/11 - and the border suddenly became a tangled net
of complexity and inconvenience, a place of growing
paranoia, where the whole range of laws, customs and
operational practices from two diverse legal regimes
collided, sometimes to ill effect.
Canada and the US may be friendly neighbours, but we
have conflicting priorities at our doorstep. We both want
an international border that is functionally unobstructed, but still secure - one that is easy to cross for goods
and people, but impenetrable for terrorists and disease.
As individuals, we might also hope that our countries are
protecting the rights of every traveller, businessperson,
tourist, migrant or refugee. But, really, at the instant
that you choose to cross the border - the very moment
when you surrender the certainties of one jurisdiction
and expose yourself to the vagaries of another - you can
never be sure whether you are stepping onto a bridge or
off a cliff.
To some degree, that mystery is understandable. In the
words of UBC Allard School of Law professor Efrat Arbel,
the Canada/US border is "under-examined" from a legal
perspective. Sociologists and criminologists have spent
lots of time thinking and writing about border policy and
practice, but the written record shows that, until recently,
the lawyers had walked right by.
TREK / ALUMNI UBC
 Arbel and her Allard colleagues, professor Benjamin
Goold and former dean Catherine Dauvergne (now a VP,
Academic and Provost, at SFU), have been working to
change all that. In 2016, they began a SSHRC-sponsored
study to shine a light on the legal issues surrounding the
world's longest undefended border. But there were few early revelations. There are so many moving people and parts,
so many interlocking pieces of legislation, and so many
agencies with overlapping or conflicting jurisdictions that,
Arbel says, "We have yet to arrive at a coherent and complete understanding of how the law operates and applies."
And for legal research, "Usually, that's a starting place."
Still, by early this year they were making some headway.
Among a mix of security agencies that are, by nature and
necessity, reticent to share information or provide access
to critical infrastructure, the Allard team was building
trusting relationships and developing protocols for security
and data protection - all while guarding the importance
of academic independence. Having conducted significant
documentary and institutional reviews, they were also
negotiating with border agencies to gain access for what
Goold describes as "boots-on-the-ground" research.
Then came COVID-19 - a global health pandemic that
might have looked like a clarifying event. On March 20,
the Canadian government simply slammed the door.
At least, they closed it for most of us. Heavily invested
in continuing to trade, both countries did everything
possible to ensure that the trains and trucks kept crossing,
while halting all but "necessary" travel for individuals.
For most people with friends, family or favourite
diversions on the other side of the border, that has created
varying levels of disappointment or dislocation. But, Arbel
says, for the most vulnerable, and especially for precarious migrants and refugees, it has created a whole new
threat to people's rights and personal safety.
It was the human rights issue that originally attracted
Arbel to this work, and it was Dauvergne who sparked the
interest. Back when Arbel was a new student at Allard,
and Dauvergne was then an up-and-coming professor
and the Canada Research Chair in Migration Law, Arbel
signed up for Dauvergne's class and was immediately
hooked. Returning to Allard as a professor after master's
and doctoral studies at Harvard, Arbel also found common cause with Goold, whose focus is on privacy rights
and the use of surveillance technologies by the police
and intelligence communities.
Accordingly, when the three researchers began this
project, Goold says, "We were thinking about people,"
and particularly how people react, interact and are
affected by the laws and practices prevailing in the border
environment. But as they dug into the work, connecting
with the Canada Border Services Agency and the RCMP
in Canada and with Customs and Border Protection in the
US, they found that, even before the COVID disruption,
those agencies were more focused on the mutual benefits
of commerce. "They're trying to reduce border friction,"
says Goold. "They want to know what they need to do so
the trucks don't slow down."
For refugees, however, an agreement between Canada
and the US has created a situation on the border that
is dangerous (according to Arbel) and unconstitutional
(according to the Federal Court of Canada). The Safe
Third Country Agreement (STCA) was negotiated in the
unnerving period after 9/11 and implemented in 2004.
The treaty holds that Canada and the US are both safe
havens for refugees, who should therefore have to make
their claim wherever they land first. So, for example, if
they try to pass through the US and claim refugee status
in Canada, Canada will turn them back.
But, Arbel says, "For decades now, the US treatment
of refugees, both at the level of law and practice, falls far
below internationally recognized standards of human
rights protection. The US is not a safe country for refugees."
Twice since the treaty was implemented, public interest
groups have challenged its validity in Canada's Federal
Court, and twice they have prevailed. In 2006, a decision
was overturned on a legal technicality. But on July 22 this
year, Federal Court Justice Ann Marie McDonald ruled
that the US is not a safe country for refugees who are
sent back from Canada. She wrote: "I have concluded
that imprisonment and the attendant consequences are
inconsistent with the spirit and objective of the STCA
and are a violation of the rights guaranteed by section 7
of the [Canadian Charter of Rights and Freedoms]."
As is typical in such cases, Justice McDonald gave the
government six months to implement the decision, or to
appeal - and the government chose to appeal. That, Arbel
says, has left refugee claimants at risk, on both sides of the
border. "It is a certainty, not even a likelihood, that more
asylum seekers are being placed into detention in truly
atrocious conditions. Detention is harmful in itself, but especially now, it is virtually impossible for detainees in the
US to protect from the spread of COVID-19," Arbel says,
adding that it is a blot on Canada's reputation and detracts
from its stated commitment to protecting refugees.
Privacy is another issue under threat, and again COVID
tends to make the situation worse, says Goold. Privacy, he
says, is a "weak right," easily overwhelmed by concerns for
security and public health. And when weak rights are eroded during perceived emergencies - as during the pandemic
- it can be difficult to re-assert those rights afterward.
In the current circumstances, with fewer people crossing
the border, Goold says, border officials have a much greater
opportunity to search crossers and little restriction on
how they use any information they might come across.
The border agencies are, he says, "not very transparent."
Transparency - or at least the increased information that
Arbel, Goold and Dauvergne are ultimately able to gather
- may be the greatest takeaway from the research project.
As Dauvergne says, "No border agents set out to do nasty
things; people are just trying to do their jobs. But it's
important to understand how individual rights are being
impacted by those jobs."
In this previously unexamined space, policymakers may
find real benefit from whatever light the UBC team is able
to shed.
TREK / ALUMNI UBC
31
 CONTINUE YOUR
PASSION FOR LEARNING
with the alumni UBC Travel Club
Browse our NEW digital     M
travel club catalogue at •"*.'■»<
alumni.ubc.ca/travel
•**
■^•■UBCUlDt
NEPAL & BHUTAN: KINGDOMS IN THE CLOUDS
NOVEMBER15-29, 2021
With Paula Swart, museum curator and lecturer at UBC
YOU MAY ALSO ENJOY:
■ MODERNISM WEEK IN PALM SPRINGS, FEBRUARY 2021
■ GREECE: AN AUTHENTIC EXPLORATION, APRIL 2021
■ TRANS-SIBERIAN RAILWAY ADVENTURE, MAY 2021
■ TREASURES OF INDONESIA: JAVA AND BALI, OCTOBER 2021
■ MOROCCO: MEDINAS, MOUNTAINS, AND
MOUTHWATERING CUISINE, OCTOBER2021
BATHURST INLET, NUNAVUT: AN ARCTIC OASIS
JUNE 28-JULY 5, 2021
With Lee Groat, UBC professor and geologist
YOU MAY ALSO ENJOY:
■ CENTRAL PANAMA'S TROPICAL NATURE, JANUARY 2021
■ GRAND GARDENS OF IRELAND, JUNE 2021
■ GALAPAGOS ISLANDS: PRIVATE YACHT EXPEDITION, OCTOBER 2021
■ TANZANIA: THE ESSENTIAL SAFARI, OCTOBER 2021
PRAGUE TO KRAKOW: SCENIC VILLAGES
AND GLORIOUS MOUNTAIN HIKES
JUNE1-12,2021
With Lynn Kanuka, Olympic medalist and WalkRun coach
YOU MAY ALSO ENJOY:
■ CUBA: AN ISLAND BIKE TOUR, JANUARY 2021
■ PORTUGUESE COASTAL CAMINO, APRIL 2021
■ WALKING THE COTSWOLDS OF ENGLAND, MAY 2021
■ ENGLAND'S SOUTH WEST COAST PATH, SEPTEMBER 2021
■ PATAGONIA: A NATURAL WONDERLAND, NOVEMBER 2021
■ilL-
FOOD&WINE
NEW WORLD WINE: MENDOZA & SALTA
NOVEMBER 7-16, 2021
With Howard Soon, BSc'74, Canada's longest serving winemaker
YOU MAY ALSO ENJOY:
■     TAIWAN FOOD TOUR, MARCH 2021
alumn
Travel arrangements by
WorldwideQuest
Alumni Expeditions
travel@worldwidequest.com     1-800-387-1483
REGISTER NOW WITH OUR
MOST FLEXIBLE BOOKING POLICY EVER!
CONFIRM WHEN THE TRAVEL ADVISORY IS LIFTED;
TOUR READY AND TRAVEL SAFE GUIDELINES IN PLACE.
VISIT ALUMNI.UBC.CA/TRAVEL
Travel Club
BEST VALUE IN EDUCATIONAL TRAVEL   |   MEANINGFUL LOCAL EXPERIENCES   |   THOUGHTFUL ITINERARIES   |   EXPERT UBC STUDY LEADERS
 INSIDE
[S
FEATURES
£*           , 40 Living with Rats
42 When Jefferson
Airplane landed   .
at UBC
DEPARTMENTS
34 Changemakers
38 President's Message
39 Rewind
46 Findings
50 The Scoop
52 Career Corner
54 Agenda
56 In Memoriam
60 The Last Word
1
&.~
BA'12 (Okanagan), JD'11
Westbank
First Nation
Next challenge:
Nsyilxcen
language
immersion
REK / ALUMNI UBC
 CHANGE/
MAKERS
HAN OF THE PEOPLE
Chief Christopher Derickson is
strengthening the foundations
of self-governance
BY ERIC DAVENPORT
"A good ylmixwm [chief] is there for the people."
Christopher Derickson cites a lesson from his
grandfather, who was Chief of Samson Cree Nation.
Now 41 and the recently elected Chief of Westbank
First Nation, Derickson finds himself in a position
to apply it.
His approach to leadership is at once old and new.
He values tradition and is committed to strengthening
communal bonds by affirming and preserving the
culture and traditional knowledge of the Syilx
(Okanagan) people. At the same time, he's shepherding his 850-strong community through a relatively
new era of self-governance, facilitating economic
development and setting his sights on a financially
independent future for the Nation.
