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The UBC Alumni Chronicle 1951

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 lltelj.B.e. AUufuti
DECEMBER, 1951
I
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KIT SI
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*HKW
Jlillli       TO A MILIIOH CANADIANS 111'
linftilir
working with Canadians in
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since 1817
Baivk of Montreal
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So many new attractions have been added to The Sunday
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things as the new Weekend Picture Magazine in rotogravure, and the 20-page section of Comics in full color,
are outstanding, but the improvement is notable in all
departments . . . the new B.C. Magazine being an
example. And when one considers that the good old
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LETTERS TO THE EDITOR
1014 E.   Forty-seventh  St.,
Seattle 5, Washington,
Dear Sir: October 30th, 1951.
As a longtime friend of Ernest G. Perrault,
whose mild provocation earned David Brock's murderous return in the October issue of your magazine, may I beg space to swing my own club.
The many inconsistencies, even incoherencies,
in Brock's reply I leave without comment, believing that those who know the mildness, the good
humor, and above all, the unpretentiousness of my
friend will be unaffected. The peevish Mr. Brock
should know, however, that his own proudly recalled brief to the Massey Commission (without
pay) was matched by one from Mr. Perrault.
I am interested in only one thing. If Mr. Brock
disclaims the label culture for himself, as he appears to do; yet is proud of his education ("some of
which I owe to U-B.C. . . . some of which I owe to
things not even U.B.C. could understand") how
would he wish himself described?
I have heard he would like to be called Elizabethan,   Most people judging him from his corres—
pandence would be more likely to call him merely
over-sensitive, all too ready for someone to knock
one of the chips off the old Brock.
As one who for several years made his living
as a "cheap little hack" I used occasionally to take
pleasure in Mr. Brock's periodic contributions to
the Victoria Times, believing them the product
of a sensitivity-killing quest for rent and food like
my own. I find I was mistaken: they were written
by one who had "never sold myself for money or
anything else"; and henceforth I will abjure them.
I am not interested in amateurs.
Yours truly,
PAUL WRIGHT.
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Page 4
THE U.B.C .ALUMNI CHRONICLE ALUMNI OFFERS A
MAGAZINE SUBSCRIPTION   FOR   YEAR'ROUND
SERVICE TO GRADS
As a result of a special arrangement with Publishers' representatives, you can now send in your
renewal for Time, Life, Colliers, McLeans, Saturday Evening Post, Readers' Digest, Toronto Saturday Night, Women's Home Companion, Western
Homes & Gardens, Esquire, Fortune, Ladies' Home
Journal, Newsweek, Chatelaine, National Home
Monthly, Cornet, American Magazine, Cosmopolitan, Redbook, Punch, Good Housekeeping — or in
fact, FOR ANY MAGAZINE IN THE WORLD-
In addition, you may send in a NEW subscription
for any magazine.
All you need to do now is send in your subscription order to your alumni office, together with
your remittance (you can EITHER make your
cheque payable to U.B.C.-Alumni Association Subscription, or you can make your cheque payable to:
"U.B.C. Subscriptions".
It costs you nothing extra; there are no hidden
charges. And for providing this service to you, your
Association will benefit from the fact that you have
renewed your subscriptions to the magazines of
your choice.
A special article on the City of Vancouver will be
a feature in the December 29 issue of the "Post."
Please remember this offer of service is not confined to any one publication or any one publishing
house, and applies to new subscriptions (including
special Christmas and other offers you may receive
in the mail), as well as renewals at any time during
the year. Simply enclose your subscription notice
or signed request with your remittance to this
office and we'll do the rest.
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Page 6
THE U.B.C .ALUMNI CHRONICLE The U. B. C Alumni
CHROHICLC
Published by the Alumni Association of
The University of British Columbia
Editor: Ormonde J. Hall, B.Comm., LLB.
'Women's Editor: Leona Sherlock, B.A., '50
Board of Management:
President Col. Gordon M. Letson, B.A.Sc., '26
Vice-President Douglas Macdonald, B.A., '30
Executive-Director— Frank Turner, B.Comm., B.A., '39
Treasurer G. Dudley Darling, B.Comm. '39
Second Vice-President JMary McDougal
B.A. '33
Third Vice-President Prof. Tom Taylor, B.A., '26
Chairman Publications Board Ormonde J. Hall, B.Comm.
*42 LLb. 48
Past President James A. Macdonald, B.A. '40
Degree Reps.: Medicine, Dr. Frank Turnbull, B.A. '23;
Law, Perry Miller, LL.B. '48; Pharmacy, W. T. Ainsworth,
B.S.P. '50; Commerce, Don Miller, B.Comm. '47; Agriculture, Iain McSwan, B.S.A. '42; Social Work, Richard Clark,
B.A. '41; Home Economics, Muriel Gullock, B.H.E. '46;
Physical Education, Reid Mitchell, B.P.E. '49; Architecture,
Harry Lee, B.Arch. 'SO; Applied Science, Phil Stroyan,
B.A. Sc. '24; Forestry, Jack Roff, B.Comm. '48; Arts, Aileen
Mann, B.A. '37.
Members at Large: David Brousson, B.A.Sc. '49, Fred
Grauer, B.S.A. '30, Jean Gilley, B.A. '27, Mrs. James Harmer, B.A. '40, Dr. W. G. Black, B.A. '22, Art Sager, B.A. '38.
Senate Reps.: Dr. Earl Foerster, Dr. W. C. Gibson, BA.
'33.
Alma Mater Society Reps.: Vaughan Lyon and Terry
Nicholls.
Editorial Office:
5th Floor, Yorkshire House
900 W. Pender St. Vancouver, B.C.
Business Office:
Room 201, Brock. Hall, U.B.C.
VOL. 5, No. 4.
DECEMBER, 1951
ARTICLES
HOMECOMING
TABLE OF CONTENTS
PAGE
..    9
WHY I HATE THE CHRONICLE by D. Brock    10
BRANCH ES    -„  21
FROM THE IVY VINE by Ernie Perrault  23
FEATURES:
PERSONALITIES    14
SPEAKING  EDITORIALLY   15
WOMEN  16
FRANKLY SPEAKING       19
Published in Vancouver, British Columbia and authorized as second class mail
Post Office Department, Ottawa
^J-or trie IKecord . . .
Anyone who missed the Annual Meeting of the
Alumni Association at the Brock on November 15,
has only himself to blame . . .the evening got off to
a fast start when after dinner the gathering was .
entertained by a hill-billy quintette • . . quite the
most entertaining group of undergraduates since
the Jokers ravaged the campus just after the war
. . . they were followed by the Varsity Choir which
was warmly received.
Highlight of the evening was the truly eloquent
address by Stuart Keate, who had the good sense
to talk about things familiar to grads in his opening remarks, and had the touch of the orator to be
serious long enough to send the members away
with something to think about ... it was a good
effort . . . Jim MacDonald's President's Report was
brief but meaty and in keeping with the tone of the
meeting . . . you can read his report in this issue
at page 13 and incidentally an effort is being made
to have Stu Keate's address printed in pamphlet
form . . . we'll let you know more about that.
150 of the faithful attended the annual meeting
and on the strength of the fast pace and organization of the whole affair (great credit to Frank
Turner) next year's meeting should be well attended again.
Running through this issue, we recommend
Dave Brock's diatribe on page 10 and Ernie
Perrault's new column "From the Ivy Vine" on
page 23.
Next issue we promise to entertain you with entertaining pieces from such writers as Stu Keate,
Dave Brock and Eric Nicol among others who are
going to help out ... so how about a helping hand
from you too . . . the U-B.C.-Alumni-Development
Fund is one of B.C.'s best investments ... it helps
ensure a great University .  .  .  U.B.C-, of course.
BOXING DAY DANCE
By popular demand, the Association's traditional Holiday Ball—the Boxing Day Dance—
will again become a one-night affair this
December 26th. This year's Dance is under
the Co-Chairmanship of 2nd Vice-President
Mary McDougal and that perennial "Pilot,"
Cart Collard.
