UBC Publications

UBC Publications

UBC Publications

The UBC Alumni Chronicle 1950

Item Metadata

Download

Media
alumchron-1.0224281.pdf
Metadata
JSON: alumchron-1.0224281.json
JSON-LD: alumchron-1.0224281-ld.json
RDF/XML (Pretty): alumchron-1.0224281-rdf.xml
RDF/JSON: alumchron-1.0224281-rdf.json
Turtle: alumchron-1.0224281-turtle.txt
N-Triples: alumchron-1.0224281-rdf-ntriples.txt
Original Record: alumchron-1.0224281-source.json
Full Text
alumchron-1.0224281-fulltext.txt
Citation
alumchron-1.0224281.ris

Full Text

 <1U %(. A. e. AUnuU
A.   C.   Vfarrsii ■•»',
K-:r.   Air-Co:i-i:'.ic:-iL'iic  Div.
CaiTiian Central   ila^tris  Co.,
Ma Albjrt  St..
Uttsja,   Ont. 'Day 6y day ...
From generation to
generation Canadians have put their trust in
the Bank of Montreal. «» «» •*»
Today, more than a million and a half people
from coast to coast call the B of M "My Bank"
Bank of Montreal
Canada's First Bank
WORKING  WITH   CANADIANS   IN   EVERY   WALK   OF   LIFE   SINCE   1817
THINK A MOMENT ...
OF   PLANS
FOR   TOMORROW
Planning   to   meet  eventualities   is   a   precaution
worth taking, if not for yourself, for those who depend on you . . . there is no time like the present to
get things done.
Your  Investments,   your  Property,  your  Will—
are they arranged to best advantage?   We can be of
assistance to you in considering these matters, at little
or no expense.
Executors and Trustees for half a century
THE
ROYAL TRUST
COMPANY
626   WEST   PENDER   ST.,   VANCOUVER    •    MA. B411
George 0. Vale, Manager
for the ideal
GIFT
for everu occasion
SHOP
O.B.ALLAN
LIMITED
Established   1904
GRANVILLE   AT   PENDER
BUY ON CONVENIENT CREDIT TERMS
AT NO EXTRA CHARGE.
Page 2
THE U.B.C. ALUMNI CHRONICLE -^
Here They Are!
SHRIMPS
Whole shrimps, tender and tasty for
salads, appetizers and those special
curried shrimp dishes.
TASTY SNACKS
Filleted fish snacks. Quick and easy
to serve as appetizers, sandwiches or
hot on toast.
FISH PASTES
Five tasty varieties for appetizers,
sandwiches or midnight snacks.
TUNA FISH
Solid, white meat. Equally delicious for
sandwiches, salads or hot recipes.
SARDINES
Packed in salad oil. A real treat when
served hot on toast. Handy and tasty
for appetizers.
t~l <si-Kn
BRITISH  COLUMBIA  PACKERS  LTD.,  VANCOUVER,  B.C.
DECEMBER, 1950
Page 3 He's
got
ideas...
Are they sound? Can they be used? How far should he go with them?
Many a young business executive, calls on The Royal Bank of
Canada to help him find the answers to such questions.
Every branch manager of this bank is there to help the young
businessman who has ideas.
Through long training and wide experience our managers are
well qualified to analyse business plans, to assist
in developing good ideas—at times to sound a word of caution.
The financial advice of your local bank manager is worth having.
He invites you to talk things over.
Credit Reports
Market Information
Plant Location
Collections-Remittances
Business Introductions
Letters of Credit
"You can bank on the ROYAL'
Page 4
THE U.B.C. AtUMNI CHRONICLE The U. B. C Alumni
CHROniCLC
Published by the Alumni Association of
The University of British Columbia
Editor: Ormonde J. Hall, B.Comm., LLB.
Business Manager: Frank J. E. Turner, B.A., B.Comm.
Ahtmni Association Executive:
President James A. MacDonald, B.A. '38
Vice-President       Col. Gordon M. Letson,
B.A. '24, B.A.Sc. '26
Secretary-Manager. .Frank Turner, B.Comm., B.A. '39
Treasurer.--- -G. Dudley Darling, B.Comm. '39
Second Vice-President Mrs. Maurice Sleightholme,
B.A. '30
Chairman Publications Board Ormonde J. Hall, B.Comm.
'42 LLb. 48
Past President John M. Buchanan, B.A. '17
Third Vice-President Dr. Henry C. Gunnirg, B.A.Sc. '23
Members at Large: David Brousson, B.A.Sc, '49; E. T.
Kirkpatrick, B.A.Sc, '47; Roderick Lindsay, B.A.Sc, '48;
Mary McDougall, B:.A., '33; Jack Underhill, B.A., '24;
Doug. Sutcliff; Harry A. Berry, B.A., B.Comm., '37; Dr.
Fred Grauer, B.S.A., '30; Jean Gilley, B.A., '27; Isobel Harvey, B.A., '18; Mrs. James Harmer, B.A., '40; J. Norman
Hyland (B.Comm., '34; Doug. Macdonald, B.A., '30; Junior
Member, Ivan Fettham; President, Nonie Donaldson; Senate
Reps., Dr. Harry V. Warren, Dr. Earl Foerster and Darrell
T. Braidwood, B.A., '40.
Editorial Office:
Room 208, Yorkshire Building, Vancouver, B.C.
Business Office:
Alumni Association, Brock Building, U.B.C.
VOL. 4, No. 4
DECEMBER, 1950
TABLE OF CONTINTS
ARTICLES PAGE
Alumni Elections   20, 21
President's Report   22
Dr.  Philip West  27
FEATURES:
New  University  Buildings 7 to  19
Frankly  Speaking    25
COVER PICTURE
New Buildings enhance the University but the most
beautiful scene on the campus still is the view of the
mountains rising above Burrard Inlet . . . here is a picture by Bill Steiner, catching the familiar University
scene as a backdrop to the Library with its new wing and
the old Gymnasium.
^jror the rCecord. . .
Your editor promised you a pictorial issue this
time, but costs caught up to us and the result is
the modified pictorial issue giving- grads who have
not visited the campus in some time a chance to
glimpse the immense building ,program that has
been going on since 1945. . . . Other buildings, including the new law faculty building, are on the
drawing board and the face of the campus is due
for further change . . . barring war (pleasant
thought). ... r
The Alumni Association Annual Dinner Meeting
was better than ever this year with a fine address
by Mr. Justice J. V. Clyne. . . . Alumni are losing
probably their finest President in a long time in
retiring John Buchanan, but can take heart in the
fact that lawyer Jim MacDonald, the incoming
President, is experienced and capable. . . .
Dr. Phillip West was recently chosen "Californ-
ian of the Year" by "Fortnight", the California News
magazine. . . . On page 27 is a short feature and picture culled from the "Fortnight". . . . We shoul be
proud of Dr. West, his is a real honour ... a medal
for his part in the war against cancer. . . .
Merry  Christmas and a Happy New Year to
everyone . . . except those who don't contribute to
the U.B.C.-Alumni Fund . . .  !
Puhlishd in Vmtaurtr, British ColumhU mi tuthcmtti is itxond class mill
Post Offuc Dipsrtmmt, Otttwt
\    Ben Backstay zvas a boatswain,
y    A very jolly boy,
No lad than he more merrily
Could pipe all hands ahoy.
For over a century Lamb's Navy has
been the call of those who know
good rum. Smooth and mellow, it is
matured, blended and bottled in
Britain of the finest Demerara Rums.
Lamb's Navy Rum
This advertisement is not published or
displayed by the Liquor Control Board or
by the Government of British Columbia.
' An old sea shanty
DECEMBER, 1950
Page 5 --iJBfcJ_t...
'"'''''S:;":?-'i»K:Ski:(;*
,:Ks^.j^p:
INTRODUCING
ARISTOCRAT Stainless steel* cookware ... for those who appreciate fine
cooking. Produced by Volrath, the makers of hospital equipment,
but especially designed to gjve you the best in modern living. Absolutely
STAINLESS ... does not discolor, contaminate or affect the taste of food.
WATERLESS . . . foods are cooked only in their own juices . . .
retain natural flavors, minerals, vitamins. Available only through our direct
representatives. For a priyate demonstration without obligation, call:
ARISTOCRAT COOKWARE LTD.
1206 Homer Street, Vancouver. TAtlow 1331
♦Stainless Steel inside and out, with heat distributing core of Pluramelt.
Poge 6
THE I.B.C. ALUMNI CHRONICLE OUR  GROWING
UNIVERSITY
New Buildings
GYMNASIUM
WOMEN'S RESIDENCES
HOME ECONOMICS
BIOLOGICAL SCIENCES
PREVENTIVE MEDICINE
PHYSICS
ENGINEERING
DECEMBER, 1950 Page 7 U.B.C.   NOW   HAS  ONE OF
COLLEGE  GYMS  ON  THE
WAR MEMORIAL  GYMNASIUM  OPENS  IN
SPRING
A useful and living memorial will come to life
next Spring, when the Herculite doors of the B. C.
War Memorial Gymnasium swing open to admit
basketball patrons to the 1951 Evergreen Conference basketball games.
The Memorial Gymnasium, British Columbia's
tribute to native sons and daughters who died during the two World Wars, will officially be opened
by a semi-sacred ceremony next Fall, with representation from all three military services. At that
time, a plaque, inscribed with the names of British
Columbia's war dead, will be unveiled on the east
wall of the Memorial foyer, a glassed-in lobby which
forms the main entrance to the gymnasium.
Housed on four floors, the million dollar memorial will be the most modern and largest gymnasium in Canada. Down two levels in the sub-basement floor are housed a steam room, sun room,
physiotherapy facilities, massage room, an individual activities room and six bowling alleys. Up one
floor are locker rooms which eventually will provide locker accommodation for 2500, team rooms,
a forty-two seat snack bar and a small gymnasium
designed primarily for tumbling, wrestling and boxing activities.