Derickson's education and career focus have
prepared him for the task. He holds degrees in politics
and law from UBC's Okanagan and Vancouver campuses respectively, as well as an MBA in Aboriginal
leadership and business development from SFU. In
2017, he co-founded Alderhill, a company specializing
in Indigenous community planning. He also lectures
about Indigenous community management at SFU,
the University of Arizona Native Nations Institute and
at the Banff Centre.
For Chief Derickson, preserving culture begins with
encouraging the growth of Nsyilxcen, the traditional
language of the Syilx. As with many Indigenous languages, the number of fluent Nsyilxcen speakers has
steadily declined as a result of Canadian government
policies that forced assimilation and threatened
to wipe out Indigenous cultures. To reverse this
decline, Westbank First Nation approved and financed
renovations that brought Syilx art and architecture
and a brand-new language and culture room to its
sansisyustan House of Learning elementary school.
Derickson wants it to become a full Nsyilxcen immersion school in the near future.
In an increasingly
uncertain world,
Derickson says he places
a lot of hope in the next
generation, and youth
engagement is another
one of his priorities. He's
found that one of the
most effective ways of
achieving this is to listen
to them and involve them
in efforts to protect the
environment, as they
tend to be its most passionate advocates. When
they're not chatting
with him about video
games, Derickson says,
they're often discussing
climate change.
"The younger
generation sees their
relationship with the natural world very differently
than our generation,
than past generations
have understood it,"
says Derickson, who has
raised a son. "They're
less ideological and
much more open to
collaborative approaches
to problems." But he still
sees a lot of overlap,
and this opportunity
for inter-generational
collaboration not only
strengthens cultural
identity, but creates
a solid foundation of
leadership for the future
of his community, and
more broadly, for the
future of Indigenous
self-governance.
Westbank First Nation
became self-governing
just over 15 years ago,
and Derickson suggests
that the current system
still has flaws. For example, tax revenues generated by the Westbank
First Nation economy
still go exclusively to
the Canadian government. Derickson wants
to see that change
- the government has
promised autonomy to
Indigenous communities, and he says that
financial independence
has to be part of the
deal. "You could argue
that Westbank First
Nation has built up a
foundation for financial
independence," he says.
"It's just a matter of
the federal government
and the provincial
governments catching
up to where Westbank
is at now."
Like his other priorities,
Derickson's plans
for further economic
development ultimately
serve the broader goal
of strengthening the
foundations of self-
governance. As a chief,
an entrepreneur, and
a teacher, he has the
influence, knowledge
and resourcefulness to
secure a successful and
sustainable future. And
the lessons he learns
along the way will no
doubt be passed along
to the next generation
of community leaders.
34
TREK / ALUMNI UBC
 Sauder grad Ian Fichtenbaum
and the zero-gravity oven
SPACE
COOKIES
Experimental
Baking on the ISS
BY RACHEL
GLASSMAN, BA'18
Last November, five balls
of raw chocolate-chip
cookie dough made
history. The cookie
dough was delivered to
astronauts in the International Space Station
(ISS), where - after
several hours of trial and
error to gauge how outer
space changes cooking
times - it became the
first food ever baked in
a zero-gravity oven. The
oven is a new innovation
from Zero G Kitchen,
founded by alum Ian
Fichtenbaum and his
wife Jordana.
The cookies may have
made history, but no
one yet knows how they
taste. Since nothing has
ever been baked in space
before, this first batch
had to be sent back to
Earth for testing by food
scientists. Inhaling the
scent of baking cookies
without being able to eat
them is surely a torture
only a psychopath could devise - so Zero G Kitchen
launched a tin of pre-made cookies to the ISS as well,
as a snack for the pioneering space bakers.
Fichtenbaum, who graduated in 2006 with a master's
degree in management from the Sauder School
of Business, hopes that freshly baked foods will
someday be routine in space. Currently, the ISS is
equipped with a food warmer and a re-hydrator to
resuscitate pre-made or dried meals, respectively -
not an especially appetizing prospect for a year-long
tour in space. To improve the menu and promote
astronauts' well-being, Fichtenbaum aims to create
a full zero-gravity kitchen, one piece at a time.
In addition to nourishing astronauts, Fichtenbaum
hopes that Zero G Kitchen will give the public
a relatable way to engage with space systems
science. "We asked ourselves, 'What's the laboratory
that most of us have in our home? It's the kitchen.'"
An oven in space, he and Jordana decided, would
help the average person to connect with the science
behind the ISS in a way that more esoteric equipment
could not.
Besides, says Fichtenbaum, the project is undeniably
fun. He and Jordana began the company when they
were engaged, the way a less imaginative couple
might have signed up for community centre salsa
lessons: they were looking for a new, creative challenge to take on together. With Jordana's background
in hospitality industry communications and lan's in
spacecraft systems, the project made full use of their
complementary skill sets.
TREK / ALUMNI UBC
 CHANGE/
MAKERS
Making culinary
history may have
been fun, but it
was no easy task.
The engineers at
Nanoracks, with
whom Zero G
Kitchen worked to
design the oven,
grappled with an
array of technical
challenges. Because
the ISS has limited
energy to spare, for
example, the oven
must run on only
90 watts, whereas
an average oven
uses around 2000
to 5000 watts. And
the zero-gravity
environment brings
its own challenges.
Hot air behaves
differently in space,
so the oven must
rely on conductive
heat transfer, rather
than convection.
There are also
unique safety
considerations: an
escaped crumb from
a baking cookie
could float around
the ISS and damage
delicate equipment.
To prevent this, the
cookies are baked
sealed in silicone
pouches - with filtered
air vents, otherwise
"the thing blows up
like a balloon."
After months of
testing, the result is
a cylindrical, energy-
efficient oven. The
process of creating
the zero-gravity oven,
says Fichtenbaum,
has proven to him that
"if you are smart, and
think creatively, and
have a certain amount
of persistence, things
do happen."
What's on the horizon
for Zero G Kitchen?
"We'd like to have
a blender up there,"
Fichtenbaum says.
In the meantime,
"the oven is open for
business" - and the
milestone moment
of eating the first
cookie baked in
space still awaits
a hungry astronaut.
Astronauts take part
in a cookie-baking
experiment on
the ISS.
ZERO-WASTE
GROCERIES
Building a supply chain to
make groceries package-free
BY ALIA DHARSSI, BA'09
For a class assignment during her last
year at UBC, Alison Carr created a map
of where Vancouver's garbage ends up.
She was shocked to learn much of it was
transported more than 300 kilometres
northwest to a landfill in Cache Creek.
"That spurred something in me," says
Carr, who thinks the notion of "away" in
"throwing away" is flawed. The garbage
that is trucked away from our homes still
persists in the environment, decomposing
slowly in landfills and emitting greenhouse
gases. At the same time, many cities,
including Vancouver, scramble for landfill
space to accommodate discarded items,
many of which could have been composted or recycled.
Today, Carr is fighting plastic pollution
and other waste, one grocery shopper
and container at a time, as the co-founder
and COO of Nada, Vancouver's first zero-
waste grocery store.
"Just Food," proclaim big red-and-white
letters painted on the store's back wall.
Customers can shop with their own
containers, although during the covid-19
pandemic Nada is offering goods in
deposit jars and recycled paper bags
instead. In addition to items often sold by
weight, like nuts and fruit, the store sells
many other package-free products, from
maple syrup to frozen berries to turmeric.
Only a handful of items, such as milk in
reusable glass bottles, are pre-packaged.
Carr leads Nada's sourcing efforts. As
well as minimizing the use of packaging,
she considers the social and environmental footprint of everything they stock,
balancing concerns like workers' wages
and greenhouse gas emissions.
TREK / ALUMNI UBC
 Alison Carr atthe  ^
counter at Nada.
"It's case by case," says Carr. "We're
not 100 per cent organic. We're not only
sourcing local. We're not only sourcing
100 per cent package-free." An organic
item, for example, might not score highly
enough on labour standards to be sold
in the store.
Nada's most resourceful suppliers turn
waste into food. The store sells organic
crackers made from imperfect vegetables
left behind in Okanagan fields after
harvest, and its cafe features baked goods
made of spent grain from beer breweries.
Carr oversees educational events at
the store, because she wants people
to think critically about their food and
choose products with the planet and
their community in mind. She became
conscious of such issues while growing
up on Vancouver Island, where her parents
focused on making the most of what they
had and wasting as little as possible.
"We always had a garden, always had
a compost," recalls Carr, whose early
jobs in grocery stores prompted her to
begin questioning how food was grown
and made.
She didn't realize this interest could
turn into a career until 2015, when she
was wrapping up her UBC arts degree
and got wind of a marine biologist named
Brianne Miller who was testing the idea
of a package-free grocery store by
coordinating zero-waste pop-up shops
in Vancouver. Before long, Carr was
interning on the project. She became
indispensable and, eventually, an
equal partner.
Nada opened its doors in June 2018
and has since diverted an estimated
650,000 containers or more from landfills,
while building a strong following among
eco-conscious Vancouverites. Perhaps
most importantly, by breaking even just
nine months after opening Nada has
demonstrated that package-free groceries
are a viable business.
But Carr and Miller are just getting
started. They dream of opening more
stores. There are also smaller-scale
challenges - like sourcing package-free
potato chips. Every company Carr has
approached so far says it's impossible.
But that won't stop her from trying.
"I'm not giving up," she says with a grin.
Alison Carr,
BA'16
A.
COO of
Vancouver's
first zero-waste
grocery store
A.
Next challenge:
package-free
potato chips
TREK/ ALUMNI UBC
37
 PRESIDENT'S MESSAGE
A World of Difference
A message from UBC President and Vice-Chancellor Santa J. Ono
In this issue, Trek is exploring the topic of
migration. I have a particular interest in
this topic, both as the president of an incredibly diverse university and as the child
of immigrants.
I was born in Vancouver in 1962, some years
after my father and mother had emigrated
from Japan to North America with little more
than a suitcase. At the time, my father was
a professor of mathematics at UBC. We didn't
stay long in Vancouver. During my childhood, my family moved first to Philadelphia,
where my father taught at the University of
Pennsylvania, and then to Baltimore and
Johns Hopkins University.
My own academic career has taken me to
three different countries - Canada, the United
States and England. I have not only lived in
and experienced different cultures, I have
had the privilege of meeting people from all
over the world, and I learned a lot from them.
My travels also had an unexpected bonus; it
was while studying at McGill University in
Montreal that I met my wife, Wendy.
But travel for work or study also brings disruptions and requires a degree of adjustment.
Even coming back to Vancouver, after
many years away from the city of my birth,
required adjustments, and I don't just mean
needing to pack extra rain gear! Or adjusting
to the fact that Canadians seem to be more
interested in hockey than in college football
and basketball.
I encountered different values, different attitudes, even different food. I had to learn what
was meant by poutine and a double-double.