Tickets will remain $6.00 per couple, and
may be obtained in advance (an especially
sound idea this year!) by mailing cheques
into the alumni office.
COVER  PICTURE
An exuberant President Norman MacKenzie leads
the cheers for HRH Princess Elizabeth during her visit
to the University Stadium at Homecoming.
DECEMBER, 1951
Page 7 o
ne of the world's great banks
is just across the street
Perhaps you think of your local Royal
Bank as the place where you deposit
money ... or buy occasional money
orders or travellers cheques ... or
arrange loans.
But it is much more than that.
Your local Royal Bank branch is the
logical place for you to go for confidential discussions on all kinds of financial
subjects, from your personal budget to
some major business venture.
When you talk things over with your
local Royal Bank manager, he brings
to your problem a banking knowledge
gained through years of training in many
different branches and communities.
And if necessary he can call on the local
knowledge of 669 other branches in
Canada and 61 abroad, and on the specialized training of experts in many fields.
In fact, all the facilities of the Royal
Bank are available to you through the
branch around the corner, or just across
the street. Its door is your door to one of
the world's great banking institutions.
ROYAL     BANK     OF     CANADA
You can bank on the "Royal" The above picture records an historical event in the life of the University, showing H.R.E. Princess Elizabeth anal the Duke of Edinburgh being escorted by President X. A. M. MacKenzie down the stadium steps.
HOME COMING MARKED BY ROYAL VISIT
CONVOCATION,  GYM   DEDICATION   COLORFUL   EVENT
Homecoming 1951 was an auspicious occasion
and one which the University of British Columbia
and its administration could well be proud.
Activities commenced Monday, Oct. 23, and
steadily built up to a climax Saturday when H.R.H.
Princess Elizabeth and the Duke of Edinburgh
visited the University Stadium after the U-B.C-
Central Washington football game. The crowd of
5000 packed in the Stadium waited until almost
darkness to see the Royal Couple who were delayed
until after the game.
It was an historical event, but somewhat overshadowed by a most memorable occasion held the
night previous in the new War Memorial Gym
which was officially dedicated to the War Heroes
of British Columbia.
The Dedication ceremony held in conjunction
with Fall Convocation and the installation of Chancellor Sherwood Lett was an inspiring event that
reflected credit on Persident Norman MacKenzie,
who handled the affair with great presence, and his
administrators who organized a most impressive
ceremonv.
3000 persons attended the colourful ceremonies
that gave special emphasis to the fact that the Gym
was a living memorial to B.C.'s fallen heroes. Next
of kin were regarded as special guests of the University and President MacKenzie made it clear that
the Gymnasium was the heritage of all people of
British Columbia and not just an ordinary college
gym.
The colourful robes of the many distinguished
guests and the presence of many high ranking military personnel, the Seaforth Band and Pipe Band,
the members of the British Columbia judiciary and
other high office and the outstanding men who received honorary degrees made it a stirring event.
Honorary degrees were conferred on the Hon.
Milton Gregg. V.C., Sir Alexander Clutterbuck and
His Excellency The Hon. Stanley Woodward.
On the Saturday, marked by the victory of the
University Thunderbirds over Central Washington
and the presence of the Royal Couple, a much respected University graduate, John Buchanan, former Alumni Association president, was awarded the
Great Trekker Award.
DECEMBER, 1951
Page 9 WHY    I    HATE    THE    CHRONICLE
By David Brock
If you tear off the cover of this number of the
Chronicle and mail it to me, together with a completion of this sentence "I hate the Chronicle worst
because . . ." in 25 words or less, I couldn't care
less. And I won't award you a prize, because I hate
the Chronicle much worse than you do and am thus
entitled to all the prizes myself. However, go
ahead and complete the sentence anyway. It will
do you good, and may even do the Chronicle good.
MARRIAGES
I think the main trouble with the Chronicle is
that it's got one syllable too many. It's chronic.
It doesn't chronicle anything very much except
births, marriages, deaths, and appeals. Appeals for
funds, I mean, not appeals against sentences of
death, birth, or marriage- The divorce court is certainly a Court of Appeal, but you can't appeal
against dying or being born, though most of us
complain against both fates simultaneously. By
the wav, since the Chronicle is so keen on vital
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statistics, why doesn't it run a column on the latest
divorces too? After all, it is quite easy to keep
track of who has died or been born lately, but it is
the very devil to discover who is married to whom
at any given moment ... to discover who, let alone
why. You'd think the Editor, being what Rabelais
called a furred law-cat, would take a professional
interest in these matters.   But does he?  Not he.
BIRTHS
Another complaint is that there is too much
chit-chat about grads nobody has every heard of.
Have we no colorful eccentrics worth writing
about? Mind you, I don't want to hear about the
successful ones. That makes me jealous. Burns me
up. It emphasizes too much my own failures. The
heck with these smart-alecky little big-shots, some
of them young enough to be my own disgusting
children. I don't read that type of fiction ... I can
make up better stuff myself. No, but surely we
have some grads who are strong or beautiful or
witty or picturesque. Or virtuous, or otherwise uncommon. Oh, and talking of virtue, why is there
no police blotter (so to speak) in these newsless
columns? If there's one thing I want to know
about my dear old colleagues (which I very much
doubt) it's their police records. Who's been pinched
lately, and how many years did he get? Did honest
old X, who bootlegged his way through college,
make a career of it? When I say X, I mean X and
Y, for there were two boys bootlegging their way
through college in my time. One of them used to
set up a little store in the gents' cloakroom at college dances and did a roaring trade in a whispering
way. The other just ran a joint at home, though
I believe he had a delivery route too. Some boys
work their way through college by delivering ice
or bread or milk, but this boy delivered something
to make the ice more useful . . . and the milk less
tempting.
WILLSON E. KNOWLTOM
Kjptometriit
•
MARINE 801 1
823 Birks Building Vancouver. B. C.
Page 10
THE U.B.C .ALUMNI CHRONICLE DEATHS
And what else is wrong with the Chronicle?
Well, there's a certain illiteracy about it, as if much
of it was written by graduates of the Tillicum Club
or some ghastly Teen Town. I realize that the
whole world grows illiterate- The more it reads,
the less it can write. Yet, stubbornly, I resent and
regret this. I'm just an old reactionary, living on
my memories, and I hate to see the English language going downhill with the assistance of the educated. The Lating language also took a bit of a
beating in the last issue, what with an article entitled IN MEMORIAM. It's not UM, it's AM.
That Am What Am.
Space does not permit but the Editor does not
permit the mention of further complaints. (He's
been rather tolerant for these last 500 words, so give
Our Boy a big hand, fellows.) I'd like to add,
though, that while we have dozens of grads earning
a living with their pens, some of them almost respectably, hardly one of them cares a hoot about
writing free for the Chronicle now and then. A
sordid bunch. Nor does it excuse them to quote Dr.
Johnson, who said that no man but a blockhead
ever wrote except for money. I grant you that I
myself may be a bit of a Brockhead, but that doesn't
affect the main point, which is that chaps who are
miles less blockish than myself have often written
free . • . even when it didn't concern their old college. How about a few vivid memoirs, you blokes?
Louder and funnier, please . . . we can hardly hear
you, away down here in the back row. And even
when we can can hear you, we're not laughing
enough. I hope you haven't gone and got sensible
on us . . . that would be a horrible fate for both
yourselves and the Chronicle.
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VANCOUVER, B.C.
DECEMBER. 1951
Page 11 GORDON   LETSON    B A Sc    '26,   ELECTED
ALUMNI    ASSOCIATION    PRESIDENT
STUART KEATE GIVES
ANNUAL MEETING ADDRESS
Retiring Alumni Association President James
MacDonald looks  happy as  he  turns  his  office
over to Gordon Letson, B.A. '24, B.Sc. '26 who looks
a trifle dubious about the whole thing.
