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The UBC Alumni Chronicle Jun 30, 1949

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Page 2
THE U.B.C. ALUMNI CHRONICLE THIS STORY IS BASED ON AN ACTUAL CASE
lt was during the depression of the early '30's that
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He was a good workman. He had ideas. And he
had a passion for fishing.
But he had no job.
Try as he did, he could find nothing. Unemployment was increasing on every hand.
* * *
For ardent fishermen, casting for trout can do
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If Edward Ferguson had worries, they soon dissolved in fishing ... as he had no work, he went
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On one of his expeditions, he got an idea — an idea
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He soon decided he needed some money to carry
his idea into production.
That was when he came to see us. Enthusiastically
he told us of his plans. His proposition appealed to
us and we lent him the money he wanted — $150,
on a note endorsed by his father.
That was some 18 years ago. Today, Edward
Ferguson has a business worth more than $30,000.
He makes all kinds of artificial bait, fishing rods
and other items of fishing tackle, and during the war
he made equipment for the R.C.A.F.
Edward Ferguson is still a customer of ours ... and
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This true experience is typical of thousands of
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Page 5 ((
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Most of us have to plan for the good things of life.
And a big part of that planning is a matter of dollars
and cents—of earmarking a certain part
of our earnings for the things we want most.
It's not always easy, especially these days:
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Page 6
THE U.B.C. ALUMNI CHRONICLE The U.B.C. Alumni
CHROniCLC
Published by the Alumni Association of
The University of \British Columbia
Editor: Ormonde J. Hall, B.Comm., LL.B.
Associate Editor:
Mary Fallis, M.A.
Alumni Association Executive:
President Winston Shilvock, B.A. '31, B.Comm. '32
First Vice-President John Buchanan, B.A. '17
Secretary-Manager Frank Turner, B.Comm., B.A. '39
Treasurer Harry Berry, B.Comm., B.A. '37
Second Vice-President Molly Bardsley, B.A., '33
Chairman Publications Board, Ormonde J. Hall, B. Comm.
'42, LLb. '48
Past President Richard M. Bibbs, B.A.Sc. '45
Members at Large: William H. Q. Cameron, B.A., '33,
Dorwin Baird, Arts, '38, Mrs. Maurice Sleightholme, B.A.,
'30, Thomas W. Meredith, B. Comm., '46, Robert S. MacDonald, B.A., '34, Ben K. Farrar, BASc, '27, Mrs. Tommy
Berto, B.A., '31, AMS Pres. Jim Sutherland, Senate Rep.,
Mrs. J. H. (Sally) Creighton; Mrs. E. T. Kirkpatrick,
B.A., '47; Roderick Lindsay, B.A.Sc, '48; James MacDonald,
B.A., '38; Elliott Schmidt, B.A.Sc, '36; F. D. Moyls, B.A.,
'46; Ruth Wilson, B.A., '41; Wilf Calnan, B.A., '39; Junior
Member AMS P. De Vooght and Senate Rep. Dr. Harry
V. Warren.
Editorial Office:
Room 208, Yorkshire Building, Vancouver, B. C.
Business Office:
Alumni Association, Brock Building, U.B.C.
VOL. 3. No. 2
JUNE, 1949
TABLE OF CONTENTS
ARTICLES—
Women's Residences	
Retirements 	
Jack Shadbolt—Artist   20
Who-um Est?     22
Page
11, 12, 13
  14,  15
FEATURES—
Personalities      16,  17
Editorial      19
Dr. Weaver  25
Graduation     27
COVER PICTURE:
The demurely beautiful gal on the cover is Lois
Stratton, one of the summer school students who will be
adding to the scenery at Point Grey when summer school
opens in July. . . . Lois has a nice spot to study but
the photographer doesn't know how she got there without
getting the book wet .   .  .  anyhow who cares?  .  .  .
4?o* t/te Record. . .
Two years ago
your present
editor took over
the Chronicle
from Darrel T.
Braidwood who
became president of the Alumni Association . . . this
month former
editor Braidwood was elected to the University Senate
as an alumni
representative
to fill the vac-
a n c y created
when elected
member Dr.
D orothy M awd-
sley was declared an automatic
member as
Dean of Women.
With $10,000 already in, the Alumni-U.B.C.
Development Fund drive is of? to a fine start . . .
Chairman Joe Brown and his fellow workers deserve much credit for their efforts and continued
support for the fund by the Alumni . . . let's make
a total of $20,000 before the end of the year and ensure the success of the drive and the health of the
Alumni Association . . .
Alumni will be pleased at the announcement that
Dr. Blythe Eagles has been appointed Dean of Agriculture in place of retiring Dean Clement . . , Dr.
Eagles is the second U.B.C. graduate to become a
Dean (Walter Gage was appointed Dean of Administrative and Inter-Faculty Affairs last year)
and the first U.B.C. graduate to become Dean of a
Faculty of U.B.C. . . . Dr. Eagles was Treasurer of
the class of '22 which started the U.B.C.-Alumni
Development Fund with a donation of almost $1000.
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TWENTY YEARS AGO TODAY
IN NEW YORK HERALD TRIBUNE
February 17, 1929
The Record Books capitulated to the
scintillating speed of young Percy Williams, Olympic champion, last night in the
13th Regiment Armory, Brooklyn, when
the unbeaten Canadian lad hung up a new
world's indoor mark for sixty meters of
6 4-5 seconds.
Dear Sirs:
Enclosed is a clipping from the New York "Herald Tribune" of February 17th, 1949. As one who
was a Freshman at the same time as Percy Williams
graced the campus I felt quite a thrill at seeing that
the New York paper remembered the Vancouver
boy twenty years later.
One of the first things that I noticed when I first
arrived in Vancouver in September of '28 was a
billboard "Welcome Home, Percy Williams." Before the end of 1929 the name of Percy Williams had
almost passed out of the picture but to those of us
who had anything to do with the Track Club, he will
always be remembered. I do hope that somehow
you will be able to let Percy Williams know that in
1949 he was still remembered by a metropolitan
daily.
Yours sincerelv,
ROBT. C. W. WARD,
Congratulations to Graduates
of 1949
dSerKleif   -J//&   -3/<
460 Granville Street
ore
PAcific 4557
Page 8
THE U.B.C. ALUMNI CHRONICLE LETTERS
Dear Editor:
At the May meeting of the Student Council it
was decided to give $25 to the fund for building
women's residences at U.B.C.
The girls were told of the plan to build dormitories and of the number of girls who have to board
to go to college. They felt that since they are fortunate in living at home they would like to do
something to help the out-of-town students.
This money is the percentage received by the
school for the Kinsmen's Club for the money collected by the Point Grey girls on the streets on
apple day.
We wish the association every success in building and furnishing homes for the students.
Sincerely yours,
Doreen Davies, Secretary,
Point Grey Junior High School
Student Council.
c/o Crown Zellerbach Corp.,
Dear Sir, Cathlamet, Wn,
May I state that I think the "Alumni Chronicle"
is an excellent publication, done interestingly and
with good taste.
Too, it is a surprise to find that the editorials
are uniformly pertinent and sensible; one finds so
often, in the newspaper field at least, that the editorials are inane. As a case in point, when Kharkov
fell, the "Daily Province" wrote a plodding piece
entitled, "Kharkov Has Fallen."
Keep up the good work.
Yours sincerely,   J. D. MATHESON.
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JUNE, 1949
Page 9 a
to
ARCHITECT'S  MODEL OF RESIDENCES
bo
n
O
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o
2
o
:.^*,w >,-%'»
rj ■:•<.*■.-rn ^Womzn ± cy\z±idzncE± at   Lis JD. C.
uu Jt>tnLna or 50
At long last a residence for women is on the way
to becoming a reality with the Government's allocation of $650,000 for this purpose in the recent appropriation.
If all goes well, residence accommodation for
200 women should be ready for the opening of college in September, 1950. This is planned in four
dormitory units housing fifty students each, which
will be placed to the east of the present Fort Camp
site. As money is available more of the units can be
erected. Plans are already under way for a social
centre which will provide dining facilities for some
250 students now, and can be expanded to care for
500 students in the future when more dormitory
units have been constructed.
The location chosen offers the practical advantages of being reasonably close to the library for
evening study or the Brock for evening functions,
as well as being within a convenient distance of the
bus service to town. Above all it offers a magnificent
view of mountains and sea which it is hoped to preserve for each residence unit by careful spacing of
the chosen site.
LOVELY ROOMS
The residence is planned largely with double
rooms but enough single rooms are included to give
some latitude in distribution. It is hoped that this
arrangement may combine some of the advantages
of the single room with the economy of the double
room type of residence. An examination of the design for a double room unit will reveal the excellent
planning which permits each girl the exclusive use
of her half of the room. Other features which may
be noted are the wide window ledges from which the
desk is developed. Placing the desk by the window
assures the student of good illumination while
studying. The beds are designed to be used as
couches by day and are also well placed to permit
a student to recline while reading by a good light.
A slight barrier running down the middle of the
desk in the double rooms is intended to shield the
girl on one side from the desk light of her room
mate in case one occupant wishes to study late and
the other prefers to retire early. Electric outlets are
also provided at both ends of the bed so that a
students will get good light whichever way she
prefers to recline. Bookcases will be built in at the
end of the desk and also above the bed on the wall
of the clothes cupboard.