The ground floor will house the general offices
of the Physical Education Department and the
Men's Athletic Directorate, a Board Room and
Alumni Lounge with a central kitchen, cloak rooms,
the memorial lobby and the gymnasium proper.
One flight higher is the upper part of the memorial lobby which contains a large common room
with a two-way view towards the mountains on one
side and the new Medical Building on the other.
Vomitory corridors run the length of the structure
on both sides with concession booths at the four
corners.
The main court of the gymnasium is 160 feet
long and 96 feet wide, which provides ample room
for three full length cross-courts for basketball or
twelve badminton courts. The main basketball
court will run lengthwise with roll-in glass backboards at each end.
The first row of permanent seats start at ten
feet above floor level on three sides and the rows
of seats run back to the glass which forms the walls
of the gymnasium. Permanent seating of 3340 is
made up to 800 seats suspended on right angle iron
brackets with backs attached, while the remaining
i
•:^..,4S-.-.»r^
Pictured above is probably the finest building the University has yet built on its campus. Modern, essentially
functional, the gym will provide for an adequate intra-mural program and also accommodate 7000 spectators
for inter-collegiate games.
Page 8
THE U.B.C. ALUMNI CHRONICLE THE FINEST
CONTINENT
seats will be suspended in a similar fashion with
provision made for installing wooden backs at some
future date.
As more funds become available, 2160 collapsible bleacher seats will be installed, bringing total
seating to 5500. Additional bleacher accommodation can be added as the need arises at both ends of
the main hall, making a possible total seating of
between 6500 and 7000.
The exterior of the building is finished in green,
with a blackish green at the base and a light green
from the base up to the glass walls. Five slender
white concrete columns contrasting against the
green give a stately look to the general appearance.
In years to come, a $250,000.00 swimming pool,
with seating accommodation for 700 will be appended to the west end of the building.
The history of the gymnasium dates back to
November 26th, 1945, at which time the Student's
Council of the University of British Columbia
passed a motion that a War Memorial be constructed in the form of a gymnasium and swimming
pool with all facilities to be included. The idea took
hold and the following month saw a flurry of activity centered around the organization of plans and
setting up of committees to start the drive for funds
the following Spring.
Allan Ainsworth, President of the Alma Mater
Society during 1945-46, was appointed Chairman of
the War Memorial Gymnasium Committee which
was composed of representatives from the Student
Body, the Alumni Association, The Legion, the
Physical Education Department, the Administration of the University and from the general public.
In the Spring of 1946, the initial campaign began. Results of the fund raising drive, which had an
objective of $500,000.00, were very gratifying. Each
and every student club put on at least one event in
support of the Gymnasium Fund. In addition, student speakers approached service clubs and 300 students canvassed individuals and firms on behalf of
Above is picture of the almost complete gymnasium showing
floor and part of seating arrangements.
Christinas Gift Suggestions
for the Artist . . .
• Oil  Painting Sets
• Water Color Sets
• Easels and  Drawing   Boards
• Air Brush Equipment
621  W. Pender Street PAcific 4448
Vancouver, B. C.
iJBMbfi
Give Her a
beautiful
^rrundbua
sWs^smWBBKSHBilSSaS^^/          3
For Christmas
Choose    From    Our    Fine
Selection
Complete   Repair   Service
MARTE'S
FINE LEATHER
870 Howe Street
MArine 0838
Formal Wear Looks Like New
when cleaned and pressed by
SHAUGHNESSY HEIGHTS
FRENCH CLFANERS and DYERS
You can trust your finest clothes to our care.
To serve you better we have modernized
our charting plants.
"We Call and Deliver"
2928   GRANVILLE   ST.
CEDAR   B191
OAK  AND   23RD
CEDAR  1714
DECEMBER, 1950
Page 9 Two years later, the University architects were
asked to prepare plans for the gymnasium. They
were instructed to include all necessary facilities
in their drawings. When tenders were called, it was
realized that, because of increases in the cost of
materials and labor, the completed unit would almost be doubled in cost.
The Board of Trustees of the Gymnasium Fund,
o nthe recommendation of the War Memorial Gymnasium Committee, decided to start construction
with the deletion of the swimming pool and other
facilities from the contract. Students floated a loan
of $150,000.00, to be paid back out of student fees
by a $5.00 levy over a period of fifteen years, and the
Provincial Government added further funds so that
sufficient monies would be available to make the
Gymnasium usable by the Physical Education Department and for spectator events on completion of
the contract.
At present time, $749,000.00 has been raised from
all source's and will be expended in full under the
present contract. Roughly, another $100,000.00 is
needed to finish off the main unit of the gymnasium
and a further $250,000.00 is required for the construction of the swimming pool, making the total
cost $1,099,000.00.
When the building is finally complete, it will be
a great and fitting tribute to the men and women
from all walks of life who gave their lives during
the two World Wars.
One of the features of the gym design is the imposing ramp from
street level to the entrance to the gym.
Abo pe is scale model of the fully completed gym which sh nos the westerly portion not included in the present
ouilding program and housing the swimming pool.  The pool would prove a valuable item if the British Empire
Games are held on the University campus.
Page 10
THE U.B.C. ALUMNI CHRONICLE WOMEN'S RESIDENCES A REALITY!
ACCOMMODATION FOR
100 GIRLS IN JANUARY
Joan Fraser, Women's Editor, Ubyssey
A new phase of campus life for women starts
in December as the first of the women's residences
is completed. By January, about one hundred girls
will be living "in residence" on the British Columbia campus.
With the addition of such a cohesive group as
the residence girls on the campus, the Women's
Undergraduate Society expects new spirit in women's activities. The president of the residence girls
has been given an ex-officio position on the WUS
Executive. In that way she will be able to keep the
girls in touch with the plans for women's affairs on
campus.
NEAR GRAHAM GATES
Very close to the campus proper, the buildings
are located just outside the Graham Gates. Built
of reinforced concrete, the dorms are finished in
cream stucco and brick. Lodge windows with overhanging eaves provide light regulated according to
up-to-date solar principles. Two units will be completed by January, while a third will be ready next
Fall. The total plan calls for four housing units and
a lounge and recreational unit as the fifth and central building.
The simple floor plan for the residences is carried out in a strikingly modern and efficient manner.
The basement has rooms for storage and clubs. The
ground floor houses a well-planned faculty suite for
the don. A smart entrance hall leads to two small
reception rooms and a spacious lounge that has a
wall of windows commanding an excellent view of
the harbour. A kitchenette off the lounge is just big-
enough for the girls to get snacks.
Wide halls lead to the dream-come-true student's rooms—a compact area for sleep and study
with modern built-in furniture. Rooms feature such
innovations as magnetically closing cupboards,
clothes drying racks next to radiators, and a button
The women's dormitories were not completed when
"Chronicle"photographer Hill Steiner went for this
shot of the exterior, butthis glimpse will give readers
an idea of the pleasant design of the new structure
. . . more units  to the dormitories  will  be
added later.
system announcing phone calls or message for each
girl. Double rooms have partitions between the
desks to ensure privacv.
Colour schemes have been carefully planned for
each room, and dominant colours are reflected in the
IT'S A FIELD WORTH INVESTIGATING!
Commercial Motion Pictures
. . . from coast to coast—in rural theatres, schools, colleges and
universities, halls, clubs and homes.  They show to every class of
buyer and they get the best kind of attention.
PRODUCERS    OF    MOTION    PICTURES    FOR    INDUSTRY
TMNS'CANABA FILMS LTD.
VANCOUVER
SALES  -  INSTITUTIONAL  -  PUBLIC RELATIONS
DECEMBER, 1950
Page 11 The lobby of, the Women's Dormitories indicates the
clean, functional lines of the interior of the huilding.
marble-patterned tile floors. Textured materials in
curtains and upholstery add a practical and interesting note.