The 1951 Annual Meeting of the Alumni Association was held this year on Nov. 15 at a dinner
meeting at Brock Hall and 150 graduates enjoyed
an interesting evening highlighted by an excellent
address by Stuart Keate, publisher of the Victoria
Times-
Stu Keate entertained the meeting with an
address that was serious in content but full of wit
and sentimental references of earlier campus days.
His theme emphasized that "a University career
should be planned so as to lead to a well-rounded
personality."
The meeting also witnessed the presentation of
a cheque for $17,260 to the University of British
Columbia by the Alumni Association from the proceeds of its U.B.C.-Alumni Development Fund.
Election of Officers was held and at the meeting
Past President James MacDonald introduced incoming president Gordon Letson, B.A., '24, B.A.
Sc. '26.
Douglas Macdonald, B.A. '30, was elected Vice-
President, Mary McDougal, BA. '33, second Vice-
President, Prof. Tom Taylor, B.A. '26, third Vice-
President, Dudley Darling, B.Comm. '39, Treasurer
and O. J. Hall, B.Comm. '42, LL.B. '48, Editor of
Publications.
Members at Large elected were Dave Brousson,
B.A.Sc '49, Jean Gilley, B.A. '27, Helen Harmer,
B.A. '40, Dr. W. G. Black, B.A. '22, Art Sager, B.A.
'38 and Dr. Fred Grauer.
This year for the first time representatives of
B.A- degrees offered at U.B.C. were elected to represent all phases of University activity on the Alumni
Association and the following were elected:
Medicine, Frank Turnbull, B.A. '23; Law, Perry
Miller,  LL.B.  '48;  Pharmacy,  W.  T.  Ainsworth,
President-Emeritus   L.   S.   Klinck   congratulates
Stuart Keate, B.A. '35 on his excellent address at
the annual meeting of the Alumni Association.
B.S.P. '50; Commerce, Don Miller, B.Comm. '47;
Agriculture.Iain McSwan, B-S.A. '42; Social Work,
Richard Clark, B.A. '41, B.S.W. '46; Home Economics, Muriel Gulloch, B.H.E. '46; Physical Education, Reid Mitchell, B.P.E. '49; Architecture,
Harry Lee, B.Arch- '50; Applied Science, [Phil
Stroyan, B.A.Sc. '24; Forestry, Jack Roff, B.Comm.
'48; Arts, Aileen Mann, B.A. '37.
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Page 12
THE U.B.C -ALUMNI CHRONICLE RETIRING   PRESIDENT   JAMES   A.
MACDONALD'S   1951   REPORT
I believe it is true to say that with the great
post-war growth of the University there has been a
marked rise in the effectiveness and prestige of
the Alumni Association. This is only as it should
be, because the organization of our approximately
17,000 graduates has an important part to play in
the life of the University. However, at the present
time not over 20% of our graduates and former
students continue an interest in the University
through our organization and the task we face is
that of stimulating interest in the remainder of
them. An important step towards this was taken
this year. By amendment to our Constitution, the
Executive of the Association has been broadened
to include a representative of each bachelor's degree
conferred by the University. Organization in the
Association on the basis of the graduate's degree
rather than his class should develop and it will
have many advantages.
SERIOUS PROBLEMS
There are serious problems to be overcome if
the Association is going to be able to function
effectively. The Alumni office must be in a position to strike off lists and dispatch mailing pieces
from day to day to Alumni members in every sort
of classification. One day, for instance, out of our
17,000 odd members a list of former Players Club
members may be required while another day it
may be necessary to dispatch some mailing piece
to Social Service graduates. Because of the enormous number of people involved now, these things
are not going to be possible without the aid of modern office machines which, as you know, are very
expensive.
Under the "University Act" Convocation is
given the responsibility of electing the Chancellor
and fifteen of Senate. It is composed of graduates,
members of faculty and certain other people appointed to it in the early days of the University.
Thus, the membership of Convocation is in very
high degree identical with the persons qualified to
join this Association- We are the live organization
of graduates of the University while Convocation
is really only able to function because of life
breathed into it from time to time by this Association. The anomalous situation has ben apparent
for some time and a strong Committee of our Association which was set up to consider it has recommended amendments to the Statute which in effect
would substitute The Alumni Association for Convocation.
In the Spring of this year elections for Chancellor and fifteen Members of Senate were required
to be held. Brigadier Sherwood Lett was nominated as Chancellor and then elected by acclamation.
In the case of the Senate, our policy was simply
to see that an ample number of qualified persons
were nominated in order to ensure a successful
election. A strong and representative Committee
of this Association therefore took steps to see that
the names of 22 persons were placed in nomination
for the 15 elective positions.
For some time a number of Alumni have felt
that steps  should be taken to form  a University
Club in this City. A year ago the University Club
Committee of this Association prepared and had
circulated among our members a questionnaire
seeking information as to the interest in a University Club and the type of Club which Alumni would
be ready to support. The response showed that
many favoured the project and most had in mind
a downtown Club with initiation fees running to
around $35 with annual dues at about $25. Following the answering of the questionnaire by our
graduates, a University Club Committee met with
representatives of Alumni of other Universities.
The answers received indicated enough interest in
the project to warrant formulating a concrete detailed proposal. I should, I think, make it clear
that it is not contemplated that this Association
should itself promote or sponsor a University Club.
With the advantage of the quite extensive data
compiled by our Committee it must be left to a
group of interested individuals to carry out the
promotion of such a Club.
"The Chronicle" is an Alumni journal of considerable prestige and I believe that it is read with
interest by thousands of our graduates- In fact,
it constitutes an indispensable link between the
University and its Alumni. However, due to sharply rising costs of printing and distribution, coupled
with a drop in advertising revenue, "The Chronicle"
(Continued on page 22)
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Page 13 IM
PERSONALITIES
*
CAMPUS PAPERS — Despite prevelant opinion
that University students nowadays are more staid
than the undergraduates of ten or fifteen years ago,
enough evidence is eminating from the Campus to
indicate that the college boys are still up to their
usual tricks . . .
The editors of the Ubyssey, who were constantly in hot water in the thirties, were involved in another "incident" over a $23-00 bill received from
the Kickapoo Club . . . The Kickapoo Club, rather
weakly, claimed it lost money because of a publicity story in the Ubyssey and tendered the editorial board of the paper a bill for $23.00 to make up
for their losses . . . The bill was rejected, and the
Students' Council came to the aid of the Club and
demanded that the Ubyssey pay it. Whereupon
the editors decided to call a newspaper strike,
which was enough to settle the matter, as the Council then abandoned the idea of collecting the $23.00.
The Engineers were improving their public relations on the Campus however this week, by making an "unconditonal surrender" campaign for
student's dimes in connection with the March of
Dimes program for the Children's Hospital . . . Ron
Foxall, recently announced that unless the Arts
men collect $200.00 for the drive by noon of the day
of the announcement, that they would throw the
Arts President, Jim Genis into the Lily Pond . . .
in order to get their own campaign up to expectations, the Engineers had devised the usual antics
they are noted for, including a long distance spitting competition which was being prepared for by
the purchasing of plug tobacco • . . Other events
were the greasy pole shinny, tug-o-war, and, other
items which they hoped would raise 10,000 dimes.
Sheila Keirns, second year Arts student, has
been accepted as a member of the College Board of
Mademoiselle magazine. She is one of 700 students
from colleges all over the country who completed
for 20 guest editorships ... If chosen to be a guest
editor, she will spend four weeks next year in New
York where she will work with Mademoiselle editors and help to write and edit the August, 1952 Col-
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lege issue of that magazine . . . Sheila's home is in
Nelson, and she is a senior editor of the Ubyssey.
The new medical faculty was in some difficulty
with the anti-vivisectionists in Vancouver who
questioned the City of Vancouver's authority to
release stray dogs from the City Pound to the
U-B.C. faculty for experimental purposes . . . The
Anti-vivisection Society of British Columbia managed to extend the Pound's holding period of stray
animals from 48 to 72 hours, but it was indicated
that the battle had not ended at that point.
