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Graduate Chronicle May 31, 1937

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 THE   UNIVERSITY   OF   BRITISH   COLUMBIA
GRADUATI
CHRONlCt
Published by
The Alumni Association of The University of British Columbia
Editor: Helen Crawford
Assistant Editors:
Dorothy McRae Lorraine Bolton (fo5~^ DEDICATION
TO GRADUATES—OLD AND NEW—
THIS NUMBER OF THE CHRONICLE
IS INSCRIBED EDITORIAL
'THE Editorial Board regret that they must preface
this number of The Chronicle with apologies for
apparent tardiness in issuing it. Their good intentions
of publishing this edition during the week of graduation were of no avail, as contributions did not come in
early enough to permit them to do so. However, we
hope that the long wait will not have caused the value
of The Chronicle to be any the less than it has been in
former years.
We had hoped to have had more reports of the work
of the Branches to publish, as it is to the Branches we
look for the extension of the programme of the Alumni
Association. Strong hopes are entertained for an
improvement in this section of next year's edition of
The Chronicle.
We acknowledge with thanks the contributions of
material and "Personals" sent in by various loyal
graduates who have been untiring in their efforts to
obtain "news". To the members of the Faculty who
have so graciously given of their time and their work,
and to Mr. Mathews and his staff, who are always
"a very present help", we offer our sincerest thanks. Four
THE UNIVERSITY OF BRITISH COLUMBIA
THE EXECUTIVE OF THE ALUMNI ASSOCIATION OF
THE UNIVERSITY OF BRITISH COLUMBIA
Honorary President:
Dr. L. S. Klinck
President:
T. H. Ellis
Secretary:
Milton Owen
Treasurer:
D. P. Watney
Publications:
Helen Crawford
Vice-President:
Dorothy Myers
Records Secretary:
Beth Abernethy
!INCE issuing The Graduate Chronicle of 1936 the following Alumni have become Life Members of the Association:
LIFE MEMBERS
Argus, Charles W.
Beattie, Arthur H.
Bennett, Robert L.
Brand, A. Gordon
Brown, Rex
Crysdale, R. C. Stuart
Gibbon, Marion
Giegerich, Henry C.
Giegerich, Joseph R.
Gilley, Jean
Godwin, Mrs. Kathleen M. (Inglis)
Graham, Jean A. C.
Hanna, William Scott
Hemming, Mrs. Alice (Weaver)
Hodson, Mrs. Hazel McConnell
Horwood, H. Claire
Johnston, C. Islay
Kask, J. Laurence
Lang, Barbara
Lanning, Roland
Lintelmann, Mrs. Ada Smith
Munn, Thomas H.
Macarthur, M. Isobel
McKinnon, Mrs. F. S.
McVittie, Charles A.
Nesbitt, Michael C.
Peardon, Thomas P.
Pearson, Harold B.
Peebles, Dr. Allon
Philipowski, Mrs. Oscar
Pratt, Bernard
Ross, Margaret
Scott, William O.
Shore, John W. B.
Sutton, Beatrice M.
Swanson, Dr. C. O.
Thompson, Douglas L.
Timleck, Curtis J.
Warren, Dr. Harrv V.
Wilcox, John C.
Willows, Pearl GRADUATE CHRONICLE—MAY, 1937
Five
EXTENSION ACTIVITIES OF THE UNIVERSITY
TPHE programme of Extension lec-
tures which was carried on so
successfully during 1935-36 stimulated
a demand for lectures by members of
the staff of the University throughout
the province. It became necessary in the
fall of 1936 to charge a fee of $5.00 for
each lecture, but a provision was made
by which the fee for three consecutive
lectures given by one lecturer was $7.50.
Between the end of October and the beginning of May over 200 lectures were
given at various points in the province
with an estimated attendance of 12,350.
The three-day course has proved very
successful in those places which tried it.
In Prince Rupert a very successful series
was carried out under the auspices of the
Junior Chamber of Commerce, the
speakers being Professor Todd and
Deans F. M. Clement, D. Buchanan and
J. N. Finlayson. On the other hand in
smaller centres like Nakusp three-day
courses were given by Professor J. E.
Morsh in Psychology and Professor W.
G. Black in Education. In New- Westminster and in Victoria an endeavour
was made to build the lectures into a
series. Co-operation with the libraries
was arranged and a very interesting programme was given of periodical lectures
based on "The Georgian Period, 1910-
1935".
An experiment was made in the matter
of evening classes. In addition to two
courses given by Professor A. F. Barss
in Horticulture and Professor E. A.
Lloyd in Poultry Husbandry under the
auspices of the Vancouver School Board,
Professor E. G. Cullwick gave a course
at the University in Electronics and
there were no less than 181 registered in
"The Modern Approach to Social Welfare" course. The course in Botany
which has been so successfully operated
by Professor John Davidson for many
years had a very satisfactory registration
and despite the unfavourable weather
conditions, the attendance was admirable.
Study groups have been formed at various centres in the province and some
help given such groups. The members of
the Faculty of Agriculture co-operated
with the agricultural section of the B. C.
Electric Railway in a series of Monday
evening radio farm talks. As to forums,
the Vancouver Institute had a successful
season; the University Hill Forum,
under the leadership of Professor O. J.
Todd, proved a successful venture on
Monday evenings, and the University
co-operated with the Public Library in
their Wednesday evening lectures. Some
attention has been given to the popularizing of the panel discussion in Vancouver with excellent results.
This year the University Players' Club
put on an excellent play, "The Brontes",
which left the audience feeling that they
wanted to re-read "Jane Eyre" and
"Wuthering Heights". A very successful tour was undertaken by the Club,
backed by the Alma Mater Society, and
they played to good houses at Courtenay,
Qualicum, Powell River, Duncan and
West Vancouver.
As to a programme for the future, it
is hoped to continue the policy of courses
of lectures given by members of the staff
throughout the province, with some emphasis upon the three-day consecutive
courses and the periodical courses. Arrangements are also being made to offer
a number of courses for evening students
at the University next winter. In the
matter of visual education, a lantern
slide loan service will be established this
summer and will be available next winter. Co-operation is being arranged with
the Vancouver Branch of the National
Film Society and the Visual Education
Branch of the Vancouver School Board
for the distribution of educational films
where there are projectors. Six
THE UNIVERSITY OF BRITISH COLUMBIA
With regard to the radio, it is realized
that the University, having no station,
can best influence the standard of radio
broadcasting by interesting itself in the
work of the Canadian Broadcasting Corporation. The Director of Extension has,
therefore, accepted the appointment of
Chairman of the B. C. Regional Advisory
Council under the Canadian Broadcasting
Corporation. The Council, consisting as
it does of members who have an intimate
knowledge of music, the drama and of
adult education, should be in a good position to relate radio programmes to the
growing movement of adult education
throughout the province.
As to the use of the small number of
volumes in the Extension Library, it is
appreciated that the libraries of the
province must be the mainstay in adult
education programmes. It is felt that
with the limited Extension Library facilities of the University, these can best
be used by boxing small collections of
books for study groups. As a general
principle the limited equipment of the
Extension Department will be made
available only to groups and not to individuals. In the library field this will
assist in differentiating the functions of
the ordinary library services (meeting
the need of individuals) from that of
the Extension Library of the University,
giving a service to study-groups.
With regard to study-groups, it is felt
that the University can best help the
movement by endeavouring to be of service to leaders of groups. An example of
this kind of course which can be developed is that being arranged in cooperation with the Parent - Teacher
Association for the month of June (16-
19th). This course deals with "Education—Modern Men, Methods and Curricula" with a programme as follows:
Hon. G. M. Weir, "Modern Trends in
Education"; Professor H. T. J. Coleman, "John Dewey"; Professor W. G.
Black, "Leaders in Education in Postwar Britain"; Mr. A. R. Lord, Principal of the Normal School, "The
Teacher and His Training";   Professor
J. E. Morsh, "John Broadus Watson";
Dr. H. B. King, Technical Adviser, Provincial Department of Education, "The
New Curriculum in British Columbia";
Professor C. B. Wood, "Modern Schools
on the Pacific Coast"; Professor J. Wy-
man Pilcher, "The Place of Terman in
Education".
Another interesting development is the
inauguration of a week-end drama school
at Invermere. This district has a very
lively interest in the drama and during
the winter put on three plays a month.
The course is being arranged for the
week-end of June 11 to 13 and will be
directed by Major L. Bullock-Webster
and Miss Dorothy Somerset. The course
will begin on the Friday evening, continue on through Saturday and on the
afternoon of the Sunday in the grounds
of the Lady Elizabeth Bruce hospital,
"The Chester Mysteries" and two scenes
from "Julius Caesar" will be performed.
In the matter of music, the University
has been fortunate in securing a set of
gramophone records of standard classical
music through the Carnegie Corporation.
It is hoped to make arrangements by
which this can be used through the radio
and in other ways for the stimulation of
music appreciation.
With regard to handicrafts, as a result
of the work being, done by Mrs. J. T.
McCay of the Vancouver Folk Festival,
the organizers plan to open a shop for
the sale of genuine artistic handicraft
and to form a branch of the Canadian
Handicraft Guild.
As to workers' education, during the
past winter Mr. Morgan, M.A., of the
University Book Store, has directed a
very successful class. A series of lectures
was given by members of the staff of the
University to a number of working men
at 666 Homer Street. As a result of the
visit of Mr. E. A. Corbett, Director of
the Canadian Association for Adult Education, and Mr. Drummond Wren of the
Workers' Educational Association of
Canada, a committee has been formed
by the trade unions to explore the possi- GRADUATE CHRONICLE—MAY, 1937
Sevt
bilities of organizing a branch of the
Workers' Educational Association. It is
hoped that classes will be established
under this organization next  winter.
In the matter of Extension, the University is faced with a very difficult
problem owing to the distances to the
outlying centres of population, but the
Faculty of Agriculture, and the Departments of Geology, Mining and Metallurgy, Forestry and Zoology are doing a
great deal in keeping the University in
contact with the agricultural, mining,
forest and fishing industries. The pleasantness of the physical environment on
Vancouver Island and Vancouver obscures the very pioneer character of the
scattered settlements throughout this
province. To carry on extension work
involves a great deal of organization if
the internal work of the University is
not to be disrupted by the absence of
members of the staff for long periods.
Yet there is great value in bringing
members of the staff into contact with
the people in outlying communities.
"Adult education" is a very bad name
for the activities which one has in mind
as constituting self-development. Sometimes the word "education" scares a
great many people, but it is gradually
becoming clear that unless our interests
are vital and significant, our lives are
cramped. Education is a form of emancipation from prejudice, narrow views
and hasty generalization. The University
can do  little  more  than  provide  avenues
of opportunity along which people can
march more confidently to a better
future.
R. E. England.
ZS£J
FAIRBRIDGE FARM SCHOOLS
"We should waste nothing of our
flesh and blood nor of the Imperial
soil from which we spring".
""|V/fONEY given to the education of
our destitute children is not
wasted; what we give we have. We are
to build up passionately the brain and
heart and soul of the children of the
Empire, however laborious and unheroic
the task". So wrote Kingsley Fairbridge
in the year after the Great War
when he was appealing for support for
his Farm School at Pinjarra, Western
Australia—a school which he had founded in 1912 and by his own undaunted
will and heroic, unselfish efforts had
kept going through the difficult years of
the war.
From early boyhood it was the ardent
desire of this young South African to
help the poor boys and girls of Great
Britain from the thickly overcrowded
centres of the old land into useful, constructive careers in the overseas Dominions. "I think that my Motherland
(meaning England) is well able to turn
those of her little citizens, who are unable to help themselves, from inmates of
workhouses into workers, and from a
state of ignorant antipathy to everything
that seems more fortunate than themselves into that of happy and prosperous
co-operators with all classes". He believed that life on a farm with training
in the theory and practice of farming
and of the domestic arts, added to the
ordinary school education as given to
all children in our public schools, furnished the most useful medium for the
realization of his desire.
"There are numbers of vocations for
which we might train our destitute children," he wrote "but none of them seem
to offer the same opportunities for health,
hope, understanding and freedom as life
on the land . . . What vocation is there
that is more essential to the human life
of the whole world?"
It was with these ideas in mind that
Kingsley Fairbridge spent his time at
Exeter College, Oxford, where he enjoyed the benefits of a Rhodes Scholarship,  in the years   1908-1911,  trying to Eight
THE UNIVERSITY OF BRITISH COLUMBIA
interest everyone with whom he came in
contact in his plans to found a Farm
School. And he gave the following thirteen years of his life to the rigorous and
unremitting prosecution of his plans.
When, worn out with hard work and recurrent attacks of malaria, he died in
1924 at the comparatively early age of
thirty-seven years, he had succeeded in
creating one of the most interesting and
important instruments of human betterment and Imperial settlement. Today, in
Western Australia, there are over one
thousand British boys and girls, young
men and women, happy in their new
environment, who owe their chance at
life and achievement to the persistent
idealism of this one man. The results of
Fairbridge training are seen in the fact
that in the year 1935 when forty boys
and girls were ready to go from the
Farm School at Pinjarra to employment,
more than one thousand five hundred
requests for their employment were received by the principal.
The success of this endeavour, extending over a period of twenty-five
years, encouraged the London Committee to extend the benefits of Fairbridge.
In 1934 property was secured near Duncan, Vancouver Island, and the first children were sent out to prepared quarters
in September, 1935. The buildings at
this Farm School now comprise, in addition to farm buildings necessary to the
running of a thousand-acre farm, seven
individual homes, each housing fourteen
children, a hospital, a four-room day
school and auditorium-gymnasium, and
a spacious dining hall. Forty-one girls
and fifty-seven boys are being trained
here as young Canadian citizens. Fifty-
six more children will be sent to this
farm school in the autumn. The children
are comfortably housed and clothed and
every possible attention is given to their
education and training for the Canadian
countryside. It was one of the axioms
of the founder to give Fairbridge children the best possible chance at life,
within the means of the Society. "Personally", he wrote "I object only to
those methods of bringing up and edu
cating destitute children which claim to
be 'cheap' or which seem to admit the
possibility of exploiting the children or
which do not aim at turning out citizens
to whom has been given the chance of
realising the best that it was in them to
become."
More recently a third Fairbridge Farm
School has been started in New South
Wales, at Molong, where children will
be sent in September this year. This will
differ from the other Farm Schools in
the fact that most of the money for its
founding has beeni collected in Sydney,
among citizens of New South Wales,
whereas both in Western Australia and
in our own province the great bulk of
the capital required has been raised in
England. Other Farm Schools are talked
of elsewhere. A fourth school, on Fair-
bridge lines and supplied with children
by the Fairbridge Society, was founded
a year ago in the State of Victoria, Australia, under the will of the late Lady
Northcote, who left a generous legacy
for the purpose.
Children carefully selected by officers
of the Society in England from poor
homes and passed through the Dominions Immigration offices with medical
and other examinations, are sent, at an
average age of ten to eleven, to a Farm
School in a Dominion. Here they remain till the age of fifteen to sixteen,
receiving the public school education required for all children, and, in addition,
undergoing training in domestic arts (for
the girls) and general farming (for the
boys). At age fifteen to sixteen they are
placed in work. After-care officers of
Fairbridge keep in touch with them,
helping them in all their problems. One
half of all they earn is sent by the employer to the Farm School principal to
be put into savings accounts and kept
for them until they come of age. The
Farm School is their home to which they
may return at any time, for holidays or
when misfortune overtakes them. They
are trained in work and in play, to play
the game always. At the Farm School
they become life members of a Society GRADUATE CHRONICLE—MAY, 1937
A"i';,
of which they are proud and which
exists to serve them in every sort of way
throughout their lives.
So this humanitarian and imperial
movement, begun in the brain of a
twelve-year-old boy on the South African veldt forty years ago, is today accel
erating with astonishing speed and is
certain to influence widely not only the
method and practice of Empire migration
but also the problems of child training-
confronting many communities of the
Dominions themselves.
T. H. Logan.
CiXL?
U.B.C. IN LONDON
TT is proverbial that Canadians, like
Scotsmen, take London by storm.
And while it is too early yet for U.B.C.
graduates to have risen to the peerage,
still there are a number who have done
distinguished work in a short time.
I don't know how many alumni are
now in London. I met several and heard
of others, and one lively Saturday night
late last summer a group of us held a
sort of reunion in Odenino's. The party
was not complete by any means since
several who might have come were out
of town, but they were present in spirit
and we had a gay evening. Unluckily
President Klinck and Dean Clement,
who arrived a few days later from Cambridge, were not there in time to join
the party.
Perhaps the two most noted alumni
now in London are Leslie Brown, who
is Junior Dominion Government trade
commissioner with headquarters in Canada House, and Count Robert Keyserl-
ing, the "boy wonder", who, after a
varied career, became assistant European
manager of the United Press. I understand that he has left that desirable post
to take a position with a business firm;
but he was flourishing on aeroplane trips
and diplomatic intrigue when last seen.
Those who remember Les Brown's
suave and nonchalant manner when he
was president of the Alma Mater Society
in 1927-28 would find him not a great
deal changed after his years in Mexico
City and London. His gifts are admirably adapted to the social and diplomatic
duties of a trade  commissioner and he
diffi-
has made a deserved success of his
cult, if pleasant, job.
In somewhat similar work is John
Berto, who is an agent of the British
Columbia government in promoting the
sale of lumber. His headquarters are in
B. C. House.
It is open to argument whether Gladstone Murray is, technically, a graduate
of U.B.C. or of McGill, or both. If we
can legitimately claim him he was, until
lately, our most distinguished alumnus in
Great Britain. As comptroller of programmes for the B.B.C., he was in active control of the most powerful broadcasting company in thej world. He was
my cordial host on more than one occasion, in Broadcast House and outside it,
and the knowledge I gained of his character then has made me his most devoted
supporter since in his new position as
general manager of Canadian radio.
We have, as yet, no one to set beside
Lord Greenwood, Lord Beaverbrook,
Sir Edward Peacock, Sir Francis Stuart,
Raymond Massey, Sarah Fischer, Beverley Baxter, or a number of other Canadians who have risen to the top flight
in British life. But we have some young
ones who may catch up with them before
many years.