Furnishings for lounges and bedrooms have
been purchased largely through donations, which
have been received from many organizations out-
^jror ^hter . . .
IMPORTED
SWEATERS
* CASHMERE
it   ANGORA
* LAMB'S WOOL
■A   BOTANY
(Full Fashioned)
in Pullovers and
matching Cardigans
J^peciaUzinq in Scotland A   rtfost tDeautiful ~J\nitu/ear
The   J4eatlier    S h O p
474 Granville Street
Vancouver, B.C.
TAtlow 4746
LINGERIE HOUSECOATS SPORTSWEAR
SKI TOGS     HANDBAGS     COCKTAIL DRESSES     UMBRELLAS
COATS FORMAL GOWNS SUITS
side the University. Donations through the Alumni
U.B.C.-Development Fund have been over twice as
much as expected, and such groups as the Women's
Residence Committee, B. C. Chapter, PEO Sisterhood, Phrateres Alumnae, Lady Laurier Club, Vancouver Liberal Club, I.O.D.E., Provincial Chapter),
and the Fall Fashion Show Committee, have helped
considerably. Dean Mawdsley plans to acknowledge these donations on plaques which will be
erected in the residences.
The building of women's residences on the
campus marks another step ahead in the progress of
the University of British Colutnhia.
The Women's Residence Committee will shortly
be organizing its work for another year.   We hope
that out-of-town alumnae will give the residence
(Continued on page 29.)
>>^
<#**»*
645 Howe Street
MILLINERY
Cocktail Hats
"after*jive" events.
PAcific 8913
■Urnhn^L- J    o.
cuns.
«.«*.. **°*'/<Sw
wear
Page 12
THE U.B.C. ALUMNI CHRONICLE ^
POETRY
*
DRIFTWOOD
(For Einar Neilson)
This man outstripped the metalled hounds of profit,
let the smell of us, the stink of bought and sold,
blow away in the winds from Squamish.
Lay doggo then with deer
in firs' tremendous caves.
Myopic from headlines, the colourblind stare
of daily pages blackballing reason,
found sight again in the shifty truth
of moonpaths like gathered silk.
Forgot slick glow of oratory,
brief patent leather on rained roads,
in sheen of taciturn crabs
and the snake's voluptuous loops.
Observed arbutus cast in spring
the scurfing bark that clasped its will;
in its grenadine skin fingered
the possible core of his being.
Then with a cedar key of quiet
unlocked his mind's grey penitentiary, released
released old lifer dreams;
with peeled alders gleaming like tall octaroons
raised beauty as grass after footsteps.
Brought flotsam, sodden with long sea troubling,
to lighten here like lizards on the suncleaved cliff,
grow to a lamp, the breasts of a proud woman,
a home.
Out of fear for the times' petrifactions,
out of lust for the wood in his palms,
out of the aching urge and surge in all of us
to waken the unseen shape
prisoned within our driftwood.
—Earle Birney.
CATCH AS CATCH CAN
The writing of English prose,
So I suppose
(And so, please God, I trust),
Should be a form of fencing: the instructed sway,
The graceful play,
Spring-steel work, wrist and toes
Strong, flexible, and gay,
And then ... a thrust.
But now I find that educated .dubs
Are using clubs,
(Their college reading have put a ban
On the grunt-and-grapple of the orang-outan).
D. Badger.
FROM THE STRAIT OF ANIAN,
SELECTED POEMS BY EARLE BIRNEY
(With the permission of the author)
THE EBB BEGINS FROM DREAM
The stars like stranded starfish pale and die
and tinted sands of dawning dry.
The ebb begins from dream, leaving a border
of milk and morning paper on the porches.
From homes like crusted reefs behind the Danforth,
from Peele, and all the suburbs' unkempt shores
the workers slip reluctant, half-asleep,
lapse back into the city'sdeep.
The waves of factory hands and heads, of salesman
eyes and dulling waitress faces,
slide soughing out from the night's brief crannies,
suck back along the strand of streets, rattling
pebbled small talk. O then the curves and curls
of girl stenographers, the loops and purls
of children foaming in the ooze
that by the ceaseless moon of living moves
through heaving flats of habit down the day.
And late, from tortuous coves in Forest Hill
and Rosedale, sets the sinuous undertow
of brokers, and the rolling politicians flow
to welter in one pelagic motion.
Housewives, beached like crabs in staling pools,
-crisccross, are swashed in search of food
down to the booming caves of Queen and Bloor.
Ah, then, with turning earth, relentless moon,
slow, but flooding, comes the swell once more;
with gurge and laughter's splash and murmur
back to the fraying rocks, far-freighted now
with briny flotsam of each morning vow,
with wrack of deeds that dull with neaping,
dead sins that float again to sea,
frustrations like long weeds that lie
and rot between the cracks of life,
and hopes that waterlogged will never link
to land but will be borne until they sink.
Now tide is full and sighing creeps
into the clean sought coigns of sleep.
And yet in sleep begins to stir,
to mutter in the dark its yearning,
and to the round possessive mother turning
dreams of vaster wellings, makes the last cliff totter,
cradles all the globe in swaying water.
The ebb begins from dream. ...
DECEMBER, 1950
Page 13 HOME ECONOMICS BUILDING EXAMPLE OF
NEAT, FUNCTIONAL MODERN ARCHITECTURE
Six years ago the Home Economics Department at U.B.C. was born and a year ago one tragic
episode almost wiped it out. The Department was
housed in army huts at that time and one morning
the huts, equipment, records and anything else belonging to the Department, suddenly went up in
flames in the University's worst fire.
Remarkably, the fire was something of a godsend because it inspired the students and the staff
to tremendous effort. In six short months, U.B.C.'s
new Home Economics Building came into being.
Within days after the fire, Dr. N. A. M. MacKenzie
had met with Miss Charlotte Black, Head of the
Home Economics Department, and Building Committee members, insurance men, bursar, and the
architect. Funds were derived from a bequest of
$78,000 from the estate of the late Johnathan Rogers, payments of insurance on the destroyed huts,
and the borrowing of P.T.A. funds from a grant
for the Home Management House. The new building cost $200,000 and six months later the department was in its new quarters and its program under
full swing.
Designed in the modern style, it is one of the
most attractive buildings on the campus; departing from the sentimental collegiate gothic style of
the majority of the older buildings, its neat, clean
lines catches the eye as one enters the mall along
University boulevard from the east.
Page 14
The building consists of two wings on different
levels one of which contains clothing, textile and
art laboratories, as well as a home management
laboratory and kitchen. The other wing houses
three foods laboratories and a demonstrative kitchen. A large lecture room seating 150 students is
designed for conversion, at a future date, into an
ampitheatre with seats looking down to the demonstrative kitchen.
~Jke Reason 'd Ljreetinqs
to ^Atliimi !
CAVE & COMPANY
A
LABORATORY SUPPLIES AND CHEMICALS
For  Assay   Offices,   Educational,
Hospital & Industrial Laboratories
567 Hornby St.                        Vancouver, B. C.
MArine 8341
THE U.B.C. ALUMNI CHRONICLE BIOLOGICAL SCIENCES BUILDING OPENED
BY HON. W. T. STRAITH ON OCTOBER 25th
The doors of a much-needed building were open
officially to U.B.C. students on October 25th at
4:00 p.m., when Minister of Education, The Honourable W. T. Straith, presented the keys of the
Biological Sciences Building to Chancellor Eric W.
Hamber.
The ceremony took place on the steps of the
$936,000 building with Dr. N. A. M. MacKenzie
presiding. The structure is framed in reinforced
concrete with the entrance and surrounding area
finished in B. C. granite veneer.
Architects Sharp, Thompson, Berwick and Pratt
employed the principal of wings to give a complete
separation of departments. At present, three wings
converge on a main lecture theatre seating 206 students. Smaller lecture rooms and common rooms
are also located in this centre area.
Although this new addition to U.B.C.'s building
plan will do much to relieve the pressure of overcrowded classrooms and laboratories it will not accommodate all of the classes and lectures in the
biological sciences as had been originally intended.
Plans called for a four-wing structure, three stories
high, but soaring labor and material costs have made
it necessary to eliminate one wing and one floor until
additional funds can be found.
Architects and faculty members co-operated
throughout to design a building that is functional
to the highest degree.
Most of the classrooms and laboratories feature
built-in storage and specimen closets. Staff members occupy offices that are also equipped for experimentation. Dechlorinating and filtering equipment supply water to a specially-constructed fish
hatchery on the ground floor.
The building is ready for full occupancy, and
has, in fact, been in use since the beginning of the