Professor Earle Birney, of the University of
British Columbia English Department, whose
novels and poems have won renown in Canada,
and who has been a contributor to the Alumni
Chronicle, was recently awarded a $200.00 prize
from a U.S. College for the best English poem of
1951 . . . "From a Hazel Bough" was submitted to
the Poetry Works Foundation of Ocidental College,
Los Angeles, California, and was deemed to be the
best published during the past year.
APPOINTMENTS — Frank M. Francis, B.A.Sc.
'45 has been appointed General Superintendent of
Engineering of Canadian Pacific Airlines.
G. S. Williamson, B.A.Sc. '36, Assistant-Manager at Shellburn Refinery, has been chosen to
head Shell Oil Company of Canada Limited's new
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Page 14
THE U.B.C .ALUMNI CHRONICLE FAITH
"Because of my faith both in the University and
its students, it seems to me that those who are about
to receive their diplomas are in some ways more
fortunate than students in a more prosperous time:
the influence of adversity on a well-balanced mind
is to make the mental vision clearer, so that even the
road to happiness becomes ultimately easier to find.
"Because of this clarity of vision, our graduating
students are saved from two intellectual dangers..
The first is that unwholesome sense of belonging
to a protected and privileged class, of being assured
either a sheltered niche in an academic cloister or a
comfortable opportunity to become rich at the expense of other people. The second danger is the
bitterness of the frustrated intellectual who, when
that community that has given him an education
cannot immediately find for him a lucrative and distinguished position, disguises his baulked ambition
and wounded vanity as disinterested reforming zeal.
"If the students of the graduating class are safe
from these two perils, it is because they have learnt
how impossible it is for college graduates to separate their individual prosperity from the welfare of
the entire community: they know that they must
stand or fall with their fellow citizens."
Those are wise words and we are indebted to the
erudition of Dr. Klinck in writing them, and the
perspicacity of Mr. Keate in recalling them, for the
hard days that are today.
The illusory element in our society of today is
that although much is gained easily and much is
given free, the elementary obstacles in gaining the
DECEMBER, 1951
ORMONDE
HALL
^(jzakinq cZditoxiaLLij
Alumni attending the annual meeting of the
U.B.C. Alumni Association were treated to a rare
evening recently when 37-year-old graduate Stuart
Keate, publisher of the Victoria Times, delivered
an address which perhaps was the most eloquent
oration ever given before that gathering.
Mr. Keate's easily delivered talk, full of wit.
humour, nostalgia and most important—intellectual
content and common sense—was a jewel among
public addresses in a day when a high-calibre after
dinner speech is regarded as a lost art.
His words were an informal account of
what higher education consisted in his day and a
comparison with education today, spiced with many
Time-like, authoritative quotes laying bare the
faults of our educational system. The speech revealed much careful preparation and considerable
thought and was accordingly highly enjoyable.
Many of his remarks and deductions were based
on the words of President-emeritus Dr. L- S- Klinck,
written by that scholarly gentleman in 1935. In that
year Dr. Klinck in the Totem, gave this message
to the graduating class:
full life in the face of inflation, control, restrictions,
threat of war, and the ever present nervous tension,
are just as trying and frustrating as they ever have
been, depression times not excepted.
SURVIVAL
The college graduate today faces the same basic
problems of survival, albeit undercut with the many
aids of the welfare state, as did his father and
grandfather. And the disillusion of defeat and failure is just as hard to take as it ever was, and many
of our graduates are not equipped to suffer temporary setbacks and go on to ultimate personal victory.
Hence the present day trend of graduates to accept
something less—with more security.
There are many advocates these days of the
wholesale subsidation of students by private, provincial and federal grants. Up to a point, of course,
scholarships and financial and other aid is indispensable, else many brilliant scholars would never attend
a University. But uncontrolled it breeds softness,
the prominent mark it would appear of our present
day civilization.
....Nothing toughens and strengthens the body
like hard work; nothing toughens and strengthens
the mind like adversity and intellectual and physical struggle.
H. G. Wells, no capitalist he, writes in his "A
Short History of the World" that during the last
half of the 19th century there was a steady growth
of knowledge and that the Universities played only
a minor part in the philosophical and scientific
thought of this period. He said "Endowed learning
is apt to be timid and conservative learning, lacking
in initiative and resistant to innovation, unless it
has the spur of contact with independent minds."
In view of those words and the advice of Dr.
Klinck, it would seem wise to consider whether the
immense amounts of money being advocated for
student subsidation in the form of scholarships and
bursaries were diverted to a greater extent to increasing the salaries of those teachers who can provide the universities the top-grade "independent
minds" of which Mr. Wells writes.
Page 15 #
WOMEN
By LEONA SHERLOCK
ENID WYNESS
Climbing the ladder of success takes a long
time, Enid Wyness (Arts '32) says but when the
climbing involves jobs that Enid's had there's never
a dull moment.
Now Provisional Supervisor of Social Service
in the Division of TB control and VD control,
Enid has accomplished a great deal since receiving
her B-A. degree in '32. After obtaining her Arts
degree, she studied Law for a year then in 1935
went into the Provincial Government Service. In
1940 she took her social work training and received
her diploma the next year.
From 1941-43 she was associated with the Canadian Welfare Council in Ottawa and then enlisted
in the CWAC as a social worker. Her army career
lasted till 1946 when she came back to B.C. and
started with the Provincial Government Social
Work Department.
They gave her educational leave from 1948-50
and she took her Masters degree in Social Work
at U.B.C. *       *       *
Christmas is almost upon us and mixed with
thoughts of what to get for Aunt Sara is the worry
of getting Christmas cards in the mail under the
post office deadline.
Familiar cry at this time of year is "Everybody
I know has either moved or got married and heaven
knows where I'm to send their card." So in view
of this we hunted up a few addresses with the hope
that we're helping you out.
Ellanor and Arnie Houghland's new address is
3961 West 31st, Sherle and Arthur Ericson are at
4431 Blenheim, Cynthia and Dennis Harland are in
West Vancouver, at 2412 Marine Drive, Bev- and
Mike Fraser are living in Victoria at 1904 Fort St.
Among apartment dwellers, Robin and Quentin
Brown are in Simcoe Lodge, 1445 West 14th, June
and Ron Cliff are in The Lions, 1430 West 13th,
Ron and Doreen Rice are at 1335 West 15th, Don
and Edith Christie are at 1570 West 15th, Audrey
and Michael Robson are in the Shaughnessy Cres-
ent Apartments on West 16th, Patsy and John IPick-
ford are at 1315 West 15th, Signe and David Housser are at 1450 Maple.
The Peter Woodwards are over in West Vancouver in their new home at 3215 Mathers and
Daphne and Gordon Poupore are in Victoria are at
730 Vancouver Street. Grace and John Ballem are
out in the University area at 5600 Dalhousie Road.
Down in Portland, Nancy and Donald Mac-
Dougall have set up housekeeping at 601 N.E. Irving. Patrick and Heln Ballentine are living at 145
Gordon Road, York Mills, Toronto.
Helen and Chuck Tier's new address is 61 Eller
Street, Cambridge 38, Mass., USA. Helen, by the
way, is working at Harvard, while husband, Chuck,
goes to M.I-T. So they're cheering for opposite
teams.
Every winter U.B.C. grads leave en masse for
Toronto.   Among the trekkers  east this fall were
Pat Johnston (Arts '50). Bev Robertson (Home Ec.
'50), Bea Brandt (Arts '48) who's taking postgrad
work in Library Science, and Liz Tupper who is
continuing   her   studies   at   Toronto    University.
Beth Estey is at McGill this year.
*        *        *
Joining the U-B.C. alumni in Seattle lately were
Lois Bennett (Home Ec. '50) and Jo-Jean Johnston
(Home Ec '51).
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Page 16
THE U.B.C .ALUMNI CHRONICLE *
WOMEN
*
Enjoying living in London is Willa MacKinnon
(Arts '50), who we hear is working at the B.B.C.
there.
