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UBC Alumni Chronicle 1955

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 U.B.C. ALUMNI
CHRONICLE
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Keep up-to-date
on Canadian Business
WITH   THE   B of M   BUSINESS   REVIEW
Each month Canada's First Bank publishes
this authoritative, fact-filled summary which
gives  you:
1) A   clear   analysis   of   Canadian   economic
developments and problems.
2) Detailed  surveys of industrial  and  trade
conditions from coast to coast.
TO 2 MILLION CANADIANS
GBlD
Businessmen all over the country who want accurate interpretation of today's fast-changing trends read  the  B of M
Business  Review.  We shall  he  glad  to add your name to
our  mailing  list — without  charge. Simply   drop   a   note
on  your  letterhead   to the  Public  Relations  Department,
Bank   of   Montreal,   Place   d'Armes,    Montreal.
Bank of Montreal
working with Canadians in every walk oj life since 1817
RESOURCES EXCEED $2,500,000,000,  650 OFFICES ACROSS  CANADA.    OFFICES IN NEW YORK, SAN FRANCISCO
AND LONDON.    SPECIAL REPRESENTATIVE IN CHICAGO.    BANKING CORRESPONDENTS THROUGHOUT THE WORLD.
U.B.C.   ALUMNI   CHRONICLE U. B. C. Alumni Chronicle
Published  by  the
Alumni Association of the  University
of  British  Columbia
Editor:   Harry  T.   Logan,  M.C,   M.A.
Assistant to the Editor: Sally Gallinari, B.A/49.
BOARD OF MANAGEMENT
EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE: President, Peter J.
Sharp, B.Com.'36; Past President, G. Dudley
Darling, B.Com.'39; First Vice-President, Hugh
John Hodgins, B.A.Sc.'28; Third Vice-President, Dean Blythe A. Eagles, B.A.'22; Treasurer,    Archie    P.    Gardner,    B.A/37;    Executive
Published in Vancouver
Secretary, A. H. Sager, D.F.C, B.A.Sc'38;
"Chronicle Editor, Harry T. Logan, M.C, M.A.
MEMBERS-AT-LARGE: John Ashby, B.A/33;
Mrs. Morris Belkin, B.A/40; Dr. W. G. Black,
B.A/22; E. G. Perrault, B.A/48; Mrs. Lawrence
E. Ranta, B.A/35, B.A.Sc.(Nurs.)'39; Leonard B.
Stacey, B.A.Sc/24. DEGREE REPRESENTATIVES: Agriculture, Jack Gray, B.S.A/39; Applied Science, Stuart S. Lefeaux, B.A.Sc.'45;
Architecture, Harry Lee, B. Arch/50; Arts,
Harold W. Fullerton, B.A/29; Commerce,
Donald A. McRae, B.Com/47; Forestry, Norman
Dusting, B.S.F/52; Home Economics, Mrs.
George Cornwell, B.H.E/49; Law, Brian W. F.
McLoughlin, LL.B/50; Medicine, Victor A.
MacPherson, B.A/50, M.D/54; Pharmacy, Miss
, Canada, and authorised as second class mail, Post
Anne Tomljenovich, B.S.P.'54; Physical Education, Richard Mitchell, B.P.E/49; Social
Work, George V. Jones, B.S.W/49, M.S.W/50.
SENATE REPRESENTATIVES: Miss Marjorie
Agnew, B.A/22; The Hon. Mr. Justice A. E.
Lord, B.A/21; Dr. I. McTaggart-Cowan, F.R.S.C,
B.A/32, Ph.D.(Calif.)'35. ALMA MATER
SOCIETY  REPRESENTATIVE:   Ron   Bray,  A.M.S.
President.        ....    . . _
Editorial Committee
Chairman: Peter J. Sharp; Members: G. Dudley
Darling,   Harry T.  Logan,   E. G.  Perrault,  A.   H.
Soger. _.       . .     -,,.
Chronicle  Offices
Business    Office:    201     Brock    Hall,     U.B.C,
Vancouver 8,  B.C.    Editorial  Office:   207  Brock
Hall,  U.B.C,  Vancouver 8,  B.C.
Office Dept., Ottawa.
VOL. 9,   ND. 4
Winter, 1955
CONTENTS INCLUDE
PAGE
U.B.C.   Development  Fund  and  Alumni—
Art  Sager       3
Editorial:  David  Milton  Owen—
An   Appreciation                     5
Branches—Art  Sager .5-7
Graduate Profile: John M. Buchanan 8-9
Lost, Strayed or Stolen    9
The  President   Reports  11
No News is Good News—David  Brock 13
Education in B.C.: General Aspects—
W.A.P.      14-15
Makers of the University:
Dr. R. E. McKechnie—Walter N. Sage .16-17
Autumn    Degree   Ceremony—Editor   18
Growing  Interest in  Homecoming . 19
Albert  Einstein:  Architect of Modern
Thought—George   M.   Volkoff 20-21
Trade Commissioner Service  Draws U.B.C.
Graduates—H.  Leslie Brown 22-23
School of Social  Work:  The  First Quarter
Century—Elizabeth Tuckey       24-25
Alumni              26-28
The Faculty  .„_   29
Sports Summary—R. J.  (Bus)   Phillips    31
Campus News and Views—
Gordon  Armstrong                33
Births   34
Marriages     r         34
Obituaries      .'.   34
FRONT  COVER
A   fanciful   sketch   of   the   University   site,
with its environment of sea and mountain.  The
design  is  by  James  H.  Acland,  B.Arch.,  M.A.
(Harvard),  U.B.C.  School  of Architecture.
SHOULD AULD ACQUAINTANCE BE FORGOT?
To make sure it is not
Come to
THE   UNIVERSITIES   BOXING   DAY   BALL
At the Commodore Cabaret, Monday,
December 26th,
9:00 p.m.  -  1:00 a.m.
For Ticket Reservations
Phone  the ALUMNI  OFFICE, ALma  3044
For Table Reservations
Phone  the  Commodore  Cabaret,  PAcific  7838
$6.50 per couple
Development Fund—and Alumni
By the time this issue of
the Chronicle is in print,
the 1955 Development Fund
will have achieved a total
of $75,000 in contributions
from 2,500 Alumni and 750 friends
of the University — a record both in
amount and in participation.
Several important developments
have occurred during the past year.
There has been a very considerable increase in the number and amount of
contributions from other than Alumni
— 735 donations for a total of $53,500
to November 10. This confirms the
growing support of the Fund throughout the community.
With this "outside" support has
come greater diversity in appeal and
service of the Fund itself. In addition
to the major objectives and private
grants for scholarships and research,
several new "special objectives" have
been initiated by 1955 donors. Most
recent of these are the Medical Students' Loan Fund, Asian Studies,
World University Service and the
Seattle Alumni Scholarship.
From the Alumni point of view, the
most significant development has been
the continuing increase in participation in the Annual Giving Programme
which is the basic part of the Fund.
To November 10, there were 2,300
Alumni donors. Approximately 500
Alumni contributed separately, during
the current Fund year, to the Brock
Rebuilding Fund. In total, 2,800 Alumni participated in the combined pro
gramme to the extent of $19,500, to
Nov. 10.
Many questions have been asked by
Alumni and friends about the relationship between the Fund and the Association. The Association operates
(publishes the Chronicle and circulates
"U.B.C. Reports") by means of an
annual grant from the Board of
Governors. It has no membership dues
nor magazine subscription fees.
At the same time, the Association
has undertaken to sponsor the U.B.C.
Development Fund and the revenue
derived from this source (and turned
over the University) is indirectly
related to the grant obtained from
the Board of Governors. It has been
necessary, therefore, to constitute two
classifications of Alumni membership
— "active" and "inactive". The former
are those who participate in the Annual Giving Program through the
Fund. These members receive the
Chronicle, U.B.C. Reports and other
material from the Alumni Office.
It should again be emphasised that
the amount of the annual donation is
not important insofar as "active"
membership is concerned. All that is
required is a token of the member's
continued interest in the University.
Commencing in 1956. non-Alumni
donors to the Fund will also receive
the  Chronicle regularly.
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DIRECTORY OF U.B.C. ALUMNI
CORRESPONDENTS
Calgary—S.     P.     (Bud     Burden,     B.A.'Sc.,'40,
3032—26th  St.,   S.W.
Chilliwack—Mrs.   Les   E.   Barber   (nee   Connie
Baird), B.A/37, 411  Wellington Ave.
Creston—W. H. Wilde, B.A/50, M.S.(Utah)'52,
Cranbrook—L G. Truseott,  B.A/41, c/o  Cranbrook High  School.
Box  1167;  Mrs.  D.  K. Archibald  (nee Constance McTavish), B.A/29, Box  100.
Dawson Creek—Robert E. Dodd, B.A/-49, LL.B.
'50,  Box 2185.
Edmonton—Hugh  B.  Mason,  B.A/48,   10226—■
147th St.
Fernie—Ken   Stewart,   B.A/32.
Grand   Forks—Hugh   Sutherland,   B.A/52,   c/o
Junior-Senior   High   School.
Hammond—Malcolm    Brown,    B.A/39,    2413
Power Line Road, R.R. No.  1.
Israel—A.   H.  Goldberg,   B.A/48,  4  Safad  St.,
Haifa.
Kamloops—Miss J. Margaret Dawson, B.A/40,
120 St.  Paul St.  W.
Kelowna—W. A. Shilvock, B.A/31, B.Com.'32,
267 Bernard Ave.
Kimberley—L. F. H. Garstin, B.A/40, M.A/46,
Box 313.
Lethbridge—M.   M.   Wiggins,   B.S.A/48,  Vaux-
hall, Alberta.
Montreal—Herb Capozzi,  B.A/47,  B.  Com/48,
C.B.C.
Nanaimo—J.   W.   Asselstine,   B.Com/46,   B.C.
Telephone Company.
Nelson—Leo Gansner, B.A.,B.Com.'35, P.O. Box
490.
New   York—Miss   Rosemary   Brough,   B.A/47,
No. 4L, 214 East 51st St.; Dr. David B. Wod-
linger. Director U.S. Student Program, Institute ot International Education, 1  E. 67th St.
Northern  California—Albert A.  Drennan,  B.A.
'23, 420 Market St., San Francisco 11.
Ottawa—Dr.    John    Davis,    B.A.Sc/39,    Ph.D.
(McGill)'42, 115 Reid Ave.
Penticton—William   Halcro,   c/o   Junior   High
School.
Portland—Dr.   David   Charlton,   B.A/25,   2340
Jefferson St.
Prince George—Rev.  Denning  Waller,  B.A/49,
1268 - 5th Ave.
Pullman—Eugene B. Patterson, B.S.A/50,  105
College Ave.
Regina—Gray   A.   Gillespie,    B.Com/48,    1841
Scarth St.
Seattle—Miss  Nora  Clark,   B.A/47,  3629   15th
N.E.
Southern  California—Les.   W.  McLennan,   B.A.
'22,  917 Sierra Vista  Drive,  Fullerton.
Summerland—A. K. Mcleod, B.A/34, Principal,
Summerland   High   School.
Terrace—John   C   Lawrance,   B.A/32,    Skeena
Junior - Senior High School.
Toronto—Roy   V.   Jackson,   B.A/43,   No.   38,
•..-   -48 Glenview Ave.
Trail—Dr. M. M. Wright,  B.A/38,  B.A.Sc/38,
Box 914,  Ressland.
Venezuela—H. Leslie Brown, Canadian Embassy,
Apartado 3306, Caracas.
Vernon—Frank    Paul,    B.A/47,    M.A/49,    c/o
Senior  High   School.
•T. Victoria—Dr. W.  H. Gaddes,  B.A/39,  M.A/46,
4150 Cedar Hill Road; or Constance Holmes,
LL.B/51, 208-10 Stobart Bldg., 745 Yates St.
Williams   Lake—M.  J.   Walsh,   B.S.A/47.
United Kingdom—Lt.-Col. H.  F.  E. Smith,  '25,
(Hon. Sec),  B.C.  House,   1   -  3  Regent St.,
London, S.W.I,  England.
U.B.C.  ALUMNI   CHRONICLE At Trail, B.C.'s biggest furnaces burn the year round . .. We feed
them concentrates and coke, blast the charge with compressed
. . and melt out over 450 tons of lead a day.
At Trail, Cominco smelted Canada's first lead ... built the world's
first electrolytic lead refinery . . . and today B.C.'s biggest
furnaces smelt 99% of the nation's refined lead.
IN TRANSPORTATION—Tetraethyl lead is in the fuel of modern,
high-compression engines. Lead if also essential to automobile
storage batteries and to manufacture of rubber tires.
IN COMMUNICATION—Lead sheathing protects telephone
and power cables, assuring uninterrupted service to homes,
farms and industry.
^ir-
IN OTHER FIELDS—Lead is an important element in the glasi
of TV picture tubes. It serves as a stabilizer in certain plastics.
It is an ingredient in high grade paints. It provides a safety
shield against radiation in production of atomic energy.
THE   CONSOLIDATED   MINING   &   SMELTING   COMPANY   OF   CANADA   LIMITED
C.   ALUMNI   CHRONICLE David Milton Owen, B.A/34
The Editor's Page
Milton Owen — An Appreciation
Homecoming on November 5 was
felt to be an outstanding success by
the several hundred graduates and
friends who attended the Noon luncheon in Brock Hall and the Football
game afterwards in the Stadium. Pew
of us were aware that, but for the
energy and faith of Milton Owen, Junior Member of the Student Council
in the Session 1932-33, this annual
festival might have been discontinued
twenty-three years ago. At a time
when the Alumni Executive were on
the point of giving up because of the
apparent lack of Alumni interest, it
was Milton Owen, with his student
committee and well-prepared programme, who saved Homecoming for
that year and possibly for future generations of graduates. Milton's part in
perpetuating this important Alumni festival will always associate his memory
with Homecoming, though his familiar, friendly figure will no longer be seen here.
The aeroplane which disappeared "without a trace" between Kemano and
Kitimat on August 3 robbed the University community of one of her most widely-
known members, and Vancouver of a much-loved and respected citizen.
. . . whose even-balanced soul,
Business could not make dull, nor passion, wild;
Who saw life steadily and saw it whole.
These words of Matthew Arnold aptly describe Milton Owen as we knew him,
first, in his student days at U.B.C. and then in the twenty-one years of strenuous
service that followed. The breadth of Milton's interests as an Undergraduate
may be seen in the activities of his four Varsity years: He studied Economics
as a Major with Minors in English and History; he was class Treasurer in 1930,
Class President 1931, Junior Member of Student Council 1933, President Men's
Undergraduate Society 1934; he represented U.B.C. in Debating; he was an
outstanding athlete, playing on both the McKechnie Cup and "Big Four"
(Canadian) Rugby Teams; he was also active in Track and Field.
After graduation in 1934 he enrolled in the Vancouver Law School, and was
called to the Bar as a Barrister and admitted as a Solicitor in 1937, joining his
brother, Walter, in the firm of Campney, Owen and Murphy, to which Milton's
name was later added as a partner.
His sensitive spirit, his feeling for his fellow man, his love of doing, joined
to a cheerful and responsive personality, found ample scope in the practice of
law and in the complex business, political, educational and social life of
Vancouver. Here his natural gifts of leadership brought him varied responsibilities and offices of honour. He was Past-President of the Alumni Association of
the University of British Columbia, the Vancouver Young Liberal Association,
the Vancouver Kiwanis Club and the United Nations Society, Vancouver Branch;
he was a member of the Executive, the Vancouver Bar Association, the Law
Society of British Columbia and the Canadian Bar Association; he was a past-
member of the Vancouver Service Club Council, a Director, Health Centre for
Children, Honorary Solicitor, Children's Aid Society of Vancouver, Director,
Vancouver Boys' Club, Member of the Golden "E", Director, Vancouver Y.M.C.A.
Elected a School Trustee, he was Deputy Chairman of the Vancouver School
Board at the time of his death. He served in World War II with the 72nd
Regiment, Seaforth Highlanders of Canada, attaining the rank of Major. He
was wounded at Ortona, in Italy. He was a member of Phi Delta Theta Fraternity and, in the Masonic Order, of the Ancient and Accepted Scottish Rite.
This impressive list of offices and tasks is striking evidence of noble purpose
and high achievement, and all the more so, when we remember that Milton
Owen was under forty-three years of age when he was tragically taken from the
scene of his labours. Such a record "seems indeed", in the words of Athenian
Pericles, "to show us what a good life is."
There is discernible, too, an enlarging of his vision beyond the horizons
of his own city and country. His interest in World Service, stimulated by his
War experiences, became real and deep. In his President's Report to the United
Nations, Vancouver Branch, given on May 4, 1955, he said, "The need will ever
be present for our work, so long as there remains in the world any vestige of
hate, ignorance and oppression. Our work, after all, is the last man-made hope
for mankind." These, and other similar thoughts possessed his mind and directed
his life when, three months later, like Mr. Valiant-for-truth, "he passed over; and
all the trumpets sounded for him on the other side."
B
ranches
What Can an Alumni Branch do?
The Executives of some of our
newer Branches have asked for guidance in planning their yearly programmes. This is not easy to provide
because the size and interests of the
Branches are as different as the communities in which they are located.
The experience of others is always
a good guide, and so in this issue
we are going to restrict our report
to those Branches which have sponsored interesting and, in some cases, new
projects. Here they are:
Seattle:  International Scholarship
The Seattle Branch has always been
fairly active, holding three very enjoyable events every year, an annual
banquet, a cocktail party (election of
officers), and a summer picnic.
For some time past, the Executive
has been anxious to undertake a project that would tie them more closely
with the University.
The growing international character
of U.B.C. furnished the answer. There
are now over 600 students on the
U.B.C. Campus from foreign countries,
and the U.S. stands second among the
countries of origin. This is a worthwhile development; then why not help
to promote it even further?
President MacKenzie dines with Seattle Alumni
at  Annual  dinner  meeting.
At the Annual Dinner Meeting of
the Seattle Branch on November 3,
Mr. Stan Arkley, B.A.'25, presented
to Dr. MacKenzie (the guest speaker)
a cheque for over $100 to start a
"Seattle Alumni Scholarship Fund".
All future donations to the Development Fund from Seattle Alumni will
be earmarked for this particular objective, and it is hoped that the first
recipient of the award will be the
daughter or son of an Alumnus living
in Seattle. This is an example that
might be followed by other "foreign"
Branches.
Victoria:  Public  Panels
Earlier this year, the reactivated
Victoria Executive under the aggressive chairmanship of Dr. Bill Gaddes
hit upon the idea of sponsoring a
series of public panel discussions dur-
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N'S OF CANADA   EATONS or CANADA   EATON'S of CAN ADA   EATONS of CAN ADA   EATON'S OF CANADA  EATON'S of CAN ADA EATON'S oF CANADA   EATON'S of CAN AD
U.B.C.  ALUMNI   CHRONICLE 6 By Courtesy Victoria Daily Times: Photo by Bill Halkett.
Panel Discussion in Victoria College. November 15, held under Auspices of Victoria Alumni Branch.
From Left: Dr. Harold L. Campbell, Mrs. Harry L. Smith, Mr. Stuart Keate, Mr. Leslie Fox and Mr.
Pat J. Sinnott
ing the winter months. They based
their decision upon the knowledge that
Victoria was a good "public meeting"
town, large numbers of people having
attended a similar series sponsored
by a local newspaper during the previous winter.
The Victoria Executive was also
anxious to undertake a project in
the general field of adult education,
believing that this would develop
goodwill for Victoria College, the
University and Higher Education generally.
The first public panel on October
19 was a great success. Four prominent medical men discussed "The Aging
Process" before an audience of over
300. The second, on November 16 (as
we go to press), will feature the Victoria Times Publisher, Mr. Stuart
Keate, B.A.'35, the Deputy Minister
of Education, Dr. Harold Campbell,
B.A.'28,M.Ed.(Wash.),LL.D., Mr. Leslie Fox, Managing Editor of the Victoria Times, and two other well-known
citizens, Mrs. Harry L. Smith and Mr.
P. J. Sinnott, who will discuss the subject, "Is the Press Doing a Good Job
on Public Education."
The Victoria Alumni project has
received excellent publicity and this
will ensure its continued success. The
project is a good one in that it fills
an obvious need in the community and
at the same time strengthens the
organisation of the Branch itself.