Fall term. One hundred and eighty-eight pharmacy
students occupy one wing, working in gleaming
new labs. The other two wings are occupied by
fisheries, physiology, and zoology.
Valuable botanical and zoological collections
have been moved from inflammable buildings on the
campus to safe sanctuary in the fireproof rooms of
the Biological Science Building. Many needs are
served by this most recent U.B.C. development—
to the students and faculty members directly—to
the communities who will benefit from future research in the new laboratories.
DECEMBER, 1950
Page 15 lilll^iVilMi
m       riiid^iwdiiiiwriiiiilww*
J ;ym\ |l.iw ysLtw ""?* wi wi pt. .-;••'.* •^"■J■*•
PREVENTIVE MEDICINE BUILDING VITAL
IN DEVELOPMENT OF MEDICAL SCHOOL
Perhaps the most dramatically conceived of the
buildings in U.B.C.'s most recent construction campaign is the Preventive Medicine Building, now
taking shape on University Boulevard near Wesbrook Village. Costing considerably more than one
million dollars it will accommodate Bacteriology
Laboratories, the extensive and elaborate equipment
needed for research in preventive medicine, and
the Department of Nursing and Health. Dr. C. E.
Dolman, as Head of Bacteriology, Preventive Medicine, Nursing and Health has worked along with
the architects from the very beginning to ensure a
maximum  degree of functional  space.
From the air the building looks like a giant
boomerang. One wing contains animal laboratories,
and numerous research laboratories in connection
with the study of bacteriology. The other contains
the Departments of Nursing and Health, an infirmary and a student health service. In the centre section of the three-storey structure is a students' lunch
room, a large lecture theatre, two large laboratories,
conference and small lecture rooms, staff common
rooms, a large reading room and a librarv.
THE  NEW 1951  .  .  .
ROYAL TYPEWRITER
Now Features a Right and Left
MAGIC MARGIN
Non-glare keys . . .
1-2-3 spacing and comes in
smart, tweed case.
THE YEAR  ROUND GIFT . . .
BYRNES TYPEWRITERS LTD.
ROYAL TYPEWRITERS • ALLEN ADDING MACHINES
592 Seymour Street Vancouver, B. C.
PAcific 2752 PAcific 7942
DEATH TAKES FOUR OUTSTANDING
U. B. C. GRADS
Dr. Ferdie Munro. Arts '28, 42-year-old Vancouver doctor whose studies of hematology made
him one of the foremost authorities on this continent, died recently in  Philadelphia.
Claude William Parker, '46. died at the age of
29 in Seattle. Washington.
Dr. A. Evan Boss. 47. who held important: post?
with the U.S Crovernment. died suddenlv in Pittsburg. He graduated in 1921 from U.B.C. and received his Ph. I J. from Illinois in 1923 . . . during
the second world war he was co-ordinator of the
synthetic rubber program for the U.S. Oo\ eminent.
John Douglas Banford Scott, Director of Division of Vital St'itis'-'cs of the Provincial Dept. of
Health and Welfare, died in Victoria at the age
of 42.
Page 16
THE U.B.C. ALUMNI CHRONICLE PHYSICS BUILDING HOUSES LATEST
SCIENTIFIC EQUIPMENT
On October 27th, 1948, the first permanent
building to be constructed at the University since
1925, was officially opened by Premier John Hart.
Built at a cost exceeding $700,000 the Physics in
appearance is an imposing compromise between the
old and new architecture on the campus. Although
University architects Sharp and Thompson had
much to do with the drafting of final plans for this
exceptionally functional building both they and
Physics Department Head, Dr. G. M. Shrum, don't
hesitate to pass credit to Dr. A. E. Hennings, who
devoted months to the design and details of the
Physics Building interior. Dr. Hennings retired in
1948 but the building, much of it his own conception, stands as a tribute to him.  The two main lec
ture rooms, acoustically treated and equipped for all
manner of demonstration, as well as for film projection, seat a total of four hundred students. All class
rooms are located in the centre of the building with
laboratories, research rooms, and offices arranged
on the periphery. One huge room two-and-one-
half stories high, houses the Van de Graaf Generator—to be used in atomic research. A "cold laboratory" in the lower regions of the building contains equipment capable of attaining temperatures
a few degrees above absolute zero. The research
work of students in the School of Graduate Studies
fills other rooms with complicated devices. In this
building, some of the University's most important
scientific projects are being developed.
NOT AT U.B.C, THOUGH
How well I remember nice old Professor Tunk
Who was always sober unless he chanced  to be
drunk.
So different was he from wicked Professor Kober,
Who was always drunk except when he turned up
sober.
Yes, Tunk was even better than Professor Sime
Who tried to find out how to stay drunk and remain
sober at the same time.
Ditchby.
WILLSON E. KNOWLTON
Opto
etridt
MARINE 801 1
823 Birks Building Vancouver. B. C.
DECEMBER, 1950
Page 17 ENGINEERING FACULTY HAS FINE
NEW HOME
The Engineering Building, referred to by many
as the new Applied Science Building, is big by anyone's standards; 1,652,830 cubic feet of expertly-
designed reinforced concrete and hollow tile rooms
and corridors erected at a cost of $936,000. But the
startling fact is that the Engineering Building, when
it is completed some time in the future, will be approximately four times its present size. The bus-
stop stands on the site of the proposed building's
north perimeter. The power-house will stand in the
centre of the hollow square formed by the four-
storey edifice and into this many-windowed "plant"
will move all the departments of engineering.
Perhaps we are getting a little ahead of ourselves, however. Although various of the engineering departments have office space, and employ the
present unit for part of their lecture and research
programs the majority of the area accommodates
Civil Engineering.
Perhaps the most outstanding features of the
building are the hydraulic laboratory and the material testing laboratory. In the first is assembled
an array of equipment unequalled by any laboratory
in the country . . . three water turbines, replicas of
hydro-electric plant turbines, permit students to run
horsepower and efficiency tests.
On the second floor of the laboratory a number
of flumes have been constructed with heavy plate
glass sides to allow the observation of flow patterns.
The flumes are adaptable to special model tests such
as the replica of a dam spillway system constructed
in one of the flumes. Two weighing tanks with a
pressure resistance of 20,000 pounds assist in measuring the discharge down the flumes and into other
hydraulic devices.
In the basement of the laboratory three pumps
supply a 1,760 cubic-foot roof tank with water which
in turn is fed by gravity to the hydraulic equipment.
The tank can be filled in two minutes by these
pumps whose ap-o-req-ate capacity exceeds 210 horsepower. Water is pumped from a sump under the
building with a capacity of 8,400 cubic feet.
The material testing laboratory features an Olsen
Universal Testing Machine capable of exerting a
pressure as well as a tensile load of 200,000 pounds,
and a Baldwin-Southwork Universal testing machine with a capacity load of 60,000 pounds. Concrete, steel and other structural materials can be
tested at terrific pressures with this equipment. . . .
Smaller laboratories in the building permit experiments with concrete highway construction, soils
and their value in construction, and many other
aspects of Civil Engineering.
Announcing Our New Address . . . at   YORKSHIRE HDUSE
t*Stjt ■.■USheH^H...(KZvwict
Crown Life
(Si
Ralph McL. Brown, -3i, provincial manager
Page 18
THE U.B.C. ALUMNI CHRONICLE SKI CLUB BUILDS
$12,000 CABIN
Years of planning and hard work have gone into
the new cabin which the V. O. C. is building in Mt.
Seymour Park. The fine new building, efficiently
designed by Prof. F. Lasserre, is the largest and
one of the most pleasingly designed ski chalets on
the coast. The structure is built to last with a roof
of cedar shakes, and walls of cedar and batten. The
walls are insulated with glass wool. Interior of the
cabin is finished with attractively painted plywood.
The building is 50 feet by 30 feet with a large
cement basement, living room and fireplace, kitchen,
pantry, washroom, and upstairs sleeping accommodation for 116. Within a few years, electric light
and water will make the cabin fully modern. Excellent transportation is provided by the New
Mount Seymour Road which runs within 50 yards
of the cabin.
Materials for the new cabin have been bought
by the club and by loans financed through the Alma
Mater Society. Most of the labour has been supplied by club members working throughout the
Summer and Fall under the direction of Don Manning, a senior architecture student who is in charge