There is, for instance, Sydney Risk,
who has quite definite gifts both as playwright and actor. He has found London
a tough nut to crack, which is what he
expected, but after considerable adversity he is beginning to get results. He is
established in a film company and in a
position now to follow either of two
promising    roads—scenario    writing    or Ten
THE UNIVERSITY OF BRITISH COLUMBIA
acting. Marjorie Ellis, another Players'
Club graduate, has also been seeking a
place in the theatre life there. She has
played a variety of roles, in all senses of
the phrase, including B.B.C. broadcasts,
and when I saw her last she was beginning with the company at the Windmill
Theatre.
A number of alumni are in academic
or research posts, either in London or
not far away, and among these are Lyle
Streight, who is in the Lancashire lab
oratory of General Chemicals Ltd.,
Ralph Stedman, who is a professor at
University College in Wrales, Roy Vollum, a fellow of Lincoln College, Oxford; Gerald Jackson, who is on the staff
of the Imperial College of Science in
London. Donald Hutchison is said to be
in his native Edinburgh but no one seems
to know what he is doing. Laurence
Meredith, who was once literary editor
of The Ubyssey, is now on the writing
staff of the British United Press.
Edgar N. Brown.
CiXL?
A UNIVERSITY CITY
/CANADA was the first foreign coun-
try to establish in France a home for
its students at the University of Paris.
The example has been followed by seventeen other countries and each has
erected a building in the big quadrangle
in University City, in a park in the south
of Paris on the site of the old city fortifications.
Although the University of Paris is
the largest and the third oldest university
in the world, it was, until recently,
notorious for the absence of living quarters for the students. Lecture halls and
libraries are scattered over the Latin
Quarter on the left bank and the 40,000
undergraduates lived in hotels, boarding
houses or small apartments. Their conditions were in the opposite extreme from
the pleasant life which Oxford and
Cambridge students enjoy.
So the authorities took possession of
the only remaining open space in the
city (except for the parks) and appropriated the ancient wall fortifications. A
wealthy French industrialist, M. Deut-
che de la Meurthe, started the ball rolling by endowing the first house, a series
of dormitories and clubrooms for French
students. Then Mr. Philippe Roy, the
Canadian minister plenipotentiary, became active and through his co-operation
Senator J. M. Wilson of Montreal and
others provided the money for a Canadian House. It is a handsome four-storey
building, flanked by two wings, contain
ing forty bedrooms and extremely comfortable lounges and reading rooms.
When I was there a year ago there were
sixteen Canadians in residence (none of
whom were from British Columbia) and
the remainder of the rooms were rented
to students of other nationalities.
The house was opened by a brilliant
international group in 1926. The inauguration was performed jointly by the
Duke of Windsor (then Prince of
Wales) and the President of the French
Republic, assisted by Mr. Roy. Great
Britain was also represented by her ambassador in Paris, the Marquis of Crewe,
and the Earl of Derby. Cardinal Dubois,
Archbishop of Paris, the late Raymond
Poincare and Aristide Briand, the late
Marshals Foch and Fayolle were among
others present.
Since that time the Boulevard Jour-
dan and the spaces around the park have
been occupied by successive foreign
houses. Those of Belgium and Cuba are
among the finest. That belonging to the
United States is one of the largest. The
red brick and far-from-beautiful house
of Great Britain has recently been completed. Others are being planned. Altogether, counting the French and Canadian houses, there are now nineteen.
Although the park and gardens are not
yet completed, University City is even
now one of the sights of Paris. One of
the most interesting things about it is
the different styles of architecture. Each GRADUATE CHRONICLE.—MAY, 1937
Eleven
country, in building its house, carried
out its own distinctive motif. Thus the
Canadian house looks like a wealthy
home in the suburbs of almost any large
Canadian city. The Japanese house has
pagoda turrets and lanterns. The Swiss
house looks a little like a sanatorium.
The Spanish house is in the style of
modern architecture now seen all over
Spain. The Indo-Chinese house is, I suppose, typical of Indo-China but, not having seen that country, I can only say that
it is extraordinarily different.
The houses are grouped more or less
around an open field, which was left
vacant because John D. Rockefeller intimated that he might do something with
it. Three years ago he set aside 80,000,-
000 francs and had International House
built as a central point for the various
residences. It has no bedrooms hut there
are dining rooms, halls, reading rooms,
a ballroom and a swimming pool. It is
really a large club. The hope is that it
will provide a medium for friendship
between the nationals of all countries and
become a social centre for the City. It
is a magnificent building and a magnificent gesture and everyone hopes that it
will fulfil its object.
In University City, as everywhere in
Paris and France, I found that Canadians are regarded with warm cordiality.
The French professors and students regard them as first cousins and treat them
accordingly. Part of the reason, no
doubt, lies in the historical kinship between the two races, but part also is due
to the extraordinarily good records
which successive waves of Canadian students have established in Paris. It is safe
to say that no other country, in proportion to the number of students, has established such an excellent record.
If, until lately, students at the University of Paris had poor living quarters, they also had compensations which
are lacking here. In that city a student
is an individual—like a doctor or a
grave-digger—not just a young thing
getting some more education. The student has a position and   a   status—and
also some rights. For instance, no policeman is allowed to enter the gates of a
faculty without first getting a written
request for his presence from the dean.
If a policeman did "trespass" there
would be an uproar, for the students are
jealous of their ancient privileges.
They also take politics and life generally more seriously than is the case in
Canada. They are older, usually, and of
course their lives are more closely affected by politics, especially international
politics.
There was an amusing example of
this during the Abyssinian crisis. Professor Jeze, in the faculty of law, has
large classes. He is one of the greatest
living authorities on international law
and he is frequently consulted by foreign governments. When Abyssinia got
into difficulties, Haile Selassie appointed
Dr. Jeze his spokesman at the League of
Nations. The professor argued eloquently and logically in favor of the imposition of sanctions against Italy. He
had frequent verbal clashes with the
French Government delegates but it was
recognized that he was, as it were, the
attorney in the case, and there were no
hard feelings.
The students in the faculty of law,
however, thought differently. Here was
their professor, a supposedly loyal
Frenchman, publicly advocating a policy
which might have thrown their country
into war with Italy. Worse still, his own
students would have been among the
first to be called to the colors. So the
students boycotted the professor—they
imposed sanctions on him. They went on
strike. When a few members of the class
appeared for his lectures, the crowd outside drowned out his voice and threw
rotten eggs at him. When he persisted
there were riots. Not mild disturbances,
but serious riots involving thousands of
students and which taxed the strength
of police reserves. Time and again, Dr.
Jeze attempted to deliver his lectures
and each time the riots became more
serious.
In  the  end  the  students  won.   They Twelve
THE UNIVERSITY OF BRITISH COLUMBIA
laid down their terms and the faculty
were forced to accept them. The professor could lecture, they said, and any
students who wished to hear him could
do so, provided he chose a hall outside
University   property.   So   Dr.   Jeze   was
compelled to find a vacant hall and continue his lectures to the faithful.
It might be added in conclusion that
Mr. Rockefeller's International house of
good friendship had not been opened at
that time. Edgar N.  Brown.
C-S£P
THE FACULTY—NEW APPOINTMENTS AND RESIGNATIONS
"TOURING the past year the following
new appointments have been made
to the Faculty:
John Norison Finlayson, M.Sc, (McGill) has been appointed as Dean of the
Faculty of Applied Science and Head
of the Department of Civil Engineering.
Dean Finlayson came to the University
from the University of Manitoba.
Hector John MacLeod, B.Sc. (McGill), M.Sc. (Alberta), M.A., Ph.D.
(Harvard), is professor and head of
the Department of Mechanical and
Electrical Engineering.
Robert England, M.C., M.A., Queen's,
is Associate Professor of Economics
and Director of University Extension
Courses.
Clarence Otto ("Cosine") Swanson
M.A.Sc, 1922, Ph.D. (Wisconsin) is
Professor of Mineralogy and Petrography. Lately he has been connected
with the Department of Geology, Michigan School of Mines at Haughton,
Michigan.
Joseph E. Morsh, B.A., 1929, Ph.D.
(John Hopkins) is lecturer in Philosophy and Psychology.
Percy M. Barr, B.A.Sc, 1924, M.F.
(Yale), held the post of Special Lecturer in the Department of Forestry Engineering from September to December
1936.
Dr. J. Allen Harris, M.L.A., is Research Assistant in Chemistry.
Dr. Williams has been appointed Head
of the Department of Geology.
Sylvia Thrupp, M.A., 1929, Ph.D.
(London)  is Instructor in History.
Frank A. Forward, B.A.Sc. (Toronto), is Assistant Professor of Metallurgy.
Dr. Blythe Eagles has been made
Head of the Department of Dairying.
Dr. Eagles is our first Alumnus to be
appointed Head of a Department.
Dr. Carrothers has returned to the
University after leave of absence to
work with the Government Economic
Council.
Physical Education instructors for the
current year have been Miss Gertrude
E. Moore for the women students, and
Mr.  Maurice Van Vliet for the men.
Resignations from the Faculty were
received from:
Dr. H. Vickers, Head of the Department of Mechanical and Electrical Engineering. Dr. Vickers has gone to
England.
Dr. H. F. G. Letson, Associate Professor of Mechanical and Electrical Engineering.
Mr. E. G. Cullwick, Associate Professor of Electrical Engineering, who
has been appointed Head of the Department of Mechanical and Electrical Engineering at the University of Alberta.
Mr. Logan is on leave of absence. He
has been appointed Principal of the
Prince of Wales Fairbridge Farm School
at Cowichan, V.I. GRADUATE CHRONICLE—MAY, 1937
Thirteen
THE LIBRARY
AX7TTHIN recent months the University Library has received something
over $11,000 in donated material.
The two largest gifts have come from
the Carnegie Corporation of New York.
The first is a collection of books on art,
together with some 2,200 photographs,
or colored illustrations, specially selected
to illustrate developments in architecture,
sculpture, painting, and the minor arts
of tapestry, working in metals, enamel,
etc. All of these show the progress in
art from primitive times to the present.
They cover all races and countries, as
they  do  all  periods  of  time.
The collection was organized under
the supervision of a special committee
of distinguished scholars, who secured
the co-operation of directors and professors in many schools of art in
America and Europe. The compilation
and accumulation of the material took
over three years. The value of this collection is $6,000.
The second gift from the Carnegie
Corporation covers the field of music as
thoroughly as the one just described
does the field of art. It consists of a
specially designed electrical phonograph,
together with a loud speaker. In volume
and in fidelity of tone this pair of specially designed instruments represents
an approach to perfection in acoustical
reproduction. Sound volume is controllable, from the softest pianissimo, to an
output that will fill Carnegie Hall in
New York. At three-quarters of its possible volume it will make the University
Auditorium reverberate, while the nuances and overtones, usually lost in an ordinary machine, are preserved with
faithful accuracy.
Accompanying these two instruments
is a collection of 945 specially selected
records. These illustrate every aspect of
musical composition. Vocal music is
illustrated by chants and folk songs from
aboriginal Australia, from Madagascar,
from China and Burma, and every
country in Europe. There are even some
of the songs of the British Columbia
Indians in the collection. Ranging from
these primitive chants, the collection has
every variety of solo and concerted vocal
music. In sacred music the illustrations
range from the Gregorian chant and
the Plain-song, to the great Masses of
Bach, and the Oratorios of Handel and
Mendelssohn. The instrumental selections
have represented solos on strings and
wood, with concerted music ranging
from the duet or quartette, up to the
biggest and most famous orchestra.
Included in the collection is a library
of nearly 200 miniature or full-sized
orchestral scores, and about 100 volumes
of biography and musical appreciation.
President Klinck has appointed a
special committee to administer this
notable gift. It is probable that invitations
will be issued to a special inaugural
recital about the time the University
reconvenes for its Autumn Session.
There have been two noted acquisitions
to the Library- within recent months as
a result of the personal efforts of the
Librarian, and the generosity of a number of the Library's friends. The first is
the acquisition of Curtis' "Indians of
North America"-—20 octavo volumes
and 20 large folios. This great work
marked a milestone in American book
publishing. It was printed on vellum, and
bound in Levant. It was limited to 500
sets, and the subscription prices, in the
two editions, were $3,500 and $4,500.
Mr. J. Pierpont Morgan contributed
$500,000 as a fund to the Smithsonian
Institution of Washington to carry out
the ethnological and linguistic researches
embodied in the work. He purchased 25
sets for presentation to institutions in
which he was interested, or to personal
friends, but died before the distribution
was completed. The undistributed sets
were secured by a firm in Boston, and
offered at less than one-third of the
publication price. The Librarian solicited
from friends of the Library subscriptions  amounting to  $930,  and acquired Fourteen
THE UNIVERSITY OF BRITISH COLUMBIA
one of the sets. There are only two
others in Canada, one at the Library of
Parliament, the other at McGill.
Another notable acquisition, likewise
secured through the generosity of the
Library's friends, is the seven-volume
set of Audubon's "Birds of America".
The lowest quotation the Librarian remembers within the past ten years has
been $700 or $800. An opportunity
arose, however, to secure a set for $300,
and three of the Library's friends each
subscribed $100 towards its purchase.
The set is in absolutely mint condition,
though it was published in from 1841 to
1846. It contains hundreds of superb
colored plates, and will be a joy to every
bird lover.
An interesting and valuable item is
the gift of Dr. John C. Ferguson of
Peiping, China, obtained through the
kindness of Mrs. Boyle, a member of
the Provincial Library Commission. This
is "Noted Porcelains of Successive
Dynasties, with Comments and Illustrations" by Hsiang Yuan-pien, revised by
Dr. Ferguson.
Dr. Ferguson was a young American
school teacher who went to China 52
years ago. Before leaving, he was married to a young lady at Belleville, Ontario, and Mrs. Boyle was bridesmaid
at the wedding. The Ferguson school developed until it became a University with
over 9,000 students, Dr. Ferguson being
its President. He resigned 15 years ago
to make way for a Chinese scholar.
In addition to being an eminent educator, Dr. Ferguson is the oldest and
the most trusted of all the foreign advisers to successive Chinese governments. His personal collection of porcelain is among the finest in private hands,
ranging from 400 B.C., through all the
Chinese dynasties.
The book he has presented to the
Library consists of illustrations, in color,
of samples from his own collection. It is
printed on paper made from green bamboo, guaranteed to last a thousand years.
Its cover is made in three sections, and
the volume is fastened by ivory clasps.
The price of the single volume is £36.0.0
—$180. It was presented to the Library
by Dr. Ferguson, at the suggestion of
Mrs. Boyle, as a gesture of International
and scholarly good will.
Space will not permit fuller description of other interesting gifts which,
within the space of about a year, have
enriched the University's book collection.
The following list gives the names of
the principal donors.
Miss Van Steenwyk.
Mr. John E. Eagles.
Carnegie Endowment.
W. R. Cryer.
Mrs. W.  H. Harrison.
M. Andre Honnorat.
Carnegie Corporation of New York.
No comment on recent additions to
the Library should fail to include,
however, the notable gift made by the
Library of Congress—the Depository
Catalogue. This consists of more than
1,500,000 printed cards, and constitutes
the most useful general bibliography
extant. The value of the cards is $65,000,
and the cabinets and equipment cost a
further $6,000, provided by the. Board
of Governors. The work of filing the
cards is about half completed, more than
three-quarters of a million having been
filed.
There are some 40 sets of the Depository Catalogue in various parts of the
United States. France has one, England
two, Russia one, Italy two, and there
are a few others located at important
bibliographical centers throughout the
world. In Canada, only three Depository-
sets are available—at McGill, and the
University of Toronto, and now, in the
University of British Columbia.
The possession of this invaluable collection will, in future years, make our
University a center of bibliographical
research, and its acquisition has already
done much to enhance the reputation of
the Library among Canadian and American scholars.
The readers of this "Chronicle" will
be interested to know that the University
Library now possesses about 108,000
volumes, and between 15,000 and 20,000
pamphlets. John Ridington. GRADUATE CHRONICLE—MAY, 1937
Fifteen
BROCK MEMORIAL
* I "HE following report has been
received from Mr. Sherwood Lett:
Approximately $32,000.00 has been
actually subscribed and received. In
addition, the students authorized a
bond issue of $10,000.00, which is not
included in the above figure. This
makes a total of approximately
$42,000.00 available. A contingent subscription of $3500.00 from the C.O.T.C.
has also been promised, subject to certain conditions. This sum is not included in the $42,000.00 figure given
above.
The above does include a $750.00
contribution from the Summer Session
Students' Association, and I understand a further sum of $750.00 or more
will be voted by them at the forthcoming Summer Session.
The figure of $32,000.00 includes the
sum of $140.00 actually received by
way of contributions from the Faculty
and a further amount to be deposited
bv the Facultv Association estimated
at $1700.00.
cifij?
STUDENT ACTIVITIES
CPORTS  have played a glorious part
in the record of the year 1936-37. The
English Rugby teams won both the
Millar and McKechnie cups. The Men's
Basketball team won the Dominion
Basketball Championship, defeating the
Fords three games in a five-game series.
It is safe to say that all Grads in Vancouver who were not present in the
Arena were glued to their radios. To
Varsity fell the honours in the Inter-
Collegiate Ski Championships and the
C.O.T.C. proved themselves first-class
marksmen by winning the Inter-University Canadian rifle competition.
In the realm of music, 'Varsity proved
itself worthy of the high standards of
former years. The sparkling operetta
"Robin Hood", produced by the Musical
Society, was acclaimed as the most delightful the Society had staged for many
years.
The Players' Club also receive high
praise for their production of "The
Brontes", a play by Alfred Sangster.
Those of you who remember the excellent production of "Hedda Gabler", two
years ago, will realize the excellence of
this year's production, since critics have
ranked the two as equal in outstanding
merit.
A new society of interest has been
formed—the Film Society.  This society
has been responsible for securing many
French and German films for the delectation of the student body. The work
this club is doing should prove of inestimable value in the future as it has
proven in this past year.
The debating society has been as active
as in the past. Debates have been held
against Canadian, Imperial, American
teams.
To Mr. Allard Ridder, gifted conductor of the Vancouver Symphony Orchestra, the student body has been indebted
for his fine series of lectures on music.