More seriously, my daughter had to adjust to
a new school with a very different curriculum.
And we had to make new friends and say
goodbye to old ones. But over time, we made
those adjustments. We made new friends and
discovered new neighbourhoods.
And now, as president and vice-chancellor
of UBC - which was recently ranked the most
international university in North America
- I have the honour to lead a very diverse
institution. Our faculty, students and staff
come from many different countries around
the world - more than 160 - bringing with
them different cultural, socio-economic, and
political perspectives.
Leading such a diverse institution brings
challenges. As university administrators,
we have to be aware that our international
students face pressures in addition to the
normal ones that all students face: being far
from their homes, their families and their
friends; adapting to a different culture and
perhaps a different language; and getting used
to different ways of studying and learning.
Some may have visa, funding or health care
issues, as well.
As an institution, we must be welcoming
and do our utmost to accommodate religious
observances, dietary restrictions, and social
and cultural mores. As scholarship becomes
more global and the university more diverse,
this becomes ever more important. But these
are good challenges
to have. Countries,
cultures, individuals,
and institutions
such as UBC benefit
from immigration
and emigration.
Not only does UBC
attract international
students, but our
faculty, staff and
students are able
to take advantage
of opportunities
outside of Canada
- enriching those institutions with their
UBC experiences.
Right now, of course,
such opportunities
are on hold, and
most of our international students are
taking their classes
virtually. But they
are still a vital part
of our community,
and their participation enriches us all.
Someday, when the
pandemic is over,
we look forward to
welcoming them
back in person.
As Antoine de
Saint-Exupery,
author of The Little
Prince, pointed
out: Those who are
different from me do
not impoverish me -
they enrich me. Our
unity is constituted
in something higher
than ourselves
- in Humanity.
TREK / ALUMNI UBC
 REWIND
The knoll:
a hill to die on?
BY RACHEL GLASSMAN,  BA'18
To outsiders, it's an unassuming grassy
slope, but for those in the know, the
knoll is a beloved campus landmark -
the place friends sprawl in the shade
to study, or the enticing hill to which
first-years flock on snowy days with
cafeteria-trays-turned-sleds. Given the
knoll's halcyon vibe, few would guess
that this lump of earth has periodically
been the centre of roiling controversy.
Today's knoll is actually UBC's second:
the first was unceremoniously razed
during the 1975 construction of the
Aquatic Centre. Students bereft of their
hangout spot called to have their green
space restored, and eventually the knoll
(phoenix-like!) was reborn with dirt left
over from the construction that had
consumed it in the first place.
All was then peaceful for our humble hill
until the mid-2000s, when UBC proposed
bulldozing the knoll to make way for
a condo, store fronts, and an underground
bus loop. A ferocious backlash ensued.
Anti-development groups occupied the
knoll for weeks, signed petitions, lit
bonfires, and staged concerts - Knoll-aid
and Knoll-aid 2.0 - during which, amid
chants of "F—k the man!" and "Save
the knoll!", 19 students were arrested.
Inevitably, a handful of (not-so-serious)
counter-protesters emerged, too, bearing
signs that said "Kno to the knoll!"
The story ends happily for the knoll, of
course: administrators heeded students'
calls for green space and community over
commercialism, and the Nest (built by
students in lieu of the original proposals)
incorporates and even celebrates the
knoll by extending the slope into an
indoor amphitheatre.
At last, the knoll is presumably safe from
bulldozers. Should anyone try to raze it
again, however, it's a fair bet that students
are willing to make a mountain out of
this molehill.
TREK/ ALUMNI UBC
 Living with Rats
Rats are part of the urban ecosystem,
and an urban ecology approach to
managing their populations may
involve learning to share the city.
BY CHELSEA HIMSWORTH,
Regional Director for the Canadian
Wildlife Health Cooperative at UBC
Rats! They eat our food, chew
through our property and spread
all sorts of nasty diseases. And
they are gross (right?), with those
naked tails and quick, unpredictable movements. Rats invade our
homes - our castles! - the one
place where we should be safe
and in control.
Over the millennia that we have
lived with them, rats have proven
themselves virtually impossible to
expunge. They are so adaptable
that they can exploit and infest
virtually every corner of our cities.
They avoid traps and poisons and
reproduce at such a staggering
rate that extermination attempts
usually end up being a game
of whack-a-mole... or, rather,
whack-a-rat.
Is it any wonder that many
cities seem to be plagued by
rats? Or do the cities themselves
bear some responsibility for
their rat problems? This is what
I have been exploring over the
past 10 years as a wildlife and
public health researcher with
the Canadian Wildlife Health
Cooperative and the University
of British Columbia.
CHALLENGES OF
MANAGING URBAN
RODENTS
For the most part, when it comes
to dealing with rats, cities have it
all wrong. For example, rat-related
issues are addressed using a
hodgepodge of unrelated policy
and programming. At best, municipal leadership is highly fragmented; at worst, it's absent altogether.
Municipal governments may
address rat infestations that occur
on public properties or in buildings
scheduled for demolition. Local
health authorities may address
infestations in food establishments
or where there is a demonstrated
health risk.
TREK / ALUMNI UBC
 For the most part, people
are left to fend for themselves.
Another problem is that we know
very little about urban rats. There
is simply not enough information
about them to answer even the
most basic questions like: How
many rats are there? Where do
they live? Why are they there?
Is the problem getting worse?
Despite this lack of knowledge,
cities are often willing to invest
tremendous amounts of time and
resources into pest control interventions, such as New York City's
$32 million "war on rats."
It means that cities have no
metric to determine the return on
their investments, because without knowing what the rat problem
looked like beforehand, there is
no way of knowing whether an
intervention made the problem
any better.
THE COHABITING
SOLUTION
The key to solving this problem
may lie in simply changing our
perspective. Rather than viewing
the city as a place entirely under
human control that's being invaded
by rats, we need to recognize that
the city is an ecosystem and that
rats live here too.
This does not mean that we
should love rats, nor does it mean
that we need to leave them alone.
Rather, it shifts the focus to managing the ecosystem of which rats
are a part, rather than focusing on
the rats themselves.
Once we recognize that we are
managing a system, it becomes
clear that leadership and strategic
planning are critical. The very
concept of a system is that the
whole is more than the sum of
its parts; this is the antithesis of
the reductionist approach that
we're accustomed to that deals
with infestations on a case-by-
case basis.
Instead, we need to understand
the urban ecosystem, just like we
would if we were trying to manage
polar bear populations in the
Arctic or elephant populations on
the savanna.
This means substantive, long-
term investments in collecting
data on rat populations and the
specific conditions that support
them, as well as the impact of any
implemented interventions.
It also means understanding
the interface between rats and
humans. For the majority of urban
centres, rats pose a relatively
minor threat to people. The threats
are certainly not in proportion to
impoverished, inner-city neighbourhoods, and residents of these
neighbourhoods are particularly
vulnerable to the physical and
mental health impacts of living with
rats. By identifying and focusing on
these highly vulnerable scenarios,
cities can start to make meaningful
changes in how we perceive and
deal with rats.
This is not to say the rest of
the urban landscape should be
ignored. Rather, the identification
of particular areas of vulnerability
needs to take place within a larger
framework that uses ecosystem-
based principles to address rats
specifically. Examples include
To manage rat populations,
"we need to understand the urban
ecosystem, just like we would
if we were trying to manage
polar bear populations in the
Arctic or elephant populations
on the savanna."
the amount of negative attention
rats receive. This means we need
to understand why we find rats so
disturbing, and what can be done
to reduce that fear.
URBAN ECOLOGIES
An ecosystem lens also directs
us to look at areas of vulnerability
and resilience within the system.
When it comes to rats, our homes
are the most obvious place of vulnerability, where the relationship
between rats and people is least
acceptable. However, private residences are often the areas most
ignored by municipal powers.
Also, rats and rat-related
issues disproportionately affect
changing the way that garbage
cans are designed and enacting
tougher bylaws that enshrine the
right to live in a healthy and rat-
free environment.
These sorts of policies and
programs that increase the
resilience of the system have the
potential to curtail the physical
and psychological damage
done by rats. The result is that
co-existence with rats will come
to seem no more unthinkable
than our co-existence with, for
instance, squirrels.
This article was originally published in
The Conversation: theconversation.com/living-
with-rats-involves-understanding-the-city-as-
an-ecosystem-118383
THE CONVERSATION
TREK / ALUMNI UBC
41
 When the Airplane
Landed at UBC
How Brock Hall came to host the international debut
of one of the hottest bands of the Sixties
BY ERWIN WODARCZAK
ILLUSTRATION  BY MARGIE AND THE MOON
42
TREK/ ALUMNI UBC
 What we now think of
as "the Sixties" arguably didn't appear at
the UBC campus until the decade was half
over. But by January
1966 it had definitely
arrived, in the form of
the "Camp Campus."
"Camp" can be defined as "a social
practice" that functions "as a style
and performance identity for several
types of entertainment.... Where
high art necessarily incorporates
beauty and value, camp necessarily
needs to be lively, audacious and
dynamic... [It] opposes satisfaction
and seeks to challenge." (Wikipedia)
- or, as more succinctly defined by
The Ubyssey in its January 21 edition,
"things so far out they're in."
The camp phenomenon at UBC was
enabled by the Alma Mater Society's
Special Events Committee, which
had a reputation in those days for
innovative programming. "We're special because we bring things which
wouldn't otherwise come to UBC,"
committee chairman Murray Farr
once boasted to The Ubyssey. "We appeal to only a segment of the campus
with each event, but in a given year,
everybody finds something to enjoy."
During the Camp Campus craze,
Special Events staged avant-garde
performances and art exhibitions;
movie nights featuring obscure cult
films, Johnny Weissmuller's Tarzan of
the Apes, and "the first Porky Pig cartoon ever made"; and a "Happening"
in the Auditorium: "an allegorical and
artistic atrocity" featuring free-style
painting with audience participation.
Perhaps Farr and the committee's
biggest coup, however, was bringing
one of the top new bands of the
burgeoning California popular music
scene to UBC, not once but twice in
one month: Jefferson Airplane.
The band had only formed the previous summer in San Francisco, yet
were already one of the hottest groups
in California. They were signed to
record for RCA Victor, for which
they received a substantial $25,000
advance. However, they had not yet
released any recordings. They had
also not played any concerts outside
the San Francisco Bay area.
To attract out-of-town performers to UBC, Murray Farr had two
standard procedures. One was to
contact their management directly,
book the show, and then contact other
organizations and convince them to
also book the act for either just before
or after the UBC date. He would
then arrange a package deal with
the act's management to lower costs.