of construction. In spite of work hikes every week
end the cabin will cost $12,500 dollars.
The active club membership will pay back at
least $1000 a year through fees and activities and
hopes to raise the interest on the loan by appeals to
graduate members. The appeal is being made
through the U.B.C. Alumni Development Fund.
All V.O.C. graduate members are being asked to
make their contributions to the Development Fund
payable to the club.
The V.O.C. is one of the oldest and largest clubs
on the campus. Its varied program of monutaineer-
ing, skiing, skating, participation in intramural
sports, and its famous parties give it the reputation
of being the most active club on the campus.
In January, the new cabin will be officially
opened by parents and friends of V.O.C. members.
A "real V.O.C. party" is promised at Brock Hall,
on Saturday, January 20th. On Sunday, January
21st, the cabin will be officially opened by Dr. and
Mrs. MacKenzie.
J. H. G. Smith,
President V.O.C. 1947-1949.
*
#
V
BIG!
ft
In Vancouver, it's the BAY! . . . Our big, modern store is ready for the bustle and
excitement of Christmas. We've expanded and placed our departments where
you'll find them most convenient. You save time and money shopping at the
BAY!
-,   BRIGHT!
it
It's a delight to shop in our bright, well lighted departments! Our escalators and
stairways are carefully lighted and our customers use them with confidence.
Christmas shoppers see what they're looking for the minute they step into the
department!
•sir
NEW!    *
Yes, it's sparkling new, from basement to sixth floor! . . . with many special departments to make your shopping easier. Everything is newer, gayer! It's a
pleasure to shop in our bright new store . . . and wise! Often you can buy it
first at the Bay! . . . often only at the Bay!
The Chrtstmas Store for You !
V
Xr
^
&
DECEMBER, 1950
Page 19 JAMES  A. MACDONALD  NEW  AL
$1500 CHEQUE TURNED OVER
Mr. Justice J. V. Clyne enjoys a chuckle
during his address.
For the second time in four years, a member of
the legal profession will be in charge of the expanding activities  of our growing Alumni Association.
This became official on November 8th. at the
annual dinner meeting, when James A. Macdonald.
Vancouver barrister and solicitor and an Arts graduate of 1938. succeeded John M. Buchanan (B.A.
'17). President of the British Columbia Packers
Liimted. as Association President. Col. Gordon M.
Letson (B.A. '24, B.A.Sc. '26), Manager of Letson-
Burpee Ltd., and a World War II Brigadier, will
serve as Jim's right-hand man as 1st Vice-President.
Mrs. Maurice Sleightholme (nee lean Salter
B.A. '30) was elected 2nd Vice-President, while Dr.
Henry C. Cunning (B.A. '23), Professor. U.B.C.
Department of Geology, was chosen 3rd Vice-President. G. Dudley Darling (B. Comm. '39), Accountant Seaboard Shipping Co., succeeded hard-working, efficient Harry A.' Berry (B.A. B. Com. '37) as
Treasurer, and Ormonde J. PTall (B. Com. '42.
LL.B. '48) was returned as Editor of the Alumni
Chronicle.
Trustee Tom Brown, on behalf of the U.B.C. Alumni   Development Fund, hands a cheque in the sum of
$15,393.00  to  Acting-President  S.F.X.   Chant.    The   Fund showed marked improvement this yew and
totalled well over $1.~>.0()0.
Page 20
THE U.B.C. ALUMNI CHRONICLE UMNI ASSOCIATION PRESIDENT
FROM FIND TO THE UNIVERSITY
Members present heard reports from President
Buchanan, Treasurer Harry Berry, Fund Board
Chairman Joe Brown, and Secretary-Manager
Frank J. E. Turner, and witnessed the formal presentation by Lieut. Col. W. Tom Brown (B.A. '32)
of 1950 Fund monies to Dean S. F. N. Chant, Acting
President of U.B.C. On behalf of alumni generally,
Mr. Buchanan expressed the hope that U.B.C.'s
popular Chancellor, the Hon. Eric W. Hamber,
would soon be well enough to again participate in
alumni and University affairs.
The Honourable Mr. Justice John V. Clyne
(B.A. '23) was the Guest Speaker at the best annual
meeting in years, paid tribute to retiring President
John M. Buchanan, and delivered an interesting and
informative address on Canadian Shipping and Canadian Shipbuilding. Mr. Justice Clyne is the first
U.B.C. alumnus to be elevated to the Supreme Court
of any Province in Canada.
Those elected as members-at-large were: Harry
A. Berry (B.A. B. Com. '37)—one-vear term, Jean
Gilley   (B.A.  '27),  Dr.  Fred  Grauer   (B.S.A.  '30),
Mrs. James Harmer (nee Helen Hann, B.A. '40),
Isobel Harvev (B.A. '18), J. Norman Hvland (B.
Com.   '34),  and   Doug  Macdonald   (B.A.''30).
BUCKERFIELD'S LTD.
FEEDS • SEEDS • FERTILIZERS
Offering a Complete Service
to B.C, Agriculture
President-elect James A. Macdonald, Arts 38, is unshed well in his new position by
retiring President John Buchanan, B.A. '17.
DECEMBER, 1950
Page 21 PRESIDENT'S      REPORT
It seems traditional that the retiring president of an
\ssociation should
give a report of the
year's activities under his presidency.
iThis appears to me
to trespass on, or
esen duplicate the
reports of the secret-
it y, the treasurer,
'iini other committee
: Ui.iirmen. I- shall,
therefore, with few
exceptions touch on
these activities only
briefly.
I  am  pleased  to
report that both our
^Executive Committee
John M. Buchanan and    our    Develop
ment Fund Committee were able to meet regularly
each month, with the exception of the two summer
months, and all meetings were well attended. All
special committees functioned in their respective
fields as the need arose. In view of the special
interest in the new medical school this committee
was particularly active. Suggested changes in the
University Act, in respect to convocation matters,
has required intensive study by a special committee
of legal talent. The resultant report with recommendations will be submitted at the next executive
meeting.
CHANGE IN CONSTITUTION
A change in our Association's Constitution is also under
consideration. This change, if ratified, will provide that the
executive be drawn from all of the various faculties as well as
at large. This should eliminate the necessity for the several
faculties forming separate associations and should strengthen
our Alumni Association.
Several special functions inaugurated on the campus in
previous years were continued. The graduating and freshmen
classes were addressed by your officers with a view to informing
these groups of Alumni activities and the facilities available
to them. A close association has been maintained with the Alma
Mater Society. Several meetings were held to discuss the
completion of the War Memorial Gymnasium, a matter in
which I feel the Alumni should take greater interest and
action. A magnificent student effort should not go unpub-
licized and unrecognized.
Visits were made by your president and secretary to the
Victoria Branch. Your secretary visited nine centres in British
Columbia and three branches in other Provinces.
The Boxing Day Dance was extended to two nights with
worthwhile results both in attendance and in net proceeds. It is
the intention to hold such a function again on two evenings
and issue an invitation for the second evening to Alumni of
other Universities.
Fireside Chats were inaugurated last Spring and a series of
three has ben scheduled to be held before Christmas. In this
way it is hoped to acquaint Alumni with the newer courses and
devlopments at the University as well as to provide an appor-
tunity of meeting faculty members, particularly new appointees.
Your executive is grateful to the members who have written to it suggesting ideas of service which our Association
might render. One suggestion, for example, was that the tax
exemption basis for summer earnings of students should be
increased. This is being considered on our behalf by our
Ottawa Branch.
In addition to the above matters of a routine nature, your
executive felt it imperative that the financial status of your
Association should be placed, if possible, on a firmer, long-term
foundation. As previously reported, an arrangement was concluded with the Board of Governors in which our direct services
being rendered to the University (particularly that of the keeping of graduate records) were recognized by a payment to us
on a per capita fee basis. A total for the University year ended
March 31st, 1951, of $15,000.00 was authorized. Of this
amount only $8,750.00 has been taken into the operating
accounts for the year ended October 31st, 1950, the remainder
being shown in our balance sheet as "deferred income". This
$8,750.00, together with other sources of revenue has permitted us not only to meet our ordinary expenses and the cost
of the "Chronicle" but also all "out-of-pocket expenses" of
our U.B.C. Development Fund Appeal. All Fund contributions
received, therefore, have gone in entirely to the objectives