A new system of Student Passes has
been inaugurated, to come into effect at
the beginning of the 1937-38 term. Each
student will pay an additional $3.00 on
his Alma Mater fees, but in return for
this sum he will receive a pass to many
University games, dances, debates, plays
and like student activities. It is hoped
that this "pass" system will do much to
increase the University spirit on the
campus.
The students also decided to float a
bond issue in order to allow for the
construction of the stadium and thus fill
a long-felt want. As the debt on the
gymnasium was finally paid off the students felt that they were able to face the
necessary cost of  construction. Sixteen
THE UNIVERSITY OF BRITISH COLUMBIA
CONVOCATION,   1937
T^HE 22nd Annual Meeting of Convocation held in the Crystal Ballroom
of the Hotel Vancouver on May 6th, introduced at least one innovation previously, we believe, unheard of. This consisted in calling upon the Speaker of the
evening, the Hon. and Rev. H. J. Cody,
M.A., D.D., LL.D., President of the
University of Toronto, immediately
after the soup course. The Speaker discussed "Some Tendencies in Modern
University Education", and the newer
graduates listened to the excellent address with an interest undimmed by
several days of speech making. It is to
be feared, however, that some of the
older graduates surveyed the meat
course growing cold before them with
longing looks and some were observed
surreptitiously snatching a bite from
time to time.
Johnny Burnett and several other
members of the Alumni conceived the
excellent idea of broadcasting the address
of the main speaker, and arrangements
were accordingly made with station
CRCV. Alumni groups met all over the
province for dinner that evening and
listened by means of the radio to the
address. Our time on the air was from
8 :00 to 8 :30, and due to the lateness of
Congregation the dinner did not start
until 7:45. It was therefore necessary to
call upon the speaker before he had fortified himself to any extent with the
dinner provided, but it was generally
agreed, nevertheless, that the address was
well worth hearing.
Before the end of the meeting telegrams were received from different
Alumni Branches advising that the address had come through very well and
was much enjoyed. It was, we think, an
excellent idea, and Johnny Burnett and
his assistants deserved congratulations
for their arrangements.
During the course of the meeting the
following officers were elected:
Treasurer,   Mr.   Mark   Collins;   audi
tors, Messrs. W. O. Banfield & T. W.
Berry; secretary,  Mr. Milton Owen.
To replace the retiring members of
the Executive Council the following
were elected: Miss Myrtle Beattie,
Messrs. A. D. Lord, H. Barrett, Roy
McConachie and Gordon Morris.
A musical program and toast list was
carried out and a most successful meeting was brought to a conclusion about
10 o'clock with the singing of "O
Canada".
"VX/'E notice in a recent edition of the
McGill Bulletin" that Stephen Lea-
cock had remarked that the graduates of
McGill, Queens, and Toronto seemed to
take care of the graduates of those colleges very well. Apparently after the
medicine of the McGill doctor had had
its effect, the Ministers from Queens
bury the poor grad and the Toronto
lawyers divide up his estate amongst the
three. It appears that certain members
of Arts '23 can offer just as complete a
service to the remaining graduates of
that class. We have Doctors Gordie
Kirkpatrick, Frank Turnbull and Hugh
McKechnie to inflict the medicine and
Messrs. Allen, Fleming and Dr. Switzer
to assist their departure to their spiritual
home and Jack Clyne, Tommy Ellis and
Hugo Ray to divide up whatever estate
they may have managed to amass since
graduation among the lot of them. This
advertisement is not published nor has it
even been approved by the Medical Association, Ministerial Association or
Law Society of B.C.
A N excerpt from a letter from Kal-
ervo Oberg, now resident at Bonhill
Cottage, Crouch, Kent, so intrigued us
with its "travel" flavour that we could
not resist printing it in longer form
than a "personal" would permit.
"Since leaving the University of British Columbia, I have continued my academic training in various parts of the
world. I took mv Master's in Economics GRADUATE CHRONICLE—MAY, 1937
Seventeen
at the University of Pittsburgh, after
which I branched into Anthropology. I
completed my Ph.D. work at the University of Chicago in 1933 under Rad-
cliffe-Brown and Professor Cooper-Cole.
I then came to the London School of
Economics where I took a year with
Malinowski, and later a summer course
with Professor Westermann at the University of Berlin. We have now returned
from a two years' anthropological field
trip in Uganda, Africa. While there we
made a study of the Banyankole tribe,
particularly  from the  point of  view of
culture change. At present we are settled
in Kent, where I am writing a book on
the Banyankole and getting my Alaskan
material ready for publication. The University of Chicago financed me during
my work there, and since I have been in
England I have received fellowships
from the Social Science Research Council in New York and from the International Institute of African Language and
Cultures in London. I am now receiving
one from the last named institute for the
purpose of writing up my African
material."
t££J>
CLASS OF '26
COME eleven years ago when we were
young and full of illusions a great
deal was said to us concerning the battle
of life upon which we were entering, and
since that time we have learned to our
sorrow that a great many of those remarks were quite true. We have been
engaged in that battle more or less successfully for a considerable period.
Some have been drafted to distant theatres of the war. It would be impossible
to name them all as, as in all wars, information from the troops closely engaged is slow in coming to hand. However, in distant China Lorimer Baker
is in charge of an outpost at Kuling.
Ruth and Les Brown are liason officers
with the Canadian Trade Commissioners
office in London, England. Barbara and
Brit Brock patrol sunny lands with the
Geological section in distant Africa. Abe
Makano reports the progress of the war
for the Japan Times in Tokyo.
In almost every State of the Union, in
every Province of Canada, and in all
parts of British Columbia our outposts
may be found. We have had our casualties ; names have been erased from our
rolls leaving only the memories of those
whom the fates allowed to battle for
such a pitifully short space of time.
Many have gone missing, their names
still appearing on our lists but their
whereabouts being unknown.
A great number of the Amazon battalions have joined the masculine regiments and recruiting for the classes of
future years  goes  briskly   forward.
We have fought under rather adverse
circumstances during the last few years
but our record speaks more of success
than of failure. It would be impossible
to interview each officer and soldier and
we can only spot a few over a widely
extended front from our reconnaisance
plane. Bill Bain, that one-time exponent
of the joys of bachelorhood, is now a
proud father and directs his well-trained
battalions from his engineering post at
Woodfibre.
We have looked for but been unable
to spot the red head of Earle Birnie.
Possibly he is fighting with the govern-
troops in Spain, or again may be arousing the fury of the Common People in
our midst. In any case if you meet him
he will be pleased to have a glass of beer
with you and inform you why, as a
capitalist, you should and will be
liquidated.
Marion Bullock-Webster remains at
her post in the stately old fort at Victoria, where, we understand, she is with
the Communications Branch and hammers a typewriter.
Virginia Eaton has finally deserted the
ranks of the spinsters and now  resides Eighteen
THE UNIVERSITY OF BRITISH COLUMBIA
in Calais, State of Maine, where in her
spare time she conducts farming operations.
Freda Edgett has each summer for
some time been in training for the
Cavalry on a certain ranch in the Cariboo. Standing at a safe distance, ask her
about that well-known cowboy, Chicago,
then duck.
Charlie Farrand is with the Advocate-
Generals Branch, practising his profession of law in Vancouver.
Dave Verchere also belongs to this
Branch and is practising in the same
city. He has recently become a father
and is, we understand, in somewhat of a
quandary as to whether to keep the child
or his motor car, he having come to the
conclusion that one or other of them is
a useless luxury.
Maurice Freeman is advising upon
the financial side of operations from the
Department of Economics at the Ohio
State University.
"Hank" Gartshore enlightens Berkeley, California, with his presence and
doubtless with his famous poems upon
subjects of a somewhat doubtful nature.
Jean Falkner, now Jean Hunt, resides
in Eastern Canada and knowingly discourses upon the ghastly mysteries of the
medical profession of which her husband
is a distinguished member.
"Brud" Letson is with the Ordnance
Corps carrying on his operations at his
foundry in Vancouver.
Tommy Louden represents the Transportation Section, being with the Engineering Department of the C.N.R.
D'Arcy Marsh is War Correspondent
reporting daily to "The Albertan" in
Calgary.
Marion Mitchell still feels that the
answer to all tactical problems is to be
found in the books of history, which she
peruses and discourses upon at Lind-
wood College, St. Charles, Missouri.
Hilton Moore represents the financial
giants on Wall St. and, we trust, is not
profiteering more than necessary as a
result of the struggle.
Bruce Macdonald is a Liaison Officer
in China, being Junior Trade Commissioner in Shanghai.
Aileen MacDonald holds up the political end, being her father's most ardent
campaigner in provincial elections.
Gordon Telford is endeavouring to
become philosophical about it all with
the Department of Philosophy at Harvard University. In due course of time
we hope to hear from him many profound utterances which will tend to
smooth the rocky path we follow.
George Vincent, our "Gaston", is, we
understand, practically the sole literary
support of the B.B.C. in London and
naturally is an outstanding member of
the Propaganda Brigade.
These are only a few of the troops
in our thin red line but we trust that
when another year rolls around, and the
heat of battle is not quite so intense, we
shall have reports from many fronts
which will advise us of battles won and
medals earned, so that we may give you
a much larger collection of names and
facts in the Chronicle of '38.
William Murphy.
<3£?
RE-UNION OF 1932-1933 STUDENTS'COUNCIL
"C*OUR years have passed—four years
since we wrangled and struggled by
the hour with budgets, the drainage of
the Stadium, the strange disappearance
of the Silence Sign, and the peculiar
ramifications of the Panhellenic Constitution. Four years, too, since we dined
hilariously in the Caf, or paraded in
black-gowned dignity to the eminence of
the Auditorium stage, to endure the
boredom or the anxiety of an Alma
Mater meeting.
Ever since that time, it has been our
dream  that   some  day,   somewhere,   we GRADUATE CHRONICLE—MAY, 1937
Nineteen
would have a complete reunion of our
Council. The realization of that dream
seemed at times a practical impossibility,
when one considered how widely the
paths of those nine people had diverged
since Graduation in 1933. True, several
were still in Vancouver; Dorothy
Thompson, President of the Women's
Undergraduate Society, is now secretary
to H. N. McCorkindale, superintendent
of Vancouver schools; Ruth Witbeck,
president of women's athletics, is organizer for the Junior Red Cross, and although she covers a goodly portion of
B. C. in the course of a year, is often in
Vancouver; Rosemary Winslow, secretary, works in the Credit Department of
Cassidy's Limited, wholesalers in china
and crockery. Mark Collins, treasurer, is
a statistician for the B. C. Packers Limited; Bob Osborne, president of men's
athletics, now teaches at Byng High
School; and Milt Owen, junior member,
is a rising lawyer. Six of us, then, are
relatively accessible; but consider the
plight of Vic Rogers, president of men's
undergrad, in far-away Island Falls,
Sask. (near Flin Flon), where he is progressing rapidly with a large power
company; or Bill Whimster, our genial
president, of somewhat migratory habits,
whose present occupation is insurance-
selling in Nelson, B. C.; or Neil Perry,
president of the L.S.E., who has graduated from teaching to a position with
Dr. Carrothers' Economic Council at
Victoria.
However, in spite of our difficulties, it
was arranged that the 1932-33 Student
Council, in toto, should foregather on
the evening of January 23, 1937. Vic was
to be in town on his holidays, Bill was
passing through that week-end, and Neil
arranged to come over from Victoria for
the occasion. Between them, Ruth Whit-
beck and Milt Owen completed the arrangements, and then Ruth had the
misfortune to contract flu so badly that
she could not possibly be with us, so our
dream of an absolutely complete reunion
failed at the last moment to materialize.
Nevertheless, the spirit of our campus
days was recaptured with extraordinary
vividness and completeness, and the four
intervening years seemed as nothing. Old
wise-cracks, old arguments, old idiosyncrasies, seemed as fresh as yesterday.
As a preliminary we went to see the
exhibition basketball game between the
Harlem Globe-Trotters and the Province,
in which our own Bob "Tony" Osborne
was starring. Then we drove for foggy
miles over the snow to Milt Owen's
Burnaby home, where such a repast
awaited us as the Caf, Heaven bless it,
never afforded. A bona fide meeting was
held over the supper-table, complete with
the minute book from our former meetings. Perhaps the motions were slightly
informal, perhaps more than one speaker
occasionally held the floor, and doubtless
Roberts' Rules would have curled up and
died at the spectacle, but we felt as if we
were back at College, and finished by resolving to have our next reunion at the
home of the first of our number to forsake the state of single blessedness in
which we were all, surprisingly enough,
still rejoicing.
Rosemary Winslow.
Secretary. Jn Ulemnnam
"They shall not grow old,  as we that are left grow old:
Age shall not weary them, nor tlte years condemn.
At the going down of the sun and in the morning
We will remember them".
*
ALFRED G. CUMMINGS, B.A.Sc. (Geological Engineering) '36,
died in Rhodesia, September, 1936.
WILLIAM   STANLEY  NICHOLSON,  B.A.   (Hons.),  died  in
January, 1937.
RENA VIOLA McCUTCHEON  (nee McRrae), B.A., '24, died
May, 1936.
CHESTER E. SOMERVILLE, B.A., '32, died June, 1936.
DOUGLAS TUTILL, B.A., '27, died 1936.
REV. T. H. WRIGHT, B.A., '21, died 1936. GRADUATE CHRONICLE—-MAY, 1937
Twenty-one
SECRETARY'S REPORT,  1936-1937
r I "HE main work of the Alumni Association for the year 1936-1937 has
been in maintaining and further extending the branch organization put into
effect in the preceding year. New
branches have been formed and the older
branches have been drawn closer together by means of various activities
sponsored by the Association.
The Annual Meeting held on November 2nd, 1936, adopted in toto the Constitution which had been in use previously for the preceding year with certain
amendments that had been added from
time to time, and which provided for
the organization of the branch system
wherever possible. At this Annual Meeting also the provision of the Constitution
for the appointment as Honorary Life
Members of our Association any persons
who had given outstanding service to
education in general, or to the University, was put into effect when motion
was duly passed by the meeting that Mr.
Chris Spencer, Mr. W. H. Malkin, and
His Honour Judge Ellis be the first three
recipients of this honorary membership.
One of the first steps taken by the
Executive was to approach Professor
Robert England, head of the new Department of Adult Extension Lectures,
with a view to offering our services and
co-operation in any way possible in the
organization of his lectures throughout
the province, by means of our branch
organizations. It is needless to say that
our offer was gratefully accepted and
the Association has been promised the
opportunity of having one of its members on Professor England's committee
for the coming year. In this way it is
hoped that the effect will be two-fold. In
the first place we will be able to contribute some substantial service to our
Alma Mater, first of all by recommendations from the branches as to what type
of address would be most suited to the
needs of the community, and secondly
by assisting in the organization of these
lectures. In the second place our partici
pation in this work should also be of
immense benefit to our Association because it will give us a service object—
a much needed impetus for any organization such as ours.
The branches will be approached early
in the Fall for their suggestions in this
regard.
The Christmas Dance of the Association was held in the Commodore Cabaret
on December 29th and was a most successful function both financially and
socially. The Association netted the sum
of $111.77 from the function and approximately 900 graduates were in attendance. The Christmas Dance has
definitely come to stay as an institution
as far as the Alumni Association is concerned. Most of the thanks for the organization of this dance must go to the
special committee appointed by the Executive for that purpose which included
the Misses Dorothy Thompson and
Dorothy Myers and Messrs. Ted Baynes
and Ken Beckett.
The Homecoming Day Rugby game
was held in the Fall term in co-operation with the Alma Mater Society at the
University. This feature consisted of a
combined English rugby game between
the Varsity Senior team and the Occasional Ex-Varsity Rugby Club, and a
Canadian rugby game consisting of a
playoff between the University Senior
team and the University of Saskatchewan Senior team for the Hardy Cup,
emblematic of Western Canadian Intercollegiate Football supremacy. Approximately 5,000 people attended this combined game, which was started off by an
immense parade of some 200 cars which
proceeded from the University and made
a tour of the city before the game. It
is hoped that this Home-coming Day will
be extended into a real University Homecoming programme this coming year with
the addition of a permanent seating
structure at the Stadium at the University this Summer.
During the Christmas holidays the Ex- Twenty-two
THE UNIVERSITY OF BRITISH COLUMBIA
ecutive Council consisting of the general
executive and representatives from the
branches held a meeting and discussed
the policy and activities of the Association and made several suggestions thereon. There were five branches represented
at this meeting and the most important
items of business discussed were: (1)
Our co-operation in the Adult Extension
Lectures; (2) Over-crowding at the
University and what steps we could take
in the connection) thereto; (3) The report on the Brock Memorial Campaign.
The secretary of the Brock Memorial
Campaign, Mr. Sherwood Lett, in reporting to the Association on the results
of this campaign estimated that the sum
of $40,000 had been collected to date. It
was pointed out further that the aforesaid committee would advise us further
in the near future as to what steps would
be suggested for the carrying on of this
campaign in order to complete our objective. Your executive appointed a committee to investigate over-crowded conditions at the University consisting of
Mr. Tom Ellis, Mr. John Burnett and
Mr. D. M. Owen. This committee has
held several interviews with President
Klinck and with various members of
the Board of Governors and has ascertained the immediate needs of the University in this connection. The branches
will be canvassed shortly concerning
their views on what steps should be
taken. One of the proposed plans is that
members of the Government in each
constituency should be approached in
turn with a view to obtaining their support on our programme. It is hoped in
this way that our Association can be of
some very material benefit to the University.
With a view to keeping the existence
of our Association before the undergraduate students at the University and
also to procure the support of this year's
Graduating   Class,   Mr.   Ellis   and   Mr.
Owen spoke to the members of the
Graduating Class of 1937 at one of their
meetings at the University and took the
opportunity to outline the work of the
Association and also obtain at that time
a list of pledges of all those who desired
to become members of the Association
after graduation. This gesture was so
successful that it is intended to repeat
this each year.
The Convocation Dinner which will
be held on May 6th, of this year, during
Graduation Week, will be noted for a
special feature which the Association has
organized. Canon Cody of the University of Toronto will be giving the main
address of the evening and it has been
arranged with CRCV Radio Station that
25 minutes will be given over the air in
which Canon Cody will be given the
opportunity of addressing not only the
Convocation Dinner but regular meetings
held by various branches of the Association throughout the province on the
same night. This is a new feature entirely in our work and it is hoped by this
means that the member branches will be
brought closer together. There are approximately some 20 branches of the
Association in existence at the present
time and these are spread throughout
the province and across the Dominion.