Alternatively, Farr would hear that
an act was already booked elsewhere
in Vancouver and make a deal either
with the venue owner or the performer's management for an additional
show on campus. Based on surviving
records, the latter is most likely what
happened to bring Jefferson Airplane
to campus.
The band was booked to play
three shows from January 14 to 16
at The Afterthought, one of the first
psychedelic nightclubs in Vancouver,
located at the Kitsilano Theatre on
TREK / ALUMNI UBC
43
 West 4th Avenue (now the Russian
Community Hall). The opening
act was to be local group The Tom
Northcott Trio. These shows were
intended to introduce the Airplane
to the world outside San Francisco -
their international debut.
It is likely that Murray Farr
contacted the Airplane's manager,
Matthew Katz, to book additional
shows either immediately before or
after the concerts at The Afterthought.
Their agreement was documented
in the AMS minutes for January 20.
The student council approved "the
contract... between the Alma Mater
Society and Mr. M. Katy [sic],
representing the Jefferson Airplane,
to provide entertainment at the
Special Events Dance on January
22,1966 at the U.B.C. Armouries
at a cost of 50 percent of net."
Whether
performing as
Jefferson Airplane
or the late-period
Starship,the
band's #1 songs
hit rock's highest
highs-and
lowest lows.
"Somebody
to Love" and
"White Rabbit"
(1967)
500 Greatest
Songs of All
Time: Rolling
Stone
But that wasn't the end of Farr's
deal-making. What exactly happened is unknown, but in the Friday,
January 14 edition of The Ubyssey
there appeared a small advertisement
Kaukonen (lead guitar), Paul Kantner
(rhythm guitar, vocals), Jack Casady
(bass), and Skip Spence (drums). The
show was a preview of their three-
night stand at The Afterthought that
"The Jefferson Airplane lands
today noon in Brock. Will Brock
survive? Only for those who are
out of their heads. 50 cents."
A note in the "Tween Classes" section
of The Ubyssey, January 14,1966.
saying simply "The Jefferson Airplane
Loves You." Students thinking that
the ad was plugging the group's shows
at The Afterthought were likely
surprised to see a much larger one
on page 12 that read: There's Still
Time Brother! - To Hear The Jefferson
Airplane - Today - Brock S0( 12:30 -
a special event. A note in the "Tween
Classes" section confirmed it: The
Jefferson Airplane lands today noon
in Brock. Will Brock survive? Only
for those who are out of their heads.
SO cents.
No records survive of whatever
arrangement Farr had made for this
last-minute show, but the band might
have arrived early in Vancouver
and had time to kill before their
Afterthought shows, and it may
have been a simple handshake deal
between him and Katz. The write-
up in UBC's yearbook, The Totem,
published later that year complained
that the show "was a sudden decision
and the promotion was virtually nil."
In the end, according to The Totem,
Jefferson Airplane ... scored a direct
hit at a dance-concert in Brock. All
flocked to the new kings of camp on
campus - no one else on campus wore
cord bell-bottoms, necklaces, a profusion of rings. Despite the loudness
everyone assimilated all the fresh
material the group presented.
The band's membership at that time
consisted of Signe Toly Anderson
(vocals), Marty Balin (vocals), Jorma
weekend, which inspired a near-
incoherent rave by The Ubyssey's
Ian Cameron published the following Tuesday:
Last weekend, in a small, dingy,
smoke-filled, ill-lit hall, a new religion
came to Vancouver.
The high priests at these initial rites
were six young people who call themselves the Jefferson Airplane, and three
even younger men who pass under
the collective cognomen of The [Tom]
Northcott Trio.
The scene outdid the most bacchanalian orgies of the long-gone but not forgotten Black Masses of the dark ages.
The parishioners writhed in convulsive spasms to the erotic pulsation of
5,000 torturedecibles [sic] being forced
through spaces that were obviously
never made to accommodate them....
The music itself was wild. The
Jefferson Airplane, from Frisco, are
a great, great group....
The dancing was something else.
It combines the thrust and counterplay
of flamenco with the motions of a sailor's hornpipe gone berserk.
Wow. Between reviews like that,
more substantial advertising in the
following Friday's Ubyssey, and
likely word-of-mouth among the
student population, the show at the
Armouries on Saturday, January 22
was an even bigger hit. The student
newspaper later reported that "600
turned up to writhe along with [the]
mop-haired pop group." The year-end
44
TREK/ ALUMNI UBC
 financial report of the Special Events Committee
recorded a profit on both shows: $71.70 (presumably
Brock Hall) and $141.22.
To put the UBC shows in historical perspective, only
a few months later singer Signe Toly Anderson and
drummer Skip Spence would be replaced by Grace
Slick and Spencer Dryden, respectively. It was with
that line-up that the Airplane would go on to record
such classics as "White Rabbit" and "Somebody
to Love."
The Afterthought concerts are today well-documented
online with set-lists, copies of posters, and even
bootleg recordings. The shows at UBC, not so much.
In Jefferson Airplane's semi-official biography Got
a Revolution! they warrant only a passing mention
as "a university gig also scheduled." Inquiries made by
this writer to the band's official website for additional
documentation were unsuccessful. However, fans of
Sixties music, and in particular of Jefferson Airplane,
should remember that UBC and the "Camp Campus"
did indeed host the international debut of one of the
top bands of the era.
HOMES BY
DAVID L
YOUNG
This fall my 18-year-old daughter enrolled in my
alma mater. Where did the time go?
If a new season of life has you thinking about
buying or selling a home, lets talk. We can grab
coffee and reminisce about the days when UBC
was mostly parking lots.
Give me a call or text 604-329-3288
I'm a UBCgrad.
Now I'm a UBC dad.
homesbydavidlyoung.com   young@dexterrealty.com
2020-21 alumni UBC Board of Directors
SENIOR MANAGERS
OFTHEBOARD
OF DIRECTORS
Chair
Ross Langford, BCom'89, LLB'89
Vice-Chair
Debra Hewson, BA'81
Treasurer
Aleem Bandali, BA'99
MEMBERS AT LARGE
Terms Ending 2021
Amir Adnani, BSo'01
Shelina Esmail, BA'93
Randy Findlay, BASc'73
Debra Hewson, BA'81
Ross Langford, BCom'89, LLB'89
Leslie Lee, BCom'84
RahimMoloo, LLB'05
Shorn Sen, BCom'84
Terms Ending 2022
Aleem Bandali, BA'99
Ian Banks, BA'92
Miranda Huron, BA'02, MEd'16
Patricia Mohr, BA'68, MA'70
Fred Withers, BCom'77
Terms Ending 2023
Anna Fung, BA'81, LLB'84
Grant Munro, BSc'01
Laura Silvester, BCom'11
EX-OFFICIO:
UBC President & Vice-Chancellor
Santa J. Ono
UBC Chancellor
Steven Lewis Point, LLB'85, LLD'13
Vice-President, Development
& Alumni Engagement;
President's Designate
Heather McCaw, BCom'86
Associate Vice-President /
Executive Director, alumni UBC
Natalie Cook Zywicki
Ross Debra Aleem Amir
Langford Hewson Bandali Adnani
Shelina
Esmail
Randy Leslie Rahlm
Findlay Lee Maloo
Ian
Banks
Patricia
Mohr
Fred Anna Grant
Withers Fung Munro
Laura
Silvester
TREK / ALUMNI UBC
45
 FINDINGS
COVID-19 Close-Up
Powerful imaging
technology is revealing the
COVID-19 virus in all its atomic
detail, providing blueprints for
the design of more effective
drugs and vaccines.
■
Atomic model of the COVID-19 spike protein, captured
using cryo-electron microscopy technology at UBC.
THE RESEARCH:
Sriram Subramaniam, a
professor in UBC's department of biochemistry
and molecular biology,
is capturing pictures of
the COVID-19 spike protein
at near-atomic resolution
to see how well various
antibodies bind to and
block the virus.
THE BOTTOM LINE:
The work has already
helped to uncover how
one antibody-based drug,
known as Ab8, prevents
and neutralizes the virus.
HOW DO YOU CREATE
THE IMAGES?
The SARS-CoV-2 virus is
a hundred thousand times
smaller than the size of
a pinhead, making it undetectable using a regular
light microscope. The
proteins on the surface
of a virus are even smaller.
To visualize the detailed
shapes of viruses and proteins, we use cryo-electron
microscopes. This powerful
imaging technology uses
beams of electrons to
visualize shapes of tissues
and cells using ultra-cooling, or "cryo" techniques
- essentially, the imaging
of samples at liquid nitrogen temperatures.
WHAT EXACTLY DO YOUR
SNAPSHOTS CAPTURE?
We're generating structural
images of the viral spike
protein, which enables the
coronavirus to enter human
cells. Ultimately, we'll be
able to better understand
the "hotspots" on the spike
protein and provide information on how to improve the
potency of treatments.
In our lab at UBC, we
are able to determine
the structures of proteins,
such as the viral spike, at
atomic detail in less than
a day, providing powerful
blueprints for drug and
vaccine design.
For example, cryo-electron
microscopy might be used
in evaluating immune
responses elicited by early
vaccine candidates by characterizing how they bind
to the spike protein. The
antibodies may also be used
as therapeutics themselves
in patients actively suffering
from COVID-19.
WHY IS IT IMPORTANT
TO DEVELOP
ANTIBODY-BASED
THERAPIES TO TREAT
COVID-19?
Most experts estimate it
could take almost a year
before there's a vaccine
that is effective and widely
available. In the meantime,
there's an urgent need for
antibody-based therapies
to stem the progression
and spread of COVID-19.
Understanding how
these antibodies bind,
and neutralize the virus,
is crucial because it can be
used by researchers who
are developing treatments
to understand and ultimately
reduce drug-related
side effects.
This is not just a critical
element for treatment
though. Knowing which
types of antibodies provide
protection against virus
spread - and which ones
are ineffective - will be
essential in the evaluation
of antibodies produced
in vaccine trials.
46
TREK/ ALUMNI UBC
 Motion-activated cameras
are monitoring wildlife
presence on the trails
in and around BC's South
Chilcotin Mountains
Provincial Park.
YOU RECENTLY
HELPED TO UNCOVER
HOW ONE ANTIBODY-
BASED DRUG. KNOWN
AS AB8. PREVENTS
AND NEUTRALIZES
THEVIRUS.WHATIS
THE SIGNIFICANCE
OF THIS FINDING?
Working with a team of
scientists from the US,
we employed our electron
microscopy and advanced
computing infrastructure at
UBC to help evaluate and
understand how this particular drug - constructed
from anantibody component
10 times smaller than a
full-sized antibody - neutralizes the virus in animal
models. We have similar
information emerging from
our studies with other
antibodies. Our expectation
is that we will be able to use
the structural information
we derive about the precise
footprints of antibody
binding to develop more
effective ways to stop
SARS-CoV-2 in its tracks.