named by the donors. While we have no reason yet to be overjoyed by the response to our fund appeals, we can take some
satisfaction in that in the year ended August 31st last, the
second year of this effort, we have received some $15,393.00
from  1845 individual contributors—19.3%  of our Alumni.
One is encouraged when one recalls that some 1 12 years
ago (a short space in human history) Lord Durham, then
Governor General of Canada, reported to the British Government, "These small and unimportant communities, Upper and
Lower Canada, Nova Scotia, New Brunswick and P.E.I, could
be elevated into a society having some objects of national importance." Such judgment seemed bold and optimistic in its
time. I, personally, am just as bold and optimistic for the
future of our Alumni Association and our Development Fund.
This optimism is based on my study of what other universities
have done and are continuing to do by the "Annual Giving"
method. True, the early years in some cases apparently saw
a struggle but once the idea became somewhat of a tradition it
gained increasing momentum. We, too, must set a goal in the
matter of the number of contributors. It surely can be no less
than the objective of McGill's present appeal—namely 50%.
Last year 32% of McGill's Alumni contributed to their Annual
Giving Fund. It is not so much the individual amounts but
rather the number of participants that is important. In our
appeals we may have irritated some. No method is perfect.
It is, however, generally recognized that Alumni Fund Appeals,
aside from the income angle, are doing a pioneer work in making more widely known to Alumni at large, something of the
current life of our Universities. Conversely, such appeals
cause the Universities to hear from some Alumni who often
bring a kind of perspective and breadth of experience which
can be of real value to those who are engaged solely in academic work. Challenging qustions can be asked and imaginative suggestions made. All this could lead to something deeper,
the strengthening on the part of our Alumni of that feeling
loosely called "loyalty", and on the part of our University a
deeper appreciation of its own continuing influence beyond the
under-graduate and graduate years.
FUND FACTS
The following facts on our Alumni Fund seem to me to
require continual stressing and at the risk of boring you I
must even repeat them here:
(a) Only one contribution is requested each year. (There
need only be one appeal if each would recognize the value of
time, stamps and stationery—Bis dat qui cito dat (he gives
twice who gives quickly).
(b) Contributions go in entirety directly to the objectives
designated.
(c) Each contribution gives an Alumnus an active membership in the Association and entitles him to receive every
issue of the "Chronicle".
(d) Not many of us are able to bequeath a large endowment but an annual contribution of $10.00 represents the
earnings of an endowment of Approximately $265.00. By
giving together we can make a contribution equal in value to
an investment of many millions of dollars—a recurring and
living endowment.
(e) All contributions are deductible from taxable income.
In   stressing   the   above,   it   is   not  the   thought  to   high
pressure anyone but rather by repetition to emphasize the
need and the benefits of this concept of annual giving. Naturally, we do recognize that cash must not be the only or the
main link between the University and the Alumnus or it may
endanger the values and benefits of the other links.
Another such link which we should be using to greater
advantage is our "Chronicle".   We have been fortunate in the
Page 22
THE U.B.C. ALUMNI CHRONICLE type of publication that has been produced for us by our
editor, particularly when we realize that this is a task for
which he receives barely an honorarium. It has ranked well
in competition with similar publications. To judge whether our
magazine is accomplishing what it is intended to accomplish
we must get reactions from our readers and solicit also from
them articles and information for publication. Here is a medium through which more Alumni should express their views.
We urge you to use it.
I am about to close my year as your president. As one of
the early graduates it has been an interesting experience to
have worked with graduates of the intervening years and to
have enjoyed some association with the student body. I have
had efficient and cheerful support from all members of the
regular executives, from all committee chairmen and members,
from our most able Development Fund chairman, his committee and the many class managers, our treasurer, and our tireless secretary who is always selling our cause in many directions. We owe them a debt of gratitude. To all those who
have served in various ways, I offer, on your behalf, my
sincere thanks.
With our Chancellor, The Hon. Eric W. Hamber and our
University President, Norman Mackenzie, and their associates,
we have had a most pleasant relationship and have felt free
to call on them on many occasions for their guidance and support.
I am sure that your affairs will be in good, capable, and
experienced hands in the coming year. The financial arrangement made with the University this year, if continued, should
provide the funds necessary to modernize the record keeping
facilities of our office, a worthy object when one considers
that graduates are the only products produced by a University—
investments surely worth  properly  recording.
In concluding this report I would express my belief that
an Alumni Association should give its members something
more than an opportunity to revel in memories of other days.
It should provide stimuli to maintain an interest in intellectual
pursuits in their after-college years. The potential strength of
our Alumni if they are informed, made interested, and properly
mobilized in various spheres of influence, should not be underestimated. This is our task and it is well worth the venture.
Let us widen our horizon and accept the challenge to do a
better job right here and now—for our members, for our
University, and fer our Community—tuum est and me.
1950 "TOTEM" TAKES
TOP HONORS
Totem 1950 wron first class honours in the National Scholastic Press Association competition held
at the University of Minnesota last October.
Said one of the judges in his judicial remarks
"The Totem is one of the finest ever turned out by
the University of B.C. The make up and editing
is particularly well done." 1950 Totem Editor Hugh
Cameron, who's agreed to edit the 1951 issue, can
be justly proud of this fine achievement.
Besides winning an award, the yearbook for
the first time in the history of U.B.C, was produced
without a grant from student council. The annual
turned back the $1000 which was included in the
1950 AMS budget, plus a profit.
At the end of last year, many grads left the
campus without picking up their 1950 Totem, on
which they had made a deposit. As a result, there
are 300 partial payment slips in the AMS office.
Because a down payment has been made, a
Totem has been saved for them. But books will be
saved only till the first of January, after that the
books will be sold to anyone wanting one.
Price is $3.88 plus 12 cents tax and can be ordered from Totem Editor, Brock Hall, University of
British Columbia.
300   GRADS
Have Not Picked Up Their
6i
TOTEM SO
99
(Winner of First Class Honours in the National  Scholastic   Press  Competition)
GRADS HOLDING DEPOSIT SLIPS CAN OBTAIN THEIR BOOKS AT THE A.M.S. OFFICE OR
BY MAILING THEIR RECEIPT TO—
TOTEM EDITOR,
BROCK HALL,
UNIVERSITY OF B. C.
Those who don't have deposit slips, and want a Totem, can obtain one by mailing $3.88 plus
12c S.S. & M.A. Tax to Totem Editor.
DECEMBER, 1950
Page 23 IT'S a common experience of mankind that has
become embalmed in a cliche ... to become so
concerned with trimmings and details that -we
lose contact -with the Big Issue. Like -when a newspaper forgets that it has to be informative and interesting and valuable to everybody, and turns itself into a daily assemblage of bits and pieces, good
in spots like the curate's egg, but scarcely a satisfying whole. At The Sun we're on guard against
anything like this, and our ever-growing circulation figures seem to say that we are succeeding in
putting out a good, all-'round paper that pleases
nearly everybody.
If you are not a regular Sun reader, we herewith suggest that a
short trial subscription will show
you what we mean.
THE VANCOUVER
ALUMNI  REUNION  DANCE
DECEMBER 26th and 27th
Alumni members of U.B.C. will be flocking back
to town for Christmas. They'll be coming in from
'way back East and 'way down South, and the common meeting ground will be the Alumni Dance at
the Commodore. Last year, by popular threat, the
committee put the dance on for two nights in order
to relieve the crowding. This year the dance will