Many other centers have loose organizations, and still others are in the process
of formation at the present time.
There is no question about it that the
Alumni Association has at last a strong
organization and our efforts now should
be directed toward strengthening the
organization still further so that we may
be of continual assistance to our University of British Columbia, and at the same
time obtain a great deal of personal
pleasure in the maintenance of those lifelong friendships and associations formed
during University days.
D. Milton Owen,
Secretary. GRADUATE CHRONICLE—MAY, 1937
Twenty-three
FINANCIAL STATEMENT, NOVEMBER I, 1936-APRIL 12, 1937
The Alumni Association of the University of British  Columbia
Balance in Bank Nov. 1st  $261.86
Receipts
Annual Dinner   4.55
Reunion Dance   111.77
Fees— 15  Life    150.00
1   Life   (Balance)     9.00
138 Annual   138.00
Expenditures
Vocational Guidance  $ 20.00
Honorary Life Members,
Record Book and Certificates    11.18
Printing and mailing of notices
re fees      14.98
Sundries — Stenographer, Postage, Stationery, Exchange ...    30.02
$ 76.18
Transfer charge          .50
Cash on hand        5.99
Bank  balance  603.51
$686.18
$686.18
D. P. Watney, Treasurer..
This is an interim statement. The books close on October 31st.    The annual fees
are payable to the treasurer on the first day of November of each year.
REPORTS ON THE ACTIVITIES OF THE BRANCHES
VICTORIA  BRANCH
T TPON various occasions during past
years efforts have been made to
establish an Alumni Branch in Victoria.
These attempts were not outstandingly
successful until the past year when a
branch was duly organized. Looking
back on the activities of the year we feel
more than justified for the effort, for
our branch has been a most active organization. Now that we have made a beginning we are sure that, because of the
great interest shown by graduates in the
city, each succeeding year will show
larger membership and greater enthusiasm than the last. There are more than
two hundred graduates in the city, all
potential active members. At each of our
functions between eighty and one hundred have been present. Among our
members are seven life members of the
Alumni Association.
Even before there was an organized
association here we held one of our most
enjoyable  affairs.   This   was  the  dinner
held last May in celebration of the Coming of Age Anniversary of the University. It was held in Empress Hotel and
was attended by graduates from 1916 to
1936. President Klinck had kindly come
over from Vancouver to speak to us.
The other speaker of the evening was
Dr. H. E. Young who has been associated with the University for so
many years. At that dinner a committee
was empowered to proceed in the fall
with plans for the organization of a
branch of the Provincial Association.
With this in view a tea was arranged
for Sunday afternoon, November 1st, in
the lower lounge of the Empress Hotel.
There many old acquaintances and
friendships were renewed, and following
tea officers were elected for the coming
year. These are:
Honorary President, Dr. H. E. Young;
President, Dr. Allan Peebles; Vice-
president, Patricia Hamilton-Smith; Secretary, Muriel MacKay; Treasurer, Neil
Perry;   Membership   Secretary,   Donald Twenty-four
THE UNIVERSITY OF BRITISH COLUMBIA
Purves; Executive,  Mary Young,  Hazel
Hodson, John Gough.
A most enjoyable dinner was held at
Spencer's on the evening of December
8th, when Professor Robert England of
the University Extension Department
spoke to us entertainingly and inform-
ingly on the future of Adult Education
in British Columbia, challenging us, as
graduates, to take part in this important
work. Subsequent executive meetings
discussed activities along this line, particularly in connection with the formation of study and discussion groups
among Alumni. A committee conferred
with Professor England and brought in
an excellent report on Book Reading
groups. This report was tabled by the
executive and will be acted upon early
next fall. Members of the Alumni acted
as official representatives on a Victoria
committee to found a branch here of the
National Film Society of Canada. The
Alumni branch participated actively in
its sponsorship and it shows every indication of being a worthwhile activity. We
were approached by the University
Players' Club with a request to sponsor
a showing in the Capital City of the
Annual Spring play. We were wholeheartedly in favour of assisting the
Players' Club, but we felt that our resources were too limited at the present
time to undertake such a project.
Harking back to University days when
we were all very young and gay we organized an evening of Hi-Jinks at the
Royal Victoria Yacht Club on April 9th.
This affair, however, broke with tradition, and instead of being for the sole
pleasure of women under-graduates,
catered to the lighter nature of both
men and women graduates. The entertainment took the form of a miniature
Monte Carlo and entire fortunes of
bogus money were lost and won during
the evening. Dancing followed, interspersed with a floor show of amusing
skits presented by some of our most
serious members who had light-heartedly
cast aside all semblance of post-University dignity.
There is still another affair planned
for the year. This will be the Annual
Spring Dinner, which, we hope, will
become a well-established function. This
year it will be held on the same evening
as the Convocation Dinner in Vancouver,
and that evening we shall join with
Alumni groups all over Canada and in
various parts of the world in renewing
our pledge of loyalty to the Alma Mater.
OKANAGAN  VALLEY ALUMNI
ACTIVITIES
'T'HE first Reunion of Okanagan Valley graduates and associates of the
University of British Columbia, was
held in Vernon, November, 1927. at the
Kalamalka Hotel. About thirty attended.
After a gay and friendly dinner we were
invited to dance at a home at which
James Craig was host. Everyone enjoyed
the gathering so much that it was decided to hold a reunion banquet annually.
The next four years the Reunion was
held at the Eldorado Arms, Kelowna.
About 4 o'clock the crowd would gather
for an informal cup of tea. Then at 7:00
p.m. there was the banquet, followed by
toasts, speeches, sing-songs and finally a
dance. In 1931 Dr. Sedgwick was
present and greatly enjoyed.
Vernon, in 1932, again entertained at
the Country Club, where a good crowd
met.
Since then the reunions have been held
at the Royal Anne Hotel, Kelowna, as it
seems to be the most central. In 1934,
Mr. T. R. Hall gave a most interesting
address. The following year we were
honored by the company of both Dr.
Sedgwick and Professor Soward, who
gave really inspirational talks. At a
business meeting an executive for the
whole valley was elected as follows:
President, Kenneth Caple, Summer-
land ; vice-president, Alan Hurst, Revel-
stoke ; secretary. Marie Chapin, Kelowna ; North representative, Edith
Sturdy, Revelstoke; South representative, Harley Hatfield,  Penticton. GRADUATE CHRONICLE—MAY, 1937
Twenty-fivi
In October, 1936, a crowd of ninety
assembled at the Royal Anne Hotel to a
banquet, with Kenneth Caple as master
of ceremonies. Our honoured guests,
Dr. Kave Lamb, Mr. Ira Dilworth, and
Mr. T. L. Hall, delighted us with
speeches, lively and interesting.
CHILLIWACK  BRANCH
A BRANCH of the Alumni Association has just been formed in Chilli-
wack. The officers are as follows:
President, Fred K. Grimmett ('32) ;
secretarv-treasurer, Rev. M. C. Humphrey  ('33).
We find there are about 15 graduates
in the district and we hope finally to
have them all in the Branch. To further
this, we are planning a dinner meeting
for April 9th. M. C. Humphrey.
TORONTO BRANCH
r I '"HE first meeting of the Toronto
branch of the U.B.C. Alumni Association took the form of a dinner-
dance late in October. At a brief business
meeting the following executive was
elected:
President, Maxwell A. Cameron; Hon.
President, Mr. N. E. W. Michener;
Secretary - Treasurer, Emma Wilson ;
Social Committee: Chairman, Bunny
Pound; committee, Isobel Arthur, Frank
Miller, Alistair Campbell, Jack Duncan.
An enjoyable dance, at which many
old friendships were renewed rounded
off the evening.
The Association met next at an informal Sunday tea on February 14, over
forty members attending.
The group is co-operating with the
Toronto Alumni of the Universities of
Manitoba, Saskatchewan, and Alberta in
a dance on February 27th. The year's
activities will conclude with a tea which
Mrs. N. E. W. Michener has graciously
invited the British Columbia Alumni in
Toronto to attend at her home on the
afternoon of Sunday, April 4th.
Judge F. W. Howay, LL.D., F.R.S.C.;
vice-president, Janet Gilley; secretary,
G. R. McQuarrie; recording secretary,
Maizie MacKenzie; treasurer, Dave
Turner.
Last meeting was held on January
27th, 1937, at the Gingham Tea Rooms.
Thirty members present.
Doctor Blythe Eagles gave an up to
date review of the work done on
vitamins.
Throughout the past year the Alumni
meetings have been in the nature of discussion gatherings, following dinner
meetings. Selected speakers have spoken
on topics of general interest to Alumni
members. The executive have felt that
dinner meetings of this nature have been
a successful method of bringing the
members together.
Another such meeting to be held soon.
O
NEW WESTMINSTER
FFICERS   for  present year:   President,  R.  Fournier; Hon.  President,
VERNON  BRANCH
'"pHE Vernon Branch of the U.B.C.
Alumni Association was organized
in September, 1936. The following officers were elected:
President, Fergus Mutrie; vice-president, Geo. Rowland; secretary, Jean
Adam; treasurer,  Page Robinson.
Other members include: Anna Fulton,
Kay Coles, Mrs. G. Rowland, Mrs. F.
Mutrie, Mr. and Mrs. Parkes, Mrs. J.
McCulloch, Marjorie Dimock, Mr. and
Mrs. J. McLean, Elinor Richards, Dick
Locke, Marjorie Bulman, Frances
Simms, Dick Pritchard, Hilda Cryder-
man, Elsie Mercer, Margaret Mossey,
Jack Fox, Anne Bowman, Larry Lang,
Larry Mars, Bill Osborn.
The main work of the group this year
was to sponsor the University extension
lectures.
Marjorie Dimock receives her M.A.
in psychology this year.
Frances Simms has been teaching in
Lumby since Christmas.
The Vernon High School has now
four U.B.C. Grads on the staff: Jean
Adams, formerly of Port Haney; Marjorie Dimock, formerly of Prince Rupert; Anna Fulton, formerly of Kelowna,
and Johnnie McLean, formerly of Oliver. Twenty-six
THE UNIVERSITY OF BRITISH COLUMBIA
Married—Larry Lang and Florence
Goulding of Oyama, in June, 1936;
Grev. Rowland and Kenna McDonald,
in November, 1936.
Engaged—Bill Osborn to June Tryon,
of Parksville.
ON WITH THE DANCE
A NOTHER Alumni tradition in the
making! Christmas holiday season
was again chosen for the grand reunion
dance at the Commodore, and from far
and wide to honour the occasion came
Grads in festive mood (for even the
most staid doff their dignity once in a
while).
From distant Haney came the gallant
Jim Hodgkiss to lead us in some old college songs, while Tommy Berto roused
us in some vigorous yells. Dear old Alma
Mater. Some of us even felt sentimental!
The ballroom was in party dress too,
streamers and balloons a colourful background for the lovely frocks of the
female dancers. Bachelors (eligible and
otherwise), with their pretty maidens;
husbands and wives; (and one new-born
father without his wife)—all had a
"large" evening. The committee really
had no worries about the success of the
affair, nevertheless, "honour to whom
honour is due", so we take off our caps
for another wonderful dance to Dorothy
Myers, Dorothy Thompson, Milt Owen,
Ted Baynes and Ken Beckett, also to
our gracious patrons: Dean Bollert,
President and Mrs. Klinck, Dean and
Mrs. Buchanan, Dean and Mrs. Finlayson. 	
GRADUATE HISTORICAL SOC'Y.
"D EADERS of the Graduate Chronicle
of 1936 will remember that the
Graduate Historical Society follows a
dual purpose of providing a gathering
place for graduates in history, and of
endowing a prize for the most meritorious student in the graduating class in
history.
The topics of this year's discussions
centered round the theme "Modern
Canadian Problems", to which the following members and guest speakers contributed :
Professor W. A. Carrothers: "The
Economic Position of British Columbia
in the Canadian Federation."
Mr. L. A. Wrinch: "Canadian-American Relations."
Miss Beth Dow, Miss Kaete Thiessen,
Miss Patricia Johnson: "Canadian Race
Problems."
Mr. Archie McKie: "Canadian Railway Problems."
Professor A. C. Cooke and Mr. Jack
Lort: "Canadian Culture."
At the annual dinner held on March
20th, Professor F. H. Soward chose as
his subject: "Canada and the League of
Nations, 1919-1937." This address, which
was fully in keeping with the general
theme of the year, was enthusiastically
received by the many members and
friends who attended the meeting.
Plans for the year 1937-1938 have not
yet been definitely decided, but the
topics will probably deal with the Orient.
This field should prove interesting to
many graduates, and all those who
majored in history at U.B.C. are invited
to join the society.
The executive for the year 1936-1937
included:
Honarary president: R. L. Reid. Esq.,
K.C, LL.D., F.R.S.C.
Faculty representative: W. N. Sage,
Esq., M.A., Ph.D., F. R. Hist. Soc,
F.R.S.C.
President: Mr. Francis H. Hardwick,
M.A. (1931).
Vice-president: Mr. John Conway,
B.A. (1935).
Recording secretary: Miss Helen
Boutilier, M.A. (1931).
Corresponding secretary : Miss Eleanor
Mercer, B.A. (1933).
Treasurer: Mr. Creswell J. Oates,
M.A.   (1931).
GRADUATE LETTERS CLUB,
SEASON   1936-1937
T^HE Graduate Letters' Club is now
five years old. It was organized in
the spring of 1932 and began its regular
meetings in the fall of that year. Affairs
this season have been under the direction of Mr. John Oliver, president; Mrs. GRADUATE CHRONICLE—MAY, 1937
Tzcenty-seven
Elsie Davies, corresponding secretary,
and Mrs. J. H. Livsey, recording secretary and treasurer.
The October meeting was in lighter
vein, given up to a paper by Mrs. Livsey
on "The Detective Novel". In November the club became more serious over
the work of C. E. Montague, discussed
by Mr. John Oliver. One evening each
year is devoted to reviews of three or
four outstanding new books and so was
spent the December meeting. The books
selected were: "Eyeless in Giaza", by
Aldous Huxley, reviewed by Mr. Saunders ; "Education Before Verdun", by
Arnold Zweig, reviewed by Mr. Yeo, and
"South Riding", by Winifred Holtby, reviewed by Miss Boyles. The club rose
triumphant over the winter's bombardment of ice, snow and 'flu. There was
excellent attendance in January, when
Mrs. Angus gave an informal talk on
plays she had seen during the summer
in New York and London, and in February several staunch souls went so far
as to gather for the Original Contributions evening. The March meeting was
held as usual in conjunction with the
University Letters' Club at the University. The subject was "The Short Story
in England and America". Papers were
read by both clubs, that of the Graduates
being prepared by Miss Rosemary Win-
slow and Miss Jean Skelton, and read
by the latter. The season closed in April
with an Anthology evening to which each
member brought some favorite reading
of prose or poetry.
The programme has been, then, varied
and interesting, with plenty of material
for brain exercising, particularly on the
evenings devoted to New Books, Original
Contributions and Anthology. It is the
aim of the club to avoid formality or
any suggestion of the class room and in
that and other respects this year has
been most successful.
formers and who are interested in music.
Thus some of the younger performers
have the opportunity to play or sing before audiences before giving recitals—
and, of course, they benefit thereby.
However, the majority of our members
are Alumni.
The purpose of our club is to enable
members to perform before one another.
We are singers, violinists, pianists, etc.,
and we even boast of one trumpeter. We
read and discuss topics of musical interest. I may say that this last year has
certainly been a lively one. We had the
privilege of having Paul de Marky,
pianist, at a private recital.
If any of the Alumni who are solo
performers would care to join the Studio
Club, please send your applications to
Miss Flo. Foellmer, secretary, at 2734
Dunbar Street, Vancouver, B. C.
The membership is limited to twenty.
PERSONALS
STUDIO CLUB
r|~\HE Alumni Studio Club has become
the Studio   Club.   We dropped the
word "Alumni" to enable the club to include non-alumni who are excellent per-
DEBORAH A1SH: Winner of the
French Government Scholarship for the
session 1935-36 has received high comment for her work at the Sorbonne.
SALLY ATKINSON (nee Collier),
Arts '30: With her husband and two
children, Ann and Peter, plans to reside
in Bolivia, South America, for the next
three years.
MRS. CARL ANDERSON (nee
BEATRICE STEWART), Arts '31:
Doing research work at Berkeley University, where her husband is studying
medicine.
FRANK ALPEN is with the Manufacturers' Life in Vancouver.
KEN ATKINSON is studying for a
Chartered Accountant certificate.
KATHLEEN ARMSTRONG, '34:
Teaches at Shawnigan Lake.
GWEN ARMSTRONG, '34, is back
at Clarke University, on a Scholarship in
History and  International  Relations.
H. I. ANDREWS, '20: Chemist
with the Powell River Pulp and Paper
Company.
A. J. ANDERSON, '23: Chemist,
with the American Trona Company. Twenty-eight
THE UNIVERSITY OF BRITISH COLUMBIA
G. M. ANDERSON, '34: Chemist,
Canadian Industries, James Island, B.C.
J. S. ALLEN, '27: Teaching at McGill  College,  Montreal,  Que.
R. M. ARCHIBALD, '30: Postgraduate student at University of Toronto, Faculty of Medicine.
LAURA ARCHIBALD, '29: Is on
the staff of Victoria High School.
BETTY ALLEN, '30: She is kept
busy at the Provincial Health Labora-
torv in Vancouver.
GORDON M. ANDERSON, '34:
Latest abode is McMasterville, Que.,
where "the man with the slide-rule
brain" juggles with acids and explosives,
for C.I.L.   Still intact.
C. R. ASHER. '28: Dick manages
the Fertilizer Division for Canadian Industries in the Royal City. "Crasher"
moves about as quietly as of old and has
managed to remain unattached.
FRED BOLTON has returned from
Toronto and Peterboro and now is with
Canadian General Electric Co., Vancouver.
JOHN N. BURNETT was elected
president of B. C. Teachers' Federation.
RONALD BURNS, '31, is statistician
with   Department  of   Finance,   Victoria.