Just back from a two-year stay in Great Britain
is Ann Spencer (Arts '50). Ann spent the first
year at the University of Edinburgh taking her
Social Work degree and last year she taught at a
prep school in Yorkshire. Her duties there included the instruction and supervision of cricket.
Ann was very glad to get back to Canada and
beefsteak after two years of existing on a British
diet. The only thing she'd say on the political question was that she never met a Socialist the whole
time she was over there- "Nobody would admit to
having helped get them in power when things were
such a mess", she said.   "Not even in the slums."
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Highlight of Ann's years "over there" were her
bicycle trips through the Scandanavian countries
and on the Continent.
Her description of these trips were of the Eric
Nicol — The Roving I — variety. Her first love
abroad now is the Italian Riviera where she spent
two weeks last summer.
But from the Riviera, Ann's come back to Vancouver to job-hunt — preferably in Social work.
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DECEMBER, 1951
Page 17 *
WOMEN
*
Head of the new business and economic division of the Vancouver Public Library is Aileen
Tufts. After graduating from U.B.C. Aileen attended the Washington Library School.
Eleanor Bennett, the former Eleanor Grace
Mayo and husband Reg. are off for three years on
Bahrein Island, Persian Gulf. Eleanor has been
engaged in scientific work since receiving her B.A.
and M.A. in physics and maths at U.B.C. She was
associated for some time with the research branch
of the University of Notre Dame, Indiana and spent
the past two years with the Physics Department,
National Research Council in Ottawa. Reg. a
graduate of U-B.C. after attending Victoria College,
is engaged in research on Bahrein Island.   They
were married September 15th.
*        *        *
Rita Loiselle (Arts '51) who'll be remembered
as a Mussoc star is back at McGill this year taking
her Social Work degree.
A new periodical is to be seen on magazine
racks in some of the better stores and hotels and it's
under the editorship of Yvonne Agazzarian Maart-
man. This interesting new book comes out under
the title of "P.M."
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Page 18
THE U.B.C .ALUMNI CHRONICLE MERRY CHRISTMAS
and
A HAPPY NEW YEAR
ALUMNOTES:
One of the most interesting alumni office visitors this past wee while was Mrs. Eric Swadell (nee
Laura Pim, a grad of '17), who was the first Secretary of the Alumni Association. Mrs. Swadell came
up from California to visit friends and relatives in
Vancouver, and is en route to join her husband,
who is Senior Protestant Chaplain in the U.S. Berlin
Military Post . . . Last year's A.M-S. Treasurer,
Walt Ewing is now with Coast Underwriters in
Seattle and has arranged a get-together of alumni
in the Puget Sound City . . . Lieut. (E) Frank Dayton, R.C.N., dropped in during a recent visit with
his folks on the  Coast and supplied one or two
BY
FRANK J. E. TURNER
EXECUTIVE -DIRECTDR
ALUMNI ASSOCIATION
FRANKLY     SPEAKING
Alumnus Eric Nicol, recently judged Canada's
Top Humorist, writes his Daily Province Column
at home mostly. "Jabez" (his U.B.C- name) is a
batchelor, and though undoubtedly interrupted on
occasion, he encounters nothing akin to Family
Man's helpful kin!
You've surmised the situation perfectly!—(this
column.?) was designed and executed (particularly
appropriate word) through the combined talents
and efforts of Marilyn Leigh (she'll be 5 in March),
Tommy (he'll be 2 in January), and Trixie (a kitten
now pushing 5 months). Without the patient understanding and superhuman supervision of the
Better Half, it still wouldn't have been possible.
For the seventeenth time, Doris has paintstak-
ingly explained just "Why Daddy has to work,"
and dashed down once more to referee a sporadic
outburst of enthusiasm   (pronounced "battle").
Since inspiration has thus been liberally
sprinkled into the typewriter keys ("Why doesn't
he just write Santa Claus about a doll's bed
Mommy?"), and U.B.C.'s Christmas exams are in
the air (yes . . . they still give out B.A.C "degrees"
on the campus), what's more fitting at this time
than to say simply and sincerely:—
"unknown" addresses. Frank's on his way to
"Niobe" and a special Engineering course with the
R.N. • . . Among the many alumni who wandered
down to the P.A. Club to attend the Big Block
Smoker which has been postponed till the Spring
were Charlie Campbell, Bill Scott (no relation to
Gordon Scott), and Gordon Logan . . . Former
U.B.C. Legion President Al Wescott informed us
that ex-A.M.S. John Haar is now with Union Oil
Co. in Southern California, lives in Lomita • . .
UNTD graduate Ian Ross .B.A.Sc. '51) is now in
Research and Development with CM. & S. in Trail,
and came in to tell us—in advance and with a bit of
a beam!—about his marriage to Lois Isabel Logan
(B.A. '52). "Effective date": October 27 . . . Enjoyed a chat with Jack Whalen, Whalen Insurance,
of the Class of '26, and another of the many generous Fund donors . . . Ron Leslie ('51 grad) 'phoned
to let us know that brother Alexander ('48) is now
Y.M.C.A. Physical Director in Sherbrooke, Quebec
. . . Gordon Wheatley (B.A.Sc. '48) has returned to
Vancouver with C.G.E. ■ . . Our special thanks to
Tom Scott (President of the Grad Classes in '46
and who's been with C.I.L. in Shawinigan Falls
since graduation) for dropping in and giving us almost a dozen correct addresses . . • We'd like to have
much more of the same in the New Year!
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Page 19 *
NOTICE
*
The following is an extract from the "University
Act", of the Revised Statutes of the Province of
British Columbia, 1948:
"The University established in the Province,
called "The University of British Columbia, (in
this Act referred to as the "University"), consisting
of a Chancellor, Convocation, Board of Governors,
Senate, Faculty Council, and the Faculties, shall
exist and continue as a body politic and corporate.
No other university having corporate powers capable of being exercised within the Province shall be
known by the same name nor shall any such university have power to grant degrees." (R.S.B.C.
1936, c 299, s.2; 1938, c. 61, s.2.)
The following is a true copy of tioo of the objects
of the University of British Columbia Alumni Association constitution:
2. (e) To adopt a definite policy on questions
directly or indirectly affecting the University of
B.C., education in the Province of B.C., or graduates of the University of B.C., or persons engaged
in educational work in the Province of British
Columbia.
2. (g) To circulate among its members information
on all matters of interest to graduates of the Uni-
THIS LEGAL NOTICE APPEARED IN A VANCOUVER
NEWSPAPER IN NOVEMBER AND DECEMBER
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that an Application will be
made to the Legislative Assembly of the Province of British
Columbia at Its coming Session for an Act to incorporate
HOLY ROSARY UNIVERSITY, as a Roman Catholic University of higher education, giving to the Corporation Inter alia,
the following powers:
(a) To acquire and hold real and personal estate of every
nature and kind whatsoever for the purposes of the said Corporation, and to sell, exchange, mortgage, lease or otherwise
dispose of the same, and to exercise, possess and enjoy all customary or incidental rights, powers and privileges usually
given to such  corporation;
(b) to take by grant, will or other conveyance, assignment
or deed of gift, real or personal estate of every kind whatsoever;
(c) Under Roman Catholic auspices, to provide instruction in and confer degrees in all branches of the liberal arts
and sciences, and in all useful branches of learning, education,
commerce, journalism, nursing, household science and physical
education;
(d) To sue and be sued under its corporate name;
(e) To have a common seal and possess all the powers of
a common law corporation and the powers conferred on a
corporation by Section 22 of the "Companies Act," Revised
Statutes of British Columbia, 1948;
(f) To designate and appoint its officers, the members of
its Council, and Board of Trustees, and to define the duties,
authority, rights and privileges of each.
DATED this 19th day of November, A.D., 1951.