Beside the entrance door in each unit a reception
room will look after visitors who are calling for the
residents and a second reception room close by can
be used for a few guests. Either of these two rooms
can be used when one or two girls are entertaining
Mrs. SHERWOOD LETT
men friends or to receive friends or members of
their families who happen to be in town. A sitting
room is available for larger groups, and all the social
facilities could be used if all the girls wish to entertain together.
In each residence there is a suite consisting of a
bedroom and sitting room with a bathroom and
small kitchenette, intended for a resident counsellor.
This suite can be occupied by two graduate students
who would, in such case, share the responsibility of
acting as adviser to the residents.
Trunk rooms in the basement will take care of
the heavier baggage of the occupants and each basement will also have a linen room for the storing and
distribution of bedroom linen.
PROSPECTS AND LIMITATIONS
A beginning is to be made with the present
allocation. What is needed is a plan which can
be expanded to meet the University needs when and
as further funds become available. The unit plan
now contemplated meets these requirements.
The limited accommodation provided by these
initial units must be reserved for students who come
to the campus for the first time. It is hoped that
other students may be accommodated later as the
plan develops.   At the moment it will be at least
JUNE, 1949
Page 11 DEAN DOROTHY MAWDSLEY . . .
something to assure each out-of-town woman student of residence in the university dormitories during her first year on the campus while she is getting
used to university life and adjusting herself to her
new  surroundings.
Out of Town Women Students Boarding in 1948-49
First Year   123
Second Year   144
Third Year   130
Fourth Year  154
Fifth Year  8
Others (Teacher Training, Social
Work, Graduates, etc.)   104
Total     663
Students on the campus for the first time include
not only first year students, but also students who
have taken Senior Matriculation and come to the
campus as sophomores. Besides these two large
groups, students who come from Victoria ordinarily take two years at Victoria College before entering the University of British Columbia in third year.
It is evident therefore, that the accommodation now
Page 12
MRS. FRANK ROSS . . .
planned for 200 students will do no more than house
the students who are new to the campus; if, indeed
it can care for all of these.
"THE RESIDENCE YEAR"
For the year during which the first units are
under construction we are using the term, "The
Residence  Year."
Already women throughout the province have
shown their interest in the need for residences on
our campus. In the past two years members of ten
women's organizations have approached the Board
of Governors and the Provincial Cabinet to urge
the need for a grant to provide residences for women. These groups include: Business and Provincial
Women's Clubs, P.E.O. Chapters, Women's Canadian Clubs, I.O.D.E. Chapters, P.T.A. Branches,
Local Councils of Women, Soroptimist Clubs, Venture Clubs, Women's Institutes and University-
Women's Clubs. The University Women's Club of
Vancouver organized a delegation that met in November to discuss consideration of a grant with the
Provincial Cabinet. Their representative group included delegates from Victoria, Vanconver, Chilliwack, the Okanagan and the Kootenays as well as
two representative undergraduates from the campus.
Their convener was EVELYN STORY LETT '17.
WOMEN'S CLUBS
Now an ALUMNAE COMMITTEE ON WOMEN'S RESIDENCES is carrying on the work of
promoting further interest in the residence program. It is approaching women's clubs in Vancouver to ask for gifts to the residences during the
"Residence Year." Approximately $250 will furnish
a single room, approximately $500 a double room,
approximately $2,000 a lounge; $2,250 will build a
room for one student, $110,000 will provide an added
housing unit which would accommodate fifty more
girls!
Branches will be approached for their assistance
too. The beginning of an organized residence program is an important landmark in University history and should be recognized as such by alumni
Continued on page 34
THE U.B.C. ALUMNI CHRONICLE MARY FALLIS
NANCY DAVIDSON
HELEN  LINDSAY
PAN HELLENIC SUPPORTS RESIDENCES
To the Vancouver Alumnae Panhellenic goes the
credit for arranging the first function to raise money
for a donation to the Women's Residences. At two
week intervals a series of lectures on Modern Art
was given at'the Vancouver Art Gallery this spring.
Lecturers were: Barnett Savery on "Appraising the
Art Isms," Mr. Geoffrey Andrew on "Modern
Thought in Art," and Mr. Hunter Lewis on "Why
Abstract?"
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JUNE, 1949
Page 13 DR. A. F. B. CLARK
After more than thirty years as a professor of
French with the Modern Languages Department,
Dr. Bruce Clark is retiring and is going to live in
JZZ t      T x? WBS b°rn- He received his education at Toronto, Harvard and Paris universities, and
sorTn 1°9?0 m     18-  HC WaS madC a ful1 Profes"
He is a most gifted and scholarly linguist   and
hough his speciality is French, he can pick up any
language that takes his fancy.   For example, when
he felt a desire to learn Russian, about which he
knew nothing, he was able in a few weeks to read
sneeT'H  ^ "'^ ? ^^ at a conversational
"; ^e has Sone ahead with his Russian studies
of "tL r  momentis engaged UP°n a translation
poet GyPsies>    ^ Pushkin, the great Russian
Perhaps his best work has been on Racine, for
which he has received honour in France itself
where one does not trifle with Racine any more
than we trifle with Shakespeare. He was made an
Officer of the French Academy.
Like all good professors of the humanities, Dr
Uark has very wide interests.   He is especially in-
•?u *l \nr mUS1C and Painting> and is connected
with the Vancouver Art Gallery and the Svmphony
Society. Those who were lucky enough to hear
something of his magnificent collection of records
will long remember his catholic and delightful appreciation of music. V
On many occasions his gifted wife, Jessie Clark
assisted his department at U.B.C, and she too will
be sadly missed both at the University and in Vancouver generally.
Page 14
RETIRE
• DR. A. F. B. CLARK
• DR. M.Y.WILLIAMS
DR. M. Y. WILLIAMS
MRS. JOHN
In June, Dr. Merlon
Yarwood    Williams
will resign as Head
of the Geology Department, a post he
has   held   since   the
death of Dean Brock,
its founder, in 1935.
He  was  one  of the
original   four   members  of  his  department, a school that
at    one    time    was
turning    out     more
geologists than any
other   undegraduate
school   in   America,
and   first-rate   geologists  at that,  men
who have made a _»„„„„__ jimMMMMM. ,tmimmmm
reputation for U.B.C. all over the world. Yfhe'S'
Head of the Department, Dr. Gunning, is one of
those students.)
As a palaeontologist he is naturallv learned in
biology, for without that science the fossil flora and
fauna could not be studied, but his interest in biology extends far beyond its geological application
especially m the matter of birds. He is a most enthusiastic and informed ornithologist, and has
studied birds (and their parasites as well) for many
years. He has the true scientific curiosity, both inside and outside his chosen field.
,;vBy™ means a caricature or stage professor,
M.Y still manages to embrace many of the qualities
ot the traditional professor of the better fiction
drawn from life but rare in life. Not least of these
qualities is his notably gentle manner, which may
be the result of his Quaker upbringing. Whatever
its cause, it is a most memorable thing. Universities will probably be the last refuge of individualism, but even there it diminishes, and with it the
memorable professors. Which is a great pity for
several reasons that are obvious to one generation
if not to the next.
DEAN F. M. CLEMENT
F. M. Clement, B.S.A., M.A., Dean of the Faculty of Agriculture and Head of the Department of
Agricultural Economics, is retiring at the conclusion of his thirtieth year in the position of Dean and
at the end of his 33rd year as a member of the
teaching staff of the University.
THE U.B.C. AtUMNI CHRONICLE MENTS
DEAN F. M. CLEMENT
DR. 0. J. TODD
CREIGHTON
Dean Clement graduated from Ontario
Agruciultural College, Guelph, with a
B.S.A. degree in 1911
and got his M.A.
from the University
of Wisconsin in 1922
During the interva
he had been a representative of the Ontario Department of
Agriculture, a lecturer at Macdonald
College, Montreal.
and a director of the
Vineland Experimental Station, of
British Columbia as
a Professor of Horticulture in 1916 and
was appointed Dean of the Faculty of Agriculture
in 1919 when the former Dean, Dr. Klinck, became
In addition to being well and favorably known
as an agricultural economist, Dean Clement during
his period of service at the University has by his
wide contacts and thorough knowledge of the Province made himself familiar with the practical problems of farming in every corner of British Columbia.
The Senate of the University decided, in recognition of the great value of Dean Clement's services
to the University, to confer on him at the Spring
Congregation the degree of Doctor of Science honoris causa, and the Dean further accepted the invitation to be the Congregation speaker.
DR. 0. J. TODD
Another U.B.C. pioneer to retire is Dr.
Otis J. Todd, A.B.,
Ph.D. -(Harvard),
F.R.C.S., Professor
and Head of the Department of Classics.
Dr. Todd concludes
this year thirty years
of service on the
teaching staff of the
University, having
joined the staff as
Assistant Professor
of Classics in 1918.
Dr. Todd was born
in Garland, Pennsylvania, and received
his A.B. degree sum-
ma    cum    laude    in
JUNE, 1949
I
Classics from Harvard in 1906 and his Ph.D. from
the same University in 1914.