The Annual Dance of the Victoria
group on November 4 (the eve of
Homecoming) was also successful, in
fact, the best on record. The financial
profit will go towards scholarships or
bursaries for Victoria College and
University students.
Nanaimo:  Lecture Series
The Mid-Island Branch (President,
J. W. Asselstine, B.Com.'46), is also
concentrating on a project in adult
education. The Executive here felt that
it would be unwise to duplicate the
excellent work being done by Mr. Bill
Tippett, B.A.'40, of Night Schools Department. They decided instead to
join forces and help to guarantee full
attendance at the series of winter
lectures featuring members of the
U.B.C. Faculty.
This arrangement has worked out
extremely well. Dr. Gordon Shrum and
Dr. W. C. Gibson were the first two
speakers, and Mr. Geoffrey Davies will
be the third. All meetings have been
popular.   Bill   Gibson   is   enthusiastic
about the reception he received and
suggests that the Nanaimo project
might well serve as a pattern for
other Branch programmes. We agree!
Prince George: Extension Speakers
An example of co-operation between
the Alumni Association and the Department of Extension is furnished
by the first Annual Meeting of the
newly-formed Prince George Branch
(Fresident, Dr. Denning E. Waller,
B.A.'49).
A speaker from the University was
requested and Dr. George S. Allen,
B.A.Sc'33, Dean of the Faculty of
Forestry, very kindly accepted the
invitation. Dr. Allen did three jobs
during the quick visit: he addressed
a Rotary luncheon, met with Senior
High School students, and spoke at
the Alumni dinner meeting. Costs of
the trip were shared by the Alumni
office and the Extension Department.
Service of this kind is available to all
Branches in B.C.
In this connection, plans are already
being made for Faculty tours of High
Schools throughout the Province in
May, 1956. All Branches will be asked
to assist on this Extension-Alumni
project by making local arrangements
for accommodation, outside speaking
engagements, etc.
Malaya:   U.B.C.   Representatives
Individual Alumni are often called
upon to represent the University at
important functions and to do special
jobs for the President's office. There
are many examples of this, one of the
most recent being the Golden Jubilee
Celebrations at the University of
Malaya. W. F. Baehr attended these
ceremonies and extended greetings on
behalf of the Chancellor and President
(See page 27).
This is only one of many reasors
why the University is anxious to maintain contact with all its former students,   and   why   the   Association   is
Group of Calgary Alumni, from Left: Dr. C. E.
(Courtney) Cleveland, B.A.Sc'34, M.Sc, Ph.D.
(McGill), J. G. (John) Gray, B.A.'34, M.A.,
S. A. (Aubrey) Kerr, B.A/40, M.A., S. R. (Stan)
Hughes, B.S.F.'49, and S. P. (Bud) Burden,
B.A.Sc'40.
attempting    to    establish    a    network
of 'Key Alumni" all over the world.
FROM THE MAIL BAG
New   York
"I have just read with the greatest
appreciation the biographical sketch
of the late President Wesbrook in
your recent issue.
As a member of the University's
first Freshman class I had the privilege of personal contact with Dr. Wesbrook to a degree which must even
then have been rare in any University
and would be impossible under present-
day conditions.
Busy as he must have been in the
opening days of the University, he
found time for a personal interview
with an anxious Freshman, and I
still recall his pithy advice, delivered
with gentle humour. Even more vivid
is the memory of our first Freshman
party, at which I had the honour of
dancing with President Wesbrook, and
at which he participated in — in fact
was the leading spirit of — a game
of Farmer-in-the-Dell. These were
only two instances of his genuine
spirit of democracy and consideration
for the individual — the same spirit
which led him to inaugurate Student
Self-Government, in a period when it
was not taken for granted as it is
today.
In spite of the University's physical
limitations, President Wesbrook and
his Faculty succeeded in creating an
atmosphere of scholarship and an
awareness of our heritage of culture,
which I have not seen surpassed in any
of the colleges and universities with
which I have since been associated,
either as student or instructor. And, in
spite of wartime burdens and bereavements, they contrived to maintain a
standard of gracious dignity in the
University social life, which is rarely
found anywhere today.
As his "high-souled vision" encompassed a future for the University
which, after forty years, it is only
now fulfilling, so did his genius of
inspiration illumine for his students
an "untraveled shore" of knowledge
and beauty and richness of life whose
margins cannot be fully explored in
a single  life time."
Evelyn C. McKay, B.A.'19.
(Evelyn C. McKay is at present Head of McKay
Associates, New York, consultants on service to
the blind. A pioneer in the field of Social Work
with the blind, Miss McKay was for 24 years
a member of the staff of the American Foundation for the Blind, where she became Director
of Social Research. She is the author of many
papers and articles on the problems of
blindness.)
ATTENTION   V.O.C.   GRADS
Open House will be on Mount Seymour,
March 4th, Sunday afternoon at the V.O.C.
cabin   100  yards west  of  mile 7   parking   lot.
Badminton Sessions are held Monday evenings 8-10:30 p.m., in the Women's Gym on
the   Campus.
For further information on Club activities,
call or write to Marie Sutherland, 5612
Holland St., Vancouver.
If you did not receive this year's news
letter  please  send   in  your   address.
U.B.C. ALUMNI   CHRONICLE Graduate Profile-
John Murdoch Buchanan
John   M.   Buchanan,   B.A.'17
John M. Buchanan (the "M" is for
"Murdoch" and is a direct link with
his Cape Breton ancestry) is a true
native son. He was born at Steveston,
at the mouth of the Fraser River on
July 21st, 1897, the son of Donald
Buchanan and Christie Ann (Morrison) Buchanan.
John Buchanan's boyhood days on
the banks of "the world's mightiest
salmon river" have proved to be a
prophetic and auspicious background
to the successful business career which
has taken John Buchanan to the Presidency of British Columbia Packers
Limited, one of the largest and most
diversified fishing enterprises in the
world.
John Buchanan commenced his early
education at Steveston Public School
and Bridgeport High School on Lulu
Island. During high school and university years, summer vacations were
vacations in name only for they were
spent in a variety of summer jobs at
one or other of the salmon canneries
which were clustered along the Fraser
River between the mouth and New
Westminster. John Buchanan was the
first student from Bridgeport High
School to go to the University of British Columbia which he attended when
that institution was housed in what
are now referred to as the "Fairview,
Shacks". John graduated from U.B.C.
in 1917 with a B.A. degree, eight
years before the opening of the buildings at the present Point Grey location. Graduation was followed by a
two-year period of employment with
the C. L. Packing Limited, with experience at that firm's Lighthouse
Cannery, Scottish Canadian Cannery,
and Green Bay Cannery.
It was in late 1919 that John Buchanan temporarily forsook his career
in fisheries for a diversion into the
lumber industry. He briefly entered
the employ of E. H. Giske, a chartered
accountant who specialized in servicing lumber firms and from there mov
ed to employment with Cedars
Limited, lumber and shingle manufacturers, whose operation was located
at Lynn Creek. John stayed with the
lumber business for seven years before
moving briefly into the Vancouver
office of Peat, Marwick, Mitchell &
Co., in 1927 and then to British
Columbia Fishing & Packing Co. Ltd.,
in March of 1928, when he accepted
the position of Internal Auditor with
that firm. Later in the same year
British Columbia Fishing & Packing
Limited was one of the parties to the
large merger which brought British
Columbia Packers Limited into corporate form. John Buchanan continued
as Internal Auditor of the new organisation and advanced steadily to the top
of the management group. In 1932 he
was appointed Secretary-Treasurer, in
1935, General Manager, in 1941, Vice-
President and General Manager, and
in 1946 he became the President of
British Columbia Packers Limited,
succeeding Mr. H. R. MacMillan, who
became Chairman of the Board.
The story of John Buchanan's business life is so closely linked with the
corporate story of British Columbia
Packers Limited that it is difficult to
record one, without referring to the
other. The leadership position which
British Columbia Packers Limited today occupies is the result of over
twenty-five years' persistent application to the opportunities and problems
which are a feature of the fishing industry. British Columbia Packers
Limited's growth and financial performance has always reflected the
characteristics of an unpredictable
and hazardous business venture. John
Buchanan has never been able to resist the challenge of such situations
and the position of the company which
he leads indicates how well the challenge has been met.
John Buchanan would be the first to
emphasise that an enterprise of the
size and diversity of British Columbia Packers Limited cannot be a
"one man show". Selection and training of executive and managerial staff
is one of the most important contributions which John Buchanan has
brought to his company, and his attention to this function of top management is never ceasing. The best-selected and trained team still needs a
leader and John Buchanan's leadership
qualities are well-known, not only
within the ranks of his own company,
but throughout the industry and in
many other fields of commercial, educational and community life throughout  British  Columbia  and  Canada.
John Buchanan brings to his numerous fields of responsibility and
activity a great capacity for work and
accomplishment. Many of his younger
executives will testify to their difficulty in matching his ability to put
in gruelling days, to mix travel and
work and extract the maximum of
enjoyment from each and all based
on a routine of not more than six
hours sleep nightly. To all problems
and controversies he brings an analytical mind, patience, tolerance and an
understanding of the other point of
view. These attributes have gained for
him the reputation of being one of
the ace negotiators in the industry,
and, in addition to his activities in
this field on behalf of British Columbia
Packers Limited, he has often been
delegated by the industry to carry-
its interests to various levels of
government, provincially, nationally,
and more recently, in the international
sphere.
As is so often the case with busy
men, John Buchanan's considerable
abilities and energies are spread over
many diverse fields of activities. On
behalf of the fishing industry he has
acted in the past as President of
the Fisheries Council of Canada, and
at the present time is serving his
third term as Chairman of the Fisheries Association of B.C.
In 1953 Canada entered into a tripartite agreement with the United
States and Japan for the purpose of
instituting conservation practices in
the fisheries of the North Pacific and
John Buchanan was selected by the
Canadian Government as one of the
four Canadian Commissioners. In this
capacity he has recently attended the
1955 Annual Meeting of the International North Pacific Fisheries Commission in Japan.
He is a Past President of the Alumni
Association and the successful establishment of the U.B.C. Development
Fund as an instrument of aid to the
The   Ones   that   Didn't   get   Awayl    Deep   Sea
Fishing   is   one   of   John   Buchanan's   Favourite
Recreations.    This   Photograph   was   taken   in
Southern  Waters  in  April,   1955.
U.B.C.   ALUMNI   CHRONICLE Attending   International   North   Pacific   Fisheries   Commission   in   Tokyo   recently,   John   Buchanan,
(Front Row, 2nd from Right), with Mrs. Buchanan and Mrs. Roger Hager (nee Helen Crosby, B.A/38);
behind his wife is Roger Hager, Canadian Member of the Commission.
University owes much to Mr. Buchanan's efforts when President of the
Alumni group. His contribution in time
and effort to the University continues
by his membership on the Senate and
the Board of Governors.
In addition to the well-known and
respected John Buchanan of British
Columbia industry, there is John
Buchanan, family man. His life in
this role is centred about his home on
Minto Crescent, which is graciously
and capably presided over by his wife,
Mildred Buchanan, daughter of the
late Mr. and Mrs. A. Abercrombie of
Vancouver. Their two children, son,
J. Bruce Buchanan, whose wife is
the former Lois Stratton, and daughter, Audrey Hetherington, wife of
Jack Hetherington, B.A.Sc.'45, have
been outstandingly successful in providing a total of seven grandchildren
for John and Mildred to dote upon.
In spite of his busy schedule, John
Buchanan also finds time to participate
in the congregational life of Shaughnessy Heights United Church and the
beautiful Sanctuary now enjoyed by
that congregation is a result largely
of his organising capacity and his
fund-raising ability.
One of John Buchanan's great assets
is an extraordinarily retentive memory. In addition to the obvious advantage which this represents to a busy
executive, it enables him to recall
and recite long passages of poetry,
Scripturo, or quotations from the English classics — all of which had captured his keen interest at an early
age. He has an apparently inexhaustible fund of stories and anecdotes
which appear to be mentally tabulated
for every possible occasion. The right
story at the right time has helped
him and his associates over many a
rough spot.
In the above paragraphs we have
attempted to describe the background,
personality, and working habits of a
well-known U.B.C. graduate and a
successful British Columbia industrialist. We hope that equally we have
presented the portrait of a warm,
generous personality, motivated principally by the desire to contribute of
his talents, energy and ability to the
enterprise, the community, and the
society in which he lives.
+
HIGH APPOINTMENT FOR HONOUR
GRADUATE
O. M. Solandt, B.A., M.A. (Tor.),
B.Sc, M.D., M.A. (Cantab.), D.Sc'47,
Chairman of the Defence Research
Board in Ottawa, will be leaving his
post to become Assistant Vice-Pres;-
den of the Canadian National Railways
in Charge of Research and Development.
ATTENTION COMMERCE ALUMNI
The Annual Meeting of the Commerce
Division, of the Alumni Association will be
held in the Spring — look out for notice;I
Commerce Alumni who attended the get-
together in the Faculty on November 24 all
agree with Terry Watt, B.Com.'49, President,
that a very good time was had by all.
"A   LITTLE   BIT   OF   FAIRVIEW"
Very soon there will be a lecture room,
somewhere on the campus, containing 15
benches (3 students per bench) which wen?
used in Rooms X, Y, and Z. in the Fairview,
U.B.C. Auditorium.
Final curtain falls on Fairview "Shacks". Professor F. H. Soward, Orson W. Banfield, B.A.Sc.
'22, Leonard B. Stacey, B.A.Sc.'24, and Professor Emeritus H. T. Logan survey the changed
scene on the former U.B.C. site. The Old Arts
Building  is seen to the Right (rear).
LOST, STRAYED OR STOLEN-
If you know the address of any of these
graduates, please send it to Art Sager, Alumni
Executive  Secretary,   Brock   Hall,   U.B.C.
W.   Brahan,   B.A.Sc.'54
J. F. Cochran,  B.A.Sc.'50
R.  M.   Cook,   B.A.Sc'49
J.  W.   B.  Day,  B.A.Sc.'54
J.  H.  Duffus,  B.A.Sc.'54
Mr. A. Eddy. B.A.Sc.'SC
J.  L.   Frazee,   B.A/40
N. G. M. Freshwater, B.A/29   M.A. 31
H.   R.  Fretviell,   B.A/41
J.   P.   Friesen,   B.A/50
J. R. Friesen, B.A/50
Mrs. M. Frost, B.A/37
Mr.   Rex  C.   Fulcher,   B.A/51
Beverley J.  Fulton,   B.A/54
R. Fulton, B.A/41
Mr. Leonard Gaddes,  B.A.'25
Mrs. R. Gahaghan,  B.A/32
Mr. H. Gale, B.A/50, M.D/54
Arthur F. Gallaugher,   B.A/26,   M.A. 26
Nina M.  Gansner,  B.A/45
J. J. Garner, B.A/48
Mr.  R.  H. Gaynor,  B.A/52
Mrs.  D. Geddes,  B.A/37
Ida M. Gibbard,  B.A/53
Ruth M. Gillespie,  B.A/33
J.  T. Gillespie,  B.A/48
Miss Sheila Gillis,   B.A/42
Warren N. Glaze, B.A/49
Mr.  Wilbur W. Good,   B.A/52
E.  S.  Goranson,   B.A/32,   M.A.'43
Mr. David Givriato, B.A/51
John Gordy,  B.A/45
Mr. John Gourlay,  B.A/45
Mr. Owen W. Govier, B.A/48
Mr. R. W. Graham, B.A/50
Mrs.  Ella K. Grant, M.A.'50
Mr. H. K. Grant, B.A.'27
Mary W. Grant, B.A/33
Mr. D. S. Gray, B.A/47
Mr.  and  Mrs. Gilbert  C.  Gray,   B.A/5C
Mr. G. H. E. Green, B.A/29, M.A/38
Mr.   R.  J.   Green,   B.A/52
Mr.  Ernest Gremell, B.A/51
A. J. Griffin,  B.A/49
Marjorie   Griffin,   B.A.'36
Mr.  Geoffrey Griffith,   B.A/52
Mr. and Mrs. D. F. Griffiths, B.A/44
Mr. and Mrs.  Richard Grimmett,  B.A   50
E. Gross, B.A/42
Mr.  Lloyd  D.  Hage,  B.A/49
Mr.  James A.  Hale,   B.A/52
Helen  F.  Hall,   B.A/33
Margaret  C.   Hall,   B.A/34
Ranjit Singh Hall, B.A/46
June C. Hallsor, B.A/48
Audrey Y. Hamilton, B.A/37
Shaun B. Hamilton,  B.A/48
Mr.  R.  Hanna,  B.A/41
Miss Joan C. Hardie, B.A/52
Mrs. M. L. Hardie, B.A/37
Mrs. T. Harmon, B.A/35
Miss B. L. Harper,  B.A/52
Mr. Nick J. Harrick, B.A/48, M.A/49
Mary A.  Harrington,  B.A/51
Mrs. C. Harris,  B.A/54
C. G.  Harris,  B.A/46,  M.A/49
Esther  Harrison,   B.A/54
--Mrs. Jack Harvey, B.A/34
Charles W. Haws,  B.A/51
Mr.  H. J.  Heilborn,  B.A/53
John Heiders, B.A/49
H.   H.   Heffing,   B.A.Sc/52
Dr. C.  B.  Henderson,   B.A/48
Miss J.  E.  Henderson,  B.A/52
Harry A. Hendry,  B.A/29
Mr. R. I. Henderson, B.A/48, M.A.'54
Lawrence S. Herchmer, B.A/32
Blythe A. Herring, B.A/50
Mr. R. T. Hewson, B.A/50
Miss Joyce  Heywood,   B.A/48,   B.Com/48
Mr.  and Mrs.  Donald C.  Higman,   B.A/49
Miss Catherine L. Hill, B.A/49
E. A. Hilltout, B.A/42
R. D.  Lawson,  B.A.Sc/48
W.   E. Matheson,  B.A.Sc/49
S. Matthews,  B.A.Sc/54
A.   G.   Mungall,   B.A.Sc/49
D. L. Pitman, B.A.Sc/47
T. R. Reeson, B.A.Sc/50
"F. R. Riddell, B.A.Sc/49
R. J. Riddell, B.A.Sc/49
D.   W.   Smith,   B.A.Sc/52
A. V. Street, B.A.Sc/49
U.B.C. ALUMNI   CHRONICLE A scene in the Company's new Works at Guelph, Ontario . . . the largest power transformer plant in Canada. Here, transformers are
built for the country's great electric power projects. Many thousands of mathematical calculations are involved in designing transformers, and Ihe wide variety of other electrical equipment manufactured at Canadian General Eleclnc's fifteen plants.
<r<r
That's why you should study maths, son
•)i
A close look at Canada today will quickly convince any
young man that mathematics will play an important
part in his future. Everywhere about him he will see the
handiwork of the professional engineer whose training,
based on mathematics, is contributing so much to this
country's vast expansion.
The demand for engineers grows as Canada grows.
Just 15 years ago, only one in 660 workers was a
graduate engineer. Now there is one. to every 180 and
the need continues to increase. For wherever big things
are going on, there you will find the engineer . . . whose
vision and initiative make him a key man in
Canada's progress.
Nearly a thousand engineers are employed by this
Company alone . . . one to about every 15 employees.
They design, develop, manufacture, sell and service
complex electrical equipment . . . equipment
that generates power, transmits it and puts
it to work in homes, farms and industry.
By the time many young Canadians have completed
their education the use of electricity will again have
doubled. The more abundantly electric power is produced and put to work in industry and homes, the
higher will go our standard of living and the lower will
go the costs of producing goods of every variety.
In the coming years Canada's continuing development
willoffer the challenge and reward of engineering careers
to thousands of young Canadians. For them there will
be the satisfaction of participating in an important and
skilful profession and the deeper satisfaction of contributing to the strength and prosperity of our nation.
For over 60 years, Canadian General Electric has
engineered and manufactured much of the electrical
equipment that has played such a vital role in making this
country one of the most highly electrified in the world.
Today the Company continues to expand its facilities, not only for present requirements, but also
to meet the needs of the Canada of tomorrow.