■      ■
This particular finding has
potential implications for
both the prevention and
treatment of COVID-19.
The drug's tiny size not
only increases its potential
for diffusion in tissues to
better neutralize the virus,
but also makes it possible
to administer by alternative
routes - including inhalation.
Importantly, it only binds
to the virus, leaving human
cells untouched, which is
a good sign that it won't
have negative side effects
in people.
In our lab at UBC, we
are able to determine
the structures of proteins,
such as the viral spike, at
atomic detail in less than
a day, providing powerful blueprints for drug and
vaccine design."
Sriram Subramaniam
HIDDEN
CAMERAS
MONITOR
WILDLIFE
THE RESEARCH:
Forestry professor Cole
Burton and Robin Naidoo,
adjunct professor at the
Institute for Resources,
Environment and Sustainability, are observing how
human activity is affecting
wildlife in protected areas.
BOTTOM LINE:
Wildlife avoids areas
recently visited by humans.
UBC researchers placed
motion-activated cameras
on the trails in and around
BC's South Chilcotin Mountains Provincial Park as part
of a multi-year study of the
region. Overall, they found
that environmental factors -
like the elevation or the
condition of the forest
around a camera location
- were generally more im
portant than human activity
in determining how often
wildlife including grizzly
bear, black bear, moose,
mule deer and wolf used
the trails.
However, deeper analysis
of trail use captured by
the cameras showed that
all wildlife tended to avoid
places that were recently
visited by recreational
users. And they avoided
mountain bikers and motorized vehicles significantly
more than they did hikers
and horseback riders. The
researchers hope their
longer-term research will
eventually be used to
inform public policy.
SORVIVAL ODDS
THE RESEARCH:
Dr. Brian Grunau of UBC's
department of Emergency
Medicine led a study to
compare survival rates of
cardiac arrest patients treated at the scene with those
of patients transported
to hospital.
TREK/ ALUMNI UBC
47
 FINDINGS
BOTTOM LINE:
The chances of surviving a cardiac
arrest among patients transported to
hospital are slim compared to those
treated at the scene.
WHAT DID YOUR STUDY FIND?
Our study, which included nearly
44,000 patients from across North
America including British Columbia
and Ontario, found that cardiac arrest
patients who are transported to
hospital during resuscitation had a
greater chance of dying than patients
treated at the scene. Among patients
who were immediately transported to
hospital, only 3.8 per cent survived
and were discharged compared to
12.6 per cent for patients treated at
the scene.
WHY ARE SURVIVAL RATES
HIGHER WHEN PATIENTS ARE
TREATED ON-SCENE?
Paramedics are experts in cardiac
arrest resuscitations, and can apply
nearly all cardiac arrest treatments at
the scene of the cardiac arrest that
are available in hospital. Secondly,
transporting a patient with cardiac
arrest to hospital can interfere with
important ongoing treatments, such
as CPR, defibrillation, and medications.
Thus, there is often no advantage of
transporting a patient with ongoing
CPR to hospital, but rather paramedics
should dedicate their efforts and expertise at the scene.
LIVES ON THE LINE
THE RESEARCH:
Civil engineering professor Tarek
Sayed explored how the size of road
markings affects collision rates.
BOTTOM LINE:
Increasing the width of road markings
substantially reduces collisions.
A study of multiple highways in Canada
by UBC civil engineering professor
Tarek Sayed suggests that increasing
the width of longitudinal road surface
markings from four inches to six or
eight inches can be a simple and cost
effective way of preventing accidents
and saving lives.
The research was based on an
analysis of eight years' of traffic and
collision data for 38 rural highway
segments in BC, Alberta and Quebec.
After edge lines, median lines and
centrelines at the sites were widened
between 2012 and 2013, total collisions were reduced by 12 per cent,
and run-off-the-road collisions by
19 per cent.
Previous research indicated that
increasing the width of pavement
markings can enhance visibility and
driver comfort, but the few studies
that analyzed real-world collision
data had not been conclusive. "More
Canadian road authorities should
consider widening their pavement
markings, particularly in areas where
run-off-the-road collisions are common," says Sayed.
We are invested in
your future success.
UBC Diploma in Accounting Program
If you are a degree graduate aspiring to become a
Chartered Professional Accountant (CPA), UBC DAP
provides you with the pre-requisites required to qualify for the
CPA Professional Education Program.
■ Recognized and respected by BC's top employers
■ Flexible delivery options, available part-time or full-time
■ Delivered by award-winning instructors
■ New entrance scholarships available for UBC alumni
fTo learn more about our program visit
sauder.ubc.ca/dap
TREK / ALUMNI UBC
 THE LONGER THE STAY,
THE MORE YOU SAVE
Rent a car with Avis, save up to 25% off
base rates, enjoy a free upgrade* and
make the most of your time!
In addition, Aeroplan® Members can
earn Aeroplan points at participating
Avis locations, worldwide.
Visit avis.com/ubcalumni and
book your reservation now!
AVIS
vis is a registered trademark licensed to Aviscar Inc. for use in Canada
'teroplan is a registered trademark of Aeroplan Inc., used under licens<
BE IN CONTROL
OF YOUR RIDE
WITH BUDGET!
Save up to 25% off base rates
+ a free upgrade on us*
If you are an Air Miles Member you
can also earn Air Miles at participating
Budget locations, worldwide.
Visit budget.com/ubcalumni
and enjoy your drive!
WA Budget
*Terms apply
©Budget is a registered trademark licensed to Budget car Inc. for use in Canada
®™ Trademarks of AM Royalties Limited Partnership used under license by LoyaltyOne
Co. and Budgetcar Inc.
- W Mi :!
TREK/ ALUMNI UBC
 THE SCOOP
Pranks, punks,
and prizes
1.  HOW MANY STUDENTS
HAVE GRADUATED FROM
THE OKANAGAN CAMPUS
SINCE IT OPENED
15 YEARS AGO?
a. More than 6,000
b. More than 13,000
c. More than 19,000
d. More than 28,000
2. WHICH TERM WAS COINED
BY SCI-FI WRITER AND UBC
ALUM WILLIAM GIBSON,
BA'77?
a. Steampunk
b. Cyberspace
c. Internet
d. Ipad
3. "FREE LOVE COMES TO
CAMPUS" IS A NEWSPAPER
HEADLINE FROM...
a. 1928 (when the UBC Social
Sciences Club organized
a controversial debate about
birth control)
b. 1968 (when UBC students
skinny-dipped in the faculty
club pool)
c. 1969 (when a Woodstock-
esque concert took place
on the Main Library lawn)
d. 1967 (when UBC students
started living on "Love
Street" in Kitsilano)
4. WHEN DID THE UBC
THUNDERBIRDS FOOTBALL TEAM FIRST WIN
THE PRESTIGIOUS
VANIERCUP?
a. 1962
b. 1972
c.1982
d. 1992
5. ON APRIL 1, 2019, A
SENIOR UBC OFFICIAL
ANNOUNCED...
a. that an annual jousting
match was set to take
place between students
from UBC and SFU
b. that classes about
16th century English
Literature would be
replaced with classes
about 20th century
American sitcoms
c. that a new satellite UBC
campus was set to open
in Hawaii in 2021
d. that the position of
president of the university would henceforth be
passed down hereditarily
7: C. UBC Okanagan now has
19,028 alumni.
2: B. Cyberspace. Although he
was a central figure in the cyberpunk literary movement, Gibson
didn't coin that term.
3: A. In a 1980s booklet of student
memories, Samuel Leonard
Simpson, BA'28, recalls his membership in a little-known Social
Sciences club that caused a major
fuss with its debate on birth control.
"Big headlines hit the frontpages
of both city papers," he claimed.
"FREE LOVE COMES TO CAMPUS
and much more of the same."
4: C. TSN commentators said it was
the best team in Canadian history
5: C. Hawaii campus. President
Santa Ono posted the April Fools'
joke on his Twitter account last
year. He also promised that
faculty, staff, and students
moving to Hawaii would be given
free sunscreen.
TREK / ALUMNI UBC
 NEWS FLASH
cssssa
VANCOUVER    OKANAGAN
FACING UP TO SYSTEMIC RACISM
In June, President Ono announced plans for a UBC advisory
committee on systemic racism, and his intention to first consult
with the UBC Black Caucus - followed by other marginalized
groups - on a strategy for addressing racism and bias at the
university. The Black Caucus itself was established early this year,
after Black master's student Shelby McPhee was racially profiled
and wrongly accused of stealing at a major conference on the
Vancouver campus. It unites and advocates for Black faculty
members, staff and students, and is bringing dialogue and
education about racism in Canada to the broader community.
DESIGNS FOR LIVING
UBC's School of Architecture
& Landscape Architecture
(SALA) is relaunching its
$50,000 Margolese National
Design for Living Prize, which
celebrates a Canadian citizen
who has made a significant
contribution to the built
environment and the people
within it. It highlights creative
solutions to address issues
involving urbanization, climate
change, the natural environment, social equity, and
human health and well-being.
Nominations open in February:
margoleseprize.com
BOOST FOR SPINAL
CORD RESEARCH
An international research
team co-led by researchers
at UBC and Vancouver Coastal
Health Research Institute
has been awarded a $48 million CAD grant by the US
Defence Advanced Research
Project Agency (DARPA).
The team's five-year project
aims to revolutionize treatments for patients with spinal
cord injury using innovative,
implantable technologies.
DOWNTOWN DIGS:
550 DOYLE AVENUE
This summer UBC and the City
of Kelowna announced plans for
a mixed-use development that
combines academic space to support community-facing programs
and services, as well as office and
residential space. It will strengthen
existing connections with community partners working in health,
tech, business, and arts and culture, as well as allow for new ones.
While the building remains vacant,
it will be made available for this
year's Emergency Winter Shelter
program, with approximately
40 beds operated by the Kelowna
Gospel Mission.
UNCORKED: NEW WINE
CENTRE HO
The Okanagan Valley now boasts
a new research hub, after a shift
of headquarters for UBC's Wine
Research Centre (WRC) from
Vancouver to the vineyard-laden
region of Kelowna. First established in 1999 on the Vancouver
campus, the WRC is dedicated to
interdisciplinary research, education and development, with a core
mission to support a sustainable
Canadian grape and wine industry.
dp
Increase in
UBC student
enrolment
numbers as of
September 21
- even as the
university
transitions to
offering most
of its classes
online
Number of
UBC courses
now being
taught
in virtual
classrooms
13/19%
Current
occupancy
of student
residences
on Vancouver
and Okanagan
campuses,
respectively
STEVEN POINT
The Honourable Steven Lewis
Point, former Lieutenant Governor
of BC, was appointed in June as
the university's 19th Chancellor.