Dr. Todd is a member of Phi Beta Kappa, the
American Philological Association and the Classical Association of the Pacific States, of the Northern
Section of which he was President in 1939-40. He
was elected a Fellow of the Royal Society of Canada in 1942. Dr. Todd is well known for a variety
of publications on classical subjects and his humane
scholarship has made its influence widely felt among
thirty years of U.B.C. graduates. He is one of that
distinguished number of scholars who made British
Columbia their home and were responsible for the
building of a great University in their lifetime. Dr.
Todd is also well known in athletic circles and is
president of the Dominion Soccer Association.
MRS. JOHN CREIGHTON
One of the Alumni Association's outstanding
members and representative on the University Senate is retiring from the U.B.C. this Spring after 25
years of lecturing.
The erudite, fluent, and persuasive Mrs. John
(Sallee) Creighton, who has managed to combine
careers of wife, mother, lecturer, and playwright,
plans to devote more of her time in future to the
radio field, where she has already had notable success.
A (B.A.) of U.B.C. as well as an (M.A.) of the
University of Toronto, Sallee Creighton's comment
on her resignation was typical. She said, "Any woman fortunate enough to have both worlds is very
lucky, and although I shall miss my students, I am
considerably more happy than sorry. My housework, of course, goes on forever."
Page 15 PERSONALITIES
BEVERLY ROBERTS
CAMPUS CAPERS
The Graduate Chronicle's cover girl on the
Christmas Issue for 1947 is back in the headlines,
this time as recipient of Mademoiselle Magazine's
coveted Guest Editor award. . . .
Thousands of American and Canadian Undergraduates try for this award every year, but only
twenty are chosen, and this year Beverly is the only
Canadian in the winning twenty.
Beverly will spend a month in New York attending the Fall Fashion openings in June, meeting celebrities of stage, screen and the publishing world at
cocktail parties, and will go on conducted tours of
the newspaper and advertising world in New York.
The main event in the month's tour will be the
getting out of the College Edition of Mademoiselle
Magazine with the help of a few of the regular
staffers. . . .
Beverly is the daughter of U.B.C. Alumni Mr.
and Mrs. Aubrey Roberts (Zella Smith '23).
U.B.C. is rapidly becoming the Capistrano of the
North. This spring, as they have for the past five
years, several hundred swallows arrived at the
campus to nest in their usual place around the walls
of the library and in the Virginia creeper covering
the auditorium, arts, applied science and aggie
buildings. . . . This year Prof. Ian McTaggart
Cowan, wild life expert in the zoology dept., had the
Page 16
welcome mat out early, but the swallows were one
day late.' "They come from Costa Rica and Central
America," the professor said, "they all had southern
accents."
APPOINTMENTS:
Taking over from the famous city analyst Inspector J. F. C. B. Vance at Police Headquarters is
U.B.C. grad Edwin J. Fennell ... he graduated in
Aggie in 1938 and got his M.S.A. in 1947 and has
served with the Dominion government and in the
dept. of agronomy at U.B.C. ,.
President of the newly-formed Western Whaling
Corporation is John M. Buchanan, vice-president of
the U.B.C. Alumni Association. . . . Mr. Buchanan
is president of B.C. Packers, which took over the
whaling company from Gibson Brothers.
Heading for the Yukon is Rev. N. E. Tannar,
U.B.C. theologian, who has been appointed to the
mission at Selkirk, Yukon Territories.
Away down south. Dr. William C. Gibson took
an important post as lecturer in neurology at the
University of California at Berkley. . . . Dr. Gibson
hus just returned from a year at the University of
Sydney, Australia.
WHERE ARE THE NOW DEPT
Prof. J. Friend Day, head of the U.B.C. Commerce Dept. before the war, turned up recently as
the Progressive Conservative candidate for Vancouver East. . . .
Arthur Edwin Covington, 35-year-old U.B.C.
Physicist, is spending his time bossing a project for
the National Research Council entirely devoted to
listening to the sun . . . research in another aspect
of radar is the reason and Covington says his projects efforts so far have indicated a relationship between noises picked up by radio and sun spots. He
blames them for some fade outs on the average
radio. ...
Another Thunderbird playing around with celestial bodies is Dr. Joseph Pearce, director of the
Dominion Observatory in Victoria. . . . Dr. Pearce
recently discovered a new star with a volume 1000
times the size of the sun and will be named appropriately "UBC."
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THE U.B.C. ALUMNI CHRONICLE
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• '■■ 'K ■■ ■ Three Varsity
grads are being sent
all over the world by
the Canadian government to improve this
country's relations
with other lands. . . .
Bob Smith, 30, brilliant student and
rugby player in his
time at U.B.C. was
sent to Newfoundland recently to help
that country prepare
for Confederation.
Bob went as commercial secretary to
the High Commissioner. A navy veteran, he was acting
trade commissioner
in Egypt before his B0B SMITH
recent appointment. . . . Vice-Consul in Mexico is
ex-pubster and hockey star Orme Dier who will be
joined shortly by Frank Clark, recent law graduate,
who has completed 10 months training in Ottawa
and after a two and a half month tour of Canada
will proceed to Mexico as Assistant Trade Commissioner.
Doing well in the United States was U.B.C.
graduate of earlier years, Prof. Lionel Laing, who
recently was appointed head of the centralized advisory system for literary college upperclassmen at
the Universty of Michigan. . . . Laing ten years ago
collaborated with President Norman MacKenzie in
bringing out a case book of International Law
called "Canada and the Law of Nations." Prof.
Laing taught political science at William and Mary
before coming to Michigan in 1942.
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The annual get-together of Alumni Association executives and the President, Deans of Faculties and other
ranking numbers of the University Administration took place at a luncheon this year, in April, in the U.B.C.
Faculty Club. The occasion was marked by the presentation of an award to Alumnus A. 31. (Monty) F other-
ingham who was the lOOQth donor in the Alumni-U.B.C   Development Fund's Inaugural Year.
Looking successful is one of
the secrets of being successful.
Fortune smiles most readily
on the man who knows his worth,
and looks the part.
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Page 18
THE U.B.C. ALUMM CHRONICLE ^hzaklna czditoxiaiLu
DOMESTIC SERVICE OR HOUSEHOLD
SERVICES
It is an accepted fact that the division of labour
in contemporary society is becoming intensified.
Everyone is a specialist of one sort or another and
the general attitude seems to cloak the particular
expert with an aura of awesome respect. Never-
thless, our folklore is at the same time channelized,
and it is only in those fields of economic activity
already clothed with bourgeois respectability that
the specialist is honoured with the additional increment of esteem.
Then there is another cross-current flowing from
our feudal forefathers which brands service of any
kind the essence of meniality. A third element,
which cuts another groove across the mountain of
our folklore, is the belief that certain work "just
isn't" to be paid for and those who accept remuneration immediately lose status.
DOMESTIC DILEMMA
Put these three things together and you have
the dilemma of domestic labour, and it is labour,
despite the improvements of the machine age, just
as the drill-press operator is in the same category
as his grandsire, the blacksmith, a working man.
The dilemma is in threefold inconsistency. First,
the housewifely art is esteemed beyond all others,
but the woman who renders domestic service in the
home of another is at once removed from the realm
of the select; and this, despite the fact that cousin
Clara, the stenographer, still enjoys a high rating
in the social hierarchy. The second inconsistency is
in the fact that the home is hailed as the very foundation stone of our way of life, yet persons whose
ability and aptitude make them indispensible in a
well-integrated and efficiently managed household
are relegated to ignominy if they are classified as
domestic help. Thirdly, it is readily admitted that
the task of housekeeping is indeed a combination of
a number of specialized skills, including no small
measure of creative executive ability, but at the
same time the field is belittled as being mere routine drudgery.
CURBSTONE PHILOSOPHER
The curbstone philosopher with an historical
bent has harried most of us with the forebodings
that face the family institution in Western Society.
He draws the parallel to be found in Roman history
and is ready with statistics of divorce, delinquency
and desertion to indicate a conclusive forecast of
disintegration. Perhaps there is something in what
he says; some of the experts, to be sure, are in complete agreement. But notwithstanding the parellel
that so-called history teaches, there is a problem
that confronts us in the realistic facts of the present
day.
More than ninety percent of the female population look forward to marriage, a home, and a family,
and when that time comes, Bobby Bridegroom has
to break in a brand new housekeeper — (his dad
probably broke in the last one). At the same time
our universities are turning out female graduates in
JUNE, 1949
ORMONDE
HALL
an ever-increasing stream, and all of them are looking for some glamorous occupation or at least some
form of employment to which no stigma is attached.
Assuming that they have emerged from college
with no specialized training except an ability to
think, there are two kinds of work in which these
ladies will find themselves—interesting jobs or uninteresting ones. Many who look forward to eventual marriage, desire to pursue a career in the commercial sphere; many others consider such a period
as nothing but a purgatorial interval. These latter
are the homemakers, the girls whose creative talents
lean toward the domestic setting, but they must
await the happening of that fortuitous turn of events
which substitutes "Mrs." for "Miss" and gives the
particular woman her own dishes to wash. To go
out and attend to the domestic organization of some
other household for remuneration would be tantamount to rendering the young lady ineligible for
any desirable proposals of marriage. While Sallv
scrubs in the scullery, Sir Galahad rides by unheeding and unheeded.