"Rvgress ts Our Most /mporfant frodud-
CANADIAN   GENERAL   ELECTRIC  COMPANY
LIMITED
U.B.C. ALUMNI   CHRONICLE        10' The President Reports—
+    Our Undergraduates
+    MacMillan and Koerner Foundations
Dear Alumni:
This F'age is part of a Broadcast
given over C.B.C. on December 1.
It is repeated here for those who may
not have heard it on their radios.
Its primary purpose is to give you
news about the University.
This year, we have close to 6,500
students, about 500 more than a year
ago, and we expect a similar or
greater increase in the years that are
to come. This is due to the increase
in the population of British Columbia
from immigration, but more particularly to the increased birth rate,
which occurred during the war years
and has continued ever since. These
are the healthy signs of a vigorous
and expanding economy and country,
and it is most encouraging to all of
us that so many of our young people
are anxious to obtain the best education possible. In many cases, this is
not easy for them, for University
education is expensive. Nearly all of
them — something over 90% — earn
some money, and a large percentage
— close to 50% — are responsible
for all the costs of their education.
This money they earn, in the main,
through employment in the summer
months; but many of them work at
part time jobs, here on the campus
and elsewhere in the city, throughout
the winter term as well. When young
people are prepared to work so hard,
and to make the sacrifices that these
young people are making, their attitude towards their work is likely to be
a serious one, and they should get all
the encouragement from the rest of us
that is possible.
Over 600 students are citizens of
other countries, although many of
these hope and intend to make their
homes in Canada. The largest group,
133, comes from Great Britain; 71,
from the United States; 65, from Germany; 59, from Trinidad; 31, from
Holland, and others from some 56 different countries. It is good for all Of
us to have these citizens of other
lands among us, for they bring to
us a variety of experience and background which we could get in no other
way. We hope that the reports, which
they take or send to their own home
lands, are good ones, and that they
will remember British Columbia and
Canada with respect and affection for
the rest of their lives.
Our students, like other young
people, are warm-hearted and generous, when any appeal that catches
their  imagination  is  made  to   them.
Over 2,000 of them volunteered in
October to give their blood to the Red
Cross Blood-Donor Service, and during
the last 10 or 15 years, tens of thousands of donations have been made, and
many lives saved as a result of their
generosity.
This year, we have been asked to
take over all the Teacher Training in
the Province. This will mean that our
Normal Schools become part of our
College of Education, which will be
organised as a Faculty within the
University, the teaching to be done
here and in co-operation with Victoria
College, in Victoria. This decision, I
believe, is a wise and a far-sighted
one, but it will be a difficult one to
give effect to in the next two or
three years. It will considerably increase our problems here at the University; e.g., it will greatly increase
our student population.
Dentistry, Music and the Fine Arts,
Asian Studies, and the expansion of
work at the Graduate level, particularly in the Humanities and the Social
Sciences, are all on the doorstep, and
must, in the near future, become part
of the University of British Columbia.
These developments, together with
the certain and continuing increase
in student population, will create
many difficult problems for all of us
— the University, the Government,
and the Community. But if British
Columbia and Canada are to continue
to grow and expand and develop,
they must have an increasing number
of well-trained and well-educated
young men and women to supply the
technical skills, to fill professional
posts, and to provide the leadership
that is necessary. The cost will be
high, but, relative to highways, or
to the social services, it will be insignificant. Indeed, I suspect that we are
presently paying more for liquor, for
tobacco, and for entertainment than
we pay for University Education.
There should be no argument, among
reasonable men and women at least,
about the relative and creative importance of these various ways of
spending  money.
Our Provincial Government has
been and continues to be, generous.
This past year, they increased our
annual grant by $200,000. They have
also promised us $10,000,000 for capital construction over the next few
years, and they are in the process of
adding to our Campus an additional
433 acres from the Endowment Lands.
Chancellor Lett and President MacKenzie
For all of this we are very grateful.
Our friends too, in business, in industry, and throughout the community, continue their interest in and
support of the University; in fact.
U.B.C. was listed this year in the
"Financial Post" as having received
more support from business and
industry than any other University in
Canada. We are particularly grateful
to Mr. MacMillan, and to Mr. and
Mrs. Leon Koerner for their generous actions in setting up Foundations,
from which the University, as well as
others in the Community, will benefit
for many years to come.
These are the evidences of the kind
of public service and generous behavior which are so essential, not only to
the University, but in my opinion, to
the whole of Canada, if our present
system, in which the individual and
the corporation have a maximum of
freedom, is to survive and to flourish.
But, fine and generous as all these
have been, they still do not provide
us with enough money to carry on as
we should, and provide the services
expected of us. The capital grant of
$10,000,000 will do no more than
replace some of the 307 huts still in
use on and around the Campus. In
place of a $200,000 increase in our
current grant, we need at least $600,-
000, not to expand services, but to
bring our salaries up to the minimum
-levels in some other institutions, and
to provide the equipment and facilities
for our presently increased enrolment.
I hope that all of you, whenever the
occasion offers, will do what you can
to bring the University, in a reasonable and favourable way, to the attention of those who are in a position to
help us and our students.
ii
U.B.C.  ALUMNI   CHRONICLE For ,he ever-9rowin, "eeds of
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U.B.C. ALUMNI   CHRONICLE        12 NO NEWS IS GOOD NEWS -
By   David   Brock
The Fugitive
(On being told that to enjoy Trollopc
is merely an escape.)
Hy  calling Trollopc an escape
Vou twist the language  out of shape.
To read his works is not a flight
On being frightened by the night
But just a walk through close and park
And  Churchyard in  the  summer dark
Or just a stroll at noon.   Is that
A coward's flight?   Am I a rat?
And even if men make a kind
Of buttress of him for their mind.
The buttresses of Barchester
Are not escapes and never were.
Unless  of  course  you  use  that  noun
To  mean   that  churches  should   fall
down.
Water for a fainting man,
Green trees on the desert's tan,
Kind words to a frightened horse.
Fairways  through  the  links' deep
gorse . . .
These are unreal timid stuff?
Is life five hundred yards of rough?
In Trollope's bad old days of yore
Men might kill a metaphor,
But now they murder words all day;
Meaning has  escaped away.
They murder many a word, poor thing,
By drawing and by quartering;
They slit its belly, roughly prise
Its bowels out before its eyes,
And then they hitch, with sullen
hymns,
Four horses to its four poor limbs
And on their four ways these are
spurred
And stretch to death the innocent
word.
+
NEW PRESIDENT  FOR  U.  OF  N.
The new president of the University
of Nitinat, Vancouver Island, is Dr.
Borley P. Ghosh, until now the Dean
of Salesmanship, and some years ago
the first holder of the now famous
Chair of Personality. Dr. Ghosh proposes to make some highly interesting
changes in the attitude of the Faculty
towards education. "Every member of
my staff,"he says, "will have to regard
himself as a salesman, and the student
as a customer or prospect. This entails
putting the prospect on a pedestal.
There is to be no more talking down
to the prospect, no more patronizing
him. If the prospect thinks one of our
salesmen (formerly professors) is a
stuffed shirt, we lose a customer. That's
bad. I am asking every member of
the Faculty to read 'The Salesman's
Complete Ideas Handbook', by Bmille
Raux, published in 1954 by Prentice-
Hall. And I would like every lecturer to take a tip from p. 103, where
we read how Ward Schrack, top-notch
Colorado salesman, keeps himself in
a selling frame of mind. Ward Schrack
whistles or hums  as  he  walks from
his car to the door. Why can't ojv
lecturers whistle as they enter a lecture
room? They could whistle 'Gaudeaiii'ts
Itjitur'." Dr. Ghosh has given the
Faculty 30 days in which to form a
sincere liking for the customer.
P.P.A.
The University of Southern North
Borneo has lately formed a Parents
and PVofessors Association, along the
lines of the more familiar P.T.A. Once
a month the parents and professors
meet over steaming cups of nourishing
soup prepared by the Grandmothers'
Auxiliary. They discuss their little
problems. They thrash things out.
Sometimes they get round a table.
They are maturely aware of the fact
that  no  man  can  get  round  a  table
hy himself unless he is a snake.
Whereas in unity there is length.
Length of time as well as of circumference.
Once in a while the parents tell
the professors they don't much care
for the novels the students are asked
to read, and the professors put on a
straight face or an understanding
smile, as the occasion demands, and
everyone goes home feeling thrashed
out. This is the democratic way . . .
people who are not quite sure what
they are talking about are free to tell
the professors to mend their ways, and
the professors promise to but don't.
and the old soup keeps flowing and
warms people up for the long ride
home.
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13
U.B.C. ALUMNI   CHRONICLE Trinity Creek School, Armstrong School District
—a  Good  Example of an  Early Type of  Rural
School.
HISTORICAL  BACKGROUND
In the year 1849, when Hudson's
Bay Company received the crown
grant of the Island of Vancouver, the
Company's representatives agreed that
they would provide homes for British
colonists. An early historian reports:
"As soon as the colony at Vancouver
Island was organised, the Hudson's
Bay Company made arrangements to
provide education for the children of
its employees."
The first of the teachers provided
by the Company was the Rev. Chaplain
R. J. Staines, who arrived with his
wife at Fort Camosun in 1849 to
organise a boarding-school at Victoria
for the children of the Company's employees. His duties were to provide
the scholars with instruction in the
basic subjects — reading, writing,
spelling, arithmetic, history and geography.
From 1849 until 1856 the Governor
of the Colony ruled supreme with
the advice of a small Council. In 1856
the Colony was granted an Assembly
which, in response to petitions from
the colonists, recommended the allocation of £500 for the purpose of
building two schools, one in Victoria
and another at Craigfiower, a few-
miles away.
These private ventures, however, di^
not ameliorate appreciably the educational problems of the distant settlements in the fertile delta lands and in
the isolated trading-posts. A demand
for a public school system was therefore made by the Assembly in 1861.
It was not until 1865, however, that
the Governor acceded to the popular
demand for a general educational
system. In that year the sum of
$10,000 was set aside for school purposes, and a general school system was
formally established by the Free
School Act of Vancouver Island. Under
this Act a total of eleven so-called
Free Schools were established. The
parents paid 6 shillings per month
per child and the Assembly 4 shillings
per    month    per    child   towards    the
Education in British Columbia
—General Aspects
(*Three articles on "Education in British Columbia'' will be written by the Department of
Education, Victoria, for the U.B.C. Alumni
Chronicle. This first article deals with general
aspects of Education. The second article will
deal with Education in Elementary Schools and
the third, with Education in Secondary Schools.}
teacher's salary. A Superintendent,
Alfred Waddington, was appointed to
co-ordinate the work and administer
the Act.
In 1867, six of the eleven schools
which had been established in 1865
were forced to discontinue operation
through lack of funds. This closing
was because of failure of the governing bodies to support Education,
rather than because of lack of interest
by parents.
In 1872, when it became fully evident that nothing short of an absolutely free school system would end
this poorly-planned and inefficient
organisation, the Free Public School
Act was designed and passed. This Act
was modelled on the Ontario Act of
1846.
The keynote of the new Act was,
"To give every child in the Province
such knowledge as will fit him to
become a useful and intelligent citizen
in after years."
Beginning at the time of Confederation in 1871 with an enrolment of 350
pupils accommodated in 12 operating
schools at a cost of $23,000, the educational system of the Province has
moved steadily forward until, in 1955,
there are more than 1100 public schools
enrolling approximately 240,000 pupils
at a budgeted gross cost of over
$62,000,000.
PROBLEMS ENCOUNTERED
It will be surmised by the reader
that the expansion which has taken
place in the educational system of
British Columbia has not been achieved
without a considerable number of
growing pains. It is a fact that most
of the recent problems of the Department of Education have been concerned with population growth. In the
seven year period 1947 to 1955 the
school population has increased from
137,000 to 240,000 and in the next
seven years will probably rise to
300,000. In the same period the number of teachers has increased from
5,000 to 8,623; capital expenditure on
school buildings increased from 2
million to 23 million.
PUBLIC  DEMAND FOR EDUCATION
In addition to the increase in school
population one of the factors that
results in increased educational costs
is that British Columbia leads Canada
in the public demand for educational
facilities. In B.C., 56% of pupils reach
Grade XI; Canadian average 27%;
44% reach Grade XII; Canadian average 13%; 21% proceed beyond High
School;   Canadian   average   8%;   13%
go to Second Year College or equivalent; Canadian average 4%.
REORGANISATION   OF   DEPARTMENT
This growth resulted in a reorganisation of the Department of Education.
Up to 1954, the Department had been
growing by an accretion of functions
made necessary by an expanding
school population and a diversification
of educational offerings, but no comparable provision had been made to
handle the increased volume of work
and responsibility. During the past
year, the following promotions were
made to senior administrative positions: Chief Inspector of Schools, Coordinator of Teacher Education, and
Director of Administration. The reorganisation effected a re-assignment
of responsibilities by changing from
a pyramidal plan of administration
to a horizontal plan. It has resulted
in greatly increased efficiency and
service.
STANDARDS FOR BUILDINGS
In order to obtain the greatest educational returns from each dollar
spent on school buildings, the Department, with the assistance of school
officials, and others, compiled a School
Building Manual. This Manual advises
School Boards and architects of minimum approved standards of school
construction, the cost of which is
shareable by the Province. The officials
of the Department also undertook the
preparation of economical standard
school plans for one to eight room
schools. These plans will be available
at a nominal charge to all School
Boards. They were developed to fill a
demand and to illustrate how the
recommendations in the Building
Manual could be put into practice.
TEACHER   RECRUITMENT
Another problem connected with
school population growth is that of
teacher recruitment. At present and
for the immediate future the Department is gravely concerned regarding
the recruitment and training of an
adequate supply of the right type of
young person for teaching.
Because of teacher retirement and
expanding school population, the Province requires approximately 1,700 new
teachers per year. To meet this need
the Department has established in the
High Schools of the Province some 85
teacher-clubs with some 1,700 members and, by a $100,000 loan fund, is
attempting to encourage students to
enter teacher-training. In addition, the
immigration of well-qualified Secondary School British teachers is receiv-
U. B. C.  ALUMNI   CHRONICLE
14
MMM Fraser Lake Superior School—The Old and New in Rural School Architecture.
ing attention. Between 1941 and 1953
there was a 70% increase in the number of teachers in B.C. This compares
with 50% in N.S., 45% in N.B., 33%
in Ontario, 29% in Manitoba, 23% in
Alberta, 11% in P.E.I, and a decrease
of .027c in Saskatchewan. Since 1953,
the statistics are even more startling
because 1955 represents our year of
greatest expansion to date. B.C. teachers are highest qualified in Canada.
In 1953, 36.1% had University Degrees
compared to a Canadian average of
22.5%. Ontario and Alberta followed
B.C. with 24.6% and 21.8% respectively.
IMPROVED   TEACHER-TRAINING   FACILITIES!
Preparations are also under way to
improve teacher-training facilities; by
an agreement between the University
and the Department, teacher-education will become a joint enterprise. A
special faculty of the University, to
be known as a College of Education,
will be established and existing Normal Schools will be incorporated into
it. Victoria College has already become
a provincial institution with the Victoria Normal School becoming an
integral part of it.
CURRICULUM DEVELOPMENT
With an objective of adjusting the
Curriculum to meet the needs of
changing conditions of society, a Provincial Curriculum Advisory Board
has been set up. The Committee consists of 25 top-level members from
lay and professional groups representative of business, industry, labour,
forestry, agriculture, fisheries, mining,
Boards of Trade, Women's Organisations, personnel and office management, School Trustees, Parent-teachers, B.C. Teachers' Federation, Secondary and Elementary School Principals.
The function of this Board, which
meets quarterly, is broadly advisory
to the Minister of Education on current problems relating to the Curriculum of Elementary and Secondary
Schools of the Province.
The Curriculum is constantly under
revision. Sixteen committees of about
100 teachers are presently at work on
course revisions in the basic subjects
at the Elementary School level.
CORRESPONDENCE EDUCATION
For those students unable to attend
the regular public schools, the Department operates an Elementary School
Correspondence Branch and a High
School Correspondence Branch. The
Elementary School Branch now provides correspondence instruction for
some 1,225 children and 195 adults,
or a total of 1,420 students, who live
in parts of the F'rovince remote from
schools. The High School Correspondence Branch! caters to those in areas
remote from High Schools, to students
in the very small Superior and High
Schools which are unable to offer all
of the required courses, and to private
study adult students. The Branch
offers 115 courses to an enrolled 9,000
students; employs 63 full-time or part-
time instructors who mark 14,000 students' papers per month. It is recognised that British Columbia's correspondence instruction is equal, if not
superior, to anything of its kind in the
world.
COMMUNITY PROGRAMMES
This recently reorganised Branch
has as its guiding philosophy, "to
help people help themselves in planning their recreational and leisure-
time activities." The Branch employs
9 District Consultants. There are now
some 86 Local Recreation Commissions
operating in the Province—a fourfold increase in the past year. These
Commissions report the employment
of 26 full-time local Directors, 752
recreational activities, with 66,574
persons participating. In addition,
under the School Boards, recreational
night school courses have enrolled
3,381 persons in 46 centres.
SCHOOL FOR DEAF AND BLIND
The enrolment at this school continues to increase slowly. It is now
180 with an anticipated attendance
of 200 for 1956. Plans for a separate
unit for blind students are being
developed to provide better accommodation and for an anticipated increase expected to reach 90 by 1959.
TEXT-BOOK   BRANCH
This Branch supplies all prescribed
text-books for Grades 1-VI on a free
issue basis while the Text-book Rental
Plan, inaugurated in 1950, operates
for grades VII to XIII inclusive. The
Plan has functioned well for parents,
students and teachers, and is highly
regarded by all concerned. During the
year, largely as a result of revisions
of courses, 20 new texts were authorised to replace obsolescent ones.
PROVINCIAL LIBRARY AND ARCHIVES
The Library attempts to be the
repository of all possible printed
material with respect to British Columbia. During the year, 20 new titles
of newspapers and periodicals have
been added and some 6,000 new general book titles.
The Archives specialises in collecting and preserving manuscripts and
photographic records relative to the
development of the Province. The
Archives sponsor and assist local historical societies, who are interested
in preserving historical materials
which otherwise would be lost.
SCHOOL RADIO BROADCASTS
This Branch, in co-operation with
other Provinces and the Canadian
Broadcasting Company, prepares and
broadcasts daily half-hour school programmes in Music, English, Social
Studies, Science, Art, French and
other subjects. The purpose of these
broadcasts is to supplement and enrich the Curriculum offering, particularly in rural areas. Over 1,000
classrooms report listening regularly,
over C.B.R., or one of twenty-one
separate stations or of ten affiliated
stations.
VISUAL EDUCATION BRANCH
An important modern instructional
aid consists of visual materials such
as silent and sound films, film strip,
pictures, etc. Such materials, designed
to supplement the programme of
studies, are provided on loan to every
school in the Province. The volume
of this service may be judged by the
fact that 3 tons of such materials are
shipped out weekly.
CONCLUSION
It will be noted from this description of activities under the direction
of the Department of Education, that
Education in British Columbia has
progressed considerably from the early
days when the three R's plus History
and Geography constituted the whole
Curriculum. —W.A.P.
tSee U.B.C. Alumni Chronicle, Autumn Issue,
1955, pp. 14-15, article entitled. College of
Education for the University.
JSee   U.B.C.   Alumni  Chronicle,   Winter   Issue,
1954,  pp. 8-9, Graduate Profile—Edith  Lucas.
Bench Elementary School, Vancouver Island. A
Modern   Rural   School
15        U.B.C. ALUMNI   CHRONICLE Makers of the University-
Robert Edward McKechnie
R.   E.  McKechnie,  C.B.E.,  M.D.,  CM.
By WALTER N. SAGE*
Dr. Robert Edward McKechnie was
a pioneer in both Medicine and Education in British Columbia. For over
thirty years he was recognised as the
"Dean" of the medical profession in
the province, and his fame as a surgeon extended, not only down the
Pacific Coast, but all across Canada.
From April, 1918, to his death on
May 24, 1944, he was Chancellor of
the University of British Columbia.
Previous to his election as Chancellor
he had been a University Senator and
later, a member of the Board of Governors. A loyal son of McGill, he was
in 1899 one of the founders of the
McGill Graduates' Society in British
Columbia, but in his later life he was
even more devoted to the University
of British Columbia, of which he was
one of the chief supporters.