A.  H.   J.   SWENCISKY,
Solicitor for Applicants.
versity of British Columbia, and to print, publish,
issue and circulate such papers, periodicals, magazines, books, circulars and other literary undertakings as may seem conducive to any of the above
objects.
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Page 20
THE U.B.C .ALUMNI CHRONICLE #
BRANCHES
*
M*'*
•-%*'.
Bob  Osborne, and Dr. Blythe Eagles get together The happy group  standing outside the new Junior-
icith Summerland Reeve C. E. Bentley during the Senior High School at Suni-merland. B.C. are U.B.C.
sessions  of the  "l.'.B.C.   Capsule  College"   held  in graduates Bob Osborne; A. K. McLeod, Principle; Dr.
Summerland.  Xorember 13, 1951. Blythe  Eagles,  Lacey Fisher, and Dr.  Dick Palmer.
U.B.C. Capsule College Is Great Success At Summerland
Under the sponsorship of the Summerland
Branch of the U.B.C. Alumni Association, and
chairmanship of Reeve Bentley. the first "U.B.C.
Capsule College" was held in the Okanagan city
recently. Featured in the unique "College" programme were three U.B.C. alumni now serving as
Faculty members of their Alma Mater—Dr. Blythe
Eagles, Dean of the Faculty of Agriculture, Dr.
William C. Gibson, Head of the Crease Clinic on
the campus, and Professor Robert F- Osborne,
Director of the School of Physical  Education.
Purpose of the affair was not only to bring
"Town and Gown" together in still another way,
but also to stimulate and promote informal discussions among the people in the community (not just
alumni) through the medium of an extended and
informal question period following opening
speeches by the three Faculty members. Alumni
Director Frank Turner introduced the three Point
Grey emissaries, and chaired the panel.
The unqualified success of this "community
seminar" might well be measured by the fact that
more than half of the seventy-five persons present
threw challenging questions at the Faculty members during the one and a half-hour "quiz" portion
of the interesting programme.
A great deal of the credit for the success of this
pioneering venture must go the Summerland President Maurice Welch, Secretary (Mrs.) Eve Fisher,
and members of that enterprising branch.
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1900
Insurance Company
HOME OFFICII     TOUOHTO, CUttO*
1950
DECEMBER, 1951
Pago  21 BERRY APPOINTED
FUND CHAIRAAAN
In one of his first official acts upon assuming
the Presidency of the Association, Gordon Letson
confirmed the appointment of Harry A. Berry (B.Com., B.C. 1937) as Chairman of the Alumni-U.B.C.
Development Fund's Board of Directors, and Aubrey F. Roberts (Arts '23) as Vice-Chairman of the
same important body. Other directors will be appointed shortly by the incoming Alumni Board of
Management.
Mr. Berry, who served as Fund Vice-Chairman
last year, brings a wealth of business and alumni
experience to the post filled so capably and successfully last year by Mr. John M- Buchanan (B.A. '17),
President of B.C. Packers. In private life, Harry is
Comptroller of Seaboard Shipping and Seaboard
Lumber Sales and has long been recognized as an
able leader. In alumni affairs, his two years as
Treasurer saw a substantial improvement in the
Association's financial picture.
The new Vice-Chairman has an equally fine
background of business and University activities.
He is Canadian Manger for Braun & Co., Business
Consultants, and has served continuously on the
Fund Board of Directors since the inception of
this annual giving programme in January, 1949.
For the past three years, most of the effective publicity releases and mailing pieces have been the
result of Aubrey's inspirational guidance.
With this new team heading the Board, alumni
members can look forward confidently to an increase
in both participation and total amount subscribed—
a tradition already established under the former
leadership of Joe Brown, Dick Bibbs and John
Buchanan.
PRESIDENT'S REPORT
(Continued from page 13)
SCHEDULE OF DONATIONS
1951 ALUMNI-U.B.C. DEVELOPMENT FUND
U.B.C. President's Fund (Unrestricted)....$5,000.00
U-B.C. Alumni Association (Regional)
Scholarships   2,500.00
(To be awarded July, 1952) 10 @ $250.00
U.B.C. War Memorial Gymnasium  5,000.00
Women's Residences (For Furnishings).... 2,000.00
School of Commerce (For special project
in general insurance field)  1,000.00
Sedgewick Memorial Committee      200.00
Dean, Faculty of Applied Science       25.00
English Department—Prize (For Creative
Writing discussed by individual donor
with Prof. E. Birney     250.00
Dean, Faculty of Applied Science
(For Library, Applied  Science  as  per
correspondence)       25000
Physical Education School—For
Projector       315.00
Scholarship, Fisheries (B.C. Packers Ltd.)     250.00
Library, Fisheries (as per discusions)     250.00
Varsity Outdoor Club       370.00
is now causing a drain on our financial resources
which cannot be allowed to continue much longer.
Fireside chats were continued through the
Spring of the year. Various members of faculty
spoke in an informal way about the particular activities on the campus in which they are engaged.
Your Executive were concerned about another
matter in the early part of this year. The Faculty
of the University had determined to take all possible action in order to obtain increases in salary.
Our view was that in justice to them and in order
to sustain teaching standards at the University
these increases were urgently required and we,
therefore, supported the Faculty Association at the
time the question was before the Government for
consideration. We were very pleased to see action
taken later to relieve the situation.
The Honourable E. W. Hamber retired as
Chancellor this Spring and there was a general
recognition of the great service he had rendered
and of the regard in which he and Mrs. Hamber had
come to be held by all associated with the University. We, of this Association, had special reason
to appreciate Mr. Hamber because he understood
the value to the University of an active and effective Alumni organization and took every possible
occasion to give our Association recognition and
support. Last June a dinner was held in the Faculty
Club attended by members of your Executive and
past Presidents of this Association at which Mr-
Hamber was given an Honourary Life Membership
in the Alumni Association and Mr. and Mrs. Hamber presented with a beautiful slate totem pole.
At the end of August the books of The Alumni
Development Fund were closed for the year. I am
pleased to be able to say that the contributions to
the fund totalled $17,327.39, an amount substantially above that raised the previous year.
I would like to report that we have continued
to enjoy the friendliest relations with Dr. MacKenzie, the retiring Chancellor and his successor.
Before I turn over the Presidency to Gordon Letson
I wish to take the opportunity of thanking on your
behalf all those who have contributed to the work
of the Association through the Executive, the Committees under it, the Board of Directors of the Fund
and in other ways. I would especially like to pay
tribute to the work of our Executive Director who
brings boundless enthusiasm to every task he takes
in hand. When other Alumni Secretaries and Directors of the Pacific Northwest met in Vancouver in
a conference last summer I was pleased to see how
highly they valued Frank Turner's advice and
guidance.
It sounds trite, but it is nevertheless true, that
any graduate is honoured by being President of this
Association and I am very conscious of this. If the
next year's Executive receives the support which
I have, the affairs of the Association will prosper.
Page 22
THE U.B.C   ALUMNI CHRONICLE From The Ivy Vine
By Ernie Perrault
I approach this new writing assignment with
trepidation, knowing that my position as Information Officer for the University could make me an
object of suspicion. Information Officers, you
might agree, are merely a sub-species of propaganda minister, and as such can be expected to
present only the rosy side of the picture- In this
very journal there was once an implication to that
effect. Honestly, fellows, I get a kick out of my
work because in the three years I have held down
my typewriter here I have said exactly what I
wanted to say in exactly the manner I wished to
say it.
I will go one step further. Here is an excellent
opportunity for any or all of you to get those questions answered. If I can turn this column into a
question and answer page, or if each article I write
deals with an issue of common interest to the lot
of you I will consider the space profitably employed.
Try me out. I don't guarantee 100% performance;
just give me credit for trying.
"The following quotation is taken from a recent
article on education and industry by James W.
Armsey, "Once the businessmen and the educators
catch on to the fact that they are in the same boat
there should be no real trouble. Too many businessmen still consider educators wide-eyed idealists
who 'never met a payroll'. Too many educators
still don't know enough of the economic facts of
life to appreciate the plight of the businessmen".