This is, surely, a most ludicrous state of affairs.
Nursing was once a lowly and servile calling, but
is now recognized as one of the honourable callings
of womankind. It is submitted that could not the
same be done in the realm of domestic service.
which, after all, can be more accurately described as
specialized household services?
N  THE' CONTINENTAL ATMOSPHERE
OF THE
i/eJ3o6e
eme
I     GRANVILLE    STREET
(LYRIC THEATRE BUILDING)
RESERVATIONS
TA.I988
Page 19 SHADBOLT'S EASTERN SHOW WELL RECEIVED
Reprinted by permission, from "Saturday Night"
By PAUL DUVAL
Any great art produced in British Columbia has
had to find its path into the Canadian consciousness
the hard way. The noble carvings of thee West
Coast Indians were only recognized in the country
of their birth after many of the best examples were
housed abroad, where they were hailed among the
finest of primitive works of art the world has known.
The late Emily Carr, whose name is now spoken
with respect and honor, found recognition only in
the last few years of her long and memorable life.
Now, another original painter has matured in the
West. His name is Jack Shadbolt.
Thirty-nine year old Jack Shadbolt recently held
his first one-man show in Eastern Canada, at the
Laing Fine Arts Galleries in Toronto. It will be interesting to see how this significant artist's work
was received by the public. Of course, one cannot
reasonably expect any profoundly personal art expression to be greeted with immediate popularity.
Immediate popularity is something the creative artist must often forfeit in return for the satisfaction
which he derives through the pursuit of his inner
creative compulsion. Nevertheless, it is the duty
and privilege of a critic to help such artsits to receive a fair public hearing. While new art accents
are rarely easy to comprehend at once, some know-
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Page 20
ledge of the artist's background and aims can help to
shorten the distance between the initial shock and
eventual appreciation.
The facts behind Jack Shadbolt's career are not
too unlike that of many other Canadian artists.
Shadbolt was born in England in 1909, but came to
Canada as a child and was educated at Victoria and
Vancouver. He attended the University of British
Columbia, and was active in his early youth in western "Little Theatre" groups. He taught at public
and high schools for ten years as an art instructor
and later joined the staff of the Vancouver Art
School where he has been teaching for the past ten
years.
Jack Shadbolt's background as a painter includes
studying in London under Victor Pasmore and
William Coldstream, and in Paris, under that remarkable teacher, Andre 'Lhote. During World War
II he was for a time acting administration officer
for Canadian Army War Artists in London.
It is in his most recent creative work, that this
British Columbia artist may puzzle the public. Having established a respectable background of rather
academic work, he has moved on to increasingly
personal and abstract forms of visual expression.
Attempting to condense his experience and ideas
into universal symbols, he has created a world of
evocative — and provocative — "images."
"What concerns me now," declares Shadbolt, "is
to find contemporary images which will express in
condensed form the fundamental attitudes emerging
from our complex of fears, angers, frustrations, our
hopes and conception of human dignity." This concern with original "images" has been preceded by a
gradual development from more literal renderings
of nature.
The watercolors "Pink House," of 1940, and the
"Don Quixote," of 1948, provide a revealing contrast. The early "Pink House" is a gentle, bucolic
comment almost fairy-tale like in color; the "Don
Quixote" is almost monochrome and as starkly linear in design as a spider.
In watercolors, the year 1945 was particularly
fruitful. Painted on wet paper and reinforced by pen
line, such landscapes as "Fishing Cove on a Rainy
Day," "British Columbia Beach" and "Boats at Low
Tide" are worth noting. Nineteen forty-six saw
Shadbolt's work overseas completed and the painting, at home, of the first of his "images." It is thus a
year of considerable diversity in painting. The gay,
fiesta-like "Along the Mall—V. J. Day" done in
England offers a foil to the brooding "Boats in the
Dusk" and the very different "Dog in the Ruins."
Allegorical Comments
During the past two years Shadbolt's water-
colors have been mainly devoted to his allegorical
comments on contemporary life. Such are the 1947
sketches for "The Dogs" and the striking sketch
for the "Yellow Dogs." The 1948 studies are divided
human beings, and tinted drawings of bird-life, some
between papers depicting confused and emaciated
Continued on page 37
THE U.B.C. ALUMNI CHRONICLE
A
^aittta&aUdttUlta
at. *A,"j&ar„j..,
' Y ifB'f f"'^"^*"^"*^"^^"*--' One of Jack Shadbolt's most interesting works is this watercolour called "Seafront." It is part of
the personal collection of his close friend and admirer Professor Hunter Lewis and has been shown at many
exhibitions all over Canada. It is a composite of Brooklyn Bridge, waterfront buildings and expresses the
gigantism of New York—of the upsurge of a big city. The gulls are suggestive of the mechanism of the city
and of the modern aeroplane.
JUNE, 1949
Page 21 WHO UM--EST?
Wally Crimble, eminent graduate and not the
least of our successful manufacturers of men's fawn
slacks, has recently come up with another of his
live-wire suggestions. According to Wally, membership in the Alumni Association is too exclusive.
"Are we living in a progressive democracy or are we
not?" asks Wally in a letter to the Editor. "I'd like
to see the Association really mean something, but
it won't mean something to anybody until it means
something to everybody." What provoked this outburst from our Wally was "a cheap wisecrack from
one Mabel P. Gittersley, a local journalistic mediocrity and author of 'I Married An Elk.' Mabel had
the bad taste to say that the Association is getting
about as exclusive as the C.P.R. station. To the pigs
with this dirty snob," says Wally in no uncertain
terms. "The C.P.R. station is too exclusive anyways ; you've got to buy a ticket to have a legal
right to fool around there, and buy it from a mighty
big company at that. Besides, what has an alumnus
to do with trains? I don't see what Mabel is after.
I don't get her Philosophy of Life."
GROUNDS OF ADMISSION
We asked Wally on what grounds he would
admit a man (or woman or innocent child) to membership ,and he said laughingly "On no grounds
except the grounds of our fair campus. Now take
the present rules. I understand that nobody is admitted unless he has completed fifteen units at
U.B.C. or Victoria College. What kind of rule is
that? To begin with, I don't even know how to
complete a unit myself. Completing a unit must be
just a knack ... if indeed it has to be done at all,
for many a unit is complete to start with and hence
the name. In fact, I'd say that nearly all units are
complete, except possibly units of sawdust from the
less conscientious firms. Anyhow, if you're going to
admit a guy because he has a knack of completing
units, you might as well admit him for a knack of
making models of the City Hall entirely out of
toothpicks and glue. And again, why call fifteen
units the sacred number? Why not fourteen or
sixteen? And is the man who flunks Chemistry I
less worthy than the man who passes English I?
You have no basis of comparison. You might as
well send a man to heaven for eating one unit of
mackerel and another man to hell for eating one unit
of haddock. No, I guess I mean the second failed to
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eat his haddock . . . anyway, the whole thing is arbitrary, and I abdominate arbitrariness.
"And here's a new angle. I have been digging in
the dictionary and I discover that an alumnus is a
nurseling. Now, if a man has sucked only ten units
from Alma Mater, is he not even more of a nurseling than the man who has been weaned after the
full sixty-unit feeding?  Sounds reasonable.
"If I had control of your rules, I'd admit anyone
who had any connection with U.B.C. in any way.
If a fireman had been playing checkers on the
campus for twenty years, isn't his connection with
U.B.C. more intimate than yours? O.K., admitto te.
I mean, admitto he. Similarly with a fireman who
has played only fifteen units of checkers, or ten.
And thus with bus-drivers, cops, gardeners, and the
like. What do you want, a class war? That's where
you're heading. And I don't mean the Class of '20
against the Class of '50, either. As for janitors . . .
why, there must be many a janitor who knows more
about some of the professors and students than the
President himself does, and in an all-round way, too,
believe me. Yet can this humble servant of knowledge join our jocund company? Not he. All because of snobbery, and fascism.
TOURISTS?
"Then again, what about the folks who drive
out to U.B.C. every Sunday? Can they join? Not a
chance. And tourists, who drive out loyally on maybe two or three consecutive days . . . isn't that better
than driving out once as. a formality? But do we
reward them by taking three bucks' subscription
off them? We do not. No, in our phlegmatic Canadian way which is so repugnant to the impetuous
tourist, we ignore them. And how about the audiences that have paid to get into every Spring Play
since 1918 or so? They've grown old 2nd haggard,
with creeping paralysis of their reserved seats, in
the service of the drama . . . they've sat through
everything from "Rollo's Wild Oat" (so help me)
to God knows what ... if they haven't seen King
Lear played by a boy soprano, they've seen everything else. Yet we don't meet these old retainers
halfway. Continued on page 34
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Page 22
THE U.B.C. ALUMNI CHRONICLE ALUMNI
POETRY
RETURN TO CANADA
Newfoundland, a low-lying bare cliff .wreathed in
mist,
Had passed the day before,
Fishing boats cresting the grey sea,
Slim, picturesque sails bobbing in the ship's wash.