RUSSELL BAKER, '30, is a member of Attorney-General's Department,
Victoria.
LAWRENCE BRYSON, '28, is with
the Civil Service, Victoria.
ISABELLA BEVERIDGE, '31, is on
the staff of Oak Bav High School.
R. L. BENNETT, B.A., Sc, '35, is
Mill Engineer, Premier, B. C.
JOHN E. BERTO is Assistant Lumber Commissioner, B. C. House, London,
S.W. 1.
MRS. W. J. BARKER (Jean Cum-
mings), Nursing '33, is now residing in
Vancouver after having spent two years
on the nursing staff of a Honolulu
Hospital.
A. G. BOSS, '21, is Research Chemist,
Columbia Alkali Corporation, Barberton,
Ohio.
DESMOND BEALL, '32, is doing
Post-graduate work in Bio-chemistry,
University of Toronto.
MARY E. BARDSLEY, '33, is teaching Chemistry, King Edward High
School.
ALLEN BELL, '33, is with Cellulose
Research Laboratories, McGill University,  Montreal.
H. E. BRAMSTOCK-COOK, '24, is
Director By-Products Division Union
Oil Co., Los Angeles, California.
R. L. BROWN, '27, is Chemist, Imperial Oil, Peru.
R. BOLTON, '32, is Chemist, Canned
Salmon Inspection Laboratories, Vancouver.
LIEUT. J. S. BEEMAN, '35, Royal
Canadian Engineers, Wellington Barracks, Halifax, N. S.
DR. DOROTHY BLAKEY, '21, is
an instructor in English at U.B.C.
TOMMY BERTO, '30: Now with a
new department of the Provincial Government, establishing an apprenticeship
system.
ELSPETH (KILPATRICK) BELL
Nursing, '30, and husband Dr. Harry
Bell, are kept busy with their young son
and daughter.
CLAIRE BROWN: Taking an M.A.
at Columbia in Student Personnel Administration preparatory to her Doctorate. She arrives back in Vancouver in
August.
BILL BIRMINGHAM: Bringing
fresh honours to Arts '33. He is excelling himself in architectural study at
the University of Toronto. Bill won two
fine awards this year.
JACK BOURNE & DICK BRIGGS
of Arts '34, have directed their ambitions towards being legal luminaries.
They are now .studying law.
MRS. EDGAR BROWN (nee
GRACE THROWER, Arts '34), has
returned to the city with her husband
after spending a year touring the Continent. While there Edgar wrote a series
of articles which have been published in
a local newspaper.
MRS. REILLY BIRD (nee LILLIAN MATHERS, Arts '29), has
moved to Chicago.
KATHLEEN   BINGAY   led   her   class
at Edmonton last year in her law finals. GRADUATE CHRONICLE—MAY, 1937
Twenty
KATHLEEN BOURNE returned to
U.B.C. to take the Social Service Course.
ALICE BAILEY and PHYLLIS
BOE are in Vancouver's business world.
DONALD BELL, '36, is Chief Statistician in the Health Insurance Commission.
ISABEL BESCOBY is Director of
the Elementary Correspondence School
at Victoria.
ALICE BELL, '31, is engaged in
library work.
CHARLES BRAZIER and ALEC
FISHER have opened up a law office
in Vancouver.
HELEN BRAID WOOD, '35, is in
the  Vancouver  General  Hospital.
DON BAKER, Chem. '35, is the
Chemist for the National Confectionery
Co., of Vancouver.
BERNE BRYNELSON, Sc, '36, is
an enthusiastic mining man in the north.
At present he is carrying out development work on a new property. Latest
reports indicate that he will visit Vancouver in the near future.
RALPH BALL is in Cranford, N. J.
GEORGE BARNWELL is a geologist at Batavia, Java, Dutch East Indies.
ARDY BEAUMONT is working at
the Head Office of the B. C. Telephone
Company.
J. C. 'BERRY, '27: On the staff of
the Faculty of Agriculture. Jack has had
fine success with his stock judging
teams in North-west competitions.
F. W\ BOGARDUS, '33: Has found
that the glass business is all that it is
"cracked up" to be at Bogardus, Wick-
ens, Ltd. He is just recovering from
Murray Mather's sudden departure for
England.
S. J. BOWMAN, '27: Syd. has retired as a married man to West Vancouver ; sells electricity to Valley farmers; acts as m.c. for B.C. Electric's
agricultural broadcasts.
MRS. M. A. BROWN (Arts '23), has
established a unique record. She is probably the first grandmother in the list of
graduates.
MR. and MRS. KENNETH CAMP
BELL (nee MARY DOOLEY', Arts
'32), are still at Barkerville, B. C.
MRS. HUNTER CANDLISH (nee
MARGIE GREIG, Arts '28), is at
Pioneer, B. C.
MASALA COSGRAVE is taking graduate laboratory work at the University
of Edinburgh.
GRACE CAVAN, Arts '35, returned
to U.B.C. to take the Social Service
Course.
KATHLEEN CROSBY is teaching
in Orillia, Ontario and plans to spend
this summer in Europe.
MARY COOK is in the main branch
of the Canadian Bank of Commerce.
HELEN CREELMAN, Arts '24, has
spent the last year at Columbia University in New York, where she has been
taking post-graduate work.
BEATRICE COOK is teaching at
Powell River.
MARGARET CREELMAN is in the
Carnegie Library.
EUGENIE CANTWELL, Commerce
'35: With the Economic Council at
Victoria.
MARIAN CROUCH, 32, is teaching
on  Vancouver  Island.
DONALDA CARSON and LORNA
CARSON, (the 'twins') '36, are both
figuring in Vancouver's business world.
BETTY MOORE CHATER returned last fall with her husband from Chicago, where they have been living since
their marriage.
NORA CUNNINGHAM: After
spending some time in the Peace River
district has returned to Vancouver to do
Public Health Nursing.
R. J. CRAIG, '36, is working with the
Britannia Mining & Smelting Co.
CATHERINE CLIBBON, '35, is
"Instructor of Nurses and Assistant
Superintendent" at a hospital in Medicine
Hat, Alta.
IAN CAMPBELL is with H. R.
MacMillan, Vancouver.
BRUCE CARRICK is in Fraser Valley District Library.
'MR. and MRS. LEW CLAR (LORRAINE FARQUHAR, '34), are in
and  coaches the basketball team.  Kath- Thirty
THE UNIVERSITY OF BRITISH COLUMBIA
leen Mary is the only addition to their
family. She'll probably require a great
deal more attention than their baby
Austin.
F. CHARNLEY, '24, is Superintendent of the Canned Salmon Inspection
Laboratories, Vancouver.
M. N. CARTER, '25, is Director of
Experimental Fisheries Station, Prince
Rupert.
G. L. CORNWALL, '31, is with the
Cariboo Quartz Gold Mine, Wells, B.C.
W. L. CUNNINGHAM, is chemist
with Pulp & Paper Co., Port Mellon,
B.C.
DON CAMERON, '36, is in the
office of Robertson Hackett.
MRS. RICHARD COOPER (Bertha
Coates) '24, has returned to Buenos
Aires after a holiday in Eastern Canada
and England. Her husband is plant
pathologist for the Argentine Government.
THELMA (MAHON) CORNWALL, '30, and husband, George
Cornwall, are enjoying life at Wells, B.C.
HOWARD CLEVELAND, Commerce '33, is doing new things in advertising these days—a bright lad in a
bright profession.
DAPHNE COVERTON and ESME
THOMPSON, both of Arts '33, have
been associated with a well-known travel
service, and are seeing life all over the
Continent.
STEPHEN CARRE, '32, is in Montreal with the Northern Electric Co.
ERNEST CARSWELL, '32, is working for Imperial Oil Co., in Vancouver.
He was married in 1936.
GEORGE CREIGHTON, '32, is
working for B. C. Electric Railway.
JOHN CUMMINGS, '32, is working
for the Provincial Government in Victoria.
JOHN COPEMAN, '34, is with Provincial Government as Civil Engineer,
Victoria.
MR. and MRS. HARRY CASSIDY
(nee BEATRICE PEARCE, '24), '23,
are in Victoria. Harry is Director of
Social Welfare for the province. They
have two children.
JIM CREIGHTON, author of "Central Banking in Canada" is Superintendent of Mothers' Pensions, Victoria.
HAROLD CAMPBELL, Arts '28, is
on the staff of the Provincial Normal
School, Victoria; is director of Summer
Schools for Teachers, conducted by the
Department of Education. Married and
has two sons.
CLAUDE CAMPBELL, '23, is on
the staff of the Victoria High School.
ELLA CAMERON is on the staff of
Victoria High School.
MARIAN CASSELMAN is Dietitian
with The Daily Province kitchen.
MRS. HARRY CANNON (MARGARET BAYNES) Nursing '33, is
now at Blakeburn, B. C.
W. CHALMERS, '26, is President of
Western Chemical Co., Vancouver.
A. H. CAMERON, '32, Chemistry
teacher, Squamish, B. C.
A. T. R. CAMPBELL, '31: Tommy
and Midge Greenwood were married
recently. The Junior Board of Trade is
still bearing up.
W. L. CORNWALL, '34: With the
Broder Canneries in New Westminster.
Bill takes a mighty mean slice at a
shuttlecock.
G. L. CORNWALL, '31: One of
Cariboo Gold Quartz' laboratory moguls.
Thelma and George are reported to be
ardent skiers.
E. A. CRUISE, '34: As irrepressible
as ever. Would rather sell a Packard
than go fishin'.
K. A. CRUISE, '31: Officiated with
gusto at a riotous stag party for tormented Tommy Campbell. Bert is a
second Gar Wood when it comes to
power boating.
R. C. S. CRYSDALE, '35: Practically
a hermit these days. Stew edits a paper
concerned with municipal matters.
JOAN DANGELZER, '35: The winner of the French Government Scholarship is at present at the Sorbonne, where
she is engaged on the preparation of her
doctor's thesis on "Valeur psychologique
du Milieu de Balzac an Naturalisme".
She will defend this work in June, 1938. GRADUATE CHRONICLE—MAY, 1937
Thirty-one
HARRY DEE, '27, is on the Victoria
High School staff.
G. A. DIROM, B.A.Sc.: Mining Engineer, Premier, B. C.
J. A. DAUPHINEE, '22: Physician,
Toronto.
J. DRAPER, '32: Canada Cement
Co., Bamberton, B. C.
C. M. DEAN, '23: Chemist, Shell Oil
Co., Martinez.
VIC DWYER, '32, is a lawyer, having passed his final exams, last spring.
MRS. C. DUNLAP (nee HESTER
CLEVELAND, Arts '27) and her husband have been transferred from Camp
Borden to England.
DOROTHY DOWNING, Arts '30, is
engaged to George Dobson, and is at
present in Vancouver's business world.
JEAN DAWSON, '36, is a secretary-
in-the-making.
RALPH DAVIS, Civil '35, is employed at Woodfibre, B. C.
MARGARET ERSKINE, is in the
laboratory staff at the Vancouver General Hospital.
MR. and MRS. GEORGE EVANS
(nee MOLLY LOCKHART) and
small son George, are living at Port
Moody.
ESTHER EDDY, of Arts '29, has
just returned from another world tour.
This time she visited Helen Matheson,
in Stockholm, Sweden, and also spent
some time in Germany and Russia.
DOROTHY ELLIOT, '36, is taking
Education at U.B.C.
GEORGE E. EVANS, '31, is with
Imperial Oil Co., loco, B. C.
A. S. J. ELLIOTT, '32, is working
in Vancouver.
BYRON EDWARDS, Arts '30, American Can Co.
H. I. EDWARDS, '30: Chemist Dept.
of Agriculture, Saanich, B. C.
G. E. EVANS, '31: Imperial Oil Co.,
loco, B. C.
JACK EDWARDS, '23, was recently
married to Annabell MacKenzie.
JEAN EMERSON, '33, is travelling
to England in the Coronation year. She
has been a business woman in Trail for
some time.
GLADYS FROST, '33, teaching at
Bowen Island.
WILBERT R. T. FOWLER, '35, is
in charge of Assay Office at Edmonton.
RUTH FIELDS, '31, Victoria High
School staff.
J. H. FISHER, '35: Assayer, Premier, B. C.
R. H. FLEMING, '29: Associate
Professor Department of Oceanography,
University of California.
F. L. FOWLER, '29: Post-graduate
student, Pulp and Paper Research Institute  McGill University,  Montreal.
J. B. FLYNN, '32, Chemist, Standard
Oil Co., Vancouver.
L. G. S. FORD, '34: Testing Laboratory, Edmonton, Alta.
R. G. FORDYCE, '35: Cellulose Research Laboratories, McGill.
GWEN (KEMP) FOERSTER, '22,
and EARLE FOERSTER, are at Departure Bay. They have recently moved
into a lovely log house.
LACEY FISHER, '21, is a teacher
at South Vancouver High School.
HELEN FAIRLEY, '33, will be married to Art Morton Sc. '34 in the late
fall. At present she is a librarian at
U.B.C.
LOUISE FARRIS is another traveller, making an extended visit to the
Continent.
NANCY FERGUSON, '31, is Supervisor of Folk Dancing in the Victoria
Public Schools.
MARGARET FLETCHER, '30, is
now a nurse in Victoria.
ALEC FISHER, with CHARLIE
BRAZIER has opened a law office in
Vancouver.
JEAN FANNIN, '33, is a librarian at
U.B.C.
MABEL FOLKINS, '36, is in the
Drapery Department of H. B. C.
S. T. FRASER: An ex-miner
(Alaska to California), Bob has turned
to his old love, chemistry, and now is
employed by C.I.L.
JEAN GALLOWAY, is a secretary
at Tranquille Sanitarium.
DARREL GOMERY has been taking
Education at U.B.C. Thirty-two
THE UNIVERSITY OF BRITISH COLUMBIA
ELEANOR GILLIES has been very
active in the Junior League's Children's
Theatre of the Air.
MRS. AUGUST GODOY, (KAY
WALKER, Arts '30), is the wife of the
Cuban Vice-Consul, now stationed in
Seattle. She has recently passed her
A.T.CM. examination with high
honours.
MURIEL GOODE is in Vancouver's
business world.
ROWENA GROSS, Arts '23, is
teaching at the Lord Byng High, having
spent two years at Kelowna.
MARJORIE GREENWOOD, Arts
'31, married to Tommy Campbell, Arts
'31 and residing in Vancouver.
BETTY GROVES, Arts '29, has now
moved from New York to Portland,
where she is doing library work.
JOHN GOUGH, '28, is an instructor
at the Provincial Normal School.
EDITH GREEN, '31, is head of the
Circulation  Department of  the  Library.
CAMERON GORRIE is with the
Central Y.M.C.A., Montreal.
MRS. BRUCE GRAY (MAIMIE
WALLACE, '32) is now living in Toronto. Her husband is connected with the
head office of the General Council of the
United Church in Toronto.
MRS. RICHARD GORE-LANG-
TON (DOREEN DAVIES, '35) is
living on Vancouver Island.
JANICE GREENLEES, '32. is secretary to a well-known writer.
L. M. GODFREY, '31 : Lang has returned from the "perils" of Beaver
Lodge, Alberta, to the more peaceful
atmosphere of the Queen City, and
C.I.L.
MRS. HOWARD GREEN (MARION MOUNCE) B.S.A. '21, is living
in Vancouver. Her husband is at present
a member of Parliament for Vancouver
South.
FRED GRAUER, Aggie '30, graduated in medicine from McGill, in 1936,
and is now doing post-grad, work in the
U.S.A.
BETTY GRANT, '33, has legal ambitions and is a law student with a Vancouver firm.
MURIEL GOODE, Arts '33, is in
the business world of Vancouver.
VERNA GALLOWAY, Mathematics
teacher at Nanaimo High School.
RON GORDON appointed manager
of the newly opened branch of the
Terminal Cartage Co., Victoria.
DR. GODFREY GROVES, Sc. '25,
has recently been appointed mining engineer at "Lucky Jim" Mines, near
Kaslo, B.C.
FRED GRIMMETT, '32, is pursuing
the legal profession in Chilliwack, B. C.
JEAN GILLEY, '27, in Department
of the Provincial  Secretary, Victoria.
A. I. E. GORDON, B.A.Sc, '27 and
'35, Mining Engineer, Premier, B. C.
A. F. GALLAUGHER, '26, Western
Chemical Co., Vancouver.
K. R. GRAY, '30, U.S. Rubber Co.,
Detroit, Mich.
D. H. GOARD, '32, Canned Salmon
Inspection Laboratories, Vancouver.
MR. AND MRS. JOHN ALLEN
GRANT (HELEN TURPIN) '24, are
now living in Winnipeg, where Jack is
associated with the Winnipeg Tribune as
circulation manager.
LOWERIE HARRIS, '33, at Ocean
Falls, chemist.
H. C. HORWOOD is in Toronto as
geologist with the Ontario Department
of Mines.
DOROTHY HARRIS, '34, in the
Department of the Provincial Secretary,
Victoria.
ELENITA HALL, '35, with Provincial Department of Information.
Victoria.
HUGH HODGINS, '28, in the Forestry Department, Victoria. Mrs. Hod-
gins was Heggie Hillas.
HARRY HICKMAN. '30; LESLIE
HARDIE, '25; NORA HOLROYD,
'29; HARRY GILLILAND, '29, are
on the staff of Victoria High School.
D. HARTNESS, '29: Principal Oak
Bay High School.
MARGARET HARDY, Nursing '33,
has been the Public Health nurse at
West  Vancouver  for past three years. GRADUATE CHRONICLE—MAY, 1937
Thirty-thre
E. G. HALLONQUIST, '28: Research Chemist, Dow Chemical Co.,
Midland, Mich.
T. A. HARRISON, '34: Chemistry
teacher. McLean High School.
J. C. HOOLY, 34, is at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, Mass.
H. H. HERD, '34: Department of
Education, Victoria.
W. S. HANNA, '23: Chemist, Standard Oil Co., Richmond, California.
J. L. HUGGETT, '24: Superintendent Imperial Oil, Halifax, N.S.
LESLIE HODNETT, '33: Research
Chemist, National Research Council,
Ottawa, Ont.
W. E. HUSKINS, '34: Instructor,
University of Michigan, Ann Harbor,
Michigan.