As well as holding two UBC
degrees, he was awarded an
honorary degree in 2013 for his
exceptional commitment in the
field of law, legal and Aboriginal
education, and his leadership
in the Indigenous community.
Mr. Point is a member of the
Skowkale First Nation and has
an outstanding record of service
to the people of British Columbia.
LESLEY CORMACK
Lesley Cormack began her role
as Deputy Vice-Chancellor and
Principal of UBC Okanagan on
July 1. She was previously Dean
of arts at the University of Alberta.
Professor Cormack is an historian
of early modern science, specializing in geography and mathematics
in 16th-century England. "UBC
Okanagan has built a well-earned
reputation as an innovative
research university with an entrepreneurial spirit, and I can't wait
to contribute to its success," said
Cormack, upon her appointment.
TREK / ALUMNI UBC
51
 CAREER CORNER
Thinking
Like an
Entrepreneur
Is an entrepreneurial mindset an advantage
in times of change and job uncertainty? And is
it something that can be learned? The following
edited highlights are from an interview on this
topic with Grant Munro, BSc'01, co-founder
of Flashstock Technology, which in 2017 was
acquired by Shutterstock for CAD$75 million.
More recently, Munro founded a B2B venture
studio aimed at launching three to four new
software businesses a year, and this fall
he joined the board of alumni UBC.
OBSERVATION
ITS ABOUT
BEING PBBACTIVE
An entrepreneurial mindset means
creating your own opportunities
versus filling an existing role.
It allows you to think a little bit
differently and be tactical.
What stands out with entrepreneurs is that they have, at
a relatively young age, a good
perspective in terms of what
they want to do. Most do things
that they're interested in and
passionate about. Others aren't
happy with just getting a day job
and want a certain lifestyle. And
so they come to this realization
that starting their own business
is the path forward.
TAKEAWAY
FINB YOUR NBBTH STAB
If you don't have conviction in your
direction, you don't have a career
plan. If you don't have that North
Star, then you're never going to
have that framework to make
those types of decisions.
Figuring out what you want to do
should be your priority, because if
you do something that you don't
generally want to do, you will
not be successful at it. As soon
as you figure it out, it gets so
much easier. When you're a new
graduate, the one thing that you
have as an advantage is time, so
try different things.
The more breadth of experience
you get, both professional or
personal, the more you're going to
start to notice what you naturally
gravitate to. What are the things
that don't require a lot of energy?
What are the things that you can
work on much longer than others?
What are the things you get
excited about? Use those signals
to tell you what you actually like,
and from that derive a better plan.
52
TREK/ ALUMNI UBC
 OBSERVATION
OBSERVATION
IT'S NOT ABOUT EGO   IT'S HIGHLY CREATIVE
'Entrepreneurs
are not visionaries, generally.
They are people
who take these
sideways glances,
and they notice
problems."
- Grant Munro, BSc'01,
founder of Flashstock
Technology
O TO LISTEN TO THE
FULL PODCAST, VISIT
alumni.ubc.ca/careers
There's no ego involved. A lot of
entrepreneurs are interested in
fields in which they may not have
expertise, and they'll go out and
learn as much as possible and be
really humble. They won't assume
that they know everything. And
then, when they've identified
something that they think is
meaningful, they don't sit on it for
months and years - they actually
go out and do something about it.
TAKEAWAY
HAVE A PLAN
And so what if you take that
mindset into any capacity, whether
you're looking for your first job,
or you've lost your job and you're
looking for another?
No matter what position or what
role you're interested in, there
are hundreds of people out there
who have done it already. Go
and introduce yourself. Say: Hey,
I want to learn about all the stuff
that you do. People love talking
about themselves.
To achieve something meaningful, you have to break it out into
big blocks. Know what you want to
do, and then work backwards from
there. Most people go through
life just taking one opportunity
at a time, and not thinking about
what's next and what's next and
what's next. But if you're able to
do that, I think it gives you way
more perspective in terms of your
career choices.
Once you've realized what your
goal is, there are tangible steps
that you can take every week to
move the ball forward to get you
to there. A planning mentality, coupled with a long-term perspective
on your life and how long things
actually take, is really powerful.
I think starting a business, building
a product, is one of the ultimate
manifestations of creativity. The
general folklore around startups on
the tech scene is that someone's
walking down the street, and this
light bulb appears over their head,
and they run off to start this amazing world-changing company. But
that's not how it works. I've interviewed more than 50 founders in
the last three or four weeks about
how they came up with their idea.
In most cases, it's derived from the
identification of a problem.
Entrepreneurs are not visionaries,
generally. They are people who
take these sideways glances, and
they notice problems. They ask
questions like: Why is it like this?
And what if it was like this? And
how would I do that?
TAKEAWAY
PAY ATTENTION
You can't read a book or take
a course and become an entrepreneur. It's much more of an
apprenticeship. The acquisition
of an entrepreneurial mindset takes
practice and time and mentorship.
Once you're thoughtful about it
and you do it in practice, it becomes really straightforward.
There's always a mindfulness
component. Instead of sticking
your nose in an Instagram feed,
keep your head up and observe the
things around you - simple things.
If you're waiting in line to order a
coffee, for example, observe what
the interaction is like and ask: Why
is it that way? Are there opportunities to make it better? Maybe not.
But if you practice asking those
types of questions, it will become
your default mindset and you'll
start to see problems everywhere.
And I think that's the point where it
gets really interesting for people.
TREK / ALUMNI UBC
 AGENDA
Thin_
to Do
BOOKWORMS UNITE!
Join the alumni UBC Online Book Club.
Books discussed focus on lifelong
learning, leadership, harnessing
creativity, communication skills and
much more. It's free, exclusive to
UBC alumni, and more than 1,800
are already participating. Next pick:
Essentialism: The Disciplined
Pursuit of Less by Greg McKeown
Do you ever find yourself at the end
of a work day wondering what you've
accomplished? Caught in a loop of
Zoom calls, endless emails and trivial
tasks, our core work can sometimes
get lost in the weeds. In Essentialism,
Greg McKeown shows us how to focus
on what really matters. Regain control
of your own choices and redirect
your energy toward "the right thing,
in the right way, at the right time."
Start 2021 on the right foot.
9 READING AND DISCUSSION
BEGIN JANUARY 7
alumni, ubc.ca/online-book-club
VIRTUAL VIRTUOSITY
Black Artistic Expressions in BC:
Dawn Pemberton
December 16, 2020, 4:30-5:30 PM
The last in a four-part series celebrating of Black lives, Black culture and
activism, and Black musical and poetic
expression in BC. Sign up for this live
event featuring the "new Queen of
Canadian soul," at equity.ubc.ca
PostSecret and the Pandemic:
Struggles, Successes & Strategies
January 28, 2021, time and details
TBD (alumni.ubc.ca/events)
Frank Warren is the sole founder of the
PostSecret Project, a growing collection
of over a million artful secrets, mailed
anonymously to him on postcards.
Known as "the most trusted stranger in
the world," Warren's all new interactive
presentation reveals our true feelings
about how the pandemic has disrupted
our lives, while providing evidence-
based tools to aid young people and
adults as they navigate through this
challenging, but temporary crisis.
TOPUPYOURKARMA
Score karma points by lending a
helping hand. You can apply for the
following two volunteer opportunities
at alumni.ubc.ca/volunteer
Support K-12 students
As a result of COVID-19, students across
BC are experiencing a very different
academic year. UBC students founded
Mentoring the Stars to provide academic support to grade K-12 students by
organizing free virtual tutoring. Volunteer tutors are matched with students
based on preferences, availability, and
areas of knowledge. No previous tutoring experience required.
Help job seekers
Job seekers often aren't aware how
their resume and interview style is
perceived by a potential employer.
Help out students and other alumni by
providing resume feedback and online
interview practice. Volunteers must
have at least two years' experience
supporting hiring decisions.
54
TREK / ALUMNI UBC
 Explore an Exhibit
MUSEUM OF ANTHROPOLOGY
Shame and Prejudice: A Story of Resilience
Running until January 3. Book your ticket at moa.ubc.ca
Kent Monkman's Shame and Prejudice: A Story of Resilience is
an 80-piece exhibit of paintings, installations and sculptures,
in dialogue with historical artifacts, that takes you on a journey
through the past 150 years of Canada. It is a journey that reclaims
and reinserts Indigenous voices into the collective memory of
our country, challenging and shattering colonial ideas of our
history. The artist's gender fluid, time-travelling alter-ego,
Miss Chief Eagle Testickle, is the narrator of this story, told
through the lens of Indigenous resilience.
BEATY MUSEUM OF BIODIVERSITY
Fire Followers by Megan Majewski and Sharon Roberts
Online exhibition: beatymuseum.ubc.ca/firefollowers
Painter Megan Majewski and writer Sharon Roberts wanted to
create an exhibit that can show both the destruction and the
great beauty that comes from wildfire. By providing a forum for
those who have witnessed this cycle, but also to give a voice to
the forests themselves, the artists aim to bring greater awareness
of the necessity of wildfire in building a healthy forest. They
hope to shape the public perception of what a healthy forest
looks like, why it can be helpful to let fires burn when there is
no immediate risk to a community, and how individuals can
contribute to decreasing wildfire risk.
DID YOU MISS?
A Discussion with
Claudia Rankine
The UBC Phil Lind Initiative hosted a discussion
with Claudia Rankine
as part of its Thinking
While Black series.
Rankine is a New York
Times bestselling poet,
MacArthur "Genius"
Award recipient,
National Book Critics
Circle Award winner
and a professor at Yale.
O WATCH THE
RECORDING AT
llndlnltlatlve.ubc.ca/
claudla-ranklne
COVID-19
Webinar Series
Since March, this series
has been offering expert
perspectives on everything from maintaining
physical and mental
well-being during lock-
down to food security.
O ACCESS ALL
10WEBINARSAT
alumni.ubc.ca/covid-19-
weblnars
alumni UBC
Monthly
Contests
on the
alumni UBC
App!
JANUARY
A $100 gift card for
the UBC Bookstore
means you get to
curl up by the fire
with a good book.
FEBRUARY
Celebrate
Valentine's Day
by crafting a meal
at home with a
$100 gift card
from Fresh Prep.
MARCH
Take in the beauty
of Vancouver's
cherry blossoms
with four tickets to
the UBC Botanical
Garden and Nitobe
Memorial Garden.
APRIL
Look sharp in
a customized
UBC Techno Lite
Jacket, part of
the alumni UBC
merchandise line
available at the
UBC Bookstore.