It was characteristic of Dr. McKechnie that he was very proud to be
Chancellor of our University. It was
not an ostentatious pride, but nonetheless it was not concealed. On the
day of the 'Great Trek', in the
Autumn of 1922, when standing with
one or two of the professors in the
top of the shell of the Science Building, now the Chemistry Building, Dr.
McKechnie recalled that as a young-
man he had dreamed of being a professor in the McGill Medical School.
This ambition he had never realised,
but, he added quietly and with the
utmost simplicity, "Now I am the
Chancellor of the University of British
Columbia."
It is now more than eleven years
since Dr. R. E. McKechnie died, and
it comes as a shock to realise that he
is unknown, except possibly by name,
not only to several generations of
university students, but also to the
majority of the younger members of
+    Chancellor 1918-1944
* Professor Emeritus of History, the University
of British Columbia.
The author wishes to acknowledge with heartiest thanks, the kind co-operation and assistance of Dr. L. S. Klinck, President Emeritus, and
Dr. R. E. McKechnie, Jr.
the Teaching Staff. The older graduates should remember him, especially
those of the early years, who recall the
gracious receptions given by Dr. and
Mrs. McKechnie at their home, "Drum-
tochty", in Vancouver. I remember
how, in some subtle way, the Chancellor, with his accustomed ease,
bridged the academic and age gaps
amongst all of us.
At the Congregation ceremonies,
Dr. McKechnie nearly always made
an address. It did not vary much from
year to year, and as the Chancellor
always spoke in a low voice, and, of
course, with no microphone to magnify
the sound, it was not usually heard
at the back of the hall. From one or
two of these early addi-esses, and
from the preface he wrote for the
1921 Annual we can reconstruct a
portion, at least, of Dr. McKechnie's
philosophy of education. It was simple
and practical, but not lacking in a
certain touch of idealism. He habitually congratulated the students in
obtaining their degrees, but warned
them that they were just commencing
life and that they should not be content with a little success too soon. He
also stressed the value of a liberal
education:
"Referring to the ancient conception
of education as an exercise for the
mind, he condemned the modern tendency to exclusive practicality in
education, at the expense of the development of the soul, which came
with a good liberal education." t
In the Preface to the 1921 Annual,
Dr. McKechnie thus expressed his
views regarding other aspects of University life: "Education is not confined
to the study of books, and so, in University life, the various student
activities count for much. Athletics
teach self-control, quick perception,
instant decision and as speedy action—
and in the more strenuous games,
physical as well as moral courage are
unconsciously learned and strengthened. The artistic is developed in the
musical and dramtic clubs, and social
functions give opportunities to many
to acquire a polish which will smooth
many a rough place in after life. And
this is all Education, but with the pill
coated with sugar."
One can almost hear Dr. McKechnie's characteristic little chuckle when
he penned the last lines with their
medical metaphor. He was a humanist.
tThe Vancouver Province, May 16, 1919, reporting Dr. McKechnie's first Congregation
address as Chancellor.
rather than an academic, but above
all he was a great physician and surgeon. As a surgeon his skill was extraordinary, and his speed terrific. His
was a sure, unfailing touch. He knew
at once what to do and he did it.
Nonetheless he never ceased to be a
"family doctor", and spent countless
hours in his office talking to his
patients and diagnosing their ills. He
loved people and did not treat them
as laboratory material. As a result,
both in his office and in the hospitals,
he was loved and universally respected.
He always tried to be punctual, but
never seemed to be in a hurry.
As Chancellor, and consequently.
Chairman of the Board of Governors,
and for several years also Chairman
of the University Senate, Dr. McKechnie never attempted to lead discussions or to put forward his own
views. Dr. L. S. Klinck, who, as President of the University, was closely
associated with the Chancellor for
over a quarter of a century, stated
recently in private conversation that
Dr. McKechnie initiated very little,
either academically or administratively, but that he attended all the
meetings of the Board, many of the
Senate and also numerous special
meetings held in his office. He rarely
spoke in the Board or the Senate, but
was keenly interested and well informed. When he did express his
views he carried great weight with
his associates. He looked to the Senate
to recommend changes and additions
in academic policy and to the Board
to implement these whenever possible.
As his name suggests, Chancellor
McKechnie was of Highland Scottish
origin. He was born at Brockville,
Ontario on April 25, 1861, the son of
Major William McKechnie of Claver-
house Castle, Scotland, and Mary Bell
McKechnie. Emigrating to Canada,
Major McKechnie was, in turn, a
Divisional Superintendent with the
Grand Trunk Railway, Traffic Manager of the Midland, and General
Superintendent of the Prince Edward
Island Railway. All these lines now
form part of the Canadian National
Railway. It is not surprising, therefore, to learn that young Robert
Edward McKechnie obtained his elementary schooling at Brockville,
attended high school at Port Hope,
Ontario, and was a student at Prince
of Wales College, Charlottetown,
P.E.I. Fired by ambition to become a
medical doctor, young McKechnie, ,in
order to better his financial position,
U.B.C.  ALUMNI   CHRONICLE
16 went West and homesteaded in Southern Manitoba. After his father retired
from the railway, the McKechnie
family also settled in Manitoba. For
seven years R. E. McKechnie, as The
Vancouver Province graphically recorded, "Trudged behind his oxen
until he had earned enough to take
him to McGill."J
After eight-and-a-half years, two of
which, 1898-1900, witnessed his political career as M.L.A. for Nanaimo
City and President of the Council in
the Semlin Administration, Dr. McKechnie decided to go to Europe and
to obtain graduate training in Medicine and Surgery. He spent over a
year in Vienna which was then famed
for its Surgeons.
When he returned from Europe in
1903, Dr. McKechnie settled in Vancouver where he practised Medicine
for over forty years. His professional
advance is recorded in the various
offices and positions which he held in
medical societies. For fifteen years he
was a member of the Council and
Examining Board of the British
Columbia College of Physicians and
Surgeons, and three times he was its
President. He was the first President
of the British Columbia Medical Association, and in 1920 was President of
the Canadian Medical Association. In
1913, the year after the American
College of Surgeons was organised,
he became a Fellow of that College,
and later served for eight years as a
member of its Board of Regents. He
was also a Fellow of the Royal College of Surgeons (Canada), and in
1920-21 was President of the North
Pacific Surgical Association. When
the Dominion Medical Council formed
its first Examining Board, Dr. McKechnie became one of its members.
He was for years a consulting surgeon
for both the Vancouver General Hospital and Saint Paul's Hospital in
Vancouver.
At McGill, he led his class, and, on
graduation in 1890, he was awarded
the Holmes Gold Medal for general
proficiency. After spending a year as
a graduate assistant at the Montreal
General Hospital, and dreaming,
apparently, of establishing himself in
the medical profession in Montreal,
he once again heard the call of the
West. This time he came to the Pacific
Coast and was appointed Assistant
Surgeon to Dr. I. M. Eberts at the
Wellington Collieries on Vancouver
Island.
In 1893, Dr. McKechnie settled in
Nanaimo as surgeon for the New
Vancouver Coal Company. The President of the Company, Samuel M.
Robbins, even as early as 1895, was
interested in applying the principles of
Social Work to Industry. As a result,
he "signed up McKechnie as Company
Doctor and this became the first
experiment in Canada of a service
paid jointly by Company and Miners
to provide medical treatment."**
Other honours were also conferred
upon Dr. McKechnie. He was a Companion of the Order of the British
Empire and the recipient of King-
George Vs Silver Jubilee Medal. In
1934 he received the Good Citizenship
Medal, awarded by the Native Sons
of British Columbia. Both McGill and
the University of British Columbia
conferred upon him the Honorary
Degree of Doctor of Laws.
Dr. McKechrie
was interested in
Sport and donated
a Trophy for the
Rugby Football
Championship of
British Columbia,
which is still
known as the McKechnie Cup. It
gave him special
pleasure on several occasions to
present the Cup
to winning teams
from his beloved
U.B.C.
In politics a Liberal, in religion an
Anglican, in Freemasonry a high
degree holder in the Scottish Rite,
Dr. McKechnie served his community
well. He was also a member of the
Vancouver Club, the Terminal City
Club and the Royal Vancouver Yacht
Club.
On May 26, 1891, Dr. McKechnu
married Miss Helen Albina Russell of
Montreal. Their only child, Reverend
Eberts Mills McKechnie, who became
Dean of Windsor College, Colorado,
died in 1933. It was a terrible blow to
his parents, but Dr. McKechnie sought
to   lighten   it   by   paying   even   more
The McKechnie Cup
attention than ever to the young
internes who were training as surgeons  under  his  direction.
In May 1944, while performing an
operation, Dr. McKechnie had the misfortune to infect his right hand. Although he received all possible medical
and surgical care, he was now 83 years
of age, and his work was done. He
died quietly and peacefully in the
Vancouver General Hospital on May
24, and was buried from Christ Church
Cathedral, Vancouver, B.C., on May
27. At the funeral service President
Klinck delivered an address from
which the following sentences are
taken:
"It has been said that no two
observers see the same rainbow, nor
do any two critics see precisely the
same excellencies in canvas or marble.
Nor do men, in the same degree, see
the virtues and abilities of a great
and good man. But what, by common
consent, did Dr. McKechnie's fellow-
citizens see in his life and in his
work ? They saw a strength of personality, a nobility of character, a
professional proficiency, an altruistic
public spirit. They saw a man whose
interests and sympathies were as
spontaneous as they were catholic; a
man gentle in disposition, quiet and
unassuming in manner, constant in
friendship, wise in counsel, and tireless in his devotion to duty; a man
who gave cheerfully and unsparingly
of his scanty leisure time to worthy
community causes; one whose friendly
smile and kindly eyes revealed his
sympathy with all that is good in
life; a man who won their confidence,
commanded their respect, and retained
their  undying affection."
Such was Dr. R. E. McKechnie!
tThe Vancouver Province, May 25,  1944.
"The Vancouver Sun, May 25,   1944.
Congregation  Procession  May  12,   1944.    From  Left:   Dean  J.   N.   Finlayson,   Dean  Mawdsley,  Dr.
McColl (St. Andrew's-Wesley Church), Dean D. Buchanan, Principal James of McGill, Congregation
Speaker, Chancellor McKechnie, Hon. R. L. Maitland, Attorney-General, and President Klinck. This
was the last occasion on which Dr. McKechnie presided as Chancellor.
17        U.B.C. ALUMNI   CHRONICLE Autumn Degree Ceremony
+    Chancellor Welcomed
+    Social Workers Honoured
Chief Justice Sherwood Lett, Chancellor of the University, received a
warm ovation at the Twenty-ninth Autumn Congregation, held in the Women's Gymnasium in the afternoon of
October 28. After extending congratulations to the Chancellor on his appointment as Chief Justice of the
Supreme Court of British Columbia,
President MacKenzie welcomed him
back to the University after his prolonged tour of public duty as Head of
the Canadian Delegation on the United
Nations Truce Commission in Indochina.
CONFERRING OF DEGREES
A total of 278 degrees were conferred in all Faculties, including 10
Ph.D.'s in the Faculty of Graduate
Studies. In addition, 48 students received Diplomas in Hospital Administration, Teacher Training, Clinical
Supervision and Public Health
Nursing.
The occasion also marked the
Twenty-fifth Anniversary of the first
Social Work Courses given at U.B.C.
and in recognition of this important
landmark in the history of Social
Work in British Columbia, the University conferred the Honorary Degree
of Doctor of Laws on five outstanding
students and workers in the broad
field of Social Welfare.
Dr. Eileen Younghusband. C.B.E..
who gave the Congregation Address,
was described in the citation for the
degree as "a Social Worker who moves
on those high national and international levels where social policy is
made, an indefatigable organiser
and administrator, a true servant
of distressed humanity . . . For
many years she has been Lecturer
and Director of Field Work in the Department of Social Service at the London School of Economics," where she
has recently been chosen to direct the
new course in Social Work Training,
supported by the Carnegie Trust.
Miss Zella Collins was honoured "as
one of the original founders and organisers of our University's training
courses in Social Work . . . Besides
acting as Executive Director of the
Children's Aid Society . . . she was
our first director of field work instruction . . . During the post-war years of
heavy enrolment, she supervised students in their field work," until her
retirement in 1953.
Dr. George F. Davidson, B.A. (Honours in Classics) '28, M.A., Ph.D.
(Harv.), has spent most of his life
since graduation in the Public Welfare
Services, in the Civic field, in Vancouver, in the Provincial arena, in Victoria
as Director of Social Welfare, and,
since 1942, in Ottawa, where, for the
past 11 years, he has been Deputy
Minister of Welfare in the Federal
Department of Health and Welfare.
This distinguished son of U.B.C. was
honoured "for his personal qualities.
The five recipients of Honorary Degrees at Autumn Congregation. From Left: Chancellor Lett,
Miss Zella Collins, LL.D., R. E. G. Davis, LL.D., Miss Eileen Younghusband, LL.D., Chancellor
Emeritus Hamber, Miss Amy Hamilton, LL.D., George F. Davidson, LL.D., and President MacKenzie.
which so well reflect his humane studies, no less than for his contributions
to the improvement of human welfare
in British Columbia, in Canada, and
through the United Nations."
The Honorary Degree was conferred
on Richard E. G. Davis, B.A. (Toronto), Executive Director, Canadian
Welfare Council, "in tribute to a great
Canadian Social Worker and to the
ideals for which he has consistently
and arduously striven: first, the desire
to make Social Welfare an interest,
not of a few professional experts, but
of the community as a whole; secondly,
a sensitive awareness of the need for
knowledge and understanding between
class and class, between Province and
Province, between English-speaking
and French-speaking; and thirdly, the
acceptance of the principle that we
human beings, wherever, whoever,
whatever we may be, are truly members one of another."
Miss Amy Gordon Hamilton, Professor of Social Work, New York
School of Social Work, Columbia University, was presented to the Chancellor as "an internationally-known
scholar and philosopher in the field of
Social Work ... a teacher of teaching,
who has been a leader of those who
have laid foundations and raised professional standards wherever Social
Welfare programmes are in operation
or even projected."
CONGREGATION ADDRESS
In her Congregation Address, entitled, Social Work Education in the
World Today, Miss Younghusband
gave a penetrating analysis of her
subject. She expressed her belief
that Social Work education, at any
level, in any land, will depend upon
the aspirations of any given society.
Since "Social Work is an expression of
the social conscience, one of the chief
means by which society carries into
effect its concern for the under-privileged . . ., the role of Social Work, in a
complexity of worlds, is to help mankind to become more responsible, more
civilised, in relation to the weaker
members of the community, and, in so
doing, to help individuals to discover
richer and more varied ways of living
in society."
"The United Nations has undertaken international studies of professional social work education and in-
service training . . . The pooling of
knowledge and resources as between
different countries is going forward
on a very considerable scale ... In
the ten years since the war ended,
Social Work education has made phenomenal advances . . . The demand
from other parts of the world for help
from Canadian and American Faculty
members far exceeds the supply."
"The profession is in its early beginnings ... In the centuries which lie
ahead we confidently hope that we
shall learn to meet more surely man's
need to live and love to the full in this
infinitely lovely and varied world
which is our inheritance."
U. B. e.  ALUMNI. CHRONICLE
IB Growing Interest In Homecoming
#»SH*"1
1. In the Chow Line, Class of '30 Twenty-fifth
Anniversary Dinner, Faculty Club, evening,
November  5.   Second  from   Left  is  Dr.  T.   H.
Boggs, Hon. Pres. of the Class.
2. Class of '30 Dinner, presided over by Doug
Macdonald,  assisted   by  Bill   Robbins  and  Jim
Pike.
3. Members  of  Class  of  '35   choosing   eats  at
Buffet  Supper, Armouries  Mess,  evening,  November 4.   Alex Wood carved the ham.
4. From Left: Bern Brynelsen (M.C. at Class of
'35 Twentieth Anniversary Party), Marny Stew
art,   Mrs.   Brynelsen,   John   Biller,   Kay   Biller,
Mrs.   Northcott   and   Phil   Northcott.
5. From Left: Mrs. J. A. Leith, J. A. Leith,
Dean Emeritus Hector J. MacLeod, Hon. Pres.
Class of '45, Mrs. MacLeod, and  Dean Walter
Gage.
6. Class of '45 Reunion Dinner, Faculty Club,
November 3;  Master  of Ceremonies was Jack
D. Hetherington.
7. Harry Price leads Musical Society Glee Club
in "Hail U.B.C." at Buffet Luncheon in Brock
Hall   before  the   Homecoming   Football  Game.
8. On their way to the Game. From Left: Attorney-General and Mrs. Robert Bonner, Mrs.
Lett and Chief Justice Chancellor Sherwood
Lett, Aubrey Roberts, Peter Sharp, Mrs. Roberts,
President  MacKenzie,   Ron   Bray,  Joe  Brown.
9. At the Football Game, from Left: Peter
Sharp, the Hon. Robert Bonner, President Mackenzie,   Chancellor   Lett,   Aubrey   Roberts,   Ron
Bray.
10. Aubrey Roberts, Arts'23, receives the 1955
Great   Trekker   Award   from   A.M.S.   President,
Ron   Bray,  before  the   Game.
1.9.
U.B. C.  ALUMNI   CHRONICLE Albert Einstein-
Architect of Modern Thought
Einstein   talks   with   Dr.   Robert   Oppenheimer,
Director   of   the   School   for   Advanced   Study,
Princeton,  New  Jersey,  where  Einstein  held  a
Fellowship   for many  years.
Phcto   taken   by   LIFE   Photographer   ALFRED
EISENSTAEDT,  TIME,   Inc.,   and  published  here
by courtesy of LIFE.
By   GEORGE   M.   VOLKOFF
A  BASIC  CONVICTION
"The most incomprehensible thing
about the world is that it is comprehensible." So wrote Albert Einstein.
When asked as to how he arrived at
his theory of relativity he replied that
he had discovered it because he was
so firmly convinced of the harmony
of the universe. He worked all his life
with a definite plan in mind—to understand the physical world starting
with a minimum number of assumptions consistent with our observational
experience.
INTELLECTUAL AND MORAL QUALITIES
Quite early in his life Einstein had
become, for the common man, a
symbol of the highest scientific and
intellectual achievement, and he remained a legend in his own lifetime
until his recent death on April 18th
at the age of 76. He made a tremendous impact on the minds of multitudes of people who have very little
inkling of the meaning of his revolutionary ideas. Because this is so, then,
to assess Einstein's influence on our
world, we have to speak of him not
only as a philosopher-scientist, but
also as a man, and a symbol.
At the age of sixty-seven Einstein
wrote in his autobiographical notes:
"the essential in the being of a man
of my type lies precisely in what he
thinks and how he thinks, not in what
he does or suffers." But I am sure
that Einstein had a deep insight into
the reason for the wide acclaim of
men like himself when he said in a
different connection: "the moral qualities of great personalities are perhaps
more significant for a generation and
*Part of a radio talk, given by Professor Volk-
otf on June 8, 1955, in a C.B.C. series entitled,
Architects of Modern Thought. Copies of the
series of ten talks when completed, will be
available in pamphlet form from the C.B.C.
for the course of history than purely
intellectual accomplishments."
THREEFOLD  REVOLUTION   IN  SCIENTIFIC
THOUGHT
In the mind of the general public
the name Albert Einstein is indis-
solubly linked with the one word—
"relativity". Actually there are two
quite distinct theories bearing that
name: his special theory of relativity
published in 1905; and his general
theory of relativity published in 1916.
Both these revolutions Einstein carried
out singlehanded. The third revolution
which Einstein helped other physicists
to launch is the Quantum Theory.
Although his connection with the
Quantum Theory is much less well
known to the average person, his
contributions to this field are every
bit as important as the two relativity
theories. In fact, it is for a contribution made by Einstein to the Quantum
Theory in 1905 that he was awarded
the Nobel Prize in 1922.
What was the general scope of
these three revolutions ? At the risk
of tremendous over-simplification we
may say that through Special Relativity theory Einstein revolutionised
our concept of Time, through General
Relativity theory he revolutionised
our concept of Space, and through
Quantum Theory he helped to revolutionise our concepts of Matter and of
Radiation.