LEWIS HUNTER, '23, is back in
town from California and is with the
Pacific Line Co.
STU HOLLAND, Sc '30: Prospecting this last year in the Great Slave district and is now assisting in the Hedley
Amalgamated investigation.
DAVID HOUGHTON, '33, has
donned the cloth and is at St. John's
Anglican Church in Hanev.
MAX HUMPHREY, ''33, has also
donned the cloth. He has been at Chilli-
wack for the past year, but expects to
go to England in the summer.
LAWRENCE HERCHMER. '32, is
practising law at Fernie.
AUDREY HUGHES, '35, having
recently returned from a seven-months
tour of the Continent announces her engagement to Edwin Nunn.
MARIAN HAMILTON has a teaching fellowship in English at Toronto.
CICELY HUNT is in Vancouver's
business world.
JANET HIGGINBOTHAM is a
laboratory technician in St. Paul's.
ISOBEL HARVEY was recently
appointed Deputy Superintendent of
Neglected Children.
HAZEL McCONNELL HODSON,
is teaching at Mount Douglas High
School in Saanich, Vancouver Island.
OLIVE HERITAGE, '28, is principal
of  the  Girl's  Central  School,  Victoria.
GORDON HISLOP, '24, is engaged
in manufacturing, Victoria.
EDWARD HORTON, '29, is Assistant Minister of the First United
Church, Victoria.
ROBERT HALLET, '31, Post-grad,
at McGill, living in  Montreal.
MR. and MRS. BERT HILLARY
(Ruth Cutherbertson, '35), are doing
research and lecturing work at U.B.C.
E D W A R D HETHERINGTON,
Social Service at U.B.C.
K. INOUYE, '33, Chemist, Tokyo,
Japan.
RODEN IRVING, '34, Chemist,
Minto Gold Mine,  B. C.
STUART ITTER, '30, Department
of Biochemistry, John Hopkins University.
DR. J. A. H. IMLAH, '22, professor
of history at Tufts College, Mass., has
been appointed a member of the summer session teaching staff of U.B.C. for
the 1937 Session.
GWEN (ROBSON) JOHNSON,
'22, was out from the East on a trip to
Vancouver with  her two children.
HOWARD JAMES, Sc. '21, is now
General Manager of Pioneer Gold mine,
Bridge River.
BILL JACK, '35, won the Dominion
Research scholarship i n botany a t
Ottawa.
ART JOHNSON, '35, is Rhodes
Scholar at Oxford. Spent Christmas
holidays in London, the guest of Mr.
and Mrs. H. H. Hemming.
HAROLD JOHNS, '29, is at the
Mount View High School, V.I.
BERNIE JACKSON, '33, is practising law at Dawson Creek.
BARBARA JONES, Agriculture '36,
is doing post-grad, work at U.B.C.
H. A. JACKSON, '36: Last word of
the 'Tiger" was from San Francisco,
where he was employed by Associated
Oil. Also, was supposed to be studying
law by candlelight.
E. G. KING, '30, is with the Celanese
Corporation,   Cumberland,   Maryland. Thirty-four
THE UNIVERSITY OF BRITISH COLUMBIA
HUGH and CATHERINE KEENLEYSIDE, '20, have returned from
Tokyo and are at present in Ottawa
where Hugh is First Secretary. He was
recently sent to Vancouver by the Dominion Government to meet Prince and
Princess Chichibu and escort them to
Ottawa.
JOHN KEENAN has been promoted
to Lord Byng High School. He is president Vancouver Secondary School
Teachers' Association.
A. KIRBY, '36, Mining Engineer,
Premier, B. C.
HUB KING, '27, is president of
Board of Trade of Barkerville and is
still untying legal knots in that old mining town.
HELEN KLOEPFER, '23, was married last year to Jack McLennan and is
now living at Kelowna, B. C.
MARJORIE KILGOUR is in the
Carnegie Library.
BETTY KILLAM who has been at
the Toronto Psychiatric Hospital for the
past year has taken the position at the
Children's Aid Society formerly held
by Pauline Lauchland.
CLIVE KELLY, '25, is on the staff
of the Esquimalt High School.
J. H. KINGHAM, Sc. '21, is in business as a merchant in Victoria.
HEATHER KILPATRICK, Nursing '29, is a Public Health nurse on
Vancouver Island.
RICHARD KING, Geology '35, landed a job at a well-known mining company at Stewart, B. C. Was married in
1936.
PAULINE LAUCHLAND married
Brenton S. Brown Jr., and living at
Choate, B. C.
CECILIA LONG is on the staff of
the Toronto Star.
MARGARET LITTLE, Arts '33,
married to Andrew Stirling, Sc. '34, and
residing at Premier, B. C.
IRENE LAMBERT, '34, is on the
staff of the Provincial Library.
FRANCES LISTER, '23, is teaching
at Oak Bay High.
MRS. C. M. LANDER, '29, is on the
staff of the High School Correspondence
School of the Department of Education.
BILL LAWSON,'31, is practising law.
HELEN LOWE, Arts '33, is working
as laboratory technician in Calgary.
C. T. LOVERIDGE, '23, manager
Belamore Rayon Co., Rocky Hill, Conn.
C. C. LUCAS, '25, Assistant Professor of Chemistry, Banting Laboratory,
University of Toronto.
J. E. R. LAWLEY, '32, head Chemist
Pioneer Mine, Bridge River, B. C.
KAYE LAMB, '27, is Provincial
Librarian and Archivist, Victoria.
ARTHUR LORD, '21, has been on
Senate for manv years.
CECIL LAMB, '21, is on the staff of
the Ohio State Experimental Station.
JEANNE LAKEMAN-SHAW and
MARGOT GORDON, erstwhile English seminar habitues, are teaching at
points in the Fraser Valley.
DOROTHEA LUNDELL, '32, is a
teacher in Albert Canyon. She was
"script girl" for the picture "Silent Barriers".
W. H. LEA: A peanut-butter and
"Empress Jam" man. Says he was the
fellow who thought of the word "pure"
on the company's billboard ads.
TOM MANSFIELD, '35, at San
Francisco with American Can Co.
NANCY MILES, '35. is a journalist
at Cranbrook, B. C.
AUDREY MUNTON, '34, has been
at Trail teaching High School and Physical Education.
C. MADSON, '32, Assistant Superintendent  Minto  Mines.  Minto,  B. C.
J. MACLAURIN, '32, University of
Wisconsin, Paper Institute, Appleton,
Wisconsin.
R. F. MITCHELL, '33, Chemist, C.
M. & S. Co., Trail, B. C.
F. L. MUNRO, '28, Research Chemist, Cancer Research Institute, Philadelphia, Pa.
H. B. MARSHALL. '29, Research
Chemist Dow Chemical Co., Midland,
Michigan.
M. K. McPHAIL, '29, Biology and
Chemistry, 1851 Exhibition Science Research Scholar, London, England. GRADUATE CHRONICLE—MAY, 1937
Thirty-fiz
MUNRO McARTHUR, '33, Chemist,
Canada Cement Co., Bamberton, B. C.
JEAN MURDOCH, Nursing '33, on
nursing staff of Vancouver Metropolitan
Health Board.
FLORENCE MULLOY is acting as
chaperone to school girls selected to go
to London for the Coronation.
T. McKEOWN, '32, Rhodes Scholar
Oxford University.
J. C. McCUTCHEON, '24, B.A. '27,
Assistant Mine Supt., Premier, B. C.
J. A. MITCHELL, '32, Chief Engineer, Premier, B.C.
R. A. MACONACHIE, '34, Mining
Engineer, Premier, B. C.
MURIEL MACKAY, '28, with Provincial Department of Education at Victoria and is engaged in educational research.
J. B. MUNRO, Deputy Minister of
Agriculture, Victoria.
INEZ MITCHELL, '28, is Reference
Clerk of Provincial Archives, Victoria.
CHARLES MOTTLEY, '27, and
MRS. MOTTLEY had a second son
last fall. Charles was recently appointed
to the staff of the University in Ithica,
New York.
STEWrART MORGAN, '25, and
MRS. MORGAN are being congratulated upon the arrival of a son. Stewart is
located with Miller Court & Manley
Ltd., and would be glad to see any of
his old friends who take a flyer now and
then.
DOUGLAS MACDONALD. '30. in
the fire insurance department of Robert
S. Day & Son,  Ltd., Vancouver.
MARIAN MILES is the new district
nurse at Abbotsford.
BETTY McNEELY. '36. is studying
interior decorating in  Los Angeles.
FRASER McKAY (Mrs. Fred Weir)
is now living in Nelson.
KATHLEEN McFARLANE. married to John Royden Morris.
ALICE MORROW is at present
cruising in the West Indies.
JEAN MACINTOSH, '30, who is
teaching at St. Margaret's School, Victoria,   has   recently   become  engaged  to
Hugh Farquhar, who teaches at Oak
Bay.
MRS. DOUGLAS McCRIMMON,
nee Phyllis White, was married and is
now living on Point Grey Road.
BETTY MACKENZIE, 30, has held
a position in Montreal since her graduation; will be married to Edward (Ted)
Hay (Electrical '30). They will reside
in Toronto.
MRS. NICHOLAS MUSSALLEM,
(nee Frances Lucas, '33), is living in
Haney.
MARION McLELLAN is teaching
at Prince George.
ANN McCLURE and VIVIAN Mc-
KENZIE  are attending  Normal  School.
JOE McDERMID is working in the
Provincial Lab.
MARGARET McKENZIE is teaching music and attending Pitman's College.
PAULINE McMARTIN is in training at the General Hospital.
CONSTANCE McTAVISH, '29, has
recently gone to Trail.
HELEN MATHEWS, '23, was married in October, 1936, to Michael Wolfe
Swangard and with her husband is
spending two years studying at the University of Munich, Germany. Letters
from Helen are as interesting as a
"Travelogue".
MR. and MRS. KENNETH MOFFAT (nee Victoria Gardiner) are living
at New Westminster, with a son, born
in December, 1936.
MRS. NORMAN McCONNELL,
(nee Sheila Tait) '33, is now residing
in Ottawa, where her husband is working with the geological survey.
DOROTHY MYERS, '32, is in the
office of the furniture department of
H.B.C., Vancouver.
JIMMY MITCHELL, '21, is teaching in West Vancouver and is also president of the Canadian Teachers' Federation.
ENID McKEE, JANE McTAVISH,
HAROLD McLEAN, W. R. (Mickev)
McDOUGAL, CHESTY MILLAY,
are all teachers and members of the
Class of '21. Thirty-six
THE UNIVERSITY OF BRITISH COLUMBIA
DR. FRED McKENZIE, Agriculture
'21, is teaching animal husbandry at the
University of Missouri.
RUSS MUNN, '30, at Norris, Tennessee Valley, is establishing library depots for the construction workers.
DOUG McNEILL, '30, practising
law at Quesnel, B. C.
MURRAY MATHER, '35, has gone
to England.
JIMMY MOYES, '33, has been rising in the merchandising world. When
last heard of he was holding a responsible position in H.B.C. Another representative of commerce.
NEIL MUNRO, B.A.Sc, '31, doing
assay work for mining companies in
British Columbia.
RUTH McKEE is now teaching in
Buenos Aires.
PAT McKINNON, '34, is teaching
at Langley Prairie and way points.
TEDDY McKENZIE, '32, has been
teaching at Appledale and later at Cour-
tenay.
HILDA MARSHALL is on the staff
of the High School Correspondence
School of the Department of Education.
ANDREW" McKELLAR is on the
staff of the Observatory, Victoria.
PAT McTAGGART-COWAN is
working with the Dominion Meteorological Service mapping out possible air-
routes across the Atlantic.
RUTH McCULLOCH, '32, is at
present visiting the Orient. In '33 she
obtained her Bachelor of Library Science
at McGill and then travelled on the Continent.
BETTY MARLATT, '34, is at the
Vancouver General Hospital, but neither
nursing nor being nursed.
DONALD MACLAURIN is at Wood
Fibre, B.C.
HOWARD McALLISTER is teaching at loco, B. C.
JOHN MILLER, studying for M.A.
at U.B.C.
NEIL McKELLAR has a teaching
fellowship at University of California.
D. MACDONALD, '30: With R. S.
Day & Son, wonders how he missed selling an accident policy to Mrs. Dionne.
R. M. MATHER, '35: Suddenly decided to get a close-up of the shipping
business in the Old World. At present is
sweltering in the Canal Zone, aboard a
Swedish freighter.
J. D. MOORE, '33: The old "iron
man" is looking after Al Pike up at
Wells, B. C. No signs of added weight
yet. With George Cornwall in the
"Quartz" lab.
DOROTHY McLAREN, '34, uses all
the Math, she acquired at college to teach
the youngsters at Falkland to balance
their budgets.
GLADYS MACINTOSH, '31, is to
be found at Maple Bay, near Duncan,
tutoring the youngsters of a resident
family and still getting time for painting
and art.
FRANKIE McQUARRIE, '36, is
head of one of the Children's Wards at
Vancouver General Hospital.
ANN McCLURE, '33, having finished a course at Normal now has pedo-
gogical ambitions.
DON McTAVISH, '34, is studying
law after two years in Oxford.
ROD McLEOD and DOUG McRAE
are two more Arts '34 graduates who
are studying law.
DON MACDONALD and CHRISTIE GLETCHER of '34, are still in
Australia, we think.
IAN MACQUEEN, Forestry '34, is
with the Provincial Government in Victoria, B. C.
WILLIAM MOFFAT, Mech. '34, is
living in Calgary, Alta.
A. D. MACDOUGALL, Science '35,
is in the Bridge River district.
JOHN MORTIMER, Science '35, is
assaying for a mining company in eastern B. C.
WM. MATHERS: Royal Can. Regiment, London, Ont.
EDDIE MERRITT is at B. C. Nickel,
Choate, B. C.
MR. and MRS. HARRY NELLEMS
(Dorothy Keillor) are living in the
Rand, South Africa and have the "most
beautiful baby ever". GRADUATE CHRONICLE—MAY, 1937
Thirty-seven
MRS. CYRIL NEROUTSOS (nee
Edythe Winter, '27), is still resident in
Montreal. She has three sons.
EDNA NAPIER (Marwick) '19, is
on the staff of the Victoria Public
Library.
JAYNE NIMMONS, '36, is nurse in
her father's dental office.
DOANIE OWEN-JONES, '29, has
gone as exchange teacher to England.
RHUNA OSBORNE, '32, is one of
those fortunate enough to be in London
for the Coronation.
ROBERT F. OSBORNE, '33, is
teaching at Lord Byng High School in
Physical Education Department. Bob
travelled to Berlin to the Olympic
games last summer as a member of the
Canadian  Olympic basketball team.
D. M. OWEN, '34: Seems to consider
law examinations harder than say English 2 or Chem. 3. Anaemic, probably.
Still retains a passion for rugby.
MRS. ALAN PLAUNT (Dorothy,
(Bobby) Pound) is taking her M.A. at
the University of Toronto. Her husband
is a member of the Canadian Broadcasting Commission.
MARJORIE (Bunny) Pound is
working at the Canadian Vickers in
Toronto.
AVIS PUMPHREY has turned
author. We hear she has just completed
a novel and is now working on another
one.
ALLAN PEEBLES, '20, holds the
position of chairman of the Health Insurance Commission, Victoria.
BETH POLLOCK, '28, Assistant
Statistician on the Health Insurance
Commission, Victoria.
DONALD PURVES and NEIL
PERRY, Com. '34, are with the Economic Council, Victoria.
MARGARET PURVES, '33, is now
teaching physical education at Powell
River.
W. W. PAYNE, '21, Chief Chemist,
B.C. Pulp & Paper Co., Woodfibre, B.C.
D. W. PEARCE, '29, Instructor, Perdue University,  Lafayette, Indiana.
J. C. PEARCEY, '27, Mine Supt.,
Premier, B.C.
PAUL PHILLIPS, '30, practising
medicine at Bella Coola Hospital.
BILL PATMORE, '35, won a fellowship in geology at Princeton.
MILDRED POLLOCK, '35, is at
the Vancouver General Hospital.
GEORGE PRINGLE is attending
Union Theological College, Vancouver
and doing a bit for the basketball team.
CONNIE PLOMMER, Agriculture
'34, is with the Government in the Seed
Testing Bureau at Calgary, Alta.
GWEN PYM, '36, is continuing grad
work at U.B.C.
H. B. PEARSON, '34: Sees that there
are enough peas for those "Royal City
Brand" cans. Travels, apparently aimlessly all over the northwest. Plays rugby
in California in his spare time.
NAN QUELCH, '36, is taking Education at U.B.C.
A. E. PIKE, '33: At Wells, with 99
per cent of the other mining graduates.
Has taken Dick Moore in hand. Will
talk Canadian football at the drop of a
hat.
MR. and MRS. PHIL ROSSITER
(Olive Malcolm) and small Marilyn,
are living now at Pioneer Extension.
DR. ELEANOR RIGGS, '29, after
graduating in medicine at Toronto and
doing interne work at the Vancouver
General Hospital, has started practice in
Vancouver.
BARBARA ROBERTSON is active
in social work in the Child Guidance
Clinic.
MARGARET RATHIE and ALICE
ROWE are teaching in the city.
A. F. RESS, '27, Chemist, Standard
Oil Co., Vancouver.
PHOEBE RIDELL, '35, is teaching
at the Mount Douglas High School,
Saanich, Vancouver Island.
MARGARET ROSS, '30, is at Victoria College instructing in History and
acting as librarian.
JACK RUTTAN, '33, is practicing
law in Victoria.
ISOBEL RUTTER, '35, is taking
Social Service at U.B.C. Thirty-eight
THE UNIVERSITY OF BRITISH COLUMBIA
GORDON RAE is with Williams,
Manson & Rae.
ISOBEL ROUTLEDGE, '31, is in
the Public Library at Victoria.
PEGGY REID, '34, is living in residence at Toronto University and will
complete her course in Home Economics
this year.
VERA RADCLIFFE, '36, is taking
Education at U.B.C.
NORDIA RICHARDSON, '33, is
with the B. C. Electric Company.
JOHN RUSSELL, '33, teaching in
Dawson, Yukon.
ETHEL ROLSTON has just left for
the Royal Inland Hospital at Kamloops
where she has a teaching position.