O GET THE
ALUMNI UBC APP
alumni.ubc.ca/app
^t   Download on the
m App Store
^^   GETITON
W Google Play
TREK / ALUMNI UBC
 IN MEMORIAM
Robert H. Lee,
CM, OBC, BCom'56, LLD'96
The UBC community is mourning
the loss of Dr. Robert (Bob) H. Lee,
CM, OBC, former chancellor of UBC
and chairman of UBC Properties Trust,
who passed away on February 19, 2020.
An esteemed philanthropist, visionary and beloved community leader,
Bob Lee was one of UBC's most accomplished alumni. He dedicated much
of his life, expertise and resources to
building a brighter future for British
Columbians and Canadians, and he
embodied the mission of UBC and
its vision for its alumni.
Bob was born and raised in Vancouver.
The traditional Confucian values of
humility, modesty, honesty, studi-
ousness, and social duty were deeply
ingrained in him from his father,
Ronald Bick Lee. Bob, who was affectionately referred to as "Mr. UBC,"
met his wife, Lily, while they were
attending UBC, and their four children
(Carol, Derek, Leslie and Graham) and
three children-in-law (Carlota, John
Murphy and Angela) are also alumni.
After graduating from UBC in 1956
with a Bachelor of Commerce degree,
he overcame racial barriers and worked
hard to establish a successful career in
real estate and founded the Prospero
Group of Companies.
Over the years, Bob touched the lives
of many. He set the bar for community
involvement through longstanding
commitment to many organizations,
including the Robert Lee YMCA, the
Robert & Lily Lee Family Community
Health Centre and the VGH & UBC
Hospital Foundation. He was a member of the Order of British Columbia
and the Order of Canada.
Bob was extremely devoted to the
service of his alma mater, serving
two terms on the UBC Board of
Governors. He was installed as
chancellor in 1993, served as chair
of the UBC Foundation, and was
the honorary chair of UBC's start
an evolution campaign. UBC awarded Bob an Honorary Doctorate
of Laws in 1996, and in 2006 the
Robert H. Lee Graduate School at
the Sauder School of Business was
established in recognition of Bob's
generous gift to support graduate
business education. In 1999, Bob received the alumni UBC Achievement
Award for volunteer leadership, and
in appreciation of his personal and
other contributions to UBC totalling
over $15 million, members of the
community came together to name
the Robert H. Lee Alumni Centre
in his honour. It opened in 2015.
Of Bob's many contributions to
UBC, the one of which he was
most proud is the creation of UBC
Properties Trust, which he founded
in 1988 and then served as chairman
for 23 years. The trust was the first
in North America of its kind, and has
earned the university over $1.7 billion dollars to date with a projected
$4 billion dollars in perpetuity.
Bob's vision inspired similar projects
at universities around the world,
making this one of the single most
influential ideas for bolstering education funding in recent history.
Bob's thoughtfulness and generosity
were far-reaching, and UBC was a
particularly fortunate beneficiary of
his attention and presence. He will be
deeply missed by our community, but
his legacy remains all around us and
will live on for generations.
RICHARD "DICK"
STEWART,
BSC(AGR)'49,
BCOM'49
Richard "Dick"
Stewart passed away
on May 12, 2020,
at the age of 94.
Born at Kelowna General Hospital
on April 8,1926, Dick was one of four
children raised by Richard (Dick)
and Mary (Whitworth) Stewart.
His parents' generosity and support
for others became the values that
Dick upheld his entire life. He was
introduced to the benefits of teamwork through adventures shared with
childhood friends, and to his love of
music through time spent singing in
choirs and performing in musicals
as a boy.
Dick was a dedicated scholar at
Kelowna High School and enlisted
in the Armed Forces after graduating. After the war, he headed to
UBC with his brother Jim and his
dear friend Dave Leckie, graduating
with a double major in Agriculture
and Commerce.
After graduation, Dick worked
in his father's nursery and orchard
business, Stewart Brothers Nursery,
and met Rosemary Boswell, a pretty,
auburn-haired girl who worked at the
nearby trucking company. Eventually,
he captured her heart and hand,
and they married in 1956, raising
four children.
Dick had a keen interest in grape
growing and his family opened
Quails' Gate Estate Winery in 1989
on a farm site he had purchased in
1956 in West Kelowna. Dick was
proud of his heritage, his community, his family, and his business.
He was a member of Kelowna City
Council from 1968-1972 and the
UBC Board of Governors from
1981-1987. He loved his hometown
and felt a deep responsibility to
serve the community.
He leaves behind his wife Rosemary,
children Ben, Cynthia (Scott)
Walker, Andrea (Dave) McFadden,
Tony (Lisa), 12 grandchildren, eight
TREK/ ALUMNI UBC
 great-grandchildren, and numerous
much-loved nieces and nephews.
He is predeceased by his parents,
brothers Bill and Jim, sister Kathleen
and grandson Andrew.
HAROLD E. HOLLAND. BASC'50
Harold passed away on September
28, 2019. He was a War Veteran
in the Engineering Class of 1950.
After graduating he re-enlisted in
the RCAF for a full career, retiring in Ottawa. He is survived by
three daughters.
JOHNC.
WILLIAMS,
BCOM'58
John will be deeply
missed by his family
and many friends.
John loved saying,
"I've never worked
a day in my life," and pursued his
career with passion until his last
days. He founded J.C. Williams
Group, which was a second family
to him, and became the go-to expert
on retail for over 40 years. John was
inducted into the Canadian Retail
Hall of Fame in 2013. He volunteered
extensively for many organizations
and fundraised for UBC, his Alma
Mater. He organized reunions at
UBC with classmates from Magee
Secondary School in Vancouver,
where he grew up. John had a loving,
happy marriage to Maureen, and was
grateful to his first wife, Betty, for
their years together raising their four
children. He loved his kids and was
delighted in his eight grandchildren.
John grew more joyful throughout
his life. At work, his voicemail message always concluded with "Make
it a great one!" and his emails always
ended with "Carpe Diem!" John's
final days took him to Vancouver
for a reunion where he joined his
brothers for a road trip. John died
peacefully in the car with his brothers at his side.
Rt. Hon. John Turner,
PC, CC, QC, BA'49
Former Canadian prime minister
John Turner died this September at
the age of 91, at his family home in
Toronto. He held a place in government for nearly 30 years and was
at the centre of some of the most
formative political debates in modern
Canadian history. As a politician, he
will be remembered for being dignified, principled, and highly respected
by both allies and rivals. Within
the UBC community, Turner will
be remembered as a distinguished
student, athlete, and alumnus who
made significant contributions to our
university, our city, and our country.
Turner's time at UBC began in 1945,
when he enrolled in the Faculty of
Arts at age 16. His impact was felt
almost immediately. By 1947, "Chick"
Turner, as he was called by his
classmates, was the fastest sprinter
in Canada and a sports editor for
the Ubyssey student newspaper.
He had a popular column called
"Chalk Talk by Chick," which
became known for its sharp wit and
snappy prose. He qualified for the
Canadian Olympic team in 1948 but
did not participate due to a serious
knee injury. Turner is remembered
as one of the finest athletes to ever
compete for the Thunderbirds.
He was also one of UBC's most
exemplary students academically,
graduating with an honours degree
and earning a Rhodes Scholarship
at just 19 years of age. He attended
Oxford University and earned a BA,
Jurisprudence, Bachelor of Civil Law,
and MA. He began work on a doctorate degree at the Sorbonne in Paris
but returned to Canada when he was
called to the Quebec bar. He was
greatly admired by his peers. In 2007,
he received an alumni UBC Award
of Distinction.
Turner's career in government began
in 1962, when he was elected as a
Liberal MP in Montreal. He became
a rising star in the party and served
as a minister in the Trudeau cabinet
from 1968 to 1975. While serving
as justice minister, Turner oversaw
changes to the Criminal Code that
led to the decriminalization of
homosexuality and a number of other
important social reforms. In June
1984, after Pierre Trudeau retired,
Turner was sworn into office as Prime
Minister and held the position for
79 days before being defeated by
Brian Mulroney in the federal election. He was the first UBC graduate
to serve as prime minister. For the
next six years, Turner served as the
leader of the Opposition, and was
a notable critic of Canada's emerging
free trade agreements. He also served
as Vancouver Quadra's MP during
that time. He was a strong presence
in Canadian politics for a generation,
and widely admired for his desire
to make Canada a nation of, in his
words, "equality and excellence."
The government held a state
funeral for Turner, who was a devout
Catholic, at St. Michael's Cathedral
Basilica in Toronto on October 6.
TREK/ ALUMNI UBC
57
 JOHN (JANOS)
SZAUER, BSC'59
John Szauer passed
away peacefully on
September 10, 2019,
in Williams Lake,
BC. Born in Hungary
on January 10,1932,
John was educated in Budapest, beginning studies at the University
of Sopron in 1954 (interrupted by
the Hungarian Revolution of 1956),
then emigrating to Canada in 1957
with fellow Sopron students and
faculty to complete his education
at UBC. In 1958 he married Sopron
classmate Klara Szikszai, and they
graduated together from UBC's
Faculty of Forestry Sopron Division
in 1959. John joined the BC Forest
Service in Prince George, becoming
a Registered Professional Forester.
In 1972 he transferred to Williams
Lake, worked as planning forester
and forestry manager, then regional manager of the Cariboo Forest
Region from 1984 to 1988. From
1989 to 1991 he served as commissioner on the BC Forest Resources
Commission. John and Klara then
operated Greentop Forestry Services
until her sudden passing in 1999.
John is remembered by daughter
Katalin; sons John, Thomas (Sarah)
and Augustine (Johanne); granddaughters Kalysta & Matiya; family
in Belgium and Hungary; and
friends and colleagues.
o
DAVID EDWARD
COLLARD, BSC'64
David passed away
peacefully at home
in Kemptville on
Saturday, October
26, 2019, at the
age of 78 years. He
was the beloved husband of Judith
Collard (nee Moore), proud father of
Christopher (Tommi), Candina, Jason
and Jonathan, and loving grandpa of
Elle, Hunter and August. He was predeceased by his brother Robert. He
will be missed by his sisters-in-law,
Frances Collard and Elaine Julien,
and nieces and nephews. Donations
may be made to Heart & Stroke
Foundation or Canadian Pulmonary
Fibrosis Foundation.
o
JANICE L. MCCORMICK,
MSC'77, PHD'97
The School of Nursing was saddened
to hear about the recent death of
Janice McCormick, a member of
the very first cohort of students to
graduate from our PhD Program,
Nursing. Janice was a pediatric nurse
from Manitoba, who found her way to
Vancouver after holding nursing positions in New Orleans (Tulane Medical
Centre, Dialysis) and Montreal (Royal
Vic). She obtained her MSN from
UBC in 1977 and worked as a clinical
nurse specialist at BC Children's
Hospital. Returning to UBC to enter
the PhD program, she was one of the
first nursing program graduates to
cross the stage in the spring of 1997.