TIME NOT AN ABSOLUTE CONCEPT
Prior to 1905 the intuitive notion
was universally held that Time was
absolute, and the same for all observers, irrespective of their state of
motion. This meant that two events
at two different places, which appear
simultaneous to some one observer,
would necessarily have to appear
simultaneous to all other possible
observers. Consider this statement:
"the wheels of an eastbound plane
touched the runway of Montreal airport at precisely the same instant that
another westbound plane touched down
at Vancouver." In principle, such a
statement could be checked by carefully synchronised clocks at the two
airports, or by transmitting televised
images of the planes from one control
tower to the other, and allowing for
the known length of time it takes the
television signals to travel between
the two locations. Once the above
statement is agreed on by the control
tower operators at the two airports,
then, in accordance with the pre-
Einstein way of thinking, the navigators of both planes, which are also
assumed to be equipped with similar
clocks    and    television    sets,    would
necessarily be expected to agree with
the ground observers.
Einstein conducted a careful logical
analysis of the possible methods of
intercomparison of clocks of the stationary observers on the ground, and
of the moving observers in the planes,
by means of light or radio signals.
He showed that clocks moving relative
to one another would not keep the
same time, and that the plane navigators must necessarily disagree with
the ground observers. If the ground
observers agree that the two planes
touched down simultaneously, then
each of the two plane navigators must
necessarily conclude that he made
contact with the runway a little before
his opposite number. In this particular
example, since the speed of the planes
is small compared to the speed of
light, the discrepancy can be computed to be less than a billionth of a
second, and of no practical consequence. But such discrepancies are
of tremendous significance in principle,
for as soon as speeds approaching
those of light become involved, as
they often are in modern physics, the
discrepancies also become serious.
NEW  CONCEPTION  OF  MASS—SPECIAL
RELATIVITY
Thus Einstein was the first to
realise that Time is not an absolute
concept, but depends on the point of
view of the observer. From this new
way of looking at Time further highly
unexpected and unfamiliar logical consequences were drawn by Einstein.
The length and mass of an object are
not absolute but depend on the speed
of the object with respect to the
observer. The mass of an object tends
to infinity as its speed approaches
that of light. This means that the
speed of light is a limiting speed which
can not be exceeded by any material
object. These revolutionary departures
from the mechanics of Newton are
now common engineering facts
familiar to designers of all modern
giant "atom-smashers".
Since a moving object acquires
kinetic energy as its speed increases,
and its mass goes up at the same
time, Einstein saw that this could be
rephrased into the statement that
energy has mass. Conversely, matter,
if a mechanism could be devised for
converting it into energy, would yield
staggering quantities of energy in
accordance with the now famous
formula E-MC2 which has become
known to all newspaper readers in
connection with the atomic bomb. This
formula for the first time pointed to
the solution of the old riddle of the
U.B.C. ALUMNI   CHRONICLE        20 seemingly inexhaustible stores of
energy which have kept our sun and
all the other stars shining for billions
of years. It also gave hope for the
understanding of the sources of energy
released by radioactive substances
discovered at the turn of the century,
and pointed the way to the atomic
bomb.
GENERAL  RELATIVITY
The state of Physics was ripe in
1905 for the Special Relativity revolution. It is quite conceivable that if
Einstein had not done it, then in a
few years some other physicist might
have been forced to give the same
revised view of the relative nature
of Time, together with all its consequences.
But the second revolution—that of
General Relativity of 1916 — is a
unique creation of Einstein's. Had he
not lived it could easily have remained
undiscovered for decades, or even
centuries. General Relativity was not
devised to overcome pressing perplexing experimental paradoxes with
which physicists were currently faced,
as was the case with Special Relativity
or with Quantum Theory.
General Relativity stems from Einstein's reflections on the well known
experimental fact that bodies of both
large and small mass behave the same
under the action of gravitation. It
leads to the only new way of looking
at gravitation proposed since Newton.
Newton considered planets moving
through uniform, infinite, empty Space
under the action of gravitational
forces transmitted in some unknown
way through the empty Space to great
distances. Space itself was assumed
to be the same everywhere, independent of whether material bodies
were present in it or not ,and subject
to the laws of Euclid's geometry.
In Einstein's novel conception, the
presence of a massive body such as
the sun essentially changes the nature
of Space in its neighborhood. The
presence of matter "warps" Space in
such a way that Euclid's geometry
no longer applies in these "warped"
regions. A body, such as the earth,
in moving through regions of Space
"warped" by the more massive sun,
follows an elliptical orbit not because
it feels a force from the sun, but
because this elliptical path is the
easiest path for it to follow through
such "warped" Space. The striking
suggestion was also made by Einstein
that because of being "warped" Space
might be finite in extent.
IMPORTANCE TO PHYSICS OF RELATIVITY
Conceptionally this second revolution is just as bold as the first, and
philosophically its significance is just
as great. But from a practical point
of view the general theory of relativity is less spectacular than the
special theory. It does not give rise
to striking new laws like E-MC2. In
fact, its predictions, to a first approximation, are precisely those of Newton's
theory. In second approximation, there
are some subtle differences, so small
as to be difficult of experimental
verification. However, three checks
have been made, and they all give
support to Einstein's views as against
Newton's. One of these checks has
to do with the bending of light rays
under the action of gravity, and is
carried out by observing stars near
the edge of the sun's disc during a
total eclipse.
General Relativity theory does not
exercise the same influence on other
parts of Physics that Special Relativity does, although it has moulded
the modern approach to theories of
cosmology. A physicist, unless he specialises in the problems of the universe on the large astronomical scale,
can afford to remain ignorant of the
details of General Relativity. But
since both Special Relativity ard
Quantum Theory lie at the basis of all
modern atomic and nuclear theory,
which is the current centre of interest
in Physics, no physicist can afford to
be unfamiliar with these two theories.
QUANTUM THEORY
We now come to the third revolution
in physics connected with Einstein's
name—known as the Quantum Theory.
At the close of the nineteenth centuiy
the physical world was pictured as
containing matter and electromagnetic
radiation, such as light or radio waves.
Matter was thought to be discontinuous, made up of individual billiard
ball-like atoms. Radiation was viewed
as continuous waves carrying energy
and spreading out from a source like
ripples uniformly in all directions.
Planck was the first to propose in
1900 that radiation, like matter, also
was not continuous but was absorbed
and emitted in chunks or in "quanta".
In his Nobel prize-winning paper of
1905, Einstein gave strong arguments
to support the view that radiant
energy not only had to be taken up
or given out by atoms in chunks or
"quanta" as Planck proposed, but
that it also travelled through space
in the form of bullet-like "quanta" or
"photons". This was a radical chang;e
in our conception of the nature of
radiation.
USE   OF   QUANTUM   THEORY   IN   ATOMIC
AND NUCLEAR STUDY
The detailed working out of the
ideas that radiation sometimes behaves like "quanta", while matter
sometimes behaves like waves, forms
the content of Quantum Theory which
lies at the basis of our modern description of all atomic and nuclear phenomena. In the course of working out
this theory, many modern physicists
like Bohr and Heisenberg have carried
on this third revolution to conclusions
with which Einstein could not agree.
Quantum Theory has led most physicists to the view that the behaviour
of individual atoms is in many respects
not governed by any causal law, and
that   the   observed   regularities    are
merely statistical. A life insurance
company cannot predict in advance
which particular clients will die in the
course of the coming year, but it can
predict very accurately how many will
die. This is the point of view of most
contemporary physicists with respect
to radioactive disintegration. Two
atoms of uranium may have existed
side by side in a sample of pitchblende
for billions of years. Suddenly one of
them disintegrates while the other
one may stay undisturbed for further
millions of years. What determines
which one breaks up now, and which
one remains unchanged ? Modern
physicists say "pure chance". Einstein
replied: "God does not play dice."
AN  UNSOLVED PROBLEM
He expected that some more fundamental underlying cause might eventually be discovered which defiinitely
determines which of the two atoms
will disintegrate first. On this philosophic point at present there is no
agreement, and it is one of the most
fascinating unanswered questions in
science today. Einstein was asked by
a younger colleague: "Why are you
so dissatisfied with Quantum Theory,
especially with the development that
really started from your own work?"
He replied: "Yes, I may have started
it. but I always regarded these ideas
as temporary. I never thought that
others would take them so much more
seriously than I did." As has happened
with other revolutions in the past, the
revolution of Quantum Theory, once
set in motion, has far outrun the
intentions of one of its bold originators.
But whichever way this particular
controversy may eventually be resolved, physicists everywhere join in
Robert Oppenheimer's tribute: "When.
if ever, Einstein shall have ceased to
be a beacon to physicists. Physics will
have ceased to be."
Professor George M. Volkoff, M.B.E., B.A/34,
M.A.'36, Ph.D. (Calif.), D.Sc'45, F.R.S.C. Dr.
Volkoff, a member of the U.B.C. Physics Department, studied under Dr. Oppenheimer at
the   University   of   California.
21
U.B.C.  ALUMNI   CHRONICLE Trade Commissioner Service
Draws U.B.C Alumni
+    Alumni in Many Lands
H.   Leslie   Brown,   B.A.'28,   Commercial   Counsellor,  Canadian   Embassy,  Caracas,  Venezuela.
By H.  LESLIE BROWN,  B.A.'28
The Trade Commissioner Service of
the Department of Trade and Commerce has been promoting and fostering Canadian Trade abroad for more
than sixty years and men from B.C.
have taken part in that work. For
example Dana Wilgress, now ambassador to NATO, was a Trade Commissioner for many years. This story,
however, is concerned only with those
U.B.C. graduates who are still active
members of the service.
A word about the titles: all officers
of the Service are Trade Commissioners when posted abroad. Each man
attached to a diplomatic mission is
Commercial Counsellor, Commercial
Secretary or Assistant Trade Commissioner and, if attached to a Consulate, also bears consular rank. Quite
simple, really . . .
The "pioneer" of U.B.C. graduates
now in the Service is Paul McLane,
Arts'24, a native son, educated in the
schools of the province. Paul was at
U.B.C. in the hostoric days of the
Fairview "shacks" and the "Trek".
He subsequently studied and taught
at the University of California before
joining the service in 1928. His first
years abroad were at Kobe, Japan,
during which time he married Peggy
Paterson, a B.C. girl.
In 1939 he was placed in charge
of the Hong Kong office and was there
long enough to be caught on that
fateful Christmas day in 1941 when
the island fell to Japanese forces. Paul
went through an unpleasant six
months in crowded quarters and with
food such as reduced his weight about
sixty pounds. More unpleasant still
was his complete ignorance of the
fate of Peggy who had gone to Manila
for safety! She too was interned and
she too had no news. Imagine their
delight when they found one another
on the wharves of Lourenco Marques.
(That is where I first met them and
there ,to my great surprise, was another "exchange", Bill Taylor of Arts
'28, who had been visiting Hong Kong
when the siege closed in).
On return to Canada in 1942, Paul
was appointed Chief of the Import,
Section, Shipping Priorities Committee, a job which later led to his laying
the foundations of the Import Division
of the Department of Trade and Commerce. But he still liked the life
abroad and, in 1945 was appointed
Trarfe jCommissiomer at Auckland,
New Zealand. The office was moved
to join the High Commissioner for
Canada at Wellington the next year
and Paul became Commercial Secretary. In 1953 he was transferred to
Trinidad as Trade Commissioner; this
summer he and Peggy will be back in
Canada on home leave and tour.
Close on Paul's tracks came Bruce
MacDonald, Arts'26, originally from
the Yukon. Perhaps his subsequent
association with export under Mr. H.
R. MacMillan whetted his appetite for
the Far East but, in any event, after
joining the Service in 1929, Bruce was
appointed Assistant Trade Commissioner at Shanghai. In 1937 he went
to Dublin as Acting Trade Commissioner and on to Hamburg as Assistant. The office was transferred to
Berlin and, in 1939, Bruce was given
charge as Trade Commissioner, only
to have to leave, within a few weeks,
because World War II was a day Or
so away.
From 1940 to 1945 Bruce was Secretary of the Wartime Shipping Board
at Ottawa during which time he met
and married Denise Ristelhueber.
After the war he re-opened the office
in Brussels and worked there until
1952 when he was appointed to Bonn
where he continues as Commercial
Counsellor. Bruce has been a representative of Canada at a number of
inter-national meetings: member of
the Canadian Delegation at Inter-
Allied Shipping Conference meetings
from 1942 to 1946 at Washington,
London and The Hague; Canadian
representative at meetings on timber,
on rubber and on maritime reparations
in Brussels, on tin in The Hague,
on Maritime matters in Paris and
Geneva.
And now I must watch my pronouns . . . The third in chronological
order of entry into the Service is
Les Brown, Arts'28. Educated in the
Crowsnest Pass and in Vancouver, I
graduated in 1928 and entered the
service in 1930. In 1931 I was posted
to Mexico as Assistant Trade Commissioner and was joined there by
Ruth Fraser, Arts'26, who became
Mrs. Brown.
In 1935 we were transferred to
London. What a place to meet Alumni!
P'robably   only   Ottawa   sees   more.
In 1940 we were transferred to
South Africa where we had a year
in Capetown and four and a half, in
Johannesburg. (It was from Jo'burg
that I went to Lourenco Marques
and met the McLane's). There are
quite a few grads in South Africa
and especially on the Rand: Brit and
Ba Brock of Science and Arts'26;
Enid Gibbs Arts'28; Harry and Dory
Nelems, Science'31 and Arts'30; and
others.
We arrived in Buenos Aires early
in 1947 and were greeted by Ed
Maguire, of whom more anon. In
1950 we were posted to Ottawa where
I was Assistant Director of the Trade
Commissioner Service for a year and
then Director of the Information
Branch. No attempt can be made to
name the grads in Ottawa but we
met many at the re-unions. At the
end of 1954 we came to Caracas
where I am Commercial Counsellor. I
had been here for a week in 1950,
while Chief of the Canadian Delegation which drew up the Modus Vivendi,
according most-favoured-nation treatment to Canadian trade with Venezuela.
Another   Arts'28  man,  Ken  Noble,
By Courtesy of National Film Board of Canada
Paul McLane, B.A/24; A. Bruce Macdonald, B.A.'26; Ken F. Noble, B.A/28;
W. Douglas Wallace, B.A/32; Edward H. Maguire, B.A.'37.
U. B. C. ALUMNI   CHRONICLE        22
■H Robert Campbell Smith, B.Com.'39; Frank B. Clarke, B.A.'40, LL.B.'48; David B. Laughton, B.S.A/48,
B.Com/49;  W.   Pattison   (Pat)   Birmingham*,   B.Com.'47,   B.A/47;   William   R.   Hickman,   B.S.A/49.
(*Died  in Vancouver,  November 9,   1955. See p. 34)
joined the Service in 1932 after a
spell of post-graduate work at the
University of California. With his
B.C. wife, Jessie MacPhail, Ken served first in the Far East — at Hong
Kong, Bombay and Singapore. He,
too, was disturbed by the military
activities of the Japanese and had to
make an unexpected, arduous and
broken journey from Singapore to
Sydney. Ken was in Australia from
1942 to 1947 when he returned to
Hong Kong. Four years later he was
transferred to Capetown and, in 1953,
to Johannesburg.
Doug Wallace, Arts'32, is a Fernie
man who set his mind on the Service.
But the depression had brought a
"policy of retrenchment" and no new
recruits were sought from the early
thirties until the war was near its
end. Doug was so keen that he asked
to be employed at the New York
office in any capacity until the lists
were again open. He had been there
ten years when he was appointed
Assistant Trade Commissioner in 1944.
During that time he married Elfrieda
Hoffman. In 1946 he was transferred
to Washington and, following a short
spell in Lima, in 1949 was posted to
Manila. In 1953 he became Commercial
Secretary at Djakarta, Indonesia.
Ed Maguire, of Arts'37, went into
the insurance business after graduation. In 1940 he enlisted in the Navy
from which he was discharged in 1945
with the rank of Lieut.-Commander.
He was already married to Barbara
Brown of Edmonton and Vancouver
when he entered the Trade Commissioner Service in 1945. They went to
their first post at Buenos Aires in
1946 and to Santiago, Chile, in 1947.
Ed opened a new office in Madrid in
1950, as Trade Commissioner, and was
there four years before going to
Washington as Commercial Secretary.
The first non-Arts man from U.B.C.
was Bob Campbell Smith, Commerce
'39. A Vancouverite, Bob enlisted in
the Navy in 1940 and served until
1945; During those years he met and
married Paule Carion of Brussels. He
entered the Service less than three
months after Ed Maguire and they
trained together in Ottawa. Bob's
first post was Cairo where he served
from 1946 to 1948 when he was transferred to St. John's Newfoundland,
soon to enter Confederation. In 1949
he went to Ottawa where he worked
three years before going to London
and, in 1945, on to Paris where he is
Commercial Secretary.
Harry J. Home, Commerce'42, also
from Vancouver, has been with the
Department since 1947. His first post
was covering Norway, Denmark, Sweden and Finland. Married with two
children, Harry has been Commercial
Secretary in Lima, P'eru, for the past
three years. At present he is on a tour
of major Canadian manufacturing
centres and hopes to be in Vancouver
for the  first  Christmas  in  14  years.
With his two degrees, Frank Clark,
Arts'40 and Law'48, surely knows
U.B.C. — and his wife Velma Smyth,
is from U.B.C. as well! Frank was in
the Navy during the war and joined
the Trade Commissioner Service ii
1948. He has enjoyed seven years in
Latin America — Mexico from 1949
to 1951, and the past four years in
Caracas where he is Commercial Secretary. (Caracas might have been
a spot for a branch of the Alumni
Association what with two Clark's,
two Brown's, a Laughton and one ol'
two others such as Geoff Crickmay
of Arts'27  (and Yale, Ph.D.'30).
(For a picture of Caracas Alumni Association
members see Chronicle, Autumn Issue, 1955,
p.   7.   Ed.).
Dave Laughton, Agriculture'48,
Commerce'49, is from Nelson though
he took his pre-University schooling
in Edmonton. After five years in
the Army he went to U.B.C. with his
English wife Dee Pearson. As a result
of his "Aggie" training, Dave joined
the Service in 1949 as an agricultural
specialist and, in 1950, was posted to
Caracas as Agricultural Secretary
At the end of May, 1955, he was transferred to Port-ofjSpain, Trinidad.
where he met "pioneer" Paul McLane
Bill Hickman, Agriculture'49, originally  from  Calgary,  took  his  aca
demic education in Vancouver. He was
in business until war attracted him
to the R.C.A.F. which gave him service
in South-East Asia. After the war he
attended U.B.C. and later was with
the Bureau of Statistics and the Department of Agriculture in Ottawa.
His wife is Elizabeth Anne Mackenzie.
In 1951 he joined the Trade Commissioner Service, just a month after
"Pat" Birmingham, and they trained
together in Ottawa. In 1952 Bill was
appointed Assistant Commercial Secretary at Berne, Switzerland. Recently,
he was given a temporary assignment
in Athens. His latest appointment
which he will assume in April, 195G.
is Acting Agricultural Secretary, The
Hague, Holland.
Another prairie man, Jim Midwinter.
Arts'51, was taught in the schools
of B.C. A graduate with honours in
1951, he had already been chosen
Rhodes Scholar and studied at Oxford
during the next two years. On his
return to Canada in 1953 he took up
his appointment in Ottawa. Just before
being posted Assistant Trade Commissioner at Guatemala in 1954 he married Sally Heard, B.Com.'53.
Since the above was written earlier
in the year, Paul McLane has been
transferred to Vancouver where, with
offices in the Marine Building, he will
be Western Representative of the Department of Trade and Commerce.
Also, three more U.B.C. Alumni have
entered the Foreign Trade Service.
Percy Eastham of Arts'50 and Law'51,
after practising law in Chilliwack.
joined this summer. He is married to
Margaret Oliver, a Vancouver girl.
Louis Burke of Arts'51 spent some
time with the Provincial Department
of Finance and with Union Steamship
Lines. John B. Ross, Commerce'53.
following graduation, took his M.B.A.
at Harvard before joining the Service
this summer. John Nelson of Com-
merce'55, graduated straight into the
Department of Trade and Commerce.