take place again on two nights—Tuesday, December
26th, and Wednesday, December 27th.
Following last year's plan, the committee is inviting the alumni of all universities to participate in
the second night. In future, the dance will no longer
restrict itself to U.B.C. Alumni, but will include all
alumni groups in this town. In this way, representatives from all universities will have a chance
to see each other and to talk, and it is hoped that
out of such a meeting may come the solution to the
problem of forming a university club in this town.
ALUMNI REUNION DANCE
TWO NIGHTS
TREK NIGHT—Tuesday, Dec. 26, 1950.
U.B.C. Classes 1916-1939.
PAN ALUMNI NIGHT—Wednesday, Dec. 27,
1950. U.B.C. Classes 1940-1950, and
Almuni of All Universities—all years.
COMMODORE
Dress Optional Entertainment
Dancing 9:00 p.m. Supper
6.00 per Couple
Tickers on  sale  at Commodore,   12:00-2:00  p.m.
By   Cart.   Collard   from   Monday,   December   18
to Saturday, December 23.
Phone: ALma 3044, CEdar 8487
861 Granville Street
A   DIAMOND   RING
will    express   your    love!
Choose   fine   gifts   from
WJter W. Qou,
MArine 5625
Page 24
THE U.B.C. ALUMNI CHRONICLE FRANKLY     SPEAKING
BY
FRANK J. E. TURNER
ALUMNI
SECRETARY-MANAGER
One of the finest features of the 1950 Homecoming, one of the best reunions yet, thanks to
Student Chairman Ivan Feltham and his hardworking committee—was the spotlight thrown on
the Great Student Trek of 1922. More than anything else, this spontaneous and successful student
demand (which immediately resulted in the long-
awaited move to the Point Grey campus) symbolizes the tremendous student and alumni spirit of
the University of B.C.
It was gratifying, therefore, to see a "Mock"
Trek at half-time of the football game, and to witness the first presentation of the Great Trekker
Award, an annual award presented by the Alma
Mater Society.
This award is presented to an alumna or alumnus of U.B.C. who has: (1) Achieved eminence in
his or her chosen field of activity; (2) Made a
worthy and special contribution to his community,
and (3) Evidenced an especially keen and continued
interest in his Alma Mater and rendered particular
service to the undergraduate students.
Certainly, there could be none better qualified
to receive this first Great Trekker Award than
Joseph F. Brown, Jr. (B.A. '23), Chairman of our
Development Fund's Board of Directors since the
inauguration of this annual giving program in 1948.
As it happens, Joe was himself a member of the
original Student Campaign Committee in '22. He
is Managing Director of Brown Bros. Florists, and
has ben Vice-President of the Pacific National Exhibition.
A MERRY CHRISTMAS AND A HAPPY NEW
YEAR TO ALL!
ALUMNOTES:—Down from Revelstoke, to attend College of Physicians and Surgeons' meetings
in Vancouver was Dr. Hugh McKay (B.A. '37) . . .
Class President Al Swencisky directed a special 30th
Anniversary appeal for support of the Development
Fund to all 1920 grads . . . "Haven't seen a Chronicle in years," said Commander (L) John R. Deane,
R.C.N., Commanding Officer of H.M.C. Electrical
School, Halifax and an engineer grad of '34 John,
a Life Member, is no longer an "unknown address"
in alumni files . . . Bob Currie, last year's P.R.O. on
the Students' Council and the one man mainly re
sponsible for U.B.C.'s most successful "Open
House" in 1948, is now District Landman with
Imperial Oil. Totem Editor Hugh Cameron reports
that Bob married the former Lois Mary Easton, of
Jasper, and the Curries live at 225 12th Avenue,
N.W. Calgary . . . Bill McKay (B.A. '50) has joined
the sales staff of Bowell-McDonald Motors . . .
Ken McLeod (B.A. '49) and one of the capable
Pre-Med. executive members a year or two ago,
dropped into the alumni office to let us know that
he's now with Darling & Co., Chicago . . . Congratulations to Darrell T. Braidwood (B.A. '40), U.B.C.
Senator, on his election as Chairman of the Advertising and Sales Bureau of the Vancouver Board of
Trade . . . Marc Gormely (B.A. '29), District Forester, Prince Rupert, dropped a note to report that
Science class-mate Tommy Warden had written
from Johannesburg, South Africa. Tommy will be
romping around S.A. for a month, then head back
to London, England. He wishes to be remembered
to all his old "tillicums", especially '29 engineers
. . . Bruce Carrick (B.A. '29) is now Executive
Director of Spokane County Rural Library. Checking the Chronicle's list of "unknown addresses" in
June, Bruce spotted his sister Marjorie's name and
informed us she is Mrs. Walter Tearoe, (B.A. '34)
and lives in West Vancouver . . . Good luck to
Gordon Wallace (B. Com. '42) in his new appointment. Gord's now Branch Manager, Excelsior Life
in Hamilton.
?i
We ha ve only one standard
for judging the quality of
our garments; that standard is the nearest we know
to perfection*
Only the finest in quality
garments for ladies and
gentlemen*
DIRECT IMPORTERS
905 West Georgia Vancouver
Opposite Hotel Vancouver
DECEMBER, 1950
Page 25 A   REFLECTION   FOR   MANAGEMENT
Paperwork is unavoidable—but
it can be easier on your eyes!
All day long - and  sometimes  into  the  night - you  and
other key men in your company have to do a lot of reading.
You read trade papers such as this one, letters, newspapers,
reports, financial statements, legal documents (and don't
overlook the fine print).
Most of this burden of paperwork is unavoidable.
But poor lighting shouldn't make it uncomfortable
and injurious to precious eyesight.   By making
sure that your lighting is scientifically right
jp  you   can   decrease   eyestrain,   fatigue   and
inaccuracy - you   can   increase   efficiency
and reading comfort.   For free advice,
call our lighting department - 570 Dunsmuir
Street, TAtlow 3171, in Vancouver, or 1503
Douglas Street, Garden 7121, in Victoria, or
v V any   of   our   local   branches   in   the   Lower
=-=? Mainland.
B.C.   ELECTRIC
504
Gifts for the Man on
Your List you'll find at
EDDIE R. DEEfll
HANKIES! . . . always acceptable. Choose from Eddie R.
Deem's fine selection. Gift
Boxed for him . . . quality Irish
Linen Men's Handkerchiefs . . .
50c ea.
SHIRTS! . . . PYJAMAS! ... let us
help you select his gift. He'd like a
Forsyth shirt! Choose from new pastels and white, Windsor or fused collars. Wide selection of fine Broadcloth pyjamas.
TIES! . . . SCARVES!    . . . does he like
stripes, Paisleys or Panel ties?   You'll find
them at Eddie R. Deem's from $1.50 to
$3.50, and Polka Dot and Tartan Scarfs
$1.50.
White Dress Scarfs, $3.00.
C/(w courteous staff will help  you,  choose  the  aift lie u  like—Caudle   rS.    oLJeem
PAcific 5920 534 Seymour Street (near Pender)
Page 26
THE U.B.C. ALUMNI CHRONICLE DR. PHILIP WEST 35 YEAR OLD U. B. C. GRADUATE
"CALIFORNIAN OF THE YEAR"
A young scientist—a U.B.C. graduate of 1935,
Dr. Phillip M. West, who alternated his first undergraduate experiments at U.B.C. with a vigorous
program of practical jokes has ben named "Cali-
fornian of the Year" in a recent Fortnight New-
magazine. He had come to fame as a cancer researcher.
Agriculture Dean Blythe Eagles was jubilant
but not surprised to hear of Phil West's latest accomplishment. "We couldn't hold him back," he
recalls. "We gave him difficult research projects
to do to use up his excess energy. He carried them
out brilliantly and still found time to lead fire extinguisher raids on Engineering students."
Today, Dr. Phillip West, aged 35, is recognized
internationally for what is probably the most important single discovery in the long battle with
cancer. After a year and a half of intensive research at U.C.L.A. and Birmingham Veterans' Administration Hospital, Dr. West has developed a
test to determine quickly, economically and positively the exact speed of cancer growth. The test
also determines the effectiveness of treatment being
administered, indicates whether surgery has eliminated cancer, and whether anti-cancer compounds
are having an effect.
Dr. D. G. Laird is probably the proudest member of the U.B.C. Faculty today. It was he who
supervised Dr. West's first experiments in soil
chemistry as an undergraduate sixteen years ago.
Always
worthwhile
Young business men of today on
the way to the top have their
share of problems.  Many are
financial . . . and that's where
we can help. For thousands of
Canada's most successful men
have found a visit to The Dominion
Bank always worthwhile.
THE
DOMINION BANK
Established 1871
FORTNIGHT
THE NEWSMAGAZINE OF CALfFORNtA
Dr. West ums cover subject for "Fortnight", and above
is a   photo reproduction of the California magazine.
"Even then he had the important requisites of a
born researcher," he states, "He had boundless
energy, endless curiosity, and imagination."
_ Dr.   Laird   helped   West   with   experiments   on
Bios,  the  mysterious  enzyme  materials  necessary