For those educators and businessmen who have
succeeded in discovering a common ground of communication certain mutual benefits are readily acknowledged; business has become an increasingly
important support of the educational institution.
Education, on the other hand, provides a steady
flow of trained personnel to industrial positions
calling, for a high degree of productivity, special
techniques, and a mental discipline that only the
University or a comparable institution can provide-
RESPONSIBILITY
, Education accepts at least one other responsibility—that of investigation and research. In the
laboratory of the university scientist and in the
files of the social workers and humanities experts
are the jigsaw pieces of many problems in process
of solution.
Education's task becomes more difficult as our
world becomes increasingly complex. Coupled with
this is the disconcerting fact that Education's
limited budget threatens the adequate fulfillment of
its undertakings. It is encouraging to note that
industry is beginning to rise to the emergency in
this region at least. Each year this University can
report new industries added to its list of donors.
In the field of scholarship and bursary assistance
the picture is particularly encouraging. At a meeting of the University Senate in October, 1951, Dean
of Administrative and Inter-factulty Affairs, Professor Walter Gage, presented a report that met
with the hearty commendation of every person
present. The enrollment at this University is 5,500
students.  Of these, Dean Gage estimates that elev
en hundred are receiving scholarships, bursaries, or
loans, representing a value of $225,000.00- One
fifth of U.B.C.'s students are receiving financial aid.
Is this type, of assistance taken for granted by
the student? Facts would indicate otherwise. Students receiving bursary and loan help obtain marks
well above average. Almost one hundred per cent
of the loans are repayed within a year or two of
graduation. More than one of these graduates has
returned considerably more than the amount of the
loan to establish new reserves for future students.
Forty-four thousand dollars went to students
out of the University Loan fund—compiled in part
from donations and bequests of industries and individuals. Forty-five thousand dollars in prizes
and scholarships were claimed by students in
second, third and fourth years.
It should not be forgotten that Dominion-Provincial aid (exclusive of D.V.A. grants) has been
available to students for some years- Three hundred and seventy-five students received a total of
seventy-eight thousand nine hundred dollars this
year from these sources. With the gradual disappearance of the D.V.A. supported student the degree of Dominion student aid has been sharply curtailed. Many of the Canadian Universities are of
the opinion that Dominion aid should be more generous, and they made their opinions official in a
brief to the Massey Commission on the Arts, Letters and Sciences.   The Commission recommended
(Continued on page 25)
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FULL COURSE TURKEY DINNER SERVED
BOXING   DAY  AND   NEW  YEAR'S   DAY
809 Park Royal
Reservation:  West  200
West Vancouver, B. C.
DECEMBER, 1951
Page 23 *
SPORT
#
ROBERT ROBINETTE'S
POST SEASON FOOTBALL REPORT
The pendulum of football swung from pessimism
to great optimism, then too quickly swung back to
the point of only "encouraging" hence to "marked
improvement" and so on across the emotional
rating scale that is associated with football.
Regardless of its erratic swing, the gallant
Thunderbird football team of 1951 finished the season with its best record to date, and one that certainly casts reflections of hope and promise for the
future of football at UBC.
However, let's not become overjoyed with 1951
results, results that the left hand says are "great"
and the right hand says "frankly they are not good
enough".
Personally the spirit and the potential of UBC
and B.C. are invincible, the best I have ever seen.
Our students are too proud, our structure too strong,
and our tradition too deep to ever be in the cellar
of any endeavor. Let's start thinking and acting
like champions, because, sincerely that's the direction we are heading.
Whatever you do for this cause will never be in
vain-
JACK POMFRET
Jack Pomfret, now in his third year as head
coach of the Thunderbird basketball team, has built
himself a reputation as an all-round athlete in Vancouver and the South during the past ten years.
Pomfret started his athletic career at Lord Byng
High School, where he made All City in English
Rugby and Canadian Football, set Canadian swimming records and also played baseball, hockey,
lacrosse and basketball.
Pomfret attended the University of Washington
on an athletic scholarship, given for his ability as a
swimmer. While there he won his Varsity letter
for two years in basketball and was captain-elect in
his graduating year, as well as selection as right
forward on the All-Conference team.
Pomfret also played Husky baseball, and during
his spare time, served as President of the Men's
Big "W" Club. He interrupted his university education at Washington to do a three-year stint in the
Royal Canadian Air Force. At the conclusion of
the war he returned to Washington where he received his Physical Education degree in 1946. The
following year he returned to Vancouver and came
to the Physical Education Department at the University of British Columbia.
The personable coach has done a remarkable job
the last few years promoting and encouraging a
"better" brand of high school basketball throughout
the Province. It is felt that he will be greatly
responsible for the success that high school basketball will have in the years to come, and the increased
desire to participate in the game.
RICHARD "DICK" PENN
ASSISTANT BASKETBALL COACH
"Jack of all sports and master of a number"
around the campus at UBC as well as assistant
coach, makes Dick Penn an important member of
the coaching staff.
Penn, upon graduating from this University in
1949 with a Bachelor of Physical Education degree
was appointed to the Physical Education staff.
Penn, prior to flying for the RCAF for three
years during the War, attended Magee High School
in Vancouver where he participated in football and
track. Such participation carried over to his collegiate days here at UBC where he continued in football, English Rugby and served as senior basketball
manager for four years.
His basketball coaching career started in 1949-
1950 when his Inter A team won the B.C. championship. The following year he took over the reins
of the Senior A "Chiefs".
1951-52 BASKETBALL TEAM
AN UNKNOWN QUANTITY
With four of last year's starters side-lined, the
possibilities for the year remain a question mark in
my mind.
Although, last year's team turned in the worst
season on record for a Thunderbird team, that same
inexperienced   team   finished   very   strongly   when
Fish Products
+
Francis Millerd & Co.
LIMITED
Cypress Park, West Vancouver
Page 24
THE U.B.C .AtUMNI CHRONICtE they came close to upsetting the two top teams in
their final conference games.
This year's team will be stronger from the standpoint of depth, but once again will be short on
height and experience. At the present time, it appears that there will only be three returning letter-
men : Art Phillips, centre; Don Hudson, guard; and
John Southcott, forward. However, John saw very
little action last year as a result of breaking two
bones in his ankle.
The rest of this year's team will be made up of
last year's subs and Junior Varsity players.
ART PHILLIPS — Centre.   Excellent hook shot
with both hands, also very deceptive with his hand-
offs.
SCOTT FRASER—Forward. Very fast, good rebound man as well as being a good one hand push
shot artist.
JOHN SOUTHCOTT — Forward. Drives hard
and finishes well under the basket. Has a good one
hand jump shot-
DAN ZAHARKO—Guard. First year with the
"Birds". An all-round ball player with lots of
hustle.
DON HUDSON — Guard. A good play maker.
Very steady under pressure. Has a good running
one handed shot.
JEFF CRAIG—Centre. Has shown great improvement in all departments. Specializes in hook shots.
GEORGE SEYMOUR—Forward. Up from last
year's freshman squad, where he showed lots of
hustle on the boards as well as a good shooting eye.
RALPH HUDSON—Forward. Lots of drive, a
good one" hand push shot artist.
PUTTING IT OFF-
May Mean Trouble Ahead
When you delay taking the steps you should
to protect your family, you leave to chance
their  future security and happiness.
Making a Will is an important step which
you can take now.
We shall be glad to help you arrange the
details and to act as your Executor and
Trustee.
THE
ROYAL   TRUST
COMPANY
626   WEST   PENDER   ST.,   VANCOUVER    •    MA. B411
George O. Vale, Manager
ELMER   MATHEWS—Forward.     A   newcomer
from Victoria.   Has a good two hand set shot, and
is dangerous with hook shots near the hoop-
RALPH   BOWMAN—Forward.     Good   rebound
man.    Very strong on defense.    Has a good one
hand push shot.
BRIAN UPSON—Guard.   A good all around ball
player.   Very steady under pressure.