This purely factual account has
been set down so friends may know
where friends have gone and where
they've met again. Such dry stuff can
have little other purpose. Yet I see
no reason for not singing a final bar
of "old school tie" on the note that
U.B.C, in contributing a tenth of
the corps of Trade Commissioners,
has done well in supplying so many
men . . . and so many wives.
By Courtesy of National Film Board of Canada
James  R. Midwinter,  B.A/51; Percy T.  Eastham,
B.Com/53; John  H.
B.A/50;  Louis   D.   Burke,   B.A/51;  John   B.   Ross,
Nelson,   B.Com/55.
23
U..E*. C.  ALUMNI   CHRONICLE School of Social Work—
The First Quarter Century
Pnoto by  Tony Arcner.
Marjorie   J.    Smith,    A.B.    (Minnesota),    A.M.
(Chicago),   Professor   and   Director,   School   ot
Social Work.
By  EUZABETH TUCKEY,  B.A/38
FOUNDATIONS AND  PIONEER WORKERS
Twenty-five years ago, in August
1930, the first three graduates of the
new Course in Social Service, as it
was then called, were granted the
Diploma in Social Service and took
their places in the Social Agencies
of the community.
The forces which brought about this
new venture of the University were
many and varied. In 1927 at the request of some of the Vancouver Service
Clubs, the Canadian Welfare Council
sent a team to make a survey of
Child Welfare in British Columbia.
Out of this study came three recommendations; (1) that the Vancouver
Children's Aid Society change its
method of child care from institution
to foster home placement, (2) that
a Family Service Agency be organised,
and (3) that trained professional social
workers be employed.  Almost imme-
+     1930-1955
diately arrangements were made for a
reorganised Children's Aid Society,
and three outstanding social work
pioneers arrived from Ontario. They
were Dr. Zella Collins, Dr. Laura
Holland, and Miss Katherine White-
man. Soon afterwards Miss Mary Mc-
Phedran came to be Executive Director
of a new Family Welfare Bureau.
They were followed by others who, together with those already active in
the local community, were to establish
the foundation upon which was to
grow the wide range of social services which are offered today to the
citizens  of British Columbia.
At the same time, the late Professor
Beckett, Sociologist in the Department
of Economics of the University of
British Columbia, through connections
with the Service Clubs which had
inaugurated the survey, became interested in the problem of trained personnel. His efforts within the University and the co-operative work of those
first professional social workers in
Vancouver brought about plans for a
training course in the Department of
Economics. The Senate of the University gave its approval for the programme to begin in September 1928.
Unfortunately, Professor Beckett died
that summer. He should be remembered as the man who had the vision to
see the place of social work education
within the University. Flans were
delayed for one year. Dr. C. W. Topping replaced Professor Beckett and,
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through his interest and zeal, further
delay was averted and the course got
under way in September 1929.
Other than Dr. Topping's lectures,
all instruction was given by Honorary Lecturers — the busy professional
workers who took time from their
unlimited tasks in new and re-organised Social Agencies to come to the
University in a volunteer capacity.
Their contribution to the University
and to the development of professional
education in Social Work cannot be
measured.
DEPARTMENT   ORGANISED
Volunteer lecturing continued for
a number of years. In 1935 Dr. Collins
received a part-time appointment as
the first paid Field Work Supervisor,
and the first full-time University
appointment was made in 1942. In
1943 Miss Marjorie J. Smith was appointed as the first full-time Administrator. This growth was made
possible, in the first instance, through
efforts of those engaged in the Public
Welfare Services of the Province,
including the late Dr. George Weir,
the late Dr. Harry Cassidy, and Dr.
George Davidson. A special grant was
made by the Provincial Department of
Welfare to the University so that full
time staff could be employed and
standards raised to meet accrediting
requirements.
The appointment of Miss Marjorie
J. Smith was indeed a fortunate one
for the School. She had had many-
years of experience in social work
practice, and in administration, in
public and private agencies in the
United States. In addition, she had
taught at Washington State School
of Social Work and Smith College
School for Social Work, and had held
the position of Field Work Instructor
at the University of Chicago. Her
vision and driving force can be seen
in the rapid progress made by the
School since 1943.
A separate Department of Social
Work was set up in 1945, and in
1950 this became the School of Social
Work, with a two-year post-graduate
course leading to the Master's Degree.
The first professional degrees in Social
Work in Canada were awarded by the
University of British Columbia in
1946. Today, it is one of the larger
schools of its kind in Canada, with an
annual enrolment of around 150 full-
time and part-time students and over
900 Alumni.
AIMS, ACHIEVEMENTS, METHODS
In its quarter century of existence
this department of the University has
U.B.C. ALUMNI   CHRONICLE        24 striven continuously to provide leadership and to develop high educational
standards in all branches of professional social work. In 1943 it reached
accredited status and became a member of the American Association of
Schools of Social Work, and in 1952
it became a charter member of the
new Council on Social Work Education. Its graduates, besides having
provided the main body of professional
social work personnel in British Columbia and other Western Provinces,
are to be found in many parts of the
world and in international welfare
organisations. In addition, the School
has trained students from many foreign countries, and this sprinkling of
persons from other lands provides
students with an opportunity for contacts with people of various cultures.
The School of Social Work at the
University of British Columbia early
established generic social work training- and continue to emphasise this
approach. The course is planned to
provide a broad knowledge of the
organisation of social services, both
public and private, understanding of
human behaviour as related to helping
people with their problems, and skill
in the methods of Social Work. In
addition to the academic courses offered by the School, the students spend
a minimum of two days a week in
field work under supervision.
OPPORTUNITIES  IN  SOCIAL WORK
The rapidly growing profession of
Social Work offers opportunities to
,'oung men and women who are concerned about the social problems of
today, and who are seeking a career
in the challenging field of human
relations. Owing to the complexity
of our modern society, the demand
for people with a spirit of service has
never been greater. Both government
and voluntary welfare agencies are
suffering from a serious shortage of
trained personnel. Although the maj
ority of social workers are employed
in Agencies offering direct help to
individuals and groups, there are opportunities for qualified people in
administrative, research and community activities.
ACTIVE ALUMNI DIVISION
From its earliest days, the School
has owed much to the encouragement
and interest of its graduates. The
Social Work Alumni Association has
played a significant part in the raising of Social Work standards. Since
1954, the Social Work Alumni Association has been a Division of the Alumni
Association of the University.
25th  ANNIVERSARY
This Twenty-fifth Anniversary
Year has been a notable one for the
School of Social Work.  In December
1954, celebrations started with a paity
and presentation to the Director, Miss
Marjorie J. Smith, by the Faculty
of the School. At the beginning of May,
services of dedication for social workers were held at the Holy Rosary-
Cathedral, Christ Church Cathedral
and Beth Israel Synagogue. There
followed, on May 20, 1955, a re-union
dinner attended by over two hundred
graduates and friends of the School.
The speaker on this occasion was Dr.
Katherine Kendall, Education Consultant, Council on Social Work Education, New York.
As a part of the Anniversary
Celebrations, it was planned to publish two volumes of papers. The first.
"Social Work Practice in Canada: Case
Records and Examples for Study and
Teaching", edited by Mr. Arthur A j-
rahamson,  was  published  on  June  1,
1955. It is the result of joint efforts of
staffs of field work training Agencies
and University personnel. This volume
is already in use in Canada, the United
States, the United Kingdom, and in
Germany. The second volume, to be
published this winter, will contain
the Symposium papers together with
Student Doing  Field Work with a Group ot Children in Alexandra  Neighbourhood  House.
25 U.B.C.  ALUMNI   CHRONICLE
Courtesy Vancouver Sun.
Oldest and youngest Social Work Alumni  meet
at   25th   Anniversary   Reunion,   May   20,   1955.
Mrs.   Ian  Cameron   (nee   Dorothy   N.   Kennedyl,
B.A.'28,  and  Gerald  Webb,  B.S.W/55.
other professional papers by graduates
and members of Faculty.
SOCIAL  WORKERS SYMPOSIUM
Following the Autumn Congregation, the School of Social Work sponsored a two-day Symposium on the
theme: "Social Welfare and the Preservation of Human Values" m
which Honorary Degree recipients
joined in discussions with members of
the Faculty of the School of Social
Work and practising social workers,
the purpose being, not only to reflect
on the past twenty-five years of
change and effort, but to assess the
present situation and to look ahead.
Each of the three sessions was attended by from four to six hundred social
workers, volunteers and other interested individuals from the University
and the community.
LOOKING   BACKWARD   AND   FORWARD
Over the period of its first twenty-
five years of existence, the School of
Social Work of the University of British Columbia has striven to be not
only a place to train social workers
but a centre of education, experiment
and research in the field of human
relationship problems. The way is
plain for the next twenty-five year:;.
In a world becoming more complex
by the minute, the School of Social
Work, as a part of the University,
must take its place in the education of
leaders who will be able to think
clearly and freely and to act with wisdom in solving the increasing problems
arising out of Man's relationship to
his environment.
+
Shaw Festival at U.B.C.
The University Fine Arts Committee, the
U.B.C. Players club and the University Workshop Production present; A SHAW FESTIVAL
at U.B.C, January 16-21, 1956. It will include
readings from Shaw's works by Lister Sinclair;
a lecture on G.B.S. by George Woodcock; a
showing of Shaw's "Caesar & Cleopatra" bv
the U.B.C. Film Society; a presentation of
"Back to Methuselah" on the last two evenings
by the U.B.C. English Department and Player's
Club, under the direction of Miss Dorothy
Somerset; and several other, as yet unscheduled
events. Alumnae & Alumni
(Items of Alumni news are invited in the form
of press clippings or personal letters. These
should reach the Editor, U.B.C. Alumni
Chronicle, 207 Brock Hall, U.B.C, for the
next  issue not  later than  February   15,   1956.)
Courtesy Vancouver Sun.
Chancellor Sherwood Lett being sworn in as
Chief Justice of the Supreme Court of British
Columbia, September 15, 1955. Chief Justice
Gordon Sloan is Administering the oath. Justices C. H. O'Halloran and H. W. Davey of the
Appeal Court are seen standing behind Chancellor  Lett.
1920
Alfred H. J. Swencisky, B.A., Permanent President of Arts'20, Vancouver Barrister and Parks Board Commissioner, has been appointed to the
County Court, replacing His Honour
Judge Arthur E. Lord.
1921
Hon. Mr. Justice Arthur E. Lord,
B.A., was elevated from the County-
Court and made a Justice of the
Supreme Court of B.C. on October 12.
Donald M. Morrison, M.B.E., B.Sc,
Ph.D. (McGill)'24, Ph.D. (Cantab.),
is the new President of Trans-Mountain Oil Pipe Line Company. On leaving Cambridge, Dr. Morrison joined
the Shell Oil Company where for the
past 28 years he has held increasingly
important positions in the Company's
refining organisation in the U.S. and
Canada. At the time of his recent
appointment he was Vice-President
in Charge of Manufacturing.
1924
Gordon Letson, B.A., B.A.Sc.'26, has
been appointed President of Letson
& Burpee, Limited, Vancouver. He
succeeds his brother, Major-General
H. F. G. Letson, C.B., C.B.E., M.C,
E.D., B.Sc.,'19, F"h.D. (London)'23,
LL.D.'45, who remains a Director.
1926
Brig. W. C. Murphy, C.B.E., D.S.O.,
E.D., B.A., LL.D., has been named an
Aide-de-camp to His Honor, Lieutenant-Governor Frank M. Ross. Brig.
Murphy has also been appointed
Magistrate and a member of the Vancouver Police Commission.
1928
Colonel D. K. Todd, D.S.O., CD.,
B.A., having terminated a 3-year appointment as Military Attache at the
Canadian Embassy in Ankara, Turkey,
is in process of retirement, on completion of his term of service with the
Canadian Army. He plans to settle
with his wife and two daughters in
Scotland. Col. Todd is the son of Dr.
O. J. Todd, Professor Emeritus of
Classics at U.B.C.
George F. Davidson, B.A., M.A.
(Harv.), Ph.D. (Harv.), LL.D., Deputy
Minister of Welfare in the Canadian
Department of National Health and
Welfare, Ottawa, was awarded an
Honorary LL.D. Degree at U.B.C.'s
recent Autumn Congregation. Dr.
Davidson was active in Social Welfare
work in B.C. from 1934 to 1942. He
has held his present post since 1944.
John H. Williams, B.A., M.A.'30,
Ph.D. (Calif.), Professor of Plrysics
University of Minnesota, is in charge
of a project which is developing the
world's most powerful straight-line
atom-smasher. This atom-smasher,
known as "Linac" — proton linear
accelerator — shoots its missiles at
one-third the speed of light. It will
be used to investigate the nuclei of
atoms and is unique in that it will enable scientists to investigate the
nature of the atom in regions never
before developed.
1931
H. Barrie Harford, B.A., B.Ed., Principal of Chilliwack High School, was
appointed during the past summer
District School Inspector by the British Columbia Department of Education.
Laurence (Larry) O. Wright, B.A.,
has been named Manager of the Vancouver and Island Branch of Sun Life
Assurance Company. He has been with
the  Company since graduation.
1935
Dr. Edwin Lovell, B.A., M.A.'37.
Ph.D. (McGill), is now Research Director for Alaska Pine and Cellulose
Limited. Dr. Lovell is an authority in
the field of cellulose development
and, since 1941, has been with the
Research Division of Rayonier Incor-
Colonel Duncan K. Todd, D.S.O., CD., B.A.'28
porated, the parent company of Alaska
Pine, in the United States.
W. Breen Melvin, B.A., National
Secretary and Treasurer of the Cooperative Union of Canada, with
Headquarters in Ottawa, attended
the meeting in Basle, Switzerland.
Sept. 7-9, of the Central Committee
of the International Co-operative Alliance, of which the Co-operative
Union of Canada is a member. As a
delegate of the Canadian Federation
of Agriculture, Mr. Melvin also attended the Conference of the International
Federation of Agricultural Producers,
held in Rome, Sept. 10-17. The I.F.A.P.
is the occupational organisation representing the farmers of the world,
including in its membership European
countries, the United States, Canada,
Mexico, India and Tunisia.
1936
Thomas L. Brock, B.A., B.A.Sc.
M.A.Sc, represented the University of
British Columbia at the Centenary
Celebration of the Swiss Federal Institute of Technology, in Zurich,
Switzerland, October 17-22, 1955.
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U. B. C. ALUMNI   CHRONICLE        26 1937
Moses C. Long, B.A.Sc, is now a
member of the technical staff of the
Electronics Tube Laboratories, Hughes
Research & Development, Culver City,
California. He was formerly a member
of the U.S. Navy serving as an officer
of Naval Research.
1942
Harry J. Home, B.Com., Commercial
Secretary at the Canadian Embassy in
Lima, Peru, is presently in Canada
where he will speak to business men
on trade possibilities with Peru and
Bolivia. Mr. Home has been with the
Department of Trade and Commerce
since 1947 and has served in Norway,
Denmark, Sweden and Finland. As an
Undergraduate he held the Big Block
Award for Ice Hockey and Association
Football.
1945
George Constabaris, B.A., M.A., was
awarded a $2,500 Fellowship at University of Washington, Seattle, by
General Electric Company. A former
Senior Research Chemist with the
Kaiser Aluminum Company in Louisiana, Mr. Constabaris is now taking
Post Graduate studies in Chemistry.
1946
Gordon R. Bell, B.S.A., has received
the degree of Ph.D. in Bacteriology
from the University of Western Ontario where he is doing research work
with the Science Service Division of
the Federal Department of Agriculture.
Kenneth L. Broe, B.A.Sc, formerly
Manager of Apparatus Sales, Canadian General Electric Co., Trail, has
been appointed Manager of the Apparatus Department in the Eastern
Region of the Pacific District. He
took up his new duties December 1,
in  Calgary.
Kenneth O. MacGowan, B.Com., formerly Manager of the Vancouver Office
of William M. Mercer Limited, has
been appointed Vice-President of the
Company and will supervise operations
in Western Canada.
1947
John B. Archer, B.Com., employed
by Shell Oil Company of Canada,
Toronto, has been made Manager,
Marine Department, and Manager,
Shell  Canadian  Tankers,  Limited.
James William Lee, B.A.Sc, M.A.Sc.
'49, stationed for some time in Puerto
Rico with Kaiser Aluminum and
Chemical Corporation, has been moved
to a new position in Haiti, with the
same Company.
1948
J. M. Cameron, B.Com., has been
appointed Supervisor of Publicity,
Consolidated Mining and Smelting
Company, Trail. He is a Past President
of the Junior Chamber of Commerce
at Trail.
Brian C. Hummel, B.A., M.A., received the Degree of Ph.D. from the
University of Minnesota recently.
C. B. Jeffery, B.A.Sc, Aerodynamics Section, Division of Mechanical
Engineering, National Research Council, is the first Canadian to be awarded
Harry J. Home, B.Com.'42, Canadian Foreign
Trade Representative at Lima, Peru, reads tile
latest Campus News on October 20, with Harry
Franklin, B.A.'49 (Right), Manager Export Sales
Division, B.C. Packers, Limited, and the
Chronicle Editor.
the "Gold C" and the "Diamond
Award" of the Federation aeronau-
tique internationale. The "Gold C"
is conferred on the glider pilot who
accomplishes the following tasks: a
five-hour "free" flight; an altitude gain
of 9,600 feet; and a "free" flight of
186 miles. The Diamond Award specifies that the pilot achieving the 186-
mile flight must land at a preder-
mined. destination. Mr. Jeffrey fulfilled
the requirements in an "Olympia"
glider from the airport at Carp, Ont..
to Windsor Mills, P.Q. — a distance of
196 miles — in six hours. He is chief
flying instructor at the Gatineau Gliding Club and holds the Canadian altitude record of 14,000 feet. He was
employed as an Instructor of Physics
at U.B.C. during the session 1953-54.
1949
William F. Baehr, B.S.A., represented the LTniversity of British Columbia
on the occasion of the Golden Jubilee
celebrations at the University of
Malaya, October 7-15. Mr. Baehr is
currently with Malayan Fertilizers,
Kuala Lumpur, Malaya. He will be
returning to Canada within the next
two years.
Graham R. Dawson, B.A.Sc., of Dawson Wade and Company, Limited, has
been elected President of the Heavy
Construction Association of B.C.
Warren L. Reynolds, B.A., M.A.'50,
recently received the Degree of Ph.D.
from the University of Minnesota.
Paul J. Sykes, B.A.Sc, Major in
the U.S. Air Force stationed a:
Wright-Patterson Air Force Base,
Ohio, where he is Chief Administrator
for Projects, is reported to have made
a discovery in the application of Nuclear Physics to Air Navigation. According to this report, the U.C. Congress has recently passed a Bill
granting a sum of $10,000,000 for the
development of Major Sykes' Project.
Two half-sisters of Major Sykes,
Diana and Virginia Bampton, graduated in the Faculty of Arts in 1947
Major Sykes served with the U.S. Air
Force as Navigating Officer in tht
Pacific Area during World War II.
1950
D. W. Bajus, B.A., has received the
appointment of Training Assistant for
the Great-West Life Assurance Company at its Head Office in Winnipeg.
In his new capacity, he will assist
in the development of life insurance
training programmes for Great-West
Life representatives in Canada and
the United States.
Flying Officer H. D. K. Beairsto,
B.A., graduated this Autumn from No.
1. Advanced Flying School at Saskatoon, Sask. F.O. Beairsto joined the
R.C.A.F. two years ago and, after
flying Sabre Jets, began advanced
training at the Saskatchewan School.
Taffara De Guefe, B.Com., has been
appointed Director-General of Civil
Aviation in Ethiopia, with Headquarters in Addis Ababa.
George G. McKeown, B.A., M.Sc'52.
has been awarded one of the 17 fellowships offered this year by Canadian
Industries (1954) Limited for postgraduate study in Chemistry. Mr.
McKeown's award is in the amount of
$1,700.00. He is studving towards his
Ph.D. in U.B.C.
1951
Richard G. Lipsey, B.A., M.A. (Toronto), has received an appointment,
Lecturer in the London School of
Economics, where he is completing
requirements for a Ph.D. Degree in
Economics.