Then the beautiful shores of the Gaspe—
A sunny day as the ship throbbed smoothly
Through a blue, sun-sparked sea
Cutting a curling white wake behind.
I looked at that shoreline long and happily;
The starkness of it—rocky cliffs, dark green firs,
And above a stream of white frothy clouds
In the quiet blueness of the sky
Framed it as a perfect picture,
And brought a softness to the bold land beneath.
The right bank of the Gulf drew near;
Rock and trees, patches of light green maple and
cottonwoods
Among the dark fir were laced here and there
By white falls of water spilling over to the sea.
The pungent scent of pine and cedar wafted across
the Gulf;
Tiny villages, the silver spires of churches,
Clung below, and suddenly,
Like an echo from a past age of happiness and glory
Striking a deep cord of memory,
The hollow, wailing, eerie sound
Of a train whistle cut across the water.
Canada! I thrilled to see her.
No land has ever looked as this
And many I have seen these past two years,
But here is my own, my native land!
P. A. M. Mitchell,
London School of Economics
Congratulations
to
Graduates '49
Wishing you all success in
your future endeavors.
C.  ^rndi
erdon
"Fine Furs Are a Quality Investment!'
653 HOWE STREET
PACIFIC DOOR
appears in this issue by kind permission of the Author
and The Ryerson Press from THE STRAIT OF ANIAN AND
OTHER POEMS.
By  EARLE  BIRNEY
Through or over the deathless feud
of the cobra sea and the mongoose wind
you must fare to reach us.
Through hiss and throttle come,
by a limbo of motion humbled,
under cliffs of cloud
and over the shark's blue home.
Across the undulations of this slate
long pain and sweating courage chalked
such names as glitter yet.
Drake's crewmen scribbled here their paradise
and dying Bering, lost in fog,
turned north to mark us off from Asia still.
Here cool Cook traced in sudden blood his final bay
and scurvied traders trailed the wakes of yesterday
until the otter rocks were bare
and all the tribal feathers plucked.
Here Spaniards and Vancouver's boatmen scrawled
the problem that is ours and yours,
That there is no clear Strait of Anian
to lead us easy back to Europe,
that men are isled in ocean or in ice
and  only joined by  long  endeavour  to  be  joined
Come then on the waves of desire that well forever
and think no more than you must
of the simple unhuman truth of this emptiness,
that down deep below the lowest pulsing of primal
cell
tar-dark and still
lie the bleak and forever capacious tombs of the sea.
RIPENESS IS ALL
There was a wet nurse of the west
Far wetter than all of the rest.
She could feed every kid
In the town, and she did.
She had a Community Chest.
—D. H. B.
ALBERTA MEAT CO.
"Puritan   Products"
Arthur  Fouks,   4T
R.R. 1,   Eburne
FR.   1126
JUNE, 1949
Page 23 NEWS
ITEMS
PROF. BUCK HONOURED
BY U?B.C. STUDENTS
It was a proud day for Prof. Frank E. Buck on
April 6 when students and citizens joined in a noon-
hour ceremony in front of the University Library to
dedicate a fountain for the more than 28 years of
service he has given to the institution as a lecturer
and landscape architect.
Prof. Buck retired officially in 1943, and has continued to work ever since as an Honorary Prof, of
Horticulture and Supervisor of Campus Development.
Thanks in large part to Prof. Buck's efforts the
U.B.C. landscape has been developed over a period
of years until it is recognized as one of the most
beautiful in the world.
A Charter member of the Town Planning Institute of Canada, a Commissioner since 1929 of the
Vancouver Town Planning Commission, and a
score of other positions of responsibility that have
earned him the respect and friendship of many individuals and groups throughout the country.
Students in the Faculty of Agriculture collected
over $1,000 for the construction of the fountain in
front of the University Library.
GAULT BROS. LTD. GIVES
$25,000 SCHOLARSHIP
The largest scholarship yet to come to the Commerce Dept. of the University has just been given
by the well-known firm of Gault Bros. Ltd., Wholesale Drygoods and Clothing manufacturers in British Columbia, which has chosen this method of
commemorating its 50th year of business in this
Province.
This gift follows in the Gault Bros, tradition established when Andrew F. Gault, who established
the business in Montreal in 1853, made substantial
donations to Old McGill College around the turn of
the century.
A fund of $25,000 has now been established by
Gault Bros. Ltd. to be awarded over a ten-year period.
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Page 24
MAYSE SELLS SERIAL
TO POST FOR $15,000
Arthur Mayse, 36-
year-old   U.   B.   C
graduate and formti
Vancouver   news-
paperman has hit the
journalistic    jackpot
by  selling  a  75,000
word serial to Satu~
day   Evening   Po
A regular contribul   ■
to that magazine, 1 i
stories with a norlh
west flavor have en
tertained Post rea I
ers for several yeai
His story will briiu
him $15,000 and i-
reported to be tin
highest figure ee\ < i *j
paid to a Canadi m
for a magazine story.
The story is entitled "Perilous Passage" and is a
romantic,.seven-instalment piece dealing with smuggling on the West Coast. It will also be published
as a book.
Arthur Mayse won several prizes for poetry
while at U.B.C. and after a journalistic career in
Vancouver went to McLean's magazine as fiction
editor.
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THE U.B.C. ALUMNI CHRONICLE
u^ya^M
f ,   {k»J*-Mi,£i;.-;- .   ..^.'-,- u,i»:l
Mm tfWi'i
1 DR. WEAVER OF MINESOTA TO HEAD U. B. C's MEDICAL SCHOOL
Dean of the Uni-
versity of B. C.'sj
long-awaited medical 1
school is to be Dr.j
Myron M. Weaver,!
now assistant Dean]
of medical sciences all
the University ofl
Minnesota, who willl
take up his duties!
here in July.
Dr. Weaver is 47'f
years of age and has
top qualifications as
a   medical   educator
and administrator.
Commenting     o n
the   new    appointment, President
MacKenzie     said:
"Members     of     the
Faculty   and   representatives     of     the|
medical    profession.!
with whom we consulted and who had!
an    opportunity    to!
meet Dr. Weaver on
his recent visit to the
University to advise on the establishment of a Medical Faculty, share the Board's satisfaction at obtaining the services of one so fully qualified by experience and achievment as Dr. Weaver to fill this important position in the higher educational programme of the Province."
"We are partciularly fortunate in that Dr. Weaver's experience has given him a wide insight into
medical education in both Canada and the United
States, which will be of great assistance in the considerable task which he has agreed to undertake."
Born in Detroit, Michigan, he received his A.B.
degree from Wheaton College in 1924, proceeded to
the University of Chicago where he received his
M.S. degree in Physiology in 1926, his Ph.D. in
Physiology in 1929 and his M.D. degree from the
same institution in 1932. His internship was served
at Chicago's Presbyterian Hospital. • From 1932-34
he was associate professor of Health and Physical
Education at Carleton College, Northfield, Minne-
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sota. Following this, until 1941, he was Director of
Research Relations for Eli Lilly and Company of
Indianapolis, in which position he was responsible
for supervising and directing the considerable programme of research in medical sciences carried on
by that company. He joined the staff of the Minnesota Medical School in 1942. In 1944 he was appointed Assistant Dean and subsequently has taken on
additional duties as attending, and later Senior attending physician, University Hospitals. University
of Minnesota.
He is an associate of the American College of
Physicians and a diplomat of the American Board
of Internal Medicine, and a member of several other
scientific bodies. His clinical interests lie in the
fields of diabetes and nutrition, and his non-clinical
speciality is Medical Economics.
Dr. Weaver is married to the former Edna Mc-
Millen, a graduate of Wheaton College. They have
two children, a son, Myron McMillen, aged 21, now
studying at the University of Minnesota, and a
daughter. Margaret Ann, eleven.
Dr. Weaver will come to British Columbia at the
conclusion of the present session in Minnesota and
will begin on July 1st to make arrangements, in conjunction with the Board of Governors, for staffing
and establishing a Medical School at the University
of British Columbia. It is not anticipated that staff
and facilities can be assembled in time to open a
Medical Faculty in the Fall of 1949, but in view of
the fact that there are already a great number of
students at the University of British Columbia who
are pursuing pre-medical studies, ever}' effort will
be made to define admission requirements and proceed with the selection of a class for admission to the
first year of the medical course in the Fall of 1950.
Country
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Page 25 CERTIFICATED
By D.  HAMILTON  BAUSON
According to the press, a lecturer in theology
was recently removed from his job in a great Canadian university. He was discharged on the following grounds:
1. He was not qualified to teach divinity at all,
being totally untrained.
2. He was insane.
Neither of these discoveries was made until he
had been instructing the young for something like a
whole year. It might at first be thought that only in
the somewhat confused and passionate field of religion could an untrained and unbalanced lecturer
discourse without yielding some clue to his disabilities. But this, alas, is not entirely true. Would
that it were. Would that we could be sure our children at U.B.C. were not being lured down the paths
of unreason by maniacs parading in stolen gowns
and hoods. Who knows if the entire faculty is in full
possession of its faculties? No man has yet settled
the question of whether a teacher goes mad from
teaching or teaches because he is mad, but it is well
known that the profession is crammed with the unhinged. Many professors have retired so far into
their dream-world that they no longer know what a
university is. Just ask any two, and stand clear.