NEIL DESAULNIER—Guard.   Very fast. Shoots
all ways.   Hustle is his first name.
FROM THE IVY VINE
 (Continued from page 23)	
that a minimum of ten thousand Canadian Scholarships be created and allotted to the provinces on a
per capita basis.
The University has had years of experience with
scholarship and bursary administration. Student
assistance of this kind does not destroy initiative; if
anything it strengthens the resolve of the student
to make good. On the other hand many deserving
and promising young men and women could never
consider university training without financial assistance. U.B.C. has stated its intention many times
—to admit any and all students who express a desire for higher education and have the qualifications
to go on with their studies- Everything possible
is being done to realize this objective. .A scholarship opening the university gates for one student
now can spell the difference between a profit and
a loss to the community and the nation in years to
come. Scholarships and bursaries are wise investments."
Quality
is never an accident, there must be a
will to produce a superior article. . .
Celebrated
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905 West Georgia Phone PAcific 9177-78
Opposite Hotel Vancouver
DECEMBER, 1951
Page 25 *   STATISTICS   *
MARRIAGES
John  Bishop   Ballem   to   Grace
CORRECTION:
Louise Flavelle
Ian Cricton Hart to Patricia Turne.
Brian Paul Jackson to Patricia Jacqueline Davies-
Willian Bruce McTavish to Dianne Evelyn Reid.
Patrick Blake Ballentine to Helen  Ruth  Belfrey.
Harry L. Warner to Joan Galbraith.
Grant Lee Ainscough to Helen Jacqueline Cross.
Dr. William Donaghy McKinlay to June Lois Law-
ernce.
Wallace P. Beck to Dorothy Joan Kent.
Dr. Evann Davies to Hillaire Claire Newland.
Carl Arnold Knutson to Doreen Margaret O'Grady.
Richard John William Wright to Audrey Elizabeth
Craig.
John Donald Clerkson to Marion Ellison Dow-
Gilbert Cecil Power Gray to Robin Johanne Orr.
Wallace Michael Robson to Audrey Mabel Wilson.
Richard Brookes Bird to Gloria Fyfe.
David Gordon Melvin to Patricia O'Bryan.
Robert Graham Annable to Janice  Elizabeth Mc-
Coll.
John Bruce Buchanan to Lois Gwendolyn Stratton.
John Holdsworth to Thelma Bradbury.
Douglas MacKay to Ruth Vilstrup.
Sub.-Lt. Alan Geoffrey Ford to Madeline Louise
Marshall.
Harold McGregg to Beverly Ann Bassett.
BIRTHS
To Mr. and Mrs. E. L. (Sandy) Robertson (Mary
Pat Crowe) a daughter.
To Mr- and Mrs. Edward Taylor (Pauline Lee) a
son.
To Mr. and Mrs. Robert White (Twigg Woodward) a daughter.
To  Mr.  and  Mrs.  John   Cunningham   (Rosemary
Coulthard) a daughter.
To Mr. and Mrs- Norman Wood, a daughter.
To Mr. and Mrs. W. B. Sweet, a son, Frederick
Alan.
To Mr. and Mrs. William Hardwick (Sidney Flavelle) a son.
To Mr. and Mrs. William A. McGavin, (Beverley
Roberts) a daughter.
CATERING SERVICES . . .
PARTIES, WEDDINGS,  RECEPTIONS,
SORORITY AND  FRATERNITY GROUPS
Sandwiches,  Hors d'oeuvres,  Fancy Cakes and Canapes.
Consult us for all your parties
BROWN'S   KITCHEN   MADE
719 Georgia St. West TAtlow 5733
•      POETRY■    •
50-50
Wahoo!   I'm a schizophrenic!
My personality is split.
The half that is hearty likes a rough-house party,
While the other half likes to knit.
Half my mind is a dirty little rascal,
The other half fair and free.
Neevy-neevy-nick-nack,   which   half  wull   ye   tak?
That's immaterial to me.
Half my mind I've christend Wallace;
The other half I call Sam.
Wallace likes debauches,  wassails,  nautches,
Wallace doesn't give a damn.
But Samuel, ah, Samuel!
Sammy is my pride and joy.
If I could get Sammy away from Wallace, damme,
Sam'd be a wonderful boy.
But the trouble is, Sam likes Wallace,
And Wallace likes Sam too.
Each like a brother admires in the other
The things that he can't do.
0 heavens, if they corrupt each other
And merge like double chins,
1 can't be a schizophrenic, boys.
I won't be the Siamese twins.
Chips-
MORE MEMORABILIA
"But you were living before that,"
Sang   Browning.     "Also  after.
And the memory I started at . . .
My starting moves your laughter?"
"Why, not at all," replied his friend.
"Your starting?    In no wise.
It's just your coming to an end . . .
Bob, that's the big surprise."
—D.H.B.
* *        *
THE MIRACLE
It used to grieve him that his friends were frail . . .
He even prayed about it.    In the end
God said: "Few pray so long without avail.
Behold, your grudge is gone.   You have no friend."
—D.B.
* *        *
ROUND  TABLE  HISTORICAL  DISCUSSION
"Sherman told us," I said to a man in a pub,
"that war is hell."
"Definitely, oP sport," the man agreed. "That
is all very well.
But here's another angle, dear ol'chum. It appears to me.
War might have seemed a bit better to anyone
who didn't have to fight Robert E. Lee."
Badger.
AWARD
Dr. Howard C- McMahon, B.A. '35, M.A. '37,
Phd. has been awarded the Franklin Institute Edward Longstreth medal for improvements and developments in machinery processes . . . Dr. McMahon, now employed by an eastern U.S. firm, won
the coveted medal for his work on the helium cryo-
stat.
Page 26
THE U.B.C .ALUMNI CHRONICLE BUY   B.C.   PRODUCTS   -   BUILD   B.C.   PAYROLLS
TOPS IN B.C.
CANNED SEA FOOD
Sockeye, Pink and Cohoe. The
Paramount label appears on only
the pick of each run . . . your
guarantee of the finest salmon
available.
An economical seafood that
fits any occasion. For
meals, or snacks . . . have
herring on hand.
If you prefer delicious white
tuna . . . always pick Paramount
Albacore. You'll notice the
difference.
The   Paramount  People  also  pack   3   Minute  Salmon
Croquettes,   Pilchards   and   Surf   brand   Fancy   Keta.
$
ALWAYS PICK
aratnount
'A B. C. PRODUCT"
BRITISH COLUMBIA...
Education is the key to success in all lines of endeavor. Manufacturing,
Logging, Lumbering and Mining, Agriculture and Fishing, all need their
technicians ... all call for minds capable of close research and intelligent analysis, or careful marshalling of the facts upon which industry
moves forward.
Through our demand for BRITISH COLUMBIA
PRODUCTS we encourage further investment
and plant expansion, thereby providing additional British Columbia payrolls and greater
opportunities for British Columbia's youth in
the  industrial  and  commercial   fields.
BUY—BUILD
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Payrolls
DEPARTMENT    OF    TRADE
AND    INDUSTRY
PARLIAMENT BUILDINGS,  VICTORIA,  B.C.     °
E.  G.  ROWEBOTTOM, Deputy  Minister
HON.  LESLIE  H.  EYRES,  Minister A  lot  of  "know  how"  went into
these  giant  condensers
GENERAL
ELECTRIC
EQUIPMENT
generates   power,   transmits  it   and   puts  it   to  work
The same "know how" — the result of years of research, engineering and
manufacturing experience—that produced these giant condensers goes into
every General Electric product you buy.
For nearly sixty years this Company has been intimately associated with the
electrical development of this country. Through all these years, in spite
of ever-growing competition, it has maintained its leadership by a combination of forward thinking, good products, fair policies and efficient service.
CANADIAN   GENERAL   ELECTRIC   COMPANY
HEAD  OFFICE:  TORONTO
LIMITED
SALES OFFICES  FROM COAST TO COAST
MCGE-551T

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