1952
Colin J. Crickmay, B.A.Sc, has
joined the Microwave Laboratory,
Hughes Research and Development,
Culver City, California. Mr. Crickmay
was formerly an engineer with the
Research and Development Department of RCA Victor Company.
Mary Southin, LL.B., was elected
President of B.C. Women's Conservative Association for the coming year
at the Association's Annual Meeting
October 27.
1954
Ronald A. Shearer, B.A.. M.A.
(Ohio), has been awarded a $3,000
Earhart Foundation Fellowship at
Ohio State University for Post-Graduate study in Economics.
195S
Patrick J. B. Duffy, B.S.F., is attending Yale University, studying for
the M.F. Degree. He has been elected
President of the Forest Club there,
a rare honour for a first-year man. Mr.
Duffy won a Canadian Pulp and Paper
Association (Western Division) Fellowship on graduation this spring, and
subsequently was awarded a Scholarship at Yale. The Yale Forest School
has a fixed enrolment of about 50
students, drawn from many countries.
Ian M. Geggie, B.P.E., is in charge
of boys' activities on the staff of North
Shore Neighbourhood House.
D. N. Mclnnes, B.A., has been
awarded a French Government Scholarship for proficiency in French and
German. He will continue studies in
Paris.
ALUMNI AT POWELL RIVER
A solid U.B.C. Alumni front was
established in Powell River Company's
Engineering Department in 1955 with
a barrage of promotions and new
appointments.
Most recent  elevation  was  that  of
27
U. B. C. ALUMNI   CHRONICLE A Billion Dollar
Business...
Pulp and paper is Canada's largest, most
important industry. Total production is
well over one billion dollars a year. It provides more employment than any other
industry, accounts for about one quarter
of total Canadian exports, and provides
the raw materials for many secondary
industries.
Basic to our present and future economy,
the pulp and paper industry is one of the
chief factors responsible for Canada's position as a leading trading nation of the
world. It has a record of expansion and
growth which in recent vears has more
than kept pace with Canada's progress.
We believe the securities of Canadian
pulp and paper companies offer many
opportunities for investment. There are
first mortgage bonds and debentures for
those whose chief need is capital security
. . . preferred shares for current income
. . . common shares for those who wish to
participate in the industry's growth and
expansion.
If you are interested in discussing the
securities of this important industry, and
particularly those suited to your objectives, you will be welcome in any of our
offices ... or if it is more convenient for
you, a letter addressed to us will receive
the same careful attention.
A. G. Ames & Co.
Limited
Business Established 1889
TORONTO
MONTREAL               WINNIPEG                VANCOUVER VICTORIA
CALGARY        LONDON         OTTAWA         HAMILTON KITCHENER
OWEN    SOUNO                           ST.    CATHARINES QUEBEC
NEW   YORK           BOSTON           LONDON, ENG.
Al Chard
Bert Mullen
Gerry   Harrison
Guy Kennedy
J. Gilbert D'Aoust, B.A.Sc'27, former
Chief Project Engineer on Powell
River's current multi-million dollar
programme, to the post of Plant
Engineer. Mr. D'Aoust succeeds Alec
Ronald M. Stewart, B.A.Sc'40, who
has joined the world-wide consulting-
firm of Sandwell & Co. Ltd., headed
by U.B.C. alumnus P'. R. Sandwell,
B.A.Sc'35, a former Powell River
Company Chief Engineer.
Powell River's present Chief Engin-
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Principal
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'33, and his Assistant is E. Norman
Walton, B.A.Sc.'42. Resident Engineer
at Powell River, home of British Columbia's pioneer newsprint manufac-
ing plant, is Donald H. R. Blake,
B.A.Sc.'43.
Sidney A. Collicutt, B.A.Sc'39,
Superintendent of Technical Services,
heads the Company's Industrial Engineering Department, assisted by
Roger Hughes, B.A.Sc.'47, and Leonard A. Murphy, B.A.Sc.'51. Superintendent of Research and Development
is Dr. John L. Keays, B.A.'41. B.A.Sc.
'41.
Project Engineers in connection
with Powell River's addition of a
ninth paper machine are Alfred E.
Chard, B.A.Sc'40, who doubles as
Development Engineer; Albert C. Mullen, B.A.Sc.'50; and Gerald E. G.
Harrison, B.A.Sc'48. Field Engineer
on this and allied projects is W. J. G.
Kennedy, B.A.Sc'49.
Among U.B.C. Alumni recently promoted to the Supervisory Staff at
Powell River are: James A. Cochrane,
B.A.Sc'45, M.A.Sc'47, Jack Grantham,
B.A.Sc'50, Don L. Stewart. B.A.Sc'46,
and G. Ken Wate, B.A.Sc'46.
Appointed Assistant to Dr. Ralph
Patterson, B.A.Sc'39, M.A.Sc, Director of Planning, is Thomas F. R.
Newmarch, B.A.Sc'47.
—Contributed by Paul King, B.A'34.
CROFTON HOUSE SCHOOL
Founded by the Misses Gordon,   1898
RESIDENT AND DAY PUPILS
PRIMARY CLASSES TO MATRICULATION
Accredited by the Department of Education
MUSIC    -    ART    -    HOME ECONOMICS
GYMNASTICS    -    GAMES    -    DANCING    -    RIDING
DRAMATICS GIRL GUIDES BROWNIE PACK
Apply to Principal, MISS ELLEN K. BRYAN, M.A.
3200 W. 41st Ave., Vancouver Telephone KErr. 4380
"A CITY SCHOOL IN COUNTRY SETTING"
U.B.C. ALUMNI   CHRONICLE
ZB The Faculty
Dean George F. Curtis. Faculty of
Law, LL.B. (Sask.), B.A., B.S.L.
(Oxon.), LL.D. (Dalhousie), Visiting
Professor at Harvard 1955-56, has
been elected Vice-President, Canadian
Branch of the International Law Association.
Professor .1. G. Andison, B.A.(Man.),
A.M., Ph.D. (Columbia), Head of the
Departments of French and German,
will become Head of a new Department
of Romance Studies to be formed by
the amalgamation of the Departments
of French and Spanish. The new Department will offer, for the first time.
a course in Italian, with Ralph W.
Baldner, A.B.(Miami), M.A.(Vander-
bilt), as Lecturer.
Dr. Charles E. Borden, M.A., Ph.D.
(Calif.), Professor of German, has
devised a scheme for designating
archaeological sites which has been
adopted by the National Museum at
Ottawa to catalogue their specimens.
The scheme provides for the first time
a uniform method for classifying artifacts discovered in any part of
Canada according to the geographical
location of the site where they were
unearthed.
Miss Irina A. Carlson, B.A.'51, Lecturer in Slavonic Studies and Mr. P.
M. H. Edwards, B.A.'49, Instructor in
French, are the co-authors of a Russian textbook, "A Numericon of Russian Inflections and Stress Patterns".
Copies have been sent to Universities
and Libraries in the U.S., Turkey,
Tokyo and Canada for comment and
suggestions from other Russian-
language specialists. A copy has also
been sent to the Academy of Arts
and Sciences in Moscow.
Dr. Paris Constantinides, M.D.(Vienna), Ph.D.(Montreal), Associate
Professor, Department of Anatomy,
will direct the use of a $6,600 grant
to aid heart and artery disease research. The grant was made by the
Life Insurance Medical Research Fund
of New York.
Dr. Murray A. Cowie, M.A.
(Queen's), Ph.D.(Chicago), Professor
of German, has been appointed Acting
Chairman of the Board of Directors
of International House on the Campus.
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Her Royal Highness, Princess Mary, C.I.,
G.C.V.O., G.B.E., LL.D., was a welcome visitor
at the University on October 22; she is seen
above leaving the Faculty Club with Chancellor
Lett and  President MacKenzie.
Professor    Frank    A.   Forward.
B.A.Sc (Toronto), F.I.M., M.C.I.M.
M.Inst.M.M., Head of the Department
of Mining and Metallurgy, has won a
further award for his development ot
processes for recovering uranium,
nickel, copper and cobalt. It is the
University of Toronto McCharles Prize
of $1,000 and Gold Medal.
Professor G. A. Green, B.Sc.(Sask.),
M.S.(Illinois), M.E.I.C, Mem.A.S.R.E..
Assistant Professor, Department of
Mechanical Engineering, spent the
summer in Edmonton, where he worked with Angus, Butler and Associates
on heating, ventilating, and refrigerating problems. Prof. Green also spent
three weeks in Ottawa in May visiting
the Division of Building Research of
the N.R.C. studying instrumentation
problems in preparation for setting-
up a programme of research in building heating in the Department of
Mechanical Engineering.
Professor G. V. Parkinson, B.A.Sc.
'46, M.S., Ph.D. (C.I.T.), Assistant
Professor, Department of Mechanical
Engineering, spent the summer at
Valcartier, Quebec with the Canadian
Research and Development Establishment (CARDE) working on aerodynamic problems of guided missiles.
Miss Barbara Pentland, Instructor,
Department of Music and noted composer   has  recently  returned  from   a
tour in Europe. She gave a recital
of her piano works in London, England, under the auspices of the Institute of Contemporary Arts and made
a pre-recording of piano works foi
the B.B.C.'s Third Programme. In
Brussels, the world premiere of her
Solo Violin Sonata was heard, along
with a cello Sonata and piano works.
This recital was sponsored by the
Business and Professional Women of
Brussels. Miss Pentland was the Canadian delegate to the International
Society for Contemporary Music This
is a world festival held in Baden-Baden
at which 18 countries were represented. In Darmstadt, Germany, Miss
Pentland attended an International
Vacation Course in which special emphasis was given to the experimental
in music.
Professor XV. O. Richmond, B.A.Sc.
'29, M.S. (Pittsburg). Mem. A.S.M.E.,
M.E.I.C, Head of the Department of
Mechanical Engineering, spent two
weeks in Detroit as guest of General
Motors at the fourth Annual Conference of Engineering Educators. This
Conference considered the place of the
graduate engineer in the automobile
industry.
Dr. Anthony I). Scott, B.Com.'46.
B.A.'47, M.A. (Harvard), Ph.D. (London), Assistant Professor, Department
of Economics, is on a year's leave of
absence while serving on the Economic Research staff of the Royal
Commission on Canada's Economic
Prospects, a 12-month study being
conducted on the various aspects of
Canadian economics—including industries, population and resources. Dr.
Scott's book, entitled. "Natural Resources: the Economics of Conservation", was published recently by the
University of Toronto Press.
Dr. George H. Stevenson, M.D.
(Tor.), F.R.S.(C), F.A.P.A., Research
Professor, Part Time, Director of the
Survey of Factors Contributing to
Narcotic Addiction in B.C., Department of Psychiatry, was invited to
present his views on the legal sale or
free gift of drugs, before the U.S. Senate Sub-Committee hearings on the
Traffic in Narcotics, September 19 and
20. in New York.
Professor  Earle Birney, B.A/26, M.A., Ph.D.  (Toe),  presents to  President MacKenzie  a   handsomely
bound  Volume containing  the  Roll  ot  Service   n  World  War   I.    The   ceremony   was  part  of  the
Remembrance   Day   Service   held   in   the   Memorial   Gymnasium   on   November   11.
25
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U.B.C.  ALUMNI   CHRONICLE
,r
30 Sports Summary-
+    East-West Came
+    Evergreen Basketball on Television
By R. J. (BUS) PHILLIPS, ATHLETIC DIRECTOR
SCORELESS GAME  WITH  McGILL
The magnificent 250 lb. Sir Winston
Churchill trophy travelled all the way
from Montreal, to be presented to the
winner of the 3rd Annual Paraplegic
Bowl Football game on September 24.
Larry Sullivan's big, tough "Redmen"
battled it out for 60 minutes with
Frank Gnup's fledging "Thunderbirds"
to no decision. The scoreless game indicated an improvement in U.B.C.
playing record, as our team lost previ-
ous contests 20-4 and 8-5. Lacking an
effective offense, the "Thunderbirds"
concentrated on holding down ex-
Columbia passing star Bill Carr, and
our hard-charging line kept McGill
off-balance during most of the game.
U.B.C.'s Mile-Relay Team won the
half-time contest in defeating the McGill squad by 50 yards. This was the
first time a track event had been included in the programme, and proved
to be one of the most exciting moments
of the afternoon.
The McGill Team was accompanied
by Mr. Lome Gales, Secretary of the
McGill Alumni Association, Brigadier
J. A. De Lalanne, member of the Board
of Governors at McGill, and Dr. Harold
Elliott, Vice-Chairman of the Board of
the Canadian Paraplegic Association,
Quebec Branch.
The game realised a net profit of
$315.00, which is being shared equally
by the Canadian Paraplegic Association and the Western Rehabilitation
Centre of Vancouver. Arrangements
are now under way in the East to have
the contest permanently underwritten.
I should like to take this opportunity to thank the U.B.C. Alumni Association and the Alma Mater Society for
their splendid support which made
this game possible.
FOOTBALL REJUVENATION
The "Up with Gnup" football slogan
has already become a Campus institution, and Coach Frank Gnup's popularity has not lessened because of an
almost vvinless football season. The
player turnouts, small in early September, grew steadily throughout the
season, culminating in our first fully-
functioning J.V. squad. Frank attended Pep Rallies and invited all
those able to walk and over 90 lbs. to
turn out, with the result that, by mid-
season, 80 sets of playing strip had
been issued. The material was green
but enthusiastic to absorb Gnup's expert coaching, and to learn that it's
fun to play football the "Gnup" way.
The J.V. squad has won all of its
four scheduled games, and will be a
fine source of material next fall.
The Varsity managed to win only
one game, but the 6-0 victory over
Western Washington College of Education on its own field was sweet vie
tory indeed, after years of humiliating
defeats at the hands of the Bellinghan
"Vikings".
Coach Gnup is optimistic about next
season, and feels that, with most of
his First String back, he will be in a
position to build a team which car
win its share of games against Evergreen Conference competition. "Continual defeats," he says, "are humiliating both to the players and other students on the Campus. It's fun to play
but everyone wants to win once in a
while. I have to install a new confidence in the boys so that by hard
work and sacrifice, they will not feel
inferior to the American boys against
whom they play most of their games
If we maintain the correct mental attitude, work hard enough, and make
some personal sacrifices, I feel sure
our record will be better next year.
We appreciate the problems which
Frank has encountered, and we have
admired his patience, humour, and
especially his skill in teaching the
sport he most dearly loves—Football.
FOOTBALL—EVERGREEN    CONFERENCE   ALL-
STAR SELECTIONS
Guard Gerry O'Flanagan and Half-
Back Bruce Eagle were named to the
Second All-Star Team, while Centre
Ron Stewart, Full Back Al Ezzy and
Tackle Dan Lazoski were given Honourable Mention Awards.
National Basketball Play-offs
for Olympic Team at U.B.C.
The 1955-56 version of the Basketball Thunderbird team was unveiled
recently at the annual Homecoming
Grad-Varsity game on November 5.
with the 'Birds' winning handily.
Coach Jack Pomfret has brought several tall boys up from the J.V. ranks,
and is looking forward to a fairly successful season.   For the first time we
At Homecoming Luncheon, November 5, President Mackenzie makes a Presentation to Frank
Read in recognition of his outstanding service
to University Athletics as Coach of the U.B.C.
Rowing Club.
Dr. Harold Elliott, Vice-Chairman, Quebec
Branch, Canadian Paraphlegic Association,
shows Sir Winston Churchill Trophy to Players
before the McGill-U.B.C. Game. From Left:
Kevin O'Connell, U.B.C. Co-Captain, Dr. Elliott,
Bob Hutchison, McGill Captain, Ralph "Buz"
Hudson,    U.B.C.    Co-Captain.
will play a tough 18-game Evergreen
Conference Schedule, nine games of
which will be played on the home
court. Four of these will be televised
over C.B.U.T. Channel 2. If you are
not able to come to the games, we suggest you tune in, and if you have enjoyed seeing U.B.C. Basketball on the
TV screen, please let C.B.U.T. know.
The highlight of the basketball season will be the Olympic play-downs
which are to be held in the U.B.C. War
Memorial Gym, commencing on February 17, and continuing every weekend
until early March, when a 4-team National Olympic Tournament will take
place to select Canada's Olympic representative at the 1956 Games in Melbourne, Australia. Our Thunderbird
team will be a strong contender to
represent the West.
Soccer
The Varsity Soccer team is flying
high this year, at the top of the Mainland Senior Soccer League, having
either won or tied all of their games
to date. Included on a busy schedule
will be matches against Seattle and
Victoria senior clubs.
Cross-Country
Peter Mullins, former Australian
Decathlon champion and Olympic
competitor is now on our Physical
Education Staff. In addition to his
teaching duties he is assisting with the
Thunderbird Basketball team and is
Head Track Coach. This fall Peter
has trained the Cross-Country Team
which placed third in the Inland Empire A.A.U. Meet at Spokane, against
first-class college competition. There
are many good track men on the
Campus, and we should do well in the
Evergreen Meet next spring.
In general, an increased athletic fee
has resulted in a more stable budget
for Athletics. With enrolment on the
steady increase, we foresee a steady
improvement in our athletic programme from now on.
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U.B.C.   ALUMNI   OFFICE  — AL.   3044.
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U.B.C. ALUMNI   CHRONICLE        32 CAMPUS NEWS AND VIEWS
By  GORDON   ARMSTRONG
LEADERSHIP CONFERENCE
Eighty-five students and nine faculty members took part in a student-
sponsored Leadership Conference this
fall. Club presidents, undergraduate
society heads, chairmen of major committees and student councillors gathered at Camp Elphinstone to discuss
topics relating to Campus affairs.
The weekend got underway on Friday night with a buffet supper. On
Saturday, three discussion periods
were followed by volleyball, football
and baseball. The evenings' diversion
included songs, roasted wieners and
marshmallows and a skit by Dean
Andrew and Dr. Shrum. Sunday morning was taken up by church services
and two more discussion groups. After
lunch, President MacKenzie expressed
his pleasure at the success of the conference.
The idea of a conference of student
leaders and faculty representatives
was suggested to the Student Council
by their delegates to the Pacific
Schools Presidents' Association convention in San Diego last spring.
Many American Colleges have similar
meetings to discuss Campus plans and
problems, but the scheme had not yet
been attempted by a Canadian University.
The meeting set a spirit of cooperation for the year's Campus activities; among the major issues agreed
upon was the Council proposal to extend the Brock Hall. It is now planned
to hold the Conference annually.
PACIFIC SCHOOLS PRESIDENTS' ASSOCIATION
U.B.C. has been chosen to host the
1956 Convention of the Pacific Schools
Presidents' Association, composed of
the incoming and outgoing student
presidents of seventy-five Colleges on
the Pacific Coast. U.B.C. is the only
Canadian University represented in
the organisation. A committee under
second year Law student Jim MacDonald is already laying plans for the
meeting, scheduled for next May. The
programme will include intensive student affairs discussions as well as
tours of the Campus and City, and
social events.
BROCK  EXTENSION
A $250,000 extension to Brock Hall
was approved at the Fall General
Meeting of the Alma Mater Society.
The extension, to be financed over the
next seven years by a continuation of
the five-dollar student levy now used
for the War Memorial Gymnasium,
should be contracted for by the end of
March and completed ready for next
fall term.
Present club facilities on the
Campus, including the double row of
huts behind Brock Hall, are sorely
overcrowded, and many clubs are entirely without space. The Gymnasium
debt will be retired by September, and
it  was felt that the student building
Student Council, Session 1955-56. From Left, Back Row: Bob Hutchison, Men's Athletic Representative; Gordon Armstrong, Public Relations Officer; Bob McLean, First Member-at-Large; Charlotte
Warren, Women's Athletic Representative; Allan Thackray, University Clubs' Committee Chairman;
Maureen Sankey, Women's Undergraduate Society President; Don McCallum, Co-ordinator of
Activities; Dave Hemphill, Under-Graduate Societies' Chairman; Front Row: Stanley Beck, Editor-in-
Chief, Publications Board; Ron Longstaffe, Vice-President; Ron Bray, President; Helen McLean,
Secretary; Geoff Conway, Treasurer; Mike Jeffrey, Second Member-at-Large.
levy should be continued, with an extension to Brock Hall given top priority. The new Arts Building, when in
place adjacent to the Brock, will further overtax the existing facilities.