Looking back at our youth, it is disturbing to
realize that our own degrees may have been handed
to us by professors who were (to put it kindly)
ever so slightly off their learned chumps, and with
just a tinge of unfitness. Does this invalidate our
degrees, morally if not legally? It is, as another divine has remarked about something else, One
Sweetly Solemn Thought.
(Continued on Page 37)
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Page 26
THE U.B.C. ALUMNI CHRONICLE GRADUATION CLASS OF '49 JOINS ALUMNI ASSOCIATION 'EN MASSE
STUDENTS   RECEIVE      DEGREES
University of B.C.'s 34th Annual Congregation
Exercises held on two days this year, May 12 and
13, saw 1,766 graduating students receive their degrees.
Congregation   speaker   was   Agriculture   Dean
F. M. Clement, who has been with U.B.C. 32 of
those years. The greatly respected Dean was retiring and leaving the University along with the graduates and in apreciation of his services to U.B.C.
over the years the University conferred on him the
Honorary Degree of Doctor of Laws.
Three others, Professor Basil Matthews, lecturer of the Union Theological College, Dr. W. H.
Brittain, Dean of Faculty of Agriculture, Macdonald College, McGill University, and Mr. J. G.
McTaggart, Deputy Minister of Agriculture, Ottawa, also received LL. D's.
This year's graduating class in line with recent
years policy of making a contribution to the Alumni
Association, greatly stepped up the grant and approximately $1,500 was sent to the Alumni Association which will provide a blanket fees coverage to
all graduating people for the year 1949-50. All
members of the graduating class will receive full
benefits of Alumni membership and will receive
copies of the Alumni Chronicle.
CLEMENT SPEAKER
Dean Clement, first day Congregation speaker,
stressed the importance of graduates retaining their
close ties with the University and of being ever
vigilant in maintaining the institutions at U.B.C.
vital to freedom.
He said:
"Guard well the right to student self-government.
"Guard the right to investigate, to study, to talk,
to criticise.
"Guard well the individual rights and freedoms
that have been won through the centuries of economic and political struggle."
The second day's address was given -by Dr. William H. Brittain who said that the "very essence of
education is learning to became an adult." He went
on to say that "I believe that the most important
component of genuine adulthood is the possession
of that attitude of mind described as a 'sense of
humour'."
A feature of the graduating ceremony was the
unveiling of a portrait of the late Professor Paul
Boving, former head of the Dept. of Agronomy. Dr.
G. G. Sedgewick, a personal friend of the Swedish-
born educator, said, "Paul Boving brought to U.B.C.
what we needed most in North America—a cosmopolitan culture."
A gift of $50,000 to the University of B.C. from
Chancellor Eric W. Hamber and Mrs. Hamber was
announced at this year's Graduating ceremonies.
The gift will establish the Hamber endowment for
medical scholarships or research in connection with
the new medical school.
Retiring Dean F. M. Cluiunt is shown receiving his
honorary Doctorate of Laws from President Norman
A. M. McKenzie
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Page 27 #
WOMEN
By MARY FALLIS
MRS. H. N. MacCORKINDALE
Triennial Convention, Canadian Federation
Of University Women
The U.B.C. campus will be the setting for the
meetings of delegates to the University Women's
Convention, August 22. 23 and 24, when the Vancouver Club' entertains the national organization.
ALICE GROSS MACCORKINDALE '19, Vancouver President, will be official hostess at this interesting gathering, and alumnae EVELYN
STORY LETT '17, and PHYLLIS GREGORY
'25 will take leading parts in the program.
Any university graduates in B.C. are eligible to
attend the open meetings of the convention providing that they take an out-of-town membership in
the club.
Graduates of the class of '49 are especially invited to become members of the Vancouver Club
and attend the national convention.
Page 28
DEAN DOROTHY MAWDSLEY will represent the Canadian Federation of University Women at the Executive Meeting of the .International
Federation in Denmark this summer.
MARJORIE LEEMING '26, will attend Physical Education Conferences in Boston, Mass., and in
Stockholm, Sweden.
DR. MARGARET ORMSBY '29, is new President of the B.C. Historical Association.
SPRING LISTENING
International honour comes to Sadie Boyles
'26 with an award for her school broadcast series,
"Ecoutez." All North American networks are rated
in the awards of the American Exhibition of Educ-
cational Programs, and Miss Boyles received one
of four first places awarded to CBC programs.
Stage '49 one Sunday presented a new play by
Lister Sinclair '42, "The Night of Promises," a
comedy of real interest to the West Coast as its
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THE U.B.C. AtUMNI CHRONICLE
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towards Howe Sound to Passage Island and Fisherman's Cove. Stage '49 later revived Mr. Sinclair's
shorter play, "The Truth About Emily," now established as a radio favorite.
CBR presented "And  So  It  Goes,"  by  Sallee
Murphy Creighton '23 on its Vancouver Theatre.
This gay piece revealed life in a trailer in a University Housing Project on a D.V.A. grant. Listen for
talks by Salle Creighton over the Trans-Canada network  this   summer.    She  will   speak  on   Rebecca
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West's "The Meaning of Treason" on the program
"A Book I Like."
JEAN COULTHARD ADAMS, lecturer on
musical composition at the university has had
honours showered upon her from Canadian, American and British sources recently. She was awarded
the Pacific Coast Committee for the Humanities'
grant of $750 offered by the American Council of
Learned Societies. Recordings of her Olympic
winning Sonata for Oboe and her Sonata for Cello
and Piano were made last month by CBC International Service in cooperation with RCA-Victor.
On her scholarship she will study with Professor
Wagenaar of the Julliard School in New York and
then go to England for a few week's study.
Congratulations to Graduates '49
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Page 29 FRANKLY     SPEAKING
By FRANK J. E. TURNER
Alumni Secretary-Manager
When Dean F. M. Clement was honored with a
Doctorate by our Alma Mater on the first day of
this year's historic two-day graduation ceremonies,
he paid tribute to the many who have contributed
over the years to U.B.C.'s present eminence in the
field of higher education in Canada. Approximately
one-half of 1949's 2,000 graduates heard him observe
that they should have learned how "to think and to
plan."
These new graduates (many of them ex-service)
listened intently when the genial Dean emphatically
asserted that College-trained men and women should
go forward with confidence into a now more competitive world of business, industry and government.
The universally popular Dean was doing just that;
entering business with his son as an agricultural
consulant.
To many, this was the end of an era and the start
of another. Dr. Clement had been a part of U.B.C.
since its infancy, and Dean of Agriculture for 30
years of its 34-year history. He was almost the last
of the "originals." But when he spoke as a "new
alumnus," he was definite about his intention of continuing as an active supporter of U.B.C. in the years
ahead.
SUPPORT ALUMNI ASSOCIATION
The Dean's observations and his deep desire to
remain associated with our U.B.C. in a positive way
resounds as a stirring challenge to all alumni to be
of real service. All can't serve on executives, committees, or edit magazines, but all of us can constructively criticize, morally support and financially
help (however little) efforts of the Alumni Association to be of service.
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Frankly, your hundred-odd fellow alumni who
are voluntarily working hard to ensure the success
of the Alumni-U.B.C. Development Fund program
in its Inaugural Year deserve more than good intentions, in the way of support. Active solicitation
for 1949 will end June 30th, and already more than
1100 individuals have contributed something.
Surely this is one way in which you—if you have
not done so—can be of real service, by supporting
this worthwhile annual giving program.
If you are a non-donor, pause, please—and do it
now!
Alumnotes:
Be it known to all: the U.B.C. Alumni Association is not a Graduate Society. Any person who has
completed 15 units or more at either Victoria College or U.B.C. is eligible for membership. Fraser
Allardyce (Science '30), brother of Fund Director
John Allardyce (B.A. '19), is now a member, after
observing that many former students didn't know
of this ruling. ...
The many friends of Brother John are hoping
for his speedy recovery after his recent serious illness. . . . Phil Frewer (B. Comm. '47) is now American Sales Representative for Pacific Veneer Co.
In his new position, ex-Naval Officer Frewer should
soon have enough air time to "re-muster" air-crew.
. . . Congratulations and good wishes to Fund Director Bruce A. Robinson, (B.A., B.A. Sc. '36) in his
new  position  as  production   Manager  for  Canada
Rice Mills Harry Smith (B.A. '38), Principal of
Keith Lynn School in Lynnmoore is a World War I
veteran and originally a member of Arts '23. Harry's
son Art is now in 3rd year Arts, majoring in Economics and History. . . . Welcome to our alumni
ranks to Fund contributor U.B.C. Bursar Ralph
Bagshaw. Ralph was in the Arts '27 class at Victoria College and is one of the first former College
students to become an active member of our organization.
'j9,
nnouncma . . .
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Page 30
THE U.B.C. AtUMNI CHRONICLE ANOTHER   ALUMNI
SERVICE
Because the Alumni Office receives so many requests for tickets to U.B.C. extra-curricular events
(Players' Club Productions, Musical Society Productions and athletic programs particularly), it was
felt that a greater effort should be made to render a
more effective service to Alumni generally by cooperating with the various student organizations
involved in publicizing these events and in providing easier access to tickets to these functions.