VERNE READ, Science '31, studying law in Toronto.
HELEN REID, '34, is taking a business course.
ALISON REID, '34, has lately been
assigned a new position as Clinic Instructor in the Training School office at
Vancouver General Hospital.
B. L. ROBINSON, '36: Another
General Foods man, "with its five delicious flavors". Bruce is employed by Mc-
Neely's Limited. Would like to be a
lacrosse referee.
AVRIL STEVENSON, '35, is spending the summer in California.
MARJORIE SCOTT, '32, is doing
secretarial  work   in   London,   England.
HELEN SUTHERLAND is active in
the social work in the Vancouver General Hospital.
BETSY SPOHN had a wonderful
trip last summer, going to England,
France, Austria, Russia and the Scandinavian countries.
L. SMITH, '26, is studying at the
University of Edinburgh, Scotland.
P. W/SELWOOD, '27, is Assistant
Professor at the Northwestern University, Evansville, 111.
i. C. SMITH, '31, Chemist Lauck's
Laboratories,  Vancouver.
T. W. SOMMARTON, '32, teacher,
Quesnel, B. C.
EUNICE SYBLEY, '35, teaching in
Hanev, B. C.
DOUGLAS SCOTT, '36, is a statis-
tiscian and is a member of the Vital
Statistics of the Provincial Board of
Health, Victoria.
ELSIE SMITH, '36, is teaching on
Vancouver Island.
JOHN S. STEVENSON, Science
'30, is a mining engineer, Victoria.
ARTHUR SAUNDERS is with the
Sidney Roofing Co., Victoria.
DORIS SALTER, '34, is working at
the Sun Office.
IRVING SMITH, Science '31, worked for Dominion Department of Agriculture at Summerland 1931-34. Now married and living in Vancouver.
ANNE SMITH, '21, who is Reference Librarian at U.B.C, has been on
leave of absence for the past year, attending the University of Michigan Library School at Anne Arbor.
ALEX. SMITH, '30, is an exchange
teacher this year in Edinburgh, Scotland,
and has spent considerable time travelling on the Continent.
GEORGE SINCLAIR, '35, is at the
Hedley Mascot.
THOMAS SOMERTON, Science
'32, teaching in Prince George. Married
in March, 1934.
ARTHUR SAUNDERS, Science '32,
working in Sydney, B. C
BILL STOTT is with Canadian General Insurance Co., Vancouver.
GORDON STRONG is a Professor
at Toledo University.
LORIN TEETZEL is with North
American Life Assurance Co., Vancouver.
BETTY SMITH, '32, teaches in
Burnaby and also directs the school
orchestra and leads the youngster's
choir.
MARIAN SANGSTER, '33, has
weathered riots and demonstrations
staged at Hamilton Hall during the past
two years.
JACK SARGENT, '32, returned to
the city following a serious illness. He
is now a member of law firm of Buell,
Lawrence, Ellis (T. H. G. Ellis, Arts
'23)  and  Sargent. GRADUATE CHRONICLE—MAY, 1937
Thirty-nine
MARGARET SWANSON, '26, is on
the Victoria High School staff.
PATRICIA HAMILTON-SMITH,
'20, is at Oak Bay High School.
MRS. JOHN SCOTT (Dorothy
PHELPS) Nursing '33, now residing
at Camp Elsa, 300 miles from Mayo.
Wife of a mining engineer.
RAE SMITH, Nursing '33, on nursing staff at Saanich, B. C.
JOE SCHELL, '21, is with the
Northern Electric Co. Joe spent the
summer in Vancouver last year.
DR. G. B. SWITZER, '23, was recently called as Minister to the West
Point Grev United Church.
DR. C. O. SWANSON, '21, returned
to his Alma Mater from the Michigan
School of Mines in the fall of 1936. He
is professor of Minerology and Petrography.
J. M. STREIGHT, '31 : Made a right
smart Crown Prosecutor in the last
Assizes in New Westminster. Jack has
been reappointed secretary to the Lacrosse Commission, is not partial to
"Pass hounds" for some reason.
H. A. SHAW', '32: Is looking forward to his "furlough" this fall, when
he will return from Shanghai. Has become practically a transplanted English
squire.
MARGARET THOMSON is active
in Social work in the Vancouver Day
Nursery.
SHEILA TISDALL is on the staff
of the University of Toronto Library.
MR and MRS. ALAN TODD (Ella
St. Pierre) have a small son, Ian.
DR and MRS. Jim TAYLOR (Ivy
Dezall) and small daughter, Marilyn,
have returned to the city from Edmonton.
RUTH TEEPLE, '28, has returned
to Vancouver, having spent the past
year in England and the Continent.
FRANCES TREMAINE, '32, is
teaching at Crofton House School.
A. A. TODD, '22. is Superintendent,
Coking Department, New York.
W. G. THOMPSON, '28, Chemist, in
private practice. Bridge River, B. C.
E. E. TODD, '29, Chemist, Los Angeles, Calif.
CLAIRE TREVOR. '31, teaches at
Sooke.
TALOSA TIMMINS, 531, is at the
Notre Dame Secretarial School in
Montreal. We understand she possesses that certain something one requires to be introduced to radio and
movie stars.
JEAN THOMAS, '35, is working at
the Children's Aid Society.
J. W. THOMSON, '32, is in Japan at
the present time, holidaying. Also
probably ascertaining how the Nipponese unload steamers.  Is still single.
T. J. TRAPP, '36, is learning how to
command a battalion for "General"
Motors in New Westminster. Has just
completed a junket to New York to
see what the Royal City hasn't got.
ALEX USHER, M.D., Arts '22, was
marred last summer.
VIVIAN VICARY, '33, is working at
The Sun office.
R. E. WALKER is carrying on a
very flourishing cold storage business,
and he and his wife, the former Eve
Eveleigh, have three fine children.
ARNOLD WEBSTER was elected
to the Senate at the last Senate elections.
MRS. A. R. WrOODs (Violet Walsh)
'20, has just returned to her home in
Bristol, England, after a year's visit
with her parents in Vancouver.
MONTY WOOD, '30, is with the
C.I.L. Co. at Toronto.
RUTH WITBECK. '33, is travelling
to England in the Coronation year.
She is the Provincial Organizer of the
Junior Red Cross, Victoria.
DAY WASHINGTON is another
member of Arts '33 to become a full-
fledged lawyer. When last heard from
his plans were to go into business up
the coast with Jack Stewart, another
U. B. C. man.
DOROTHY MARY WALKER, '33,
after spending two years in Toronto,
has returned here to teach music. Forty
THE UNIVERSITY OF BRITISH COLUMBIA
MADELINE WHITTEN, '35, is
leaving in June for Europe by way of
GWEN WRIGHT is in the Main
Branch of the Canadian Bank of Commerce.
JEAN WILSON is a school nurse at
Templeton Junior High.
BETTY WOLLARD, '35, has been
teaching at Alta Lake for the past year.
G. WADDINGTON, '28, is Professor
of Chemistry at Rollins College,
Florida.
D. E. WYLIE, '31, is Laboratory
Assistant, at the Vancouver General
Hospital.
THOS. WILKINSON, Aggie '25, and
Mrs. Wilkinson are enjoying their
young son. Tommy is now District
Sales Manager of the Kraft-Phoenix
Cheese Co., and is located in Chicago.
REV. DOUGLAS P. WATNEY, '25,
is to be married to Gertrude Smith, '23,
in May.
GERRY WHITAKER is on exchange in London.
DOUG. WALLIS, Sc. '24, is on the
staff of the Victoria High School.
IOLA WORTHINGTON, '29, is
teaching at Mt. Douglas High School
at Saanich, V. I.
BOB WALLACE, '32, is Instructor
in Mathematics at Victoria College.
WILLESBY WOOD, B.A.Sc, '32, is
working in Victoria.
ALAN WEBSTER, Sc. '33, is working for the Municipality of Burnaby.
HENRY WEST VICIL, '34, is with
the Federal Government at Ottawa.
HERBERT WHEELER, Civil '34,
since graduating has been living and
working in various parts of the Yukon.
He managed to make an extended trip
to Europe in 1935. He spent several
months in Vancouver during the past
winter and recently returned to the
Yukon.
RONALD WILSON, Sc. '33, is married and living in Vancouver.
ROSEMARY WINSLOW, '33, is a
stenographer at Cassidy's Wholesale
China in Vancouver.
MARGARET WILSON, '32, teaches
at Likely, B. C.
GLADYS WEBSTER, '32, is managing husband Arnold and sons David
and John.
WINNIE WIGGINS, '33, is doing
Social Service in connection with
Essondale Mental Hospital.
RIKA WRIGHT, '33, is working
with the Children's Aid.
PEGGY' WALES, '36, is with the
Adjustment Department of David
Spencer Ltd.
IRENE WALLACE, '36, is attending Normal School.
MARY YOUNG, '36, is a Secretary
in the making in Victoria.
G. H. WHEATON, '33, is a partner
in the newly formed Martin-Wheaton
Ltd., real estate. George is viewing
with pleasure the frameworks arising
all over the city.
O. A. WHITE, '31, is New Westminster's insurance salesman extraordinaire. Spends half his time taking relatives from California up Capilano Canyon. Ask him—at your risk.
NEW WESTMINSTER BRANCH
Teaching at Duke of Connaught
High School, New Westminster, are
DAVE TURNER, BILL MINATY,
MRS. F. H. GILLEY, FLORENCE
JOHNSTON.
On the staff of T. J. Trapp Technical
School, New Westminster, are
LAURA LANE, MAIZIE MacKEN-
ZIE, ANNIE ARCHIBALD, J. A. K.
ARMOUR, ERNEST LEE, A. W. Mc-
DERMOTT, IAN DOUGLAS, FRANCES GILLEY and NORA JENKINS.
To add to the list of teachers in New
Westminster are DORIS MANN at the
Central School and J. WILLIAM
MORROW at Kelvin-Lister.
DOROTHY BUCHANAN is teaching in Burnaby; ROSEMARY EDMONDS is teaching at Langley High
School, and ARNOLD WEBSTER is
teaching at Walhackin, B. C. All are
members of the Westminster Branch. GRADUATE CHRONICLE—MAY, 1937
Forty-one
BRUCE CRYSON is studying Medicine at McGill, but remains true to the
Westminster Branch by remitting his
annual dues without fail to the
Treasurer.
COLIN McQUARRIE, after passing
his examinations for barrister and
solicitor, went to England to continue
his studies in law at the University of
London. When last heard from he was
touring Europe.
BETTY WILSON is nursing and
DOROTHY McKAY holds an important position with the Hollywood Sanitarium, New Westminster.
GEORGE McQUARRIE and JACK
STREIGHT are both practicing law in
New Westminster; while MILT
OWEN graces the same profession in
Vancouver.
ELMER BRYSON is with the Government Forestry Department in
Victoria.
RUTH CAMERON is Librarian for
the City of New Westminster.
Noted on the list as faithful and
illustrious members of the Westminster Branch—and they come no keener
—are BARBARA WATTS, GEORGE
NELSON, CAMERON MacKENZIE,
MARGARET MacKENZIE, ENID
McEWEN, ANNIE HILL, DR. and
MRS. BLYTHE EAGLES and GREN-
VILLE EARP, who, not so long ago,
was added to the list of the "marrieds"
in England. To Max is largely due the
credit of forming a branch of the
Association  in  Chilliwack.
CHILLIWACK BRANCH
"E^ROM Chilliwack we have the following information about alumni:
MARION SPROULE, MADELEINE
ELLIOTT, ERNEST ROBERTS and
HERBERT HARFORD adorn the
ranks of the teaching profession.
GORDON EDDIE is carrying on in
the well known Eddie business as nurseryman.
HARRY FULTON is an Entomologist.
FREDERICK GRIMMETT is in
practice as a barrister.
MAX HUMPHREYS is a Priest at
Sardis.  After June he will probably be
CLASS OF ARTS '28
nPHE Class of Arts '28 seems to be
the only one that has kept track of
its members as a class. When we asked
them for some "personals" for the
Chronicle their executive gave us this
list, and we see no reason why they
should not be left in this order rather
than divided up among the A, B, C, D's
of the rest of our "personals". Here
they are:
MRS. E. E. TRENT (Kathleen
Allen) is now in Toronto.
DON ALLAN is a school teacher at
Port Haney, B. C.
MRS. JOHN MANLEY (Kathleen
Baird) is residing in New York.
TOM BARNETT is married and living in Montreal.
MRS. J. M. ROBERTSON (Irene
Bamber) is an elocutionist.
ETHEL BERRY is a teacher and
living in Abbotsford.
BRUCE BARR is teaching school at
Penticton.
MRS. A. P. CROKER (Flora Burritt) has one child and is living in West
Vancouver.
ARTHUR BEATTY is with the
French Department at the University
of Idaho.
HELEN BURTON has gained her
A.T.CM. and is a teacher at MacDon-
ald School.
ELIZABETH BLANCHE CARTER
is a stenographer.
HAROLD BLACKETT is living in
West Vancouver.
WILLIAM BLANKENBACK is
married, and is a chemist at the Vancouver Sugar Refinery.
BILL BRIDE is married to NORA
HOMES, and is in Vancouver in the
stock and bond business.
MARGARET CRAIG is studying
occupational therapy in Toronto.
LES BROOKS is married to ETHEL
ELLIOTT of Nursing '31 and is teach- Forty-two
THE UNIVERSITY OF BRITISH COLUMBIA
ing school at W'est Vancouver. They
have one child.
DOROTHY DE CEW is a Provincial
Government stenographer at the Vancouver Court House.
MRS. BEATON (Isobel Douglass)
is living in Montreal.
JAMES EVERETT BROWN is
married and lives in Revelstoke.
MARGARET ESTEY is an exchange
teacher to Toronto.
LES BROWN married RUTH
FRASER, Arts '26, and has two children. Les is Junior Trade Commissioner in London, England.
Mz\RY FRITH is a stenographer in
a law office at Powell River.
MARGARET GAMMIE is a teacher
at Kitsilano High School.
BILL BROWN married Margaret
Bell, graduate of Queens. He is teaching at South Vancouver High School.
They have one child.
LAWRENCE BUCKLEY is with
D. H. Hamilton Co., stock brokers.
ENID GIBBS is married and living
in South Africa.
MRS. FRANK MAHER (Mona
Graham) is the mother of two children
and is living in Nelson. B. C
RUSSELL BULGER married Marjorie Stevenson. He is a Radio Engineer.
MRS. (name please), (Margaret
Greig) is now in Bridge River.
ERNEST BULL married Margaret
Jean Carder, and is a lawyer with
Farris, Farris, Stultz, Bull & Farris.
PATRICIA GWrYER is teaching in
Prince Rupert.
MRS. WILLIAM BLACK (Nora
Haddock) is living in Vancouver.
LAWRENCE BRYSON is a lawyer
in New Westminster.
EUGENE CAMERON married
Gladys Taylor and is now studying in
Portland.
MRS. ALLAN JONES (Gertrude
Hillas) now lives in West Vancouver.
MRS. DOUGLAS WELCH (Dorothy
Hipperson) has two children, and is
one of the many Twenty-eighters living in West Vancouver.
SYDNEY CLARKE is married and
is teaching at Vancouver Technical
School.
MRS. HARRIS (Ruth Hornsby) is
now in Prince Rupert.
JESSIE HOW is working in a
library.   News wanted.
ALAN CRAWFORD is with the
New England Fishing Company.
VIVIENNE HUDSON is a'technician in the British Columbia Provincial
Laboratories, and is achieving fame as
a concert soprano.
JOHN CURRIE (news wanted).
FLORA HURST has won a traveling scholarship, and is now in Moscow,
U. S. S. R., engaged in research in collective farming.
JULIET JOHNSON is married and
living in the city.
GEORGE DAVIDSON is married to
Ruth Henderson, Arts '31. He is now
director of the Vancouver Welfare
Association.
ELIZABETH KENDALL is a
teacher at Tecumseh School.
ELSIE DAVIES (nee Rilance) is
librarian in King Edward High School.
MRS. IAN CAMERON (Dorothy-
Kennedy) is the mother of two
children.
RUBY KERR is a teacher in the
Orient.
CLAYTON DELBRIDGE is married, and is with Dune Hamilton & Co.
HEATHER KILPATRICK is a
nurse at Youbou, B. C.
WILFRED DONLEY is engaged in
research work with the Federal Reserve Bank in San Francisco.
HELEN LAMB is in the office of the
Lamb Lumber Co.
MRS. MARTIN RICHARDS (Mary
Lane) has a baby girl.
HOWARD EATON married Catherine Ireland.
MARGARET LAW (news wanted).
PHIL ELLIOTT is an insurance
agent and is taking post-graduate studies
in spare moments.
MRS. KENNETH SALMOND
(Hope Leeming) is residing in
Toronto. GRADUATE CHRONICLE—MAY, 1937
Forty-three
EDITH LITCH is teaching at the
Lord Kitchener School and will be married this summer.
DONALD FARRIS is married to
Shirley Fraser, and has one child. Don
graduated at Harvard, and is now
managing director of a dairy company.
MIRIAM SHIRLEY LOWE is now
in Sydney, B. C.
FRANK FOURNIER married Jean
MacDiarmid, and is a geologist at
Bulolo Mines, British New Guinea.
They have one child.
MRS. (name please) (Verna Lucas)
gained her Ph.D. in Toronto.
HERMIENA MARION LYONS is a
librarian in Washington.
CHARLES GOULD is with the
Powell River Pulp and Paper Co.
DORIS MANN is a teacher in New
Westminster.
JOHN GOUGH, M.A., is married
and is teaching at the Victoria Normal
School.
HELEN MATHESON is married;
she lives in Sweden.
MRS. HAROLD SMITH (Jean
Matheson) lives in Toronto.
JACK HARKNESS is married to
Esther McGill, Arts '28; he is a teacher
at Burnaby South High School.
MARGARET MELLOR (news is
wanted).
ELVA MILLEY teaches in South
Vancouver Public School.
HARLEY HATFIELD is married to
Toddy Tisdale. They have two children.
JACK HEELAS' is with the B. C.
Telephone Company.
MRS. IAN MacKAY (Lorna
Murphy) is the mother of a child.