A student committee, under Council
Co-ordinator Don McCallum, has prepared an outline of general space requirements, and the first draft of the
blueprints are now being prepared by
the architects. It is tentatively
planned to build an L-shaped wing on
the North side of the present building,
leaving the South side free for future
expansion. It is hoped that eventually
the area behind the Brock will be used
to extend cafeteria accommodation.
The new wing will make some 25,000
square feet of offices, club rooms and
lounges available for A.M.S. clubs;
space is also planned in the new structure for the Alumni Offices and the
University Information Service. A
recreational area for billiards and
ping-pong, as well as an enlarged
College Shop and Barber Shop are included in the plans.
U.B.C. PLAYERS' CLUB: "BACK TO
METHUSELAH"
To say that the presentation of
"Back to Methuselah" by the U.B.C.
Players Club and the English Department Dramatic Workshop is the greatest dramatic undertaking ever performed on the U.B.C. Campus is almost an understatement. It will represent the first time in Canada that
an attempt has been made to stage
the entire Shaw play.
To be presented by the two dramatic
groups on January 20 and 21, the play
will climax a week-long Festival commemorating the centennial anniversary of the birth of George Bernard
Shaw.
The cast of 43, for the most part
members of the Players Club, is rehearsing for the play in four sections,
under the joint directorship of Miss
Dorothy Somerset, U.B.C. Dramatics
Director;    Robert    Reid,    well-known
Director of the Vancouver Little
Theatre; Mrs. Joan Chapman, Director
of many recent productions in England; Miss Flora Murray; Arnold
Cohen; and Alade Akesode.
"Back to Methuselah" will also introduce a new type of set to the Vancouver stage. Under the direction of
Vancouver artist and set-designer for
C.B.C. Television, Cliff Robinson, the
play will be presented entirely with
projected scenery.
ODDS  AND  ENDS
A new student literary magazine the
"Raven", made its appearance during registration week—judged excellenr by the English Department, a second edition will appear before
Christmas . . . all activity at the Leadership Conference did
not centre around discussion: Dean Chant
proved himself a
worthy football centre
while Art Sager shone
at volleyball
U.B.C. graduate, Rolf
Blakstad, B.A.'51, wili
take time out from
his C.B.U.-TV design
ing to paint a 20
mural for Brock Hall
—first of a series of
three, the price-tag
will be picked up by
University officials . .
a panel of Campus
coffee experts has
been set up at last to
delve into the mysteries of the infamous
"caf coffee" . . . students voted at the General
Meeting to extend their participation in the
World University Service to include aid to foreign education programmes as well as scholarships—first payment of SI 500 has been sent
to Pakistan   .  .   .
CAMPUS CALENDAR
January  19, 20—Thursday,  Friday
MARDI GRAS—Greek Letter Societies—
Commodore.
January  20, 21—Friday,  Saturday—
"BACK TO METHUSELAH"—Players'
Club and English Department—U.B.C.
Auditorium.
February 1 4 to 19—Monday to Saturday—
"THE CHOCOLATE SOLDIER"—Musical
Society—U.B.C.  Auditorium.
February   29—Wednesday—
INTERNATIONAL HOUSE BALL—International House Committee—Commodore
Current Campus Fad
Four-foot  Blue  and
Gold   Wool   Scarf
33
U.B.C. ALUMNI   CHRONICLE BIRTHS
MR. AND MRS. IAN V. F. ALLEN, B.A'53,
a daughter,  Susan  Mary,  November   13,   1955.
MR. AND MRS. ARCHIBALD C. BAIN,
B.A.'41, (nee Jean V. Anderson, B.A.'40),
a daughter,  Lynne Anderson, March 28,   1955.
MR. AND MRS. JOHN TURPIE BRONGER,
B.Arch.'54, a daughter, Patricia, on August 23,
1955.
MR. AND MRS. MERTON R. LECHTZIER,
B.Com.'48, (nee Bette Heard), a son, Matthew
Wyatt, September 24,   1955.
PROFESSOR C. L. MITCHELL, B.Com. (Toronto), CA. and Mrs. Mitchell, a son, Christopher  Gordon,   July  9,   1955.
MR. AND MRS. SLADE NIX (nee Peggy
Light, B.A.'49), their second daughter, Mary
Elizabeth Joan, May 18, 1955, London, Ontario.
DR. AND MRS. A. L. OGILVIE, (nee Margaret
Pike, B.A/48), a son, Hugh Charles, August,
1955,  in Seattle,  Washington.
MR. AND MRS. GEORGE PRINS-SHUMLIN,
(nee Kitty Adriand Prins, B.A.'52), a daughter,
March 2,  1955, in Putney, Vermont.
LIEUT. DOUGLAS ,SHERLOCK, iR.C.N.,
B.A.'51, LL.B.'52, and Mrs. Sherlock (nee
Elsie Leona Louise Francis, B.A.'50), a son,
Christopher Ward, October 28, 1955, Ottawa,
Ontario.
MR. AND MRS. MICHAEL SRIBNEY, (nee
Margaret Parker, B.A.'46), a daughter, October,
1955,   Chicago,   III.
PROFESSOR J. B. WARREN AND MRS. WARREN, (nee Lorna Silver, B.A/46, M.A/49), twin
boys,  November 4,   in Canberra,  Australia.
MR. AND MRS. WILLIAM WOOD, a daughter,
Laura   Christine,   June   28,   1955.
+
MARRIAGES
ADERS-CAMERON.     Bernard    Maria   Aders   to
Patricia Anne Cameron, B.A/49, M.A/50.
ANDERSON-SPICER.    Douglas   Chesley   Ander-
son,   B.A/52,   B.S.W/53,  to  Lydia  Josephine
Mingay   Spicer,    B.A/49,    B.S.W/50,    M.S.W.
'54.
ARNISON-KIRK.   Ronald Arnison, B.A.Sc/54, to
June Evelyn  Kirk,  B.H.E/53.
ASHTON-MILENOVICH.    Harry Edward Ashton,
B.A/45,  to  Jean  Forchyn  Milenovich  in  Ottawa.
BAIN-MclNTYRE.   William Arthur Bain, B.A.Sc.
'26, to Lois Beth Mclntyre.
BARTLETT-URQUHART.   Leslie Hamer Bartlett,
B.A/48,    M.D.    (McGill),   to    Beverley    June
Urquhart,  B.H.E/51.
BEZDAN-KITOS.     George    Joseph    Bezdan    to
Helen Alice Kitos,  B.A/47.
BOULDING-BAIKIE.      James     Phillip     Francis
Boulding, B.P.E/55, to Myrna Hazel  Baikie.
BRUCE-STURDY.     James    Douglas    Bruce,     to
Sandra Joan Sturdy,  B.A/55,   in Victoria.
BUCKLEY-JOHNSON.    Glen   J.   Buckley,   LL.B.
'55,  to  Lorna  Kathleen Johnson.
CAMPBELL-LEWIS.     Thomas   John    Campbell,
LL.B/52, to Juliette Louisa Lewis, B.A/49.
CAVE-HEMPSEED.   Robert Milne Cave,  B.Com.
'53, to   Elizabeth  Constance  Hempseed.
CLARK-DAVIDSON.     Colin    Whitcomb    Clark,
B.A/53, to Janet Arlene Davidson.
COBBIN-MOON.   Allan  Lewis  Cobbin,   B.A/51,
B.S.W.'52, to Nora Frances Moon, in Williams
Lake.
COLEMAN-WITT.     Herbert   Sherman   Coleman
to Marian Gail Sybil Witt,  B.A/54.
DAVIDSON-SEYMOUR. Donald Leybourne Hugo
Davidson  to  Barbara  Ansley  Seymour,   B.A.
'50.
deMAINE-MOODIE.    Paul   Alexander   Desmond
de Maine to Margaret Marion  Moodie,  B.A.
'51,   M.Sc/53.
DIXON-CONNELL.   Ray Spencer Dixon,  B.Com.
'55,  to  Rae  Elinor Connell,  B.S.W/55.
DOYLE-HAMILTON.     Donald    Jackson    Doyle,
B.A/52, to Betty Alleyne Hamilton.
ECCOTT-GRIFFIN.   James  Eliot  Eccott,   B.Com.
'55,   to Shirley-Anne Griffin,   B.A/54.
ENGLISH-DEAN.      Roderick    Alastair    English,
B.A/51,    M.D.    (McGill),    to   Shirley    Anne
Dean,  B.H.E/52.
FRITZKE-DANIEL.      Arthur     Charles     Fritzke,
B.A/53, to Evelyn Marie Daniel,  B.A/51.
GAIRNS-JOUGHIN.      Charles     Henry     (Harry)
Gairns,      B.A.Sc/55,      to     Margaret      Ruth
Joughin.
GERWING-COPPENS.      Howard     B.     Gerwing,
B.A/54,   to   Julia   Coppens.
GIRARD-PERRY. Leo George Girard to Patricia  Diane  Perry,  B.A.Sc.(Nurs.)'55.
GOODSHIP-REDGELL. Geoffrey Laurence Good-
ship, B.P.E/55, to Alfreda (Freddie) Red-
gell.
GRAHAM-WILSON. Douglas James Thomas
Graham,   LL.B/55,   to  Dorothy   Jean   Wilson.
GREENWOOD-LEDINGHAM. Hugh John Greenwood B.A.Sc.'54, to Mary Sylvia Ledingham.
HARBOTTLE-PETERSON. Albert Ernest (Bert)
Harbottle, B.Com/52, to Barbara Mae Peterson.
HILLMAN-BESLER. Melville E. D. Hillman
B.A/52, M.Sc/54, to Freda  Besler.
HORNSTEIN-POOLE. John Walter Hornstein,
B.Com.'54, to Shirley Aline Poole.
HOWARD-SABISTON. John Montague Howard,
B.A.Sc/50,   to   Lois   Sabiston,   B.H.E/50.
JOURNEAUX-PALLOT. Cecil Pepin Journeaux
to Margaret Elaine Pallot, B.A/44.
KEATLEY-BURGESS. Patrick Crawford Keatley, B.A/40, to Prudence Eve Burgess, in
London,  England.
KELLMAN-LAMOUREAUX. John Douglas Kell-
man, B.Com/49, to Irene Marie Laurent
Lamoureux.
KILBANK-INCH. Alfred C. Kilbank, B.Com.'47,
B.A/47, to Doris Isabel Inch in Port Hope,
Ontario.
LAW-MacKAY. James Palmer Law, B.S.A/55,
to    Ena   Lorraine   MacKay,    in    Youbou,B.C.
LeBRASSEUR-GOWE. Robin John LeBrasseur,
B.A/51, to Shirley May Gowe.
LILLY-WILLSON. Arthur William Lilly, B.Com
'53,  to  Betsy Ann  Willson.
LOWTHER-HORSFIELD. Gordon Readman Low-
ther, to Barabara Joan (Lea) Horsfield, B.A.
'53.
LUND-SCAN1TLAND. Eric Philip Lund to
Cecile   Anne  Scantland,   B.A/55.
LUNNY-CRUICKSHANK. Rev. William John
Lunny, B.A/52, to June Andrienne Inez
Cruickshank,  B.A/52.
McCONACHIE-GUNDERSON. Charles Eric Bruce
McConachie, B.A.Sc/49, to Barbara Lynn
Gunderson,   in   Edmonton.
MACDONALD-JAMES. John Morrison Macdonald, to Patricia Kathleen Reynette James,
B.S.P/52,   in   Writtle,   Essex,   England.
McDONALD-TROTTER. Peter MacAuley McDonald, B.Com.'55, to Helen Elizabeth
Trotter.
MacKENZIE-DANIEL. George Alexander MacKenzie, to Merna Lou Daniel, B.A.Sc.(Nurs.)
'55.
MacKINNON-COADY. Douglas MacKinnon to
Mary Margaret Coady, B.A/48.
MacKINNON-MOHORUK. John Alexander MacKinnon, B.S.P/51, to Elizabeth June
Mohoruk.
MACMILLAN-BENSLEY. John Wallace Mac-
millan,    B.Com/54,    to   Betty   Bensley.
McNULTY-MONK. William (Bill) Howard
McNulty, B.A/55, to Beatrice (Babs) Clar-
ine Monk.
MAWHINNEY-CARPENTER. John Donald Maw-
hinney, LL.B/54, to Sharon Margaret Carpenter.
MOYLS-EDWARDS. Francis David (Luke)
Moyls, B.A/46, to Grace Helena Edwards.
MUNN-PARKER .Robert Ellsworth Duncan
Munn, B.A/53, to Elizabeth Jane Parker, in
Sarnia, Ontario.
MURRAY-CAMERON. William Stanley Murray,
B.A/50, to Audremae Cameron.
NICOL-HESELTON. Eric Patrick Nicol, B.A/41,
M.A/48, to Myrl Mary Helen Heselton,
B.A/49.
NORDLUND-WILLIAMS. Lloyd Harold Nord-
lund, B.S.P/53, B.Sc. (Alta.), to Betty Joan
Williams.
NORDQUIST-NEIGHBOR. Ernest E. Nordquist
to Frances May  Neighbor,  B.A.Sc.(Nurs.)'51.
OSTROM-FLEMING. James Brock Ostrom
(Phys.Ed.'50),   to   Beverley   Eva   Fleming.
PANTON-LABERGE. John Andrew Panton,
B.Com.'48,   to   Doreen   Patricia   Laberge.
PARKES-DeFOE.      Francis     Alfred     Houghton
Parkes,   B.A/54,  to  Liane  Alyce   DeFoe.
PEARSON-FLETCHER.   Wallace John Pearson to
Valerie Joan Fletcher,  B.A/55.
PENSON-McDONALD.   Norman Hubert Penson,
B.Com.'47, to Marilyn McDonald.
PERRAULT-GALBRAITH.     Ernest   George   Perrault,   B.A/48,   to Audrey   Lee  Galbraith.
PRATT-MIDDLEDITCH.    John   Hamilton   Pratt
to  Patricia Anne Middleditch,  B.A/52.
RAE-LEE.      Basil     Allen     Rae,     B.Com/55,    to
Barbara   Louise   Lee.
RATCLIFFE-STEMLAND.     Allan    William    Rat-
cliffe, B.A/49, B.Ed/52, to Martha Stemland,
B.A/49.
RUNDLE-AUBIN.      Howard     Norton     Rundle,
B.A/54,   MA/55,  to Yvonne  Dorothy  Aubin.
SAWERS-HAMILTON.    Norman   Mason   Sawers,
B.A.Sc/52,      to     Eleanor      Joan     Hamilton,
B.A/49,  B.S.W/50.
SHARP-LANCASTER.    James   Sharp,   B.S.P/54,
to   Mary   Diane   Lancaster,   B.A/52.
SLEEMAN-HALICKI.     Kenneth    Jack    Sleeman,
B.S.A/55,   to   Irene   Eleanor   Halicki.
SMALL-TAYLOR.  Andrew Small, Jr., B.A.Sc/52,
to   Bernice   Jessie   Taylor.
STEVENS-MUNRO.       Gerald     David      Stevens,
B.A.Sc/54,  to Mary-Frances Munro,  B.A/53.
STEVENSON-GUISE.     Robert   Louis   Stevenson,
B.A/49,    to   Shirley    Ann    Guise.
STRANGE-FOGARTY.   William  Herbert  Strange,
B.A.Sc/53, to Adrienne Mildred Fogarty.
TAYLOR-SOWERBY.     Charles    Patrick   Stirling
Taylor,    B.A/52,   to    Elizabeth   Sowerby,    in
London,   England.
THOMPSON-JANZEN.    Basil   Herbert   Marshall
Thompson,   B.A/48,   M.A.   (Univ.   of   Mich.)
50,  M.D/54,  to Margaret  Elnora  Janzen,  in
Chilliwack.
THOMSON-WHELAN.    Wilson  Bruce  Thomson,
B.Com/55,  to  Joan  Myrtle Whelan.
TRUNKFIELD-COULTER.      Christopher    John
Trunkfield,    B.A/54,    to    Kathryn    Margaret
Coulter.
VAUGHAN-MILLARD.   Victor  Henry  Dashwood
Vaughan,     B.A.Sc/48,    to    Marcia    Patricia
Millard.
WALLACE-PLEVY.    John   Merritt   Wallace,
B.A.Sc/44, to Beverley June Plevy.
WHITE-HURLBURT.     Donald    Stavers    White,
B.A/52, LL.B/55, to Helen Jean Hurlburt.
WIELER-LEWIS.      Verner    J.    Wieler,    B.A/55.
to Audrey Winnifred Lewis.
WOOD-CHRISTIE.     Robert   Selkirk   Wood,   Jr.,
B.S.F/54,  to Janet  Armour Christie.
©bttuartw
W. P. (PAT) BIRMINGHAM, B.A., B.Com.'47,
Assistant Trade Commissioner in Bombay,
died November 9, 1955, in Vancouver, B.C.,
while home on leave. He is survived by his
parents, Mr. and Mrs. A. W. Birmingham of
1933  West  37th,  Vancouver,   (see  page 23).
WM. M. MART1NDALE, B.Com.'53, died in
Victoria, October 7, 1955. He had been employed as Assistant Manager, Hosiery and
Glove Department, The T. Eaton Company,
Victoria, B.C. Mr. Martindale is survived by
his widow, Patricia Mary and one son, Wharton
Michael, of 1508 Arrow Street, Victoria, B.C.,
and his parents, Mr. and Mrs. Murray Martin-
dale, of 1917 Runnymeade Ave., Victoria, B.C.
FREDERICK STEWART MORGAN, B.A.Sc.'25,
and his wife, Anne, were killed November 1,
when a United Air Lines plane bound for
Seattle crashed in Northern Colorado, en route
from New York. Formerly of Vancouver but
recently of Wilmette, III., Mr. and Mrs. Morgan
are survived by two young daughters, Susan
and Shirley, of 8167 French St., Vancouver;
Mr. Morgan's father, F. W. Morgan of North
Vancouver and Mrs. Morgan's parents, Mr.
and Mrs. Jack Smith of 8167 French St.,
Vancouver,   B.C.
DAVID MILTON OWEN, B.A/34, partner
in the law firm of Campney, Owen, Murphy and
Owen, was lost tragically on the plane flying
from Kemano to Kitimat, August 3, 1955.
As an undergraduate, Mr. Owen took an active
part in student affairs and was President of
the Student Council in his final year. He
was President of the Alumni Association in
1937. This interest in community affairs he
continued throughout his life. During the
past year he has been Deputy Chairman of
the Vancouver School Board. He leaves his
wife, Marion Margaret (nee Reid), B.A.'39,
and three children, Janet Leslie, Reid Milton
and Stephen Douglas, of 4812 Belmont Ave.,
Vancouver. His brother, Walter, is well known
in  University and  legal  circles.
LT.-COL. MacGREGOR MaclNTOSH, M.C,
Manager of Construction Industrial Relations,
who was on the plane with Mr. Owen, was
associated as Permanent Force Instructor with
the U.B.C. Contingent of the C.O.T.C. when
it was reorganised in 1928. He is survived by
his wife, Margaret Sydney, 3354 Radcliffe,
West Vancouver. He was 58.
U.B.C. ALUMNI   CHRONICLE
34
mt^mm You will find, in our monthly
Commercial Letter, a quick but
accurate survey of current commercial activities in Canad
concise review of foreign trade
developments, the latest statistics
on trade, industry and finance,
authoritative articles on special
aspects of Canada's economy.
Your local manager will gladly
place your name on our mailing
list, or just write to:
THE CANADIAN BANK OF COMMERCE
HEAD OFFICE    •    TORONTO
B-15
Your Sign of
GUARANTEED
PROTECTION
in Paint Finishes
GENERAL PAINT CORPORATION
OF    CANADA    LIMITED
y
,
950 Raymur Avenue, Vancouver
For industrial finishes and specialty coatings to
meet your specific needs call on GENERAL PAINT'S
Technical Service.
Telephone TAtlow 531T
for  complete  information.
Makers of Monamel and Monaseal
Northern
Electric
SERVES
YOU
BEST
35
U.B.C.  ALUMNI   CHRONICLE RETURN POSTAGE GUARANTEED
Ambassadress of Pear.
l)n^m^n% dmnpanji
NCORPORATED   2??    MAY    1670.

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