The actual cost incurred in the direct solicitation
of Alumni support for any and all of these functions
is, of course, borne by the student group concerned.
In the past, this has been confined to clerical and
mailing expenses in connection with student-mailed
appeals.
In the present instance, the Alma Mater Society
—through the Men's Athletic Directorate—has embarked on a new approach in fostering better student-alumni relations in the field of athletics by arranging for the special insert in this issue of the
U.B.C. Alumni Chronicle. It is hoped that other
campus clubs will avail themselves of this opportunity in the future, and it is hoped too that the
others, like M.A.D., will give preferential treatment
(as far as position of seats are concerned) to those
alumni who are active, paid-up members of the
Association.
Congratulations to Graduates '49
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Page 31 ^rn
0 •
BRITISH COLUMBIA
THE WHEELS OF INDUSTRY TURN CEASELESSLY... WEEK IN, WEEK
OUT, THEY BEAT THEIR STEADY RHYTHM . . . ONLY FORCES
BEYOND MAN'S CONTROL CAN BRING THEM TO A STANDSTILL.
^
In this vast organism there is a place somewhere for every student. More
and more, as techniques improve and new processes are developed, industry
demands the trained mind.
Logging and Lumbering, Mining, Agriculture, Fishing, all need their technicians ... all call for minds capable of close research and intelligent
analysis, of careful marshalling of the facts upon which Industry moves
forward.
Our secondary industries, of great and growing importance, offer their own
field of opportunity, a field as wide as it is attractive.
Industry and Science march in step . . . the Laboratory and the Factory are
partners . . . the trained mind finds easier ways for the trained hand.
For the student, trained, alert, and adaptable, there is a place in the industrial world of British Columbia.
V
THE DEPARTMENT OF TRADE AND INDUSTRY
Parliament Buildings
Victoria, B. C.
E. G. Rowebottom, Hon. Leslie H. Eyres,
Deputy Minister Minister
32 THE U.B.C. AtUMNI CHRONICLE
M^riiMi^^M^^A^^iita
V        '   mmMBUni ALUMNI   FIND   TOTALS   $10,000
DEVELOPMENT    DRIVE   CONTINUES
Latest tabulations (just prior to the last general
mail appeal to non-donors) indicate that the Alumni-
U.B.C. Development Fund wil be a pronounced
success in its first year of operation. To date, approximately 1,100 individual alumni have contributed and the Fund total has now reached $10,000.
Charles Gordon McLachlan, Sc. '24, had the
honour of putting the Fund total slightly over the
$10,000 mark with a donation from the distant point
of Noranda Mines, Quebec. Science '24 had their
25th reunion June 3 in the Faculty club and although Charlie McLachlan couldn't be there in person he sent along the Fund cheque to mark the
occasion.
STATISTICS
Statistics compiled by Frank J. E. Turner,
Alumni Secretary-Manager, reveal that the classes
of 1916, 1917 and 1921 are leading the way. Almost
60 per cent of the total number of known addresses
for those years have contributed. The Class of 1922,
which is fourth in percentages has the highest Class
total with $1,760.98 ($962.99 of this amunt was
moneys accumulated by the Class prior to this
year), while the large class of 1948 has contributed a
total of $788.50 but with only an 8 per cent participation.
Leading class managers, on the basis of donations received from those on their particular lists,
are: Ray Perrault ('47), Rudy Paradis ('36), Fred
Grauer ('30), Med Macfarlane ('28), Harry L.
Purdy ('26), Jack Underhill ('24), Joe Giegerich
('23), Hunter Lewis ('23), R. C. (Dick) Palmer
('21), and Mrs. A. M. Menzies (*16).
At the May meeting of the Board of Directors, it
was decided that active solicitation for the 1949
program would end on June 30th and that this first
year's Fund books would close August 31st. All
donations received up to the latter date will be
credited towards this year's total, and where applicable, respective class managers would be given
credit for contributions received from those on their
lists.
(iDedt     VUiiheA    to
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All Fund workers are anxious that present donors as well as those now donating indicate their preferences as far as objectives are concerned. (Several
possible objectives were listed in the February and
March mailings.)
Branch groups have been asked to contact as
many as possible in their respective areas before the
end of the active solicitation period.
JUNE, 1949 WOMEN'S DORMITORIES
Continued from page 12
WHO-UM EST
Continued from page 22
who can help this program expand. Out-of-town
alumni cannot fail to see how much residences will
mean to out-of-town students. Vancouver alumni
should  gladly  assist,
Your branch will be asked to sponsor some project in "The Residence Year" and to forward a donation through the Development Fund.
ALUMNAE PROMOTION
In a small room high in the new wing of the
library a group of women is hard at work. This is
the Alumnae Committee on Women's Residences
making its plans for promotion of what they call
"The Residence Year." Here are Almnae from the
classes of '16 to 'SO, past Presidents of the Women's
Undergrad: ISABEL MACMILLAN '16, EVELYN STORY LETT '17, MYRTLE KIRK-
PATRICK LORD '21, ANEE ANDERSON
ANGUS '23. DOROTHY MYERS '32, and MARY
MULVIN DENNIS '43; Alumni Executive Members: JEAN SLEIGHTHOLME '30, MOLLY
BARDSLEY '33; Lecturer: SALLEE MURPHY
CREIGHTON, 23.
Phrateres Alumnae: PAULINE POWELL and
NANCY MACLAREN; Alumnae: MARY CHAPMAN LEESON '23, ISABELLA ARTHUR
BECKETT '33, EVELYN CRUISE and GLADYS
FROST CAREY. FLORENCE MULLOY '34 acts
as secretary, MARY FALLIS '32 is convener.
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"And here, friends, is a subject which I confess
is very dear to my heart. What about identical
twins? Have you ever thought of that? No, you
haven't. Oh, just from forgetfulness and not malice,
maybe, but you may wreck democracy all the same.
If one identical twin knocks back his fifteen units
while his alter ego doesn't get to U.B.C. at all, is it
either logical or fair to refuse membership to a man
who is identical with a member fully paid up? It
just doesn't make sense, and I admit this thing is
driving me mad, mad, mad. Fraternal twins, maybe
not.   But identical twins?   The thing is a mockery.
"And once more . . . what about poor chaps who
have failed their matric? Through no fault of their
own, they have no chance to choose between fourteen units and sixteen. Why not consolation memberships for these? For there is no way they can
enter our society unless we make some new rule .. .
unless we ACT . . . and say to these unfortunates
'east is east, and west is west, and home is best,
but Tuum Est with all the rest.' I would even admit
Jack Scott himself (all stand! off caps!), though
many is the bitter thing he has said about knowledge
in general as distinguished from his own knowledge
in particular. Perhaps if we gave him, and others
like him, some honorary membership, they would
soon forget that in early youth they had been
bitten by a professor, or whatever it was that
brought them to fear and distrust the higher education.
"Believe me, friends (concluded Wally), if we
attempt to draw any line, we'll only have to rub
it out again. And that's not constructive. Let us
bear in mind the famous Japanese artist Jo-To
whose pictures were so subtle they were actually
invisible. Not a line in them. And thus every man
could see in them what he wanted to see, and Jo-To
became very popular indeed and made a lot of
money."
Signature of Significance
in
Women's Fashions
Page 34
THE U.B.C. ALUMNI CHRONICLE
HM-i Better markets abroad
mean bigger payrolls at home
Like other basic industries of British  Columbia, our fisheries depend
largely upon export markets for steady employment of large numbers of men and women and maintenance
of high wage standards. The battle for these markets is unending.
It is a situation which can only be met by more intensive sales efforts, better marketing methods and
highest quality products. Only by the willing co-operation of all concerned—
fishermen, plant employees, technicians and management—can these markets
be maintained and extended, to the benefit of all.
BRITISH  COLUMBIA  PACKERS  UNITED
Packers and Distributors of
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L
JUNE, 1949
Page 35 *
ST ATI   STICS
*
BIRTHS
To Mr. and Mrs. W. R. Dowrey, a son.
To Dr. and Mrs. William Gibson (Barbara Baird), a
son.
To Mr. and Mrs. Edward W. Disher (Mary Joan
MacDonald) a son.
To Mr. and Mrs. Haddon W. Agnew.
To Mr. and Mrs. Lockhart Knowles (Marian
Hanes), a daughter.
To Mr. and Mrs. Ernest M. Kershaw, a daughter.
To Mr. and Mrs. L. H. Taylor, a daughter.
To Mr. and Mrs. G. Sykes (Bobby Paine) a daughter.
To Mr. and Mrs. W. J. McMaster (Anna Ruth Finlayson), a son.
To Lieut, and Mrs. Thomas Henry Crone (Patricia
Borgerson), a son.
To Mr. and Mrs. J. Beattie MacLean, a daughter.
To Mr. and Mrs. Bruce Malloy (Dora Menzies),
a daughter.
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WEDDINGS
James Wilkie Quin to Margaret Doreen Gamey.
Ernest David Hill to Mary McLorg.