On completion of her PhD, Janice
taught at the UVic School of Nursing,
Langara Campus. She loved the
engagement with students and
the continuing scholarly work. In
addition to critical reflections on
optimizing pediatric care, Janice had
a fierce commitment to equality and
power imbalance issues. Her dissertation research reflected a feminist
post-structural examination of power
discourses within clinical nursing
practice. Janice will be remembered
as a wonderful friend and colleague.
LUITJE K. TROMP,
BSC'79
It is with great
sadness we announce
the passing of Lou
Tromp. After a courageous battle with
cancer, Lou passed
away peacefully, with Alice, his wife
of 40 years, faithfully by his side. He
also leaves to mourn their two daughters: Colleen (Devon) Van Veen and
Cheryl (Dave) Tromp; three grandsons: Trayke, Tyson and Jeremiah
Van Veen; two brothers: Jelmer
(Wendy) Tromp and Ralph (Ginny)
Tromp as well as numerous extended
family members and friends.
Born and raised in Duncan, Lou had
a love for the outdoors that led to a
long career in the forest industry as
a Registered Professional Forester.
He studied at UBC, and his career
took Lou, Alice and their daughters to
live in Williams Lake and Smithers.
During the summers Lou enjoyed
camping with his family and running
the Tromp U-Pick Strawberry Farm.
Lou and Alice returned to Vancouver
Island several years ago in preparation for his retirement. He will
greatly missed.
RICHARD
BERWICK,
MED'79, DED'88
Dr. Richard Franklin
Berwick, an internationally respected
UBC sociolinguist,
passed away at the
age of 74 on June 3, 2019, in his North
Vancouver home. Rick pioneered
practitioner research in the field
of intercultural communication at
Kobe University of Commerce and
Ritsumeikan Asian Pacific University
in Japan, and at UBC, his alma mater,
and Capilano University. He was
the original academic coordinator
of the UBC Ritsumeikan Academic
Exchange in 1991. For his efforts,
Capilano University has created an
annual student community service
award in his name.
Known for his sense of humour
and intellect, Rick loved to debate,
and always had a sincere, open and
unbiased perspective on people
from all cultures and walks of life.
His many students, colleagues and
friends in Canada and Japan will be
seeing him in all their familiar places.
He is survived by his beloved wife,
Taeko; daughter, Yuri; son, Benjamin;
granddaughter, Maya; and extended
family and friends. A celebration of
life was held in North Vancouver on
June 30.
TREK / ALUMNI UBC
 DAVID FUSHTEY,
LLB'88
On October 8, 2019,
David Fushtey
passed away at
St. John Hospice
in Vancouver at
the age of 64. Dave
was born on August 21,1955, in
Guelph, Ontario, to Ruth and Steve
Fushtey. Beloved husband to Moura
Quayle, Dave was a true Renaissance
man: a landscape architect, sculptor and multi-talented lawyer. He
loved music, art and beauty. Law
was everything Dave believed in -
discipline, justice and consideration
of others without compromising
his values.
Dave actively followed his dreams.
He had fallen in love with the art
of stone sculpture and this passion
led him to start a program called
"Stoneworks" for street youth. But
his commitment to words and the
rule of law drew him back to create
The Governance Counsel in 2002
to focus on his passion for governance - the effective exercise of
informed authority.
Dave was a Fellow at the Centre
for Dialogue at Simon Fraser
University (SFU) where he valued
the staff and students of the Centre.
These experiences led to the May
2019 publication of The Director and
the Manager: Law and Governance
in a Digital Age: Machiavelli Had it
Easy. The 1000-page text includes
direction for the emerging discipline
of governance and was a celebration
of years of thinking, researching,
writing, editing and compilation.
At the SFU book launch, Dave was
his usual humble, funny and deeply
thoughtful self.
Dave was passionately involved in
politics. Most recently he worked
to build bridges with China and
was privileged to visit Huawei in
Shenzhen with students in May 2019,
where he developed enduring relationships. Dave loved his work with
youth, mentoring many students and
young professionals. He truly wanted
to help people understand how legal
and regulatory systems should evolve
to enable positive relationships in our
complex world.
From a young age Dave showed
leadership, kindness and courage,
and he worked tirelessly in his pursuit
of justice. He will be dearly missed.
RRSPS,RRIFS&TFSAS
INTERNATIONAL GIFTS
SECURITIES ^^
EVERY DONOR
IS UNIQUE.
EVERY GIFT
MAKES A
DIFFERENCE.
Explore your giving options with
our professional gift planning
team.
giftandestateplanning.ubc.ca
or 604.822.5373
 Andrea Bang,
BA'12 (Psychology)
Lifelong learner,
tea-worshipper,
slayer of chairs
WHO WAS YOUR CHILDHOOD HERO?
Buffy! I would practice "slaying" chairs.
Vampires and chairs - same-same.
DESCRIBE THE PLACE YOU MOST LIKE
TO SPEND TIME.
At home. Or a buffet.
WHAT WAS THE LAST THING YOU READ?
Doretta Lau's How Does a Single Blade
of Grass Thank the Sun? It's a bunch
of short stories featuring young Asian
Canadian voices. They're funny, witty,
somber and heartbreaking.
WHAT OR WHO MAKES YOU LAUGH
OUT LOUD?
Recently went to see Hannah Gadsby
perform live and was rolling! Oh, and
kids are guaranteed laughs. They're
so brutally honest and carefree.
CLAIM
TO FAME
Stars as
Janet Kim
in CBC's Kim's
Convenience.
CHILDHOOD
CAREER
ASPIRATIONS
Librarian,
construction
worker, fairy.
LATEST
PROJECT
Refreshing her
high school
Spanish.
WHAT'S THE MOST IMPORTANT LESSON
YOU EVER LEARNED?
It's never too late to learn something new.
WHAT WAS YOUR NICKNAME AT SCHOOL?
Didn't really have one. But an old boss
used to yell "BANG!" at me.
WHAT IS YOUR MOST PRIZED POSSESSION?
As a Vancouverite, my umbrella? But I've
lost hundreds of them in my lifetime so...
WHAT WOULD BE THE TITLE OF
YOUR BIOGRAPHY?
Be Back in 5 Minutes
WHAT ITEM HAVE YOU OWNED FOR
THE LONGEST TIME?
I've kept lots of childhood mementos,
but somewhere there's an autographed
photo of Seth Green that I'm pretty sure
I've had forever.
WHAT WOULD YOU LIKE YOUR EPITAPH
TO SAY?
She's standing behind you.
IN WHICH ERA WOULD YOU MOST LIKE
TO HAVE LIVED. AND WHY?
1960s. Minus all the crappy parts,
it'd be fashion, art and music heaven.
WHAT ARE YOU AFRAID OF?
Bed bugs.
WHAT IS YOUR LATEST PURCHASE?
A box of donuts and mini Oreos.
NAME THE SKILL OR TALENT YOU WOULD
MOST LIKE TO HAVE.
Superhuman strength.
WHICH FAMOUS PERSON (LIVING OR
DEAD) DO YOU THINK (OR HAVE YOU
BEEN TOLD) YOU MOST RESEMBLE?
I've been told I resemble a bunch of
different people. But my favourite was
in high school when someone showed
a magazine to me, pointed at a random
Asian person and genuinely said "Andrea,
it's your twin!" We looked nothing alike.
WHAT IS YOUR PET PEEVE?
When people try to enter a full train
before letting anyone out.
DO YOU HAVE A PERSONAL MOTTO?
Tea is delicious.
WHAT ARE YOUR UBC HIGHLIGHTS?
Sleeping in the Aquatic Centre.
TREK/ ALUMNI UBC
 BENEFITS
THAT ARE
ABOV
m
Tl
didas
Gear up for fall
and winter with
the latest looks
from adidas
Canada. UBC
alumni can save
30% on regular
price items and
15% off outlet
items online.
Whether you're a sports fan, love
to travel, enjoy live theatre, need
a car, or simply enjoy getting
a great deal, you're sure to find
an offer you love on our list of
exclusive alumni UBC partners.
V
CURRENT PARTNERS
adidas Canada
Avis Budget
Broadway Across Canada
Dilawri Preferred
Choice Hotels
Contiki Holidays
Evo Car Share
EyeBuyDirect
Fresh Prep
Gold's Gym
HearingLife Advantage
Mapiful
Modo
Pets Plus Us
Reitmans
RW&Co
Simons
Sparkling Hill Resort
Surmesur
Trip Merchant
Unhaggle
Vk\
WNLOAD THE ALUMNI UBC APP
It's the easiest way to access your alumni UBC benefits.
or visit alumni.ubc.ca/savings
Interested in becoming an alumni UBC corporate partner?
Contact jenna.mccannaubc.ca
UBC
 ^      In our nearly 100 years as a firm, Odium Brown Limited has experienced
^   and learned from a multitude of global events. Now we are putting those
decades of hard-earned resilience to work for our clients.
Discover how you can benefit from our rich legacy: the lessons we've learned,
our ability to adapt and our patience to stay the course to grow and preserve
your wealth.
Let our experience and long-term results help you navigate through these
difficult times. Contact us at 604-669-1600, toll-free at 1-888-886-3586 or visit us at
odlumbrown.com for more information.
©
ODLUM BROWN
Investing for Generations®
Waterstone
CANADA'S   ,
MOSTi"
ADMIRED
CORPORATE
CULTURES
BEST
J1 MANAGED
IS COMPANIES
Platinum member
j Odium Brown Limited
] @Odlum_Brown
Odium Brown Community
o\ OdlumBrown
Member-Canadian Investor Protection Fund

Cite

Citation Scheme:

        

Citations by CSL (citeproc-js)

Usage Statistics

Share

Embed

Customize your widget with the following options, then copy and paste the code below into the HTML of your page to embed this item in your website.
                        
                            <div id="ubcOpenCollectionsWidgetDisplay">
                            <script id="ubcOpenCollectionsWidget"
                            src="{[{embed.src}]}"
                            data-item="{[{embed.item}]}"
                            data-collection="{[{embed.collection}]}"
                            data-metadata="{[{embed.showMetadata}]}"
                            data-width="{[{embed.width}]}"
                            data-media="{[{embed.selectedMedia}]}"
                            async >
                            </script>
                            </div>
                        
                    
IIIF logo Our image viewer uses the IIIF 2.0 standard. To load this item in other compatible viewers, use this url:
https://iiif.library.ubc.ca/presentation/cdm.alumchron.1-0396122/manifest

Comment

Related Items