MRS. KORNOSOFF (Gwen Mus-
grave) is with a Tutorial School in
Vancouver, B. C
HARRY HENDRY is studying
Theology.   '
MARGARET KATHERINE Mc-
DONALD has a leave of absence from
teaching for a year.
VERNON HILL is a lawyer in Vancouver.
MRS.   JAMES   POLLOCK    (Ruth
MacDonald) has one child, and is living
in Vancouver.
DOLINA KATHERINE MELVOR
is now a school teacher.
WILFRED ALLEN JACKDON is
married, with one child, and is teaching
school in Kamloops.
MURIEL MacKAY is with the Provincial Government in Victoria, B. C.
She is the co-editor of a French
textbook.
BERT JAGGER is married to Betty
Guernsey, and is with the Canadian
General Electric Co., at Peterborough,
Ontario.  They have one child.
MARY EVELYN McQUEEN is a
teacher at Duncan, B. C.
GLADYS McALPINE is a teacher
at South Vancouver High School.
RALPH JAMES, Ph.D., is married,
and is a professor of Mathematics at
Stanford University.
WTLBER McBAIN is a teacher.
JACK KASK, after taking a course
at the University of Washington, is
with the Fisheries Commission.
DOROTHY McDONALD (news is
wanted).
MRS. J. A. C. HARKNESS (Esther
McGill has gained her L.M.C.C, graduating from McGill in Music in 1930.
During the last year she has been
publicity agent for Paul de Marky,
pianist.
GORDON KELLY is teaching at
Silverton, B. C.
DONALD KERLIN is a bond-trader
with A. E. Ames & Co.
GRACE McLAUGHLIN is a collector in the B. C. Telephone Co.
KATHLEEN McLUCKIE is an exchange teacher to Toronto.
EDNA McLENNAN is a stenographer.
WTDNELL KNOTT is married.
After receiving his Ph.D. at Columbia
be is teaching at King Edward High
School.
JOSEPH LANE is teacher of Mathematics at Saanich.
TURH ALICIA NEILL took her
M.A. and is now with the Imperial Oil Forty-four
THE UNIVERSITY OF BRITISH COLUMBIA
Company. It is rumored that she is
engaged.
GRACE NICHOL is a teacher.
GERALD LEE is principal of
Squamish High School.
ELSIE NORDBERG is a teacher at
Matsqui.
RUSSELL LOGIE gained a Ph.D.
at New York, and is now with the
Water Survey of the State of Connecticut with part time at Yale.
MRS. BENNIE WILLIAMS (Helen
Northey) is living in Vancouver.
MARGARET O'NEILL is teaching
at Drumheller, Alberta.
DR. ALEXANDER MARSHALL is
a graduate of McGill Medical School.
MRS. ARTHUR MERCER (Ethel-
wyn Paterson) is living in Vancouver.
WILLIAM MASTERSON is law
student with Reid, Wallbridge and
Gibson.
MARY ELIZABETH POLLOCK
took her M.A. and is now with the
Department of Health.
MRS. (NAME wanted) (Kathleen
Ralph) has one child and lives in
Ottawa.
CLARENCE RAYMOND MATTICE
is teaching at Princeton.
MARJORIE REID teaches at'Rev-
elstoke High School. She is reported
to be engaged.
ROBERT LAWRENCE MORRISON is married to Marion Roberts and
is living in Peterborough, Ont.
MRS. (Name wanted) (Muriel
Amelia Robertson) is now in Winnipeg.
AUDREY ROBINSON is nurse in
the office of Dr. Saunders, Vancouver.
FERDINAND MUNRO received a
Ph.D. at Montreal, was with the
Saanich Experimental Research, and is
now in the Department of Chemistry
at Queens University. He was married
last year to Miss Muriel Piatt of Philadelphia.
ANNIE ROBSON is a stenographer.
NORMAN McDONALD married
Evelyn MacDougall, and is Principal at
Burnaby South High School.
MRS. LEX McKILLOP (Lucy Ross)
is living at University Lodge, West
Point Grey.
WILLIAM EDMUND McINNES is
married and living in Calgary.
BEATRICE MARY RUTTAN is
married and living in California.
EDWIN MacLEAN is in the grocery
business.
DOROTHY ESTHER SALISBURY
is with the Main Library.
JOHN McCHARLES is a teacher at
Cloverdale, B. C.
MEREDITH McFARLANE is a
lawyer, and is married to Nancy
Carter.
NANCY SCOUSE is a stenographer
with the B. C. Electric Company in
Steveston.
DON McGUIGAN is in the Real
Estate and Insurance business.
JEAN SKELTON is a teacher in the
University Hill School.
REID McLENNAN is a lawyer in
Prince Rupert.
DR. JACK McMILLAN graduated
in Medicine from McGill, and is now
practising at Woodfibre, B. C.
ANGUS McPHEE is a teacher in
Cranbrook.
MRS. LLOYD EDGETT (Myrtle
Spencer) is mother of two children.
GEORGE McQUARRIE is a lawyer
in New Westminster and is married.
HAROLD McWILLIAMS is with
the Forestry Survey in Victoria.
HARRIETTE STEPHENS is teaching at Lord Selkirk School.
KENNETH NOBLE married Jessie
MacPhail. He is Junior Trade Commissioner in Hong Kong.
CFIRISTINA JEAN STEWART (information wanted).
ROBERTSON NOBLE married
Gladys Harvey. They have one child.
He is a Chartered Accountant.
GLADYS SWANSON is a teacher in
Mission, B. C.
VICTOR OSTERHOUT is teaching
Social Studies at Magee High School.
MRS. ALBERT WHITELEY (Marion Swanson) has one child and lives in
Ottawa. GRADUATE CHRONICLE—MAY, 1937
Forty-five
BEVERLY PATRICK is with the
Standard Oil Co.
ROBERT PETRIE gained a Ph.D.
and is now with the Dominion Observatory, Victoria.
MRS. BOB BROOKS (Annie Taylor) is living in New Westminster.
GAUNDRY PHILIPS has married,
and is a teacher in a girls' school in
China.
GRACE TAYLOR is a teacher in
John Oliver School.
FRANK PILKINGTON is taking a
M.A. course at the U. B. C.
ABNER POOLE is a teacher at
Magee High School. He is president of
Provincial Secondary School Teachers'
Association.
ALFREDA THOMPSON is coauthor with MURIEL MacKAY of a
French textbook for Junior High
Schools. She has just returned from
an interesting trip to England.
WILLIAM REID is married with
two children and teaches at Lord Byng
High School.
MRS. (name wanted) (Hester
Thompson).  Some information, please.
FREDERICK HENRY SANDERS
gained a Ph.D., is married, and is
assistant in the National Research
Laboratory in Ottawa.
SAM SIMPSON is married and is
working on an Economics Fellowship
in California.
MARGARET THOMSON is active
in child welfare work.
ODIN SOSTAD is teaching at King
Edward High School.
JEAN TOLMIE is a practicing lawyer in Vancouver.
ALAN STEVENSON is a teacher in
Kamloops.
HOWARD SUGARMAN is a lawyer
in the Contract Department of the
Musical Publishing Co., New York.
EVELYN TUFTS is with a school
library.
JOHN SWANSON is a lawyer with
Grossman, Holland Co.
MRS. FRED NEWCOMBE (Lorine
Vosper) has two daughters.
BILL TAYLOR received his Ph.D.
at the University of California. He is
now engaged in a survey of political
and economic movements in America
and Europe under the Carnegie Foundation.
DOUGLAS TELFORD received his
M.D. at the University of Toronto, and
later served as Resident Surgeon at
the Vancouver General Hospital. He is
now a practising physician and
surgeon.
NORMA WASHINGTON is an exchange teacher to London for next
year.
JOSEPH HAROLD THOMPSON.
Information please.   Married?
MRS. H. H. HEMMING (Alice
Weaver) resides in London, England.
She has two children.
BILL THOMPSON is married, and
is with Pemberton & Son.
DUNCAN TODD is an officer in the
Roval Canadian Horse Artillery.
MRS. KENNETH CREER (Helen
White) ; information wanted.
GUY WADDINGTON is married,
and resides in Pasadena, California.
NEIL WATSON is in the grocery
business.
ALBERT WHITELEY married
Marion Swanson and is with the Department of Statistics at Ottawa. They
have one child.
MRS. PETER PRICE (Jean Wilson)
has two children.
JOHN WILLIAMS married Vera
Martin and has one child. Receiving
his Ph.D. at the University of California he is now at the University of
Chicago on a National Research
Fellowship.
DORIS WrOODS is on leave of absence from teaching.
DAVID WODLINGER is a lawyer.
ROBERT WRIGHT was granted a
Ph.D. at McGill and is Professor of
Chemistry in the University of New
Brunswick. He married Joan Creer
and has one child.
MRS. KENNETH CAPLE (Beatrix
Clegg) has two children and lives in
Summerland, B. C Forty-six
THE UNIVERSITY OF BRITISH COLUMBIA
BIRTHS
Mrs. D. Carey (Dorothy Ingram '30)
a son.
Harvey ("Pi") Campbell and Mrs.
Campbell, a son, May, 1935.
Kenneth and Jane (Stevenson)
Fraser, a son, May, 1936.
John and Dorothy (Colledge) Farris,
a daughter.
Wm. and Thelma (Colledge) Ingle-
dew, a daughter, August, 1936.
Henry Giegerich, Sc. '23, and Catherine (Maynard) Giegerich, Arts '19, a
son, in Chidaugamau, Que.
Willard Thompson and his wife,
Dorothy, have a baby daughter, Pamela Jane.
Mrs. Charles Stewart (Freda Wilson) Arts '21, a son. They now have
three boys.
Mrs. Walter Owen, a daughter.
Jean (McGougan) Gaddes, Arts'30,
and Charles Gaddes, a daughter.
Mr. and Mrs. John Ross Tolmie
(Helene Ladner) a daughter, at Ottawa, April, 1937.
Mr. and Mrs. Tommy Groves (Betty
Groves, Arts '30) a daughter.
Mr. and Mrs. Jimmie Pike, Sc. '30
(Pat Newlands, Arts '31), a daughter.
Mr. and Mrs. John McKee (Margaret Cunningham, Arts '35), a son,
John Charles.
Mr. and Mrs. Ted Baynes (Jean
Cameron), a son, December, 1936, Duncan Cameron.
Mr. and Mrs. Terrence Holmes
(Irene Ramage), a son.
Mr. and Mrs. J. W. Sier (Grace
Huton), a son.
Mr. and Mrs. Jaeger (Betty Guernsey), a daughter, in Toronto, March,
1937.
Mr. and Mrs. Murray Leith (Jeanne
Carlawe. Arts '28), a daughter.
C3L3
MARRIAGES AND ENGAGEMENTS
Howard Nicholson, '29, married to
Elaine Colledge, '30.
Bill Jack, Agric. '35, married to
Dolly Hudson, Arts '34.
Amy Carson, '32, married to Bob
Rolston.
Gertrude Lamont, '33, married to
Phillip Tulk.
Kathleen Brown, '30, married to
G. C. Parrott.
Mary Darnborough, '33, married to
Rodden Irving, Sc. '33.
Mabel MacDonald, Arts '31, married
to Ernest Carswell.
Don Davidson, Arts '33, married to
June Reynolds, Stanford.
Kendall Mercer, Arts and Comm. '34,
married to Dorothy Allan, Arts '32.
Rosalind Young, Arts '32, married to
Alfred Watts, Comm. '32.
Mary Newlands, Arts '33, married to
Ted Isaacson, University of Washington.
Margaret Baynes, Nursing '33, mar
ried to Dr. Harry Cannon of Blake-
burn, B. C.
Dorothy Patmore, '31, married to
Steve Mellor, living at Digby Island,
near Prince Rupert, B. C.
Phae Van Dusen, '35, engaged to
Mark Collins, '34.
Molly Eaki-ns. '35, engaged to Bob
McDonald, '34.
Jean Bogardus. '35, engaged to
Howard Cleveland, '33.
Margaret Winter, '35, engaged to
Bruce McKedie.
Dorothy Barrow, '32. engaged to
Chris Taylor, '32.
Ruth Lundy, '35, engaged to Stanley
Williamson, Sc '36.
Margaret Gammie, '28, engaged to
Jack Young.
Betty Black engaged to Bill McKee.
Dorothy McRae engaged to Bob
Osbourne.
Charles W. Brazier, '30, married to
Margaret Samis, April, 1937. GRADUATE CHRONICLE—MAY, 1937
Forty-seven
Laurie Nickolson, Sc. '33, married to
(name please) at Trail, B. C.
Ernest E. Hyndman married to Marjorie Peel, Arts '31.
Armour Bull, Arts '25, married to
Miss E. Buckle last April.
Dr. Earle Gillanders, Arts '25, to be
married to Mary Ethel Lougheed in
May. They will reside in Noranda,
Que., where Earle holds down an important position with the Noranda
Mines.
Alf. Buckland married to Helen
Jackson, Arts '33, living at Bloedel.
Aleda McRae, Arts '29, married to
David Foubister, October, 1936.
Donalda Strauss, Arts '27, married
to Bert Hoffmeister, residing in Vancouver.
Loraine Crowe married to Gibb Henderson, both Arts '31, residing in
Vancouver.
Jean Henderson, Arts '35, married to
Philip Barratt. Sc. '32, residing in
Hedley, B. C
Margaret Little, Arts '33, married to
Andrew Stirling, Sc. '34, residing in
Premier, B. C
Marjorie Greenwood, Arts '31, married to Tommy Campbell, Sc. '31, residing in Vancouver.
Margaret MacKinnon (nee Clark)
Arts '34, went to Scotland to be married. She returned to Vancouver with
her husband to reside. They now have
a baby girl.
Aubin Burridge, Arts '31, to Jeckell
Fairley, Sc. '34, residing in Vancouver.
Nancy Symes, Arts '34, married to
Henry Bell-Irving, April, 1937.
Justine Healy married to Colin
Campbell.
Dave Le Page married to Margaret
Woodward. They reside in Powell
River.
Dr. Ross Davidson, '24, married and
is practising medicine at Ocean Falls.
Frances Cowan, '24, her engagement
to Prof. Gilbert Norman Tucker of Yale
University has been announced.
Hilary Helliwell married to Dr. E. S.
James.
Pauline Lauchland, Arts '32, to
Brenton S. Brown, Sc. '32, residing in
Choate, B. C
Anne Ferguson married to Robin
Peers.
Kathleen Ross married to Harold
Lawson.
Temple Keeling, '30, married to
Betty Lytic
Douglas Watney married to Grace
Smith.
"DLEASE send all Personals—and may
they be many and "spicy"—to Helen
Crawford, 3260 W. 33rd Avenue, who
will forward them to the Editorial Board
for next year.
Changes of address and other relevant
material—degrees and such—should be
sent to the Registrar's Office, U. B. C
LOCATION OF GRADUATES
October, 1936
Number in:
Vancouver     2029
Other parts of B. C  1042
Other parts of Canada  207
United States of America  172
British Isles   32
Australia   1
India  2
Africa     5
France   1
South America   4
China   12
Japan   9
Other countries  9
Number deceased   59
Number whose address
is unknown   318
Total     3902 SCHOLARSHIPS, FELLOWSHIPS AND BURSARIES AWARDED TO GRADUATES
During the year many scholarships, fellowships and bursaries have been won by graduates of the University.   The following
list does not include awards which have been made in The University of British Columbia.
In many cases these scholarships and fellowships carry with them free tuition or exemption from fees in addition to their
monetary value.
Total value of scholarships, fellowships, and bursaries won by our graduates in other Universities and in Institutes since the
first awards were made in 1917, $533,925.00.
1936
Armstrong, Gwendolyn...Graduate Scholarship       $200
Bell, Alan National Research Council Bursary and
Scholarship	
History Clark University.
700
Bickerton, Jack M Scholarship	
Black, Edgar C Teaching Fellowship	
Carl, C. Clifford Teaching Fellowship	
Davidson, Donald Senior Teaching Fellowship..
Finlay, Robert Fellowship	
Fordyce, Reid Scholarship	
Forshaw, Robert P Research Scholarship  1500
Halley, Elizabeth M The I. O. D. E. Travelling Scholarship  1400
Hart, Josephine F. L Teaching Fellowship	
Hillary, Bertrand B Teaching Fellowship  400
Hooley, Gilbert Fellowship  700
Huskins, Eric Teaching Fellowship	
Johnson, Arthur J Rhodes Scholarship (3 years)	
Kane, George Special Open Fellowship	
Moore, R. G. H National Research Council Bursary
and Scholarship	
MacLaurin, Donald J Cellulose Research..
Neal, G. Morley National Research Council Bursary  500
Niven, Ivan Fellowship  500
Ormsby, Margaret A Graduate Scholarship  400
Phillips, Norman Teaching Fellowship  750
Ridland, G. Carman Teaching Fellowship  400
Snow, William E Graduate Fellowship  300
Walker, Forrester Teaching Fellowship	
Wilson, Norton Fellowship	
Wilson, Robert J Banting Research Foundation Scholarship..
Wood, Alexander J New Zealand Dept. of Scientific and
Industrial Research Scholarship	
Chemistry Cellulose Research Institute,
McGill University.
750       Plant Pathology Cornell University.
800       General Physiology University of Toronto.
400       Biology University of Toronto.
600       History University of California.
750       Chemistry McGill University.
600       Chemistry Cellulose Research Institute,
McGill University.
Animal Nutrition Macdonald College, Que.
Botany Cambridge, England.
Biology University of Toronto.
Botany University of Toronto.
Chemistry Massachusetts Institute of
Technology.
Chemistry University of Michigan.
History Oxford University.
English University of Toronto.
Chemistry Cellulose Research Institute,
Montreal.
600       Chemistry Institute of Paper Chemistry,
Appleton, Wis.
Zoology University of Toronto.
Mathematics University of Chicago.
History Bryn Mawr College.
Chemistry McGill University.
Geology Princeton University.
Geology California Institute of
Technology.
400       Chemistry McGill University.
800       Chemistry California Institute of
Technology.
1000       Bacteriology and Preventive Medicine The University of
British Columbia.
£100       Dairying Dairy Research Institute,
Palmerston North, N. Z.
800
.i400 a yr.
500
700

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