Continued on page 29
Celebrate  Hew Lyear's C^ue
at the
Dance to the Music of OLE OLSON and His
13 Piece Orchestra.
MAKE  YOUR   RESERVATIONS   EARLY!
Remember Saturday Night Dancing at the
Commodore is only $1.25 per person, including tax
PA 7838
672 Granville St.
DECEMBER, 1950
Page 27 MARDI-GRAS DANCE
SET FOR JANUARY 16
Winking totem poles and dancing Indian maidens are preparing to welcome the Alumni to this
year's Mardi Gras on January 18and January 19, at
the Commodore. With the theme of "Totemland",
the party is expected to be better than ever as many
Alumni start making up tables for the First Night,
acting on a special invitation from the Mardi Gras
committee.
The affair will feature a floor show of gorgeous
chorines decked in buckskins and totem feathers,
a men's chorus of warlike Indian braves, and of
course, the queen contest consisting of sorority
candidates representing the pick of campus beauty.
U.B.C.'s War Memorial Gymnasium will benefit from the festivities with two-thirds of the total
proceeds going towards its completion. The remaining third will be turned over to the Community Chest.
Tickets may be bought at the Commodore from
well-known alumnus Cart Collard from 12 to 2 p.m.
duiing the week preceding the Mardi Gras. They
are $3.00 (three dollars) per person.
The
Season's Greetings
to Alumni
PACIFIC MEAT Co. Ltd.
VANCOUVER, B. C.
QUALITY       |
CLEANLINESS!
Motional Mold
BREAD CAKE PIES
Always Oven-Fresh
Vancouver
NATIONAL SYSTEM of BAKING LTD.
 ___^   519 Granville St. 	
| FRIENDLINESS   | [       SERVICE
Page 28
Pretty June Taylor, freshette chorus girl for the
1951 Totemland Mardi Gras,  is doing her best to
cheer up this totem pole who just found out he's
been chosen for the Theme!
SAFETY
an
PAcific
9267
1150
^*&>i&f^ SEYMOUR
"T/cm ccwTZefxendcm
BOB BODIE
STEERING SAFETY AND
WHEEL ALIGNMENT
BOB BODIE ltd.
1150 SEYMOUR ST.    VANCOUVER BC
THE U.B.C. ALUMNI CHRONICLE WOMEN'S RESIDENCES
(Continued from page 12)
project a place in their program this year. Gifts to
date have made it possible to equip the first two
units with the essential furnishings. Donations are
still needed to complete the fittings for the lounges.
In closing this report for this year, special mention should be made of the continued interest of the
Panhfillenic groups in the project. Vancouver City
Panhellenic, the undergraduate Panhellenic, Kappa
Kappa, Gamma, Gamma Phi Beta, Alpha Delta Pi,
and Alpha Gamma Delta have all made generous
donations to the new residences.
DR. PHILIP WEST
(Continued from page 27)
for the growth of bacteria. "He isolated chemicals
that made plant cells run wild," Dr. Laird remembers, "His curiosity about plant cells carried over
to an investigation of human cancer tissue and the
Vancouver hospitals and City morgue were driven
frantic with his requests for cancer growths."
Since that time it has been a story of tireless,
single-purposed research with cancer as the formidable target. Dr. West is unmarried. At one time
the results of his experiments seriously injured his
health.
Following his graduation from U.B.C. he attended the University of Wisconsin, and the Columbia College of Physicians and Surgeons. He took
his master's degree at 20, a PhD. in biochemistry
at 22 and his M.D. at 28, financing himself with
scholarships, emergency hospital work, and waiting
on college tables.
Dr. West's recent discovery is the result of sixteen years of hard work that started with his youthful conviction at U.B.C. that enzymes held an answer to cancer. The two enzymes which he studied
under U.B.C. Dean Blythe Eagles—chymotripsin
and rennin—are the ones he uses in his test. Both
enzymes are extremely difficult to isolate, so he decided to study the action of body substances, called
inhibitors, which slow down the production of these
two enzymes.
In healthy persons there are always more rennin inhibitors than chymotripslin inhibitors. As
both of these enzymes are involved in the digestion
and curdling of milk Dr. West's tests are based on
their milk coagulating properties.
A slight amount of blood is drawn from the
patient and allowed to clot. A tiny bit of serum is
drawn from the clot, milk and pure enzymes are
added to the serum, and a technician holds a stopwatch to measure the time it takes to curdle the
milk. The amount of inhibitor in the patient's blood
affects the time it will take to curdle the milk. It
is a simple and certain test.
Dr. West emphasizes that his test is not a cure.
His fellow scientisis regard it as the most important single step, to date, in the control of one of
man's major enemies—cancer.
ItS FROM
?<?    *   CQ,
Dainty little Evening Bags
from Paris. Made of
Ct M
rich sparkling brocade.
Choice of silver or gold colours.
Price 3.75 Each
BIRKS
MArine 6211
JEWELL
DECEMBER, 1950
Page 29 *
STATI   STICS
*
MARRIAGES
Donald E. Mann to Margaret Joan Kirk Bayne.
Charles F. Bullen to Joan McEachern.
Thomas George Hatcher to Pauline Ann Hirst.
Norman Gregory Borwn to Elizabeth Helen McEachern.
Charles D. Underhill to Elizabeth Ann Bridge.
Allan Macdonald to Marion Spence Archibald.
William P. Orr to Joan C. Burnell.
Dr. William Cockburn to Patricia Cowan.
Ian Frederick Greenwood to Doreen Margaret
Leonard.
Blake Baile to Margaret Julia Harrison.
Harold Martin Scott to Helen Farmer.
Stanley E. George to Maria Stenzel.
Daniel R. Wallace to Joan Cecelia Charters.
Douglas C. Basil to E. Margaret Pitcairn.
H. F. Bob Francis to Dorothy Mary Elvidge.
Gerald Quentin Lake to Jean B. Horner.
Kenneth A. MacKirdy to Margaret Richardson.
Nigel A. Hale to Marian Watson.
p
•
CEdar 4217
(O        Me
JUNIOR SHOP      /       \
2608 Granville Street
SHDPAT lor0%
Jfrh»trfn*r'0  f">*"if>
Imported Scarves of Pure Silk and Wool
Lansea Cashmere  and Botany Sweaters
English Blouses and Skirts
CHerry 8440
2572 South Granville
BIRTHS
To Mr. and Mrs. Robert Currie (Nora McGarry),
a son.
To Mr. and Mrs. Kenneth Wright, twin sons.
LEADING   and   RELIABLE
BIG THREE MOTORS LTD.
JAVELIN
Authorized Dealers for
KAISER
)  CAR SALES   ^Hp^
w  -~-^0 m
f.                                      i^~
"Britain's Best"                                     "America's Best"
QUAtlTY, ECONOMY, plus styling and comfort
MAIN STREET AT 12th AVE.
FAirmont 7305            FAirmont 3930
A great friend of
a great industry
Page 30
js|    A.J. Dalrymple
"Dal" is a close friend of the
farmers and ranchers all over B.C.
In "Farm and Ranch" he analyses
markets, discusses crops and
cattle conditions and reports
facts of interest to this important
B.C. industry.
.. PMJM.'
•••••••
Canada's Best Newspaper
THE U.B.C. ALUMNI CHRONICLE
KaaUfa EATON'S
A pre-view of what's
'in store" for Christmas
Around this time of year, we really get wrapped up in
Christmas . . . our Yuletide spirit starts to show, and
honestly, we don't mind a bit! We're ready for Santa
and all the wonderful joys and toys he brings with him
... and we're ready for YOU and YOUR family too!
Plan to do ALL your Christmas shopping at the Big,
Happy, Friendly Christmas store, EATON'S!
«T. EATON C°
■  ■ BRITISH   COLUMBIA ^^ LIMITED
DECEMBER, 1950
Page 31 CANADA'S ELECTRIC UTILITIES
WMCH PROVIDE
LOW COST ELECTRIC POWER
This 48,000 KVA hydroften-
cooled synchronous condenser, here
shown on test at C-G-E's Peterborough
Works, is now Installed at the Kipling Station.
GENERAL
use •..
ELECTRIC
EQUIPMENT
G-E Equipment, used by Electric Utilities in every Province, helps to
provide electric power which assures a stronger, wealthier, better
Canada . . . just one example of the way C.G.E. is HELPING
CANADA GROW.
CANADIAN    GENERAL    ELECTRIC    COMPANY
LIMITED
HEAD   OFFICE:   TORONTO — SALES   OFFICES   FROM   COAST   TO   COAST ftCGE-350
Page 32
THE U.B.C. ALUMNI CHRONICLE

Cite

Citation Scheme:

        

Citations by CSL (citeproc-js)

Usage Statistics

Share

Embed

Customize your widget with the following options, then copy and paste the code below into the HTML of your page to embed this item in your website.
                        
                            <div id="ubcOpenCollectionsWidgetDisplay">
                            <script id="ubcOpenCollectionsWidget"
                            src="{[{embed.src}]}"
                            data-item="{[{embed.item}]}"
                            data-collection="{[{embed.collection}]}"
                            data-metadata="{[{embed.showMetadata}]}"
                            data-width="{[{embed.width}]}"
                            async >
                            </script>
                            </div>
                        
                    
IIIF logo Our image viewer uses the IIIF 2.0 standard. To load this item in other compatible viewers, use this url:
https://iiif.library.ubc.ca/presentation/cdm.alumchron.1-0224281/manifest

Comment

Related Items