Dr. Alan Pedlow to Margaret Elizabeth Hunter.
Stuart Robert to Helen Roberta Christie.
Dr. Douglas R. Hunter to Elizabeth Anne Harris.
Roger Baigent to Mary Eveline Hawkins.
Marcel Patteeuw to Dorothy Margaret Rowell.
Charles MacDonald Atkinson to Dorothy Mary
Mallett.
Alan Russell to Mildred Evelyn Bishop.
Graham Russell Dawson to Dorothy Williams.
David MacDonald Ritchie to Winifred Eleanor
Johnston.
William R. Campbell to Suzanne Isabel Dalrymple.
Kenneth L. Keith to Veronica Anne Caffrey.
Ross Pratt to Audrey McKim.
Edward Ian MacPhee to Margaret Agnes Purves.
William Hogan Humble to Helen Korlee.
Maurice Hughes Davidson to Betty-Louise Mehan.
William Harold Wallace to Margaret Anne Livingstone.
John P. MacArthur to Margaret Patricia Gilmour.
David Thomson to Louella Mildred Harper.
Edward L. Zahar to Constance Marian Ingram.
Lewis Hector MacKay to Margaret Florence Kennedy.
Ralph Henderson to Janet Dorothy MacDonald.
Robert Gordon Kerr to Elizabeth Beatrix Rae.
Edward Gray Eakins to Mary Frances MacDonald.
Guy R. L. Curwen to June Bernice Grierson.
John Oxley Moxon to Myra Eileen De Beck.
James Grant Allan to Ruth Mary Solloway.
Robert C. Thode to Kathleen Beatrice Halpin.
Gordon East to Alma Mervyn Snyder.
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Page 36
THE U.B.C. ALUMNI CHRONICLE CERTIFICATED
Continued from page 26
JACK SHADBOLT
Continued from page 20
I well recall old Professor Blennerhasset. We
had, of course, no reason to think he had forged his
degree from dear ole Mount Pimple College. If
there is one thing about a Mount Pimple degree
that would strike even a cretin, it is the futility of
forging such a document. One might as well counterfeit streetcar transfers. There ain't no percentage
in it, as any mathematician can readily compute.
Any man who wants a Mount Pimple degree simply
lines up and accepts it, that's all. So there is little
doubt about Blennerhasset's qualifications being in
order. But was Professor B. himself in any kind of
order? That is what, with a wild surmise, we now
ask ourselves when it is too late.
Assuming that there is such a thing as sanity
(a thesis hotly denied by Professor Wringworm who
is possibly biased), was Professor B. within its outer
suburbs, so to speak, There was, for example, his
habit of devoting his first lecture in each course to
the elements of note-taking. "Many of you will be
using pencils," he would say, rapidly sketching a
pencil on the blackboard. "A pencil has two parts,
the wood and the so-called lead. Or three, if it has
an attached eraser." He would label the parts A, B,
and C. "A good pencil is better than a bad pencil,"
he would go on. Now, everything he said was profoundly true, or seemed so to us. And yet . . . there
are times when to speak too much truth of a certain
elementary type is itself a sign of being bugs, or
(as the English say) crackers. Or, as the French
and Scots say,fou.
WALNUT SANDWICHES
I do not care to damn Professor Blennerhasset
too freely for his little personal whims, such as
doing a kind of tap-dance while talking, or partaking
of light ale and popcorn-and-walnut sandwiches in
the middle of a lecture. These were his own affair,
and not necessarily symptomatic of (if I may so express myself)  crackpottery.
Nor do I wish to mention all the other professors
who subjected us to daily experiences of psychopathic or pseudo-psychopathic phenomena. (In this
sense, if in this sense only, they were a real education to us, though a rather specialized one.) Their
names will occur to most of you, with either wistful
pleasure or a dull recurring pain. Did they in the
mass do us in the mass much harm? By the Mass, I
know not. Does it even matter, now? For all I
know, they did not exist at all but were mere products of our own diseased imaginations, a mass hallucination. And yet this sheepskin on my wall is
real enough, and a sign of something or other, I
shudder to think what.
In any event, if two doctors can certify a madman, two or more madmen should be able to certificate a doctor. Democratic fair play. Not that
U.B.C. gave doctors' degrees in those day. but to
certificate a bachelor of arts should be even simpler
... in most ways, though not in all.
One word more. With the whole world going
distinctly balmy, is it not democratic, in faculty and
students alike, to side with the majority? With this
thought, my hearties (but not my brainies), I leave
you.
JUNE, 1949
of which are obviously kin to the mythical "Thunderbird" of Indian lore.
All but one of the Shadbolt oils on view were
painted in 1947, which was a fruitful year for his
art. It saw a new and rich cohesion of his thought
and style. A summer spent at Bucaneer Bay produced some of the most powerful, significant and
original landscape paintings ever produced in this
country.   They are the work of an artist who has
To date, Jack Shadbolt's painting has shown the
continually enriched development of an artist who
has a great deal to say, but has not over-reached
himself to say it too soon. His pictorial conceptions
have been paralled by a constantly expanding technical vocabulary. The sole 1948 canvas in the present exhibition would seem to foretell another advance in this remarkable Canadian artist's evolution.
Certainly, the painting entitled "Landscape with
Skeleton" is one of the most notable works we have
seen bv a Canadian artist is some time.
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Page 37 SPORT
St. Martin's Game Crucial
On September 17th, thirty-five of the best and
biggest of U.B.C.'s young manhood will pack their
bulky gear and husky frame on a chartered bus and
head south towards Olympia, Washington, for their
initial gridiron test of the 1949 season against St.
Martin's College, in a contest that looms as a turning point in the footfall history of one of the two
competing teams.
St. Martin's, cellar dwellers of the Evergreen
Conference the last two years, have yet to win a
game in conference competition, and will be going
all out to come up with their first win. U.B.C, which
won one in '47 and tied one in '48, have a better
record in the won and lost column. On the basis of
competitive scores, however, St. Martin's has a
slight edge, losing to Western Washington by a
one touchdown margin while U.B.C. lost by two.
The St. Martin's game may well be a mirror of
future games this fall, and will indicate whether the
1949 edition of the Thunderbird flock will have
better fortunes in this, their fourth year of play
under the American code. A win for the 'Birds in
the season opener will give a terrific boost to team
morale, and might serve as mental conditioning for
tougher games to come.
THUNDERBIRD ROUNDUP
U.B.C. track ace Bob Piercy was awarded a gold
wrist watch for the outstanding individual performance of the annual St. Martin's Relays, May 7th.
Piercy set a record in the two mile event besides
running on the winning distance medley and mile
relay teams. U.B.C. set seven records during the
meet, including a shot-put toss by John Pavelich of
45 feet, 6^ inches . . . Ralph Henderson and Janet
McDonald were married in a quiet ceremony in
Seattle, May 14th. Ralph had to cut their honeymoon short in order to coach his basketball team,
the Clover Leafs, in the Canadian finals the following week . . . Site of the new Memorial Gymnasium
has been cleared in preparation for the start of construction during the summer months. Gymnasium
should be ready by the fall of 1950 . . . U.B.C. will
probably be well represented in the British Empire
games next spring. Trials will be held this summer
in Toronto . . . First football game next fall will
take place before University starts. Team has two
weeks, from September 1st, to prepare for season
opener . . . U.B.C. hockey team will probably move
into new quarters in the Kerrisdale Arena next fall.
They will also be taking part in an exhibition series
against Colorado in Colorado Springs sometime in
February. . . . Basketball prospects for this fall look
good with seven lettermen returning. These will
be strengthened with recruits from the Chiefs and
Braves plus one or two high school stars. Big John
Forsythe, scoring kingpin on the 'Bird team, and
Reid Mitchell, standout guard, will both be returning. Incidentally, Mitchell and Bud Spiers, president of Men's Athletics at U.B.C. during the past
year, were the first co-winners of the Bobby Gaul
Memorial Trophy, highest U.B.C. athletic award.
U. B. C.  THUNDERBIRDS
FOOTBALL SCHEDULE
T949
Season Ticket $5.00 (For SIX home games)
SEPTEMBER 17 *ST. MARTIN'S COLLEGE  OLYMPIA, WASH.
SEPTEMBER 24   WHITMAN COLLEGE  U.B.C. STADIUM
OCTOBER    8    EASTERN OREGON COLLEGE U.B.C. STADIUM
OCTOBER 15 *WESTERN WASHINGTON COLLEGE BELLINGHAM, WASH.
OCTOBER 22  CENTRAL WASHINGTON COLLEGE  U.B.C. STADIUM
OCTOBER 29  PACIFIC UNIVERSITY U.B.C. STADIUM
NOVEMBER    5   NORTHERN IDAHO COLLEGE  U.B.C. STADIUM
NOVEMBER  12 *WHITWORTH  COLLEGE U.B.C. STADIUM
•Evergreen Conference Game
ALL HOME GAMES — U.B.C. STADIUM — 2:15 P.M.
Write or phone:
Graduate Manager of Athletics,
Brock Hall, U.B.C, AL. 2818.
"Follow the Thunderbirds"
Page 38
THE U.B.C. ALUMNI CHRONICLE
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JUNE, 1949
Page 39